Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts Collections

Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts (ESPI) is the home for high-impact research that advances our understanding of environmental chemistry in natural matrices. Here, we’ve brought together all of our latest Article Collections, Themed Issues, and Editor’s Choice collections to enable you to easily navigate to content most relevant to you. We hope you enjoy reading the papers in these collections!

Ongoing Collections:

Themed Issues: 

 


Editors’ Choice Collections: 

 

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RSC Environmental Science Journal Symposium at NCEC this August

We are delighted to announce a special journal Symposia taking place at the NCEC in Tianjin, China, next month. This Symposia will feature talks from Editorial Board members of Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, Environmental Science: Nano, and Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology, alongside some of our recent Emerging Investigators.

More details about the NCEC conference can be found here, including details on how to register

Symposium details

When: Saturday 17th August (all-day)

Where: Nankai University, Tianjin

Speakers and talk titles:

John Fortner Yale University, USA
TBC

Helen Hsu-Kim Duke University, USA
Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining in the Peruvian Amazon: Mobilization, Bioaccumulation, and Exposure of Mercury

Zhang Lin South China University of Technology, China
TBC

Greg Lowry Carnegie Mellon University, USA
TBC

Iseult Lynch University of Birmingham, UK
TBC

Joel Pedersen UW-Madison, USA
Modulation of nanoparticle-membrane interactions by proteins

Weiguo Song Chinese Academy of Sciences, China
Nano stirrer to enhance catalytic rate within micro droplets

Paul Tratnyek Oregon Health & Science University, USA
Redox Properties of Natural Organic Matter

Peter Vikesland Virginia Tech, USA
Nanosensor development for pH sensing in confined environments

Laura Carter University of Leeds, UK
Pharmaceutical Exposure in Agro-Ecosystems

Jingyun Fang Sun Yat-Sen University, China
Roles of halogen radicals for the abatement of micropollutants by the UV/chlorine process

Xian-Zheng Yuan Shandong University, China
Short-term nanoplastics exposure causes oxidative stress and membrane destruction in cyanobacteria

This Symposium aims to showcase the exciting research being conducted by thought-leaders and rising stars in the field of environmental science and engineering – we do hope that you will be able to join us!

Click here to return to the ESPI journal homepage

Click here to return to the ES:Nano journal homepage

Click here to return to the ESWRT journal homepage

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RSC Environmental Science Journal Symposium at ACS Fall this August

We are delighted to announce a special journal Symposia taking place at the ACS Fall in San Diego, USA, next month. This Symposia will feature talks from Editorial Board members of Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, Environmental Science: Nano, and Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology, alongside some of our recent Emerging Investigators and winners of our inaugural Best Papers Initiative.

Symposium details

When: Sunday 25th August (all-day) and Monday 26th August (morning)

Where: Room 29A, San Diego Convention Center, USA

 Speakers and talk titles:

