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The 2021 PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship Award – Winners Announced!

Dr Stella Stopkowicz and Dr Stefania Impellizzeri have been selected as the winners of the 2021 PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship Award.

We are delighted to let you know that due to the additional difficulties faced by emerging investigators in raising their profile during the COVID-19 pandemic and the high quality of nominations, we have decided to grant two Lectureship Awards for 2021.

As part of the Lectureship, Dr Stopkowicz and Dr Impellizzeri will each be awarded £1,000 to attend and present at a leading international event in 2021, where they will also be presented with their individual Lectureship awards. They have also been invited to contribute a Perspective article to PCCP.


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In 2020, nominations were open to all and were made by leading researchers from around the world. After careful deliberation, Dr. Stella Stopkowicz (University of Mainz, Germany) and Dr. Stefania Impellizzeri (Ryerson University, Canada) were selected as the 2021 recipients by the PCCP Editorial Board. In addition, a number of the outstanding shortlisted nominees were selected and will be invited to contribute to the themed collection, which will be published in 2021.

Stella Stopkowicz received her PhD in theoretical chemistry from the University of Mainz (Germany). She joined the University of Oslo (Norway) for a postdoctoral stay in 2012. In 2015 she became a junior group leader at the University of Mainz. In 2017 and 2018 she has been a fellow at the Centre of Advanced Study in Oslo (Norway) within the project ‘molecules in extreme conditions’. In 2021 she will be a fellow at the Kavli Institue of Physics at the University of California in Santa Barbara (USA) on a White Dwarf related project. Her research group focuses on the development and the application of highly-accurate quantum-chemical methods with a focus on relativistic effects and the treatment of atoms and molecules in strong magnetic fields.


Stefania Impellizzeri is Assistant Professor at the Department of Chemistry and Biology of Ryerson University. She received a Laurea in Chemistry from the University of Bologna with Alberto Credi, with a thesis project in collaboration with 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry recipient, Sir James Fraser Stoddart. Following a PhD in Chemistry at the University of Miami with Françisco Raymo, she joined the research group of organic photochemist Juan C. (Tito) Scaiano at the University of Ottawa as postdoctoral fellow where she was awarded a Banting PDF fellowship. Dr Impellizzeri’s research focuses on the design and synthesis of switchable fluorescent probes for bioimaging, sensing and molecular computing, the discovery of new strategies to couple molecules and nanostructured materials, and the analysis of modern optical phenomena at the interface between organic chemistry and the chemical physics of materials and nanostructured objects.

 

Many congratulations to Dr Stopkowicz and Dr Impellizzeri on behalf of the PCCP Editorial Board, Office and Ownership Societies.

Nominations for the 2022 PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship will open next summer, keep up to date with latest journal news on the blogTwitternewsletter and e-TOC alerts.

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ANNOUNCEMENT: Deadline extension for the Quantum Computing and Quantum Information Storage themed collection

Due to the significant challenges being caused by the COVID-19 pandemic we would like to inform you that we are extending the submission deadline for the themed collection – the new deadline for submissions is 31 August 2020.

When you are ready to do so you can submit your article through our online system and indicate where requested that your manuscript is for the Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics (PCCP) themed collection on Quantum Computing and Quantum Information Storage, with Guest Editors:

John Doyle
Harvard University, USA
Anna Krylov (Associate Editor, PCCP)
University of Southern California, USA
Kang-Kuen Ni
Harvard University, USA

 

Quantum computing and information storage promise to revolutionize our information technology. Some basic theory of quantum computing has been established over the past two decades and researchers are on the cusp of quantum supremacy for truly useful systems. Yet, for quantum computing to become a reality we need to find a practical physical platform for realizing qubits with enough fidelity and depth to solve important problems. At present it is not clear what platform will succeed at this.

Molecules are a relative newcomer to the field (apart from the initial molecular NMR qubits that energized the field), but the power of such systems is easy to recognize with a myriad of internal quantum states and dipole coupling for quantum processing. The key goals are the ability to prepare, control, manipulate, and interrogate specific quantum states of interacting qubits, control their interactions and thus program an array of qubits. The current status quo in this field is reminiscent of the dawn of the first quantum revolution (which brought us GPS, MRI, and other amazing technologies): fundamental physics tells us that there are grounds for a powerful and transformative technology and informs us of what needs to be done to realize it, but the actual work and, consequently, the success of the entire endeavour is in the hands of scientists, who must find the right platform for qubits and the right physical tools to control them.

This topical collection will highlight physical chemistry/chemical physics aspects of quantum computing and quantum information storage and will welcome contributions from experimental and theoretical communities working on atomic, molecular, and optical aspects of emerging quantum information technology. Contributions focusing on application of quantum computing to physical problems are also welcome.

