Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts

ESPI Themed IssueESPI Board NewsRecent ES:PI& Articles

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Higher levels of some metals in e-cigarette smoke

This article was written by Harriett Brewerton

The source of the metals appears to be the e-cigarette cartridge rather than the e-liquid © Shutterstock

 A study comparing secondhand emissions from e-cigarettes and conventional tobacco ones reveals that although e-cigarettes release much lower levels of most harmful compounds, they actually discharge more nickel and silver than tobacco cigarettes. 

E-cigarettes are electronic devices that aerosolise nicotine-containing liquids, called e-liquids, for users to inhale. They have been widely marketed as safer alternatives to traditional cigarettes as they do not contain tobacco, and their use has rapidly risen over the last decade. However, little research exists on what effects e-cigarettes have on users or those in the vicinity. 

To read the full article, please visit Chemistry World

Particulate metals and organic compounds from electronic and tobacco-containing cigarettes: comparison of emission rates and secondhand exposure
Arian Saffari, Nancy Daher, Ario Ruprecht, Cinzia De Marco, Paolo Pozzi, Roberto Boffi, Samera H. Hamad,   Martin M. Shafer, James J. Schauer, Dane Westerdahle and Constantinos Sioutas
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/ C4EM00415A, Paper

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Top ten most accessed ES:P&I articles in Q2 2014

This month sees the following articles in Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts that are in the top ten most accessed April – June:-

Energy positive domestic wastewater treatment: the roles of anaerobic and phototrophic technologies 
B. D. Shoener, I. M. Bradley, R. D. Cusick and J. S. Guest    
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2014,16, 1204-1222 
DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00711A 

Human exposure to aluminium 
Christopher Exley  
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2013,15, 1807-1816 
DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00374D 

A critical assessment of the photodegradation of pharmaceuticals in aquatic environments: defining our current understanding and identifying knowledge gaps 
Jonathan K. Challis, Mark L. Hanson, Ken J. Friesen and Charles S. Wong    
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2014,16, 672-696 
DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00615H 

Professional ski waxers’ exposure to PFAS and aerosol concentrations in gas phase and different particle size fractions 
Helena Nilsson, Anna Kärrman, Anna Rotander, Bert van Bavel, Gunilla Lindström and Håkan Westberg 
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2013,15, 814-822 
DOI: 10.1039/C3EM30739E 

Evolving shale gas management: water resource risks, impacts, and lessons learned 
Brian G. Rahm and Susan J. Riha    
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2014,16, 1400-1412 
DOI: 10.1039/C4EM00018H 

A review with recent advancements on bioremediation-based abolition of heavy metals 
Nisha Gaur, Gagan Flora, Mahavir Yadav and Archana Tiwari    
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2014,16, 180-193 
DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00491K 

Towards energy neutral wastewater treatment: methodology and state of the art 
Han Gao, Yaniv D. Scherson and George F. Wells 
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2014,16, 1223-1246 
DOI: 10.1039/C4EM00069B 

Iron nanoparticles for environmental clean-up: recent developments and future outlook 
Weile Yan, Hsing-Lung Lien, Bruce E. Koel and Wei-xian Zhang  
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2013,15, 63-77 
DOI: 10.1039/C2EM30691C 

Air quality concerns of unconventional oil and natural gas production 
R. A. Field, J. Soltis and S. Murphy    
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2014,16, 954-969 
DOI: 10.1039/C4EM00081A 

Photo-transformation of pharmaceutically active compounds in the aqueous environment: a review 
Shuwen Yan and Weihua Song 
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2014,16, 697-720 
DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00502J 
 
Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting an article to Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts? Then why not submit to us today or alternatively email us your suggestions.