Sunday 25th August
8:20am Amir Farnoud Ohio University, USA
Interactions of nanomaterials with the cell plasma membrane: Can model membranes predict nanoparticle-induced membrane damage in cells?
8:45am Yu (Frank) Yang University of Nevada Reno, USA
Quantitative analysis for the environmental fate of carbon nanotubes in soil-plant systems for their environmental implication and application
9:10am Leanne Gilbertson University of Pittsburgh, USA
Designing sustainably at the nanoscale
9:35am Liwu Zhang Fudan University, China
Promoted heterogeneous reaction of SO2 in atmosphere by CO2 and flue gas SO2 utilization
10:15am Ning Dai University at Buffalo, USA
Sunlight photolysis of anthropogenic chemicals on simulated environmental surfaces
10:40am Ryan Sullivan Carnegie Mellon University, USA
Using aerosol optical tweezers to learn and predict the chemical evolution of the composition, pH, and phase separated morphology of complex atmospheric particles
11:05am Lin Du Shandong University, China
Exploring the surface properties of aqueous organic aerosol
11:30am Raoul-Marie Couture Universite Laval, Canada
Disentangling the contributions of metabolism, light, and flocculation to removing dissolved organic carbon from vertically stratified aquatic environments
1:35pm Yujie Men University of Illinois, USA
Organic contaminants of emerging concerns: Environmental fate and impacts
2:00pm Manish Kumar Pennsylvania State University, USA
Biomimetic and bioinspired membranes: Challenges and opportunities
2:25pm John Fortner Yale University, USA
Next generation graphene-based membranes for water treatment: Evolving from 2D to 3D materials
2:50pm Delphine Farmer Colorado State University, USA
Chemistry of wildfire smoke: Measuring emissions and evolution of submicron particles
3:30pm Ed Kolodziej University of Washington (Tacoma/Seattle), USA
Characterizing urban stormwater impacts on water quality
3:55pm Krista Wigginton University of Michigan, USA
Nucleic acid reactivity with UV radiation and HOCl and the impact of virus capsids
4:20pm Ligy Philip IIT Madras, India
Development of low-cost colorimetric sensor for the detection of aqueous nitrite ion
4:45pm Graham Gagnon Dalhousie University, Canada
Achieving low levels of lead at the tap through a multi-faceted corrosion control program
Monday 26th August
8:25am Stuart Khan University of New South Wales, Australia
Biologically mediated chiral inversion of emerging contaminants: Role of wastewater treatment
8:55am Greg LeFevre University of Iowa, USA
Putting the “bio” in bioretention: Microbial, plant, and fungal transformation processes in green stormwater infrastructure for sustained removal of emerging contaminants
9:25am Haizhou Liu University of California Riverside, USA
Which photo-oxidant for potable reuse? Treatment efficiency and toxicity considerations
10:10am Joel Pedersen UW-Madison, USA
Modulation of nanoparticle-membrane interactions by proteins
10:40am Sijin Liu RCEES, China
Transformation-determined nanotoxicity
11:10am Korin Wheeler Santa Clara University, USA
Toward predictive analysis of nanoparticle protein corona populations

This Symposium aims to showcase the exciting research being conducted by thought-leaders and rising stars in the field of environmental science and engineering – we do hope that you will be able to join us!

Click here to return to the ESPI journal homepage

Click here to return to the ES:Nano journal homepage

Click here to return to the ESWRT journal homepage

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Themed Issues in the Environmental Science journals

The Royal Society of Chemistry’s Environmental Science journals Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, Environmental Science: Nano and Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology are home to a diverse array of impactful research. Each journal publishes topic-based themed issues covering a variety of exciting areas in the field of envionmental science and engineering.
Here, we’ve collated our topic-based themed collections across the three journals for you to easily navigate to content most relevant to you, and also explore exciting new areas. We hope you enjoy reading the papers in these collections!

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#EnvChem2019: Advances in Environmental Chemistry

Meeting organised by the Environmental Chemistry Group of the Royal Society of Chemistry

15 October 2019, The Royal Society of Chemistry, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London, W1J 0BA, United Kingdom

Join us for #EnvChem2019: Advances in Environmental Chemistry.  #EnvChem2019 aims to provide a forum for early career and established researchers and environmental practitioners working in environmental chemistry and engineering to share their latest research findings.

The meeting will include presentations from keynote speakers coupled with the opportunity to share your research either as a platform or poster presentation
The themes of the meeting include:

  • Environmental Processes and Chemical Fate;
  • Environmental Analysis and Investigation;
  • Emerging Contaminants;
  • Toxicology and Risk Assessment;
  • Environmental Management and Sustainability.

Abstract Submission
We invite you to present your latest research either as a platform or a poster presentation. Abstracts should be saved as a Microsoft Word document and should be no longer than one A4 page in portrait layout. A template is  provided on the event web-page and send the completed abstract to Prof Steve Leharne (S.A.Leharne@greenwich.ac.uk). Please indicate whether you intend to make an oral or poster presentation.

Registration
Registration is now open. Registration is £55 for RSC members and £65 for non-members. In addition for student members of the RSC registration is £30 and for non-member students £40.

Keynote Speakers
Dr Cecilia Macleod is currently Programme Leader in “Water, Wastewater and Environmental Engineering” at the University of Greenwich. Cecilia was formerly a director at the WYG Group. She is an environmental geochemist with over 25 years of experience in site investigation, risk assessment and remediation.

Dr Mike Rivett is currently a research fellow at the University of Strathclyde and founding director of GroundH2O plus Ltd. Mike was formerly senior lecturer at Birmingham University and spent nearly five years at the University of Waterloo in Canada. He has extensive experience in contaminant hydrogeology

 

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Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts Editors’ Symposium – join us

We are delighted to announce that the Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts Editors’ Symposium will be taking place at MIT in Cambridge, MA, USA later this month. We warmly invite you to join us on 24th June for this exciting Symposium, which will feature talks from several of Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts’ international Editorial Board members.