We welcome contributions of articles for this the collection including Communications, Full Papers and Perspectives. Please see our Author Guidelines for further information.

If you are interested in submitting a manuscript but are facing issues with the deadline or other aspects of the publishing process due to COVID-19, please get in touch to discuss options with the Editorial Office.

Deadline for submissions: 31 August 2020

Articles can be submitted via our website: mc.manuscriptcentral.com/pccp. Please mention on submission that your manuscript is intended for this themed collection.

All articles will be subject to our fair and impartial peer-review process in the normal way. Accepted articles will be published online in a citeable form as soon as they are ready.

Please contact the Editorial Office with any questions you may have.

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Open for Nominations: 2021 PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship and Themed Issue

PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship

Lectureship and Themed Issue details

Recognising and supporting the significant contribution of early career researchers in physical chemistry, chemical physics and biophysical chemistry, the lectureship is a platform for early career physical chemists to showcase their research to the wider scientific community.

The lectureship recipient will receive £1000 to cover travel and accommodation costs to attend and present at a leading international meeting in 2021. The recipient will also be invited to contribute a Perspective article to PCCP. In addition, selected nominees will be invited to submit to the PCCP Emerging Investigator Themed Issue. You can read the inaugural 2020 Emerging Investigator Themed Issue here.

Eligibility
To be eligible for the lectureship and themed issue, candidates must:
•    Have completed their PhD 
•    Be actively pursuing an independent research career within physical chemistry, chemical physics or biophysical chemistry.
•    Be at an early stage of their independent career (typically this will be within 10 years of completing their PhD, but appropriate consideration will be given to those who have taken a career break or followed a different study path).

Selection criteria, nomination and judging process
•    Nominations must be made via email to pccp-rsc@rsc.org using the PCCP Emerging Investigator nomination form and a letter of recommendation.
•    Nominators may only nominate one candidate for consideration per year.
•    Individuals cannot nominate themselves for consideration.
•    Selection will be made by the PCCP Editorial Board. The Lectureship winner will be selected in quarter four of 2020 and announced before the end of the year.
•    The Lectureship winner will be selected based on their nomination, with due consideration given to the letter of recommendation, candidate biography, research achievements, previous PCCP publications and overall publication history.
•    Selected shortlisted nominees, as chosen by the PCCP Editorial Board, will be invited to submit to the 2021 PCCP Emerging Investigator Themed Issue following the Lectureship winner selection.

Submit a nomination
To be considered for the 2021 Lectureship and Themed Issue, the following must be sent to the Editorial Office
•    A letter of recommendation
•    A complete nomination form 

Submission deadline: 14 September 2020

 

Download nomination form 

Submit nomination with letter of recommendation

 

Find out more about our previous winner’s: 

Dr Federico Calle-Vallejo, University of Barcelona (2019 winner)
Professor Debashree Ghosh, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science (2018 winner)
Professor Ryan P. Steele, University of Utah (2017 winner) 
Dr David Glowacki, University of Bristol (2016 winner)
Read a selection of their work in the PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship Winners Collection.

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Submissions still welcome to the Quantum Computing and Quantum Information Storage themed collection

The submission deadline is fast approaching for the Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics (PCCP) Themed Collection on Quantum Computing and Quantum Information Storage, with Guest Editors:

John Doyle
Harvard University, USA
Anna Krylov (Associate Editor, PCCP)
University of Southern California, USA
Kang-Kuen Ni
Harvard University, USA

Quantum computing and information storage promise to revolutionize our information technology. Some basic theory of quantum computing has been established over the past two decades and researchers are on the cusp of quantum supremacy for truly useful systems. Yet, for quantum computing to become a reality we need to find a practical physical platform for realizing qubits with enough fidelity and depth to solve important problems. At present it is not clear what platform will succeed at this.

Molecules are a relative newcomer to the field (apart from the initial molecular NMR qubits that energized the field), but the power of such systems is easy to recognize with a myriad of internal quantum states and dipole coupling for quantum processing. The key goals are the ability to prepare, control, manipulate, and interrogate specific quantum states of interacting qubits, control their interactions and thus program an array of qubits. The current status quo in this field is reminiscent of the dawn of the first quantum revolution (which brought us GPS, MRI, and other amazing technologies): fundamental physics tells us that there are grounds for a powerful and transformative technology and informs us of what needs to be done to realize it, but the actual work and, consequently, the success of the entire endeavour is in the hands of scientists, who must find the right platform for qubits and the right physical tools to control them.

This topical collection will highlight physical chemistry