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Concerns over chemical treatment of reclaimed fracking fluid

This article was written by Elisabeth Bowley

The study analysed water samples from shale gas wells in Marcellus (Pennsylvania), Eagle Ford (Texas), and Barnett (New Mexico) © Michael J Mullen Scranton Times-Tribune/AP/Press Association Images

Estimates suggest that in the next 50 years, over one trillion gallons of water will be used in shale gas extraction but research from scientists in the US suggests that environmentally detrimental compounds are being created when this fluid is recycled.

Shale gas is found in rock formations kilometres underground. Hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking, facilitates the release of this energy dense fuel in a cost-effective and timely manner. Water, sand and a combination of other additives are pumped into the ground at high pressure, breaking the shale formations apart, allowing the gas to migrate to the surface where it can be collected.

To read the full article, please visit Chemistry World.

Organic compounds in produced waters from shale gas wells
Samuel J. Maguire-Boyle and Andrew R. Barron
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4EM00376D, Paper

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Geoscience Themed Issue

We are delighted to announce the publication of Issue 9, Volume 16 of Environmental Science Processes & Impacts, which is a themed issue dedicated to Geoscience, guest edited by Yu-ping Chin from The Ohio State University.

Geology, and especially the field of geochemistry, has become inextricably linked to the environmental sciences, and has evolved over the past few decades to view earth in a much more holistic fashion. The papers in this themed collection reflect the diversity of research problems that face earth scientists studying environmentally relevant processes today. They range from the nano- to macro-scale and tackle problems that face organic and inorganic geochemists alike.

This collection features  a HOT Critical Review on the structural characterization of dissolved organic matter, by researchers from the USA, which received particularly high scored during peer review.

Click here to view the full geoscience themed issue – we hope you enjoy the collection

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Macronutrient Cycles Themed Issue

Macronutrient Cycles Guest edited by the directorate of the NERC Macronutrient Cycles Programme, Professor Paul Whitehead (Director) and Dr Jill Crossman (Assistant Director), this themed issue focuses upon the key macronutrient cycles linking nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon. Disturbance of the interactions, or cycles, of these macronutrients has had significant environmental and economic implications including soil nutrient enrichment, eutrophication of surface waters, reduced air quality, and loss of drinking water quality. These issues pose a threat not just to biodiversity, but also to public water supplies and public health.

Within this themed issue are four HOT research papers, which received particularly high scores during peer review – click on the links to download the articles:

1. Carly Stevens and colleagues describe a nitrogen footprint tool for the UK, demonstrating that the UK footprint is smaller than that found in the USA but higher than that for the Netherlands and Germany.

2. Researchers from Lancaster University investigate cattle in-stream activity in order to further our understanding of cattle contribution to sediment load.

3. Researchers from Norway and Canada model phosphorus loading and algal blooms in an agricultural catchment-lake system under changing land-use and climate.

4. Our fourth HOT article  focuses on phosphorus transport and assessment using a semi-distributed catchment model.

Click here to view the full macronutrient cycles themed issue – we hope you enjoy the collection

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Free access to HOT articles

This HOT article was recommended by our referees and is free to access for 4 weeks*

Caffeine as an indicator of estrogenic activity in source water
C. C. Montagner, G. A. Umbuzeiro, C. Pasquini and W. F. Jardim  
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2014,16, 1866-1869
DOI: 10.1039/C4EM00058G, Communication

Graphical abstract: Caffeine as an indicator of estrogenic activity in source water

*Free access to individuals is provided through an RSC Publishing personal account. It’s quick, easy and more importantly – free – to register!

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Introducing Editorial Board Member Yngvar Thomassen

The fouth of our Introducing series of blog posts features Editorial Board member Professor Yngvar Thomassen – we’re very pleased to welcome him to the board and post his profile and research vision:

Yngvar Thomassen

Yngvar is currently a Research Director for the Department of Chemical and Biological Work Environment at the National Institute of Occupational Health in Oslo – where he has spent 35 years of his professional life. After graduating from the Department of Analytical Chemistry at the University of Oslo in 1973, Yngvar spent a year at the Norwegian Defence Institute before taking a post research associate position, back at the University of Oslo.In 1978 he worked for the Department of Environmental Studies and Geology at the University of Toronto as a visiting scientist. He has since been appointed as a Professor in Environmental chemistry, Department of Plant and Environmental Science, at the Norwegian University of Life Sciences.