Symposium details

When: Monday 24th June 2019, 1:00 PM

Where: 1-190 @ MIT, 33 Mass Ave, Cambridge, MA, USA

Speakers and talk titles:

Kris McNeill, ETH Zurich

The unexpectedly large role of photochemistry in the S cycle

 Helen Hsu-Kim, Duke University

Managing aquatic mercury pollution: Modern approaches for a legacy contaminant

 Ed Kolodziej, University of Washington

Impacts of vehicles and roads on urban water quality

If you’d like further information please contact us at espi-rsc@rsc.org.

We hope that you will be able to join us at this exciting session, and please do pass this information on to any colleagues that may be interested to attend.

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On the importance of considering all reaction partners: a lesson from birnessite-induced BPA oxidation

Written by Rachele Ossola

Bisphenol A (BPA) is one of the most used industrial chemicals worldwide. Since its introduction in the market in 1959, BPA production has increased steadily and it is forecasted to reach 7.3 million tons by the end of 2023.1 BPA is used for a range of applications: from dental sealants to internal can coatings, electronic equipment and supermarket receipts.2 “In the past years, concerns have been raised over the use of this compound due to its estrogenic effects that can be observed also at low BPA concentration, such as the ones found in the natural environment.2,3 Thus, investigation of natural attenuation processes might help us developing strategies to reduce human exposure to this widespread chemical.

Several literature studies showed that manganese oxides (MnOx)-mediated oxidation represents the main PBA degradation pathway in anoxic conditions.2 This process produces a series of degradation products, including radicals that might couple to dissolved organic matter to form the so-called “bound residues”, unknown high molecular weight products whose long-term environmental risks are still debated.4 A detailed knowledge of the reaction mechanism will therefore allow to predict, and ideally prevent, the formation of degradation products that might be more hazardous than the parent compound.

In this context, Balgooyen et al. used stirred flow reactors to investigate the effect of influent concentrations on BPA degradation mechanism via birnessite (δ-MnO2) oxidation. This research question was motivated by the hypothesis that higher influent concentrations might lead to a higher formation of bound residues. The results of this work are directly relevant for engineered water treatment systems that use MnOx-coated sand,5 where contaminant inflow concentrations might change during time.

As a unique feature of this work, the authors used a combined approach based on the detection of both organic and inorganic reaction products. Specifically, they followed the formation of both hydroxycumil alcohol (HCA) and aqueous Mn(II). HCA is the main PBA oxidation product and is considered a proxy for bound residues formation, while Mn(II) is a reaction byproduct released in solution upon reduction of birnessite.

Unexpectedly, the two approaches gave opposite results: HCA yields were constant for the influent concentration range investigated, while Mn(II) yields decreased as the influent concentration increased. In order to explain their results, the authors hypothesized that Mn(II) was not an accurate proxy, as comproportionation and disproportionation reactions occurring at the mineral surface might alter aqueous Mn(II) concentrations. Using an elegant series of sorption and desorption experiments, Balgooyen et al. were able to confirm this hypothesis, leading to the conclusion that BPA oxidation mechanism in stirred-flow reactors is indeed independent from the influent concentration.

In addition to providing a valuable new piece of information for the complex puzzle of BPA cycling in anoxic conditions, the work of Balgooyen et al. teaches us something that has little to do with micropollutants or flow-through reactors: for a throughout study of a chemical mechanism, all reaction partners must be considered – no matter how many different analytical techniques you will have to use.

To download the full article for free*, click the link below:

Impact of bisphenol A influent concentration and reaction time on MnO2 transformation in a stirred flow reactor

Sarah Balgooyen, Gabrielle Campagnola, Christina K. Remucal and Matthew Ginder-Vogel

Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2019, 21, 19

DOI: 10.1039/c8em00451j


About the Webwriter:

Rachele Ossola is a PhD student in the Environmental Chemistry group at ETH Zurich. Her research focuses on photochemistry of dissolved organic matter in the natural environment.

 

 

 


Additional references

(1)        The Global Bisphenol A Market, https://www.researchandmarkets.com/reports/4665281/the-global-bisphenol-a-market (accessed May 26, 2019).

(2)        Im and Löffler, Environ. Sci. Technol. 2016, 50 (16), 8403–8416.

(3)        vom Saal and Hughes, Environ. Health Perspect. 2005, 113 (8), 926–933.

(4)        Barraclough et al. Environ. Pollut. 2005, 133 (1), 85–90.

(5)        Charbonnet et al., Environ. Sci. Technol. 2018, 52 (18), 10728–10736.

 

*Article free to access until the 30th June 2019

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Emerging Investigator Series: Sarah Jane White

Sarah Jane White studies the biogeochemical cycling of metals that are critical in emerging energy technologies but whose environmental behavior and impacts remain largely unknown. She is interested in metal transport and speciation in natural ecosystems, and its intersection with contaminant fate & transport, industrial ecology, and human health. Sarah Jane received her doctoral degree in Environmental Chemistry from MIT, and her bachelor’s degree in Chemistry from Princeton University. She held positions as a Postdoctoral Fellow and Research Associate at the Harvard School of Public Health while doing multidisciplinary research as an NSF Science, Engineering, and Education for Sustainability Fellow. She continued her research and taught in the Environmental Studies Program as a Visiting Associate Research Scholar at Princeton University before joining the U.S. Geological Survey as a Research Chemist in 2017. Presently Sarah Jane’s research focus is the cycling of indium, gallium, and germanium during the mining and processing of zinc ores (of which they are a byproduct), with a goal of understanding the full life cycle of these elements from ore formation, through mining and processing, to their subsequent behavior and potential health impacts when released to the environment.

Read Sarah Jane White’s Emerging Investigator Series article “atmospheric cycling of indium in the northeastern United States” and read more about her in the interview below:

Your recent Emerging Investigator Series paper focuses on atmospheric cycling of indium. How has your research evolved from your first article to this most recent article?

My first published article was about what causes Candida albicans, a typically-benign yeast that everyone has in their bodies, to switch to a virulent form that can cause significant problems in immunocompromised people.  That paper was a result of work that I did as a lab technician – my first job out of college.  After doing an undergraduate thesis in environmental chemistry, and not having taken any biology courses in college, I serendipitously had the opportunity to work in a molecular biology lab, and knew that the opportunity to better understand biology would enhance the environmental science that I was hoping to do in the future.  After that, I went back for a PhD in environmental chemistry, where I focused on contaminant fate and transport – for which biology is immensely important!  As my research interests have expanded even further to include human exposure to metals and subsequent impacts on health, this biology experience has proven invaluable. Now my work focuses on the environmental and anthropogenic cycling of elements like indium, that are critical to new energy technologies but whose environmental behaviors and human health impacts are poorly understood.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?

I have recently begun doing some synchrotron-based x-ray absorption work to determine the speciation of germanium in mine wastes.  It has been exciting to learn a new technique that has powerful implications for understanding the mobility, bioaccessibility, and potential for recovery of a critical element from mine wastes.

In your opinion, what are the most important questions to be asked/answered in this field of research?

There are a dizzying number of chemicals and metals that we are exposed to on a daily basis, many of which have poorly characterized toxicity and environmental behavior.  I believe that it is essential for researchers to not only study the behavior and toxicities of these elements and compounds, but also find ways to predict their characteristics to protect human and organismal health.

What do you find most challenging about your research?

Juggling multiple projects at once, and finding sufficient time to invest in all of them.

In which upcoming conferences or events may our readers meet you?

I just returned from a workshop on the environmental behavior of technology-critical elements in Croatia, and don’t have conference travel planned until likely the AGU Fall Meeting in December.

How do you spend your spare time?

I spend most of my non-working time with my husband and two young kids.  We like to go on bike rides, hit wiffle balls in the backyard, play music, garden, go to farmers’ markets…

Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?

Baseball radio announcer?  Violin maker?  Physical therapist?

Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?

Research is worthless unless people know about it.  For me, this means working to overcome perfectionist tendencies so that my work is published, even if not perfect.