MY RESEARCH VISION:

My passion for research and teaching derives from my quest for social and environmental interest. This has inspired me throughout my professional life as an analytical chemist. From occupational and personal use of products to nutritional intake people are exposed to a variety of chemical agents – many essential or non-essential compounds with the potential to affect our health. Analytical science has been and is an important instrument in chemical exposure science which strives to collect and analyse qualitative and quantitative information which is needed to understand the nature of contact between people and chemical stressors. There are a continuous demand for exposure science information to meet the need to understand the fate of stressors and to establish exposure data, not only for the existing chemical agents, but also for the thousands of  new chemicals introduced into the marked each year.

Although analytical science has brought about a recent revolution in exposure characterization and dose assessment, now even able to reach the nanoscopic domain and fundamental limits of atom or molecule detection, these developments need to be further integrated into more portable and direct reading instruments for biological and environmental monitoring for faster identification of chemical stressors affecting our health. Of special importance is further improvement of ambient, indoor and work-room air qualities since airborne contaminants still seriously affects the health of workers and the global population at large. In order to achieve this,  an expanded integrated vision in exposure science which consider exposures from source to dose, over time and space, as well as multiple stressors are required. Thus, the society should give priority to

a) educate the next generation of analytical and exposure scientists

b) further develop new and improve existing instrumentation

c) stimulate to strategic collaboration across scientific boarders

d) develop prevention and intervention strategies to reduce any related health problems

e) improve quality of exposure data collected and make them available to help set priorities and inform policy

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Free access to HOT articles

These HOT articles were recommended by our referees and are free to access for 4 weeks*

Unconventional oil and gas extraction and animal health
M. Bamberger and R. E. Oswald  
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4EM00150H

Graphical abstract: Unconventional oil and gas extraction and animal health

Assessing the performance of standard methods to predict the standard uncertainty of air quality data having incomplete time coverage
Richard J. C. Brown, Peter M. Harris and Maurice G. Cox  
Environ. Sci.: Processes Impacts, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4EM00189C

Graphical abstract: Assessing the performance of standard methods to predict the standard uncertainty of air quality data having incomplete time coverage

*Free access to individuals is provided through an RSC Publishing personal account. It’s quick, easy and more importantly – free – to register!

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2014 Emerging Investigators Issue

Emerging Investigators Guest Editors David Cwiertny, Juana Maria Delgado-Saborit and Hee-Deung Park introduce the third edition of our emerging investigators issue.

Celebrating the best and brightest amongst early career environmental scientists around the world, this collection of reviews and papers demonstrates the talent, innovation and creative ideas that new researchers can bring.  Read the profiles of the contributors to find out more about our young scientists, including their research objectives, inspirations and what environmental challenges they believe the future holds.

We have made the following HOT articles free* to access for a limited time only! We hope you enjoy reading this collection as much as we did.

Critical Reviews:

B. D. Shoener, I. M. Bradley, R. D. Cusick and J. S. Guest
DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00711A

Critical Review of electrochemical advanced oxidation processes for water treatment application

Brian P. Chaplin
DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00679D


impacts of UV protections on bacterial survival

HOT Paper:

Association of nuisance filamentous algae Cladophora spp. with E. coli and Salmonella in public beach waters: impacts of UV protection on bacterial survival

Aubrey Beckinghausen, Alexia Martinez, David Blersch and Berat Z. Haznedaroglu
DOI: 10.1039/C3EM00659J

For the full collection, visit our 2014 Emerging Investigators Themed Issue platform.

*Access is free through a registered RSC account – click here to register

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