 

 

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Emerging Investigator Series: Shantanu Jathar

Shantanu Jathar is an Assistant Professor in Mechanical Engineering and also an affiliate of the Energy Institute at Colorado State University. He leads the Laboratory for Air Quality Research (http://tinyurl.com/aerosol-csu) that performs research at the intersection of energy and the environment. By leveraging laboratory and field experiments and regional air quality models, his group studies the atmospheric evolution and properties of air pollutants arising from energy and combustion systems, all in the interest of addressing future energy and environmental policy. He has a Ph.D. from Carnegie Mellon University where he used numerical models and laboratory experiments to understand the atmospheric formation of organic aerosols from combustion sources. He worked as a post-doctoral scholar at the University of California, Davis where he worked on improving the treatment of particulate matter in air quality models used for regulatory purposes. Shantanu hails from the suburbs of Mumbai, India. He is married to Poorva (an electrical engineer) and is enjoying parenthood with two energetic sons. In his spare time, he likes to run, bike, hike, and play the bansuri (bamboo flute).

Read his latest Emerging Investigator Series “Oxidative Potential of Diesel Exhaust Particles: Role of Fuel, Engine Load, and Emissions Control” and find out more about him in the interview below:

Your recent Emerging Investigator Series paper focuses on oxidative potential of diesel exhaust particles and the role of fuel, engine load, and emissions control. How has your research evolved from your first article to this most recent article?

My first project, as a graduate student at Carnegie Mellon University nearly a decade ago, examined the influence of an updated treatment on the global distribution of organic fine particles in a climate model. This study was motivated by the need to reduce the large uncertainties linked to fine particles in climate models. Over the years, my research interests have broadened to think about the impacts of fine particles on human health. In this study, we probed how the oxidative reactivity (proxy for toxicity) of particles generated by a modern-day diesel engine varied as we changed the fuel and engine operation. We found that biodiesel and the use of an emissions control device (particle filter) significantly lowered the oxidative reactivity of diesel exhaust particles and we suspect that the reduced oxidative reactivity might be from lower soot emissions. Our work provides some evidence that wider adoption of biofuels and stricter regulations on diesel vehicles may reduce their harmful impacts on human health.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?

It has to be wildfires. Wildfires are a growing concern in the western United States as rising temperatures have been linked to more frequent and bigger wildfires. Unlike burning fossil fuels in a controlled environment (think of the internal combustion engine), the variability in fuel and environmental conditions under which fires burn results in large variability in their emissions. As a result, there are large uncertainties surrounding the atmospheric evolution and impacts from wildfire emissions. We have a project supported through the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) where we are studying the atmospheric evolution of wildfire emissions in a controlled environmental chamber and using computer models trained on the laboratory data to predict the evolution in real wildfire plumes.

In your opinion, what are the most important questions to be asked/answered in this field of research?

Fine particles when inhaled deposit in our respiratory system and have been linked to lung and cardiovascular disease. However, little is understood about what properties of the particle — defined by their size and composition — are responsible for those diseases and how they might affect different individuals over different periods of time. This, I believe, is an open question and we are not going to figure the answer to this anytime soon.

What do you find most challenging about your research?

Very broadly, I study the sources and impacts of air pollution arising from energy and combustion sources. What I find most challenging with this research area is to keep abreast of the breadth and depth of topic areas it encompasses: physics, chemistry, biology, mathematics, engineering, statistics, public health, and more. Thankfully, the vastness is humbling and I rely on collaborations with some very smart people at Colorado State University and elsewhere to bring their expertise to the topic.

In which upcoming conferences or events may our readers meet you?

I usually don’t miss the annual American Association for Aerosol Research Conference (AAAR), which will be in Portland, OR this year in October. It’s the perfect place to get my scientific fix for fine particle research and catch up with collaborators and colleagues.

How do you spend your spare time?

My wife and I have a 5.5 and a 1.5 year old and we like to spend as much time as we can get with them when we are not working. Summers are the best because we spend a lot of time outdoors hitting the trails and pools.

Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?

I have thought about this question a lot and my answer hasn’t changed in a while. I would like to host and produce a science radio show, similar to Radiolab, that mixes physical and social sciences with personal stories. The one thing I would do differently would be to focus on geographies, cultures, and topics relevant to the developing world.

Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?

The one thing I would tell early-career scientists is that don’t take any advice (including this one!) too seriously. Listen, but forge your own path. Don’t be afraid to make mistakes and don’t hold any regrets.

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Emerging Investigator Series – Karen Dannemiller

Karen C. Dannemiller, PhD is an Assistant Professor at Ohio State University with a joint appointment in Civil, Environmental, and Geodetic Engineering and Environmental Health Sciences. She also has a courtesy appointment in Microbiology. At Ohio State, she leads the Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) (https://ieq.engineering.osu.edu/) group and studies the indoor microbiome and indoor chemical exposures. In 2017, she was awarded the Denman Distinguished Research Mentor Award.

Prior to her current position, Dr. Dannemiller graduated with honors in Chemical and Biochemical Engineering from Brown University and earned her MS, MPhil, and PhD at Yale University in Chemical and Environmental Engineering. During this time, she completed an internship at the California Department of Public Health in the Indoor Air Quality Program. She was also a Microbiology of the Built Environment Postdoctoral Associate at Yale University

Read Karen Dannemiller’s Emerging Investigator article “Degradation of phthalate esters in floor dust at elevated relative humidity” and find out more about her in the interview below:

Your recent Emerging Investigator Series paper focuses on the degradation of phthalate esters in floor dust at elevated relative humidity. How has your research evolved from your first article to this most recent article?

This paper has really allowed my work to come full circle.  My first research paper was on formaldehyde in the indoor environment, which was based on my work in the chemical engineering department at Brown University as an undergraduate.  During my PhD, I began to focus more on microbial exposures in the indoor environment.  This Emerging Investigator Series paper is so exciting because it combines my interest in both indoor chemistry and indoor microbiology by examining the interactions between these two systems.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?

I direct the Indoor Environmental Quality Laboratory at Ohio State University, and I am excited about all the applications that we are discovering to which we can apply our research. It is so critical to understand the chemical and microbial processes occurring in the indoor environment, and this has important implications in many different systems.  These processes can be particularly important in influencing exposures of vulnerable populations, such as asthmatic children.  We also need a thorough understanding of chemical and microbial interactions in specialized, sensitive systems such as on the International Space Station.  I am most excited to have received grants from NIH, NASA, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, and other organizations to study these interactions.

In your opinion, what are the most important questions to be asked/answered in this field of research?

Right now, very little is known about the interactions between chemicals and microbes in the indoor environment.  There are a plethora of questions that need to be asked to gain even a basic understanding of what is happening around us on a daily basis.  These may have important implications for our health.

What do you find most challenging about your research?

One of the most challenging but also exciting aspects of my research are the unexpected surprises inherent in any scientific dataset, but especially rich microbial datasets.  Often, future grant proposals can result from novel associations discovered during data analysis.

In which upcoming conferences or events may our readers meet you?

The next conference I will attend will be AEESP in Tempe, AZ, May 14-16, 2019.  I am very excited to be giving the plenary talk on Thursday morning.

How do you spend your spare time?

I love spending time with my family.

Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?

If I were not a research scientist, I would be an environmental public health practitioner.  They apply scientific principles to help people reduce their harmful exposures.  I appreciate the hard, challenging work that they do everyday, especially in fields like mold remediation.

Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?

I have been very lucky and very thankful to have some outstanding mentors throughout my career.  I would highly recommend that early career scientists find mentors to help them navigate different obstacles they may encounter.  Mentors are a great source of advice and inspiration.  They can also help you identify exciting opportunities

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6th European Conference on Environmental Applications of Advanced Oxidation Processes

No photo description available.The 6th European Conference on Environmental Applications of Advanced Oxidation Processes will take place in Portorož, Slovenia from 26th – 28th June 2019. The conference will bring together scientists, engineers and other environmental professionals to present their findings and discuss future trends and directions concerning various environmental applications of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). The contributions will focus on the scientific and technological advances of AOPs for the remediation of water, air and soil contaminated with various recalcitrant compounds, either alone or in combination with other processes.

Registration is required for all participants and accompanying guests. Please complete and submit on-line the Registration Form  to the EAAOP-6 Secretariat. Use a separate form for each participant and accompanying guest. Register here

Early bird registration deadline: To take advantage of the reduced conference registration fees, register before or on 15 April 2019. Higher fees apply after 15 April 2019.

Plenary speakers 

Prof. Dr. Angelika Brückner

Prof. Dr. Kazunari Domen

Dr. Wolfgang Gernjak

Prof. Dr. Gianluca Li Puma

Keynote speakers

Dr. Isabel Oller Alberola

Dr Fernando Fresno

Prof. Dr. Josef Krýsa

Prof. Dr. Urška Lavrenčič Štangar

For more information about the conference, check out the event website here http://eaaop6.ki.si/ 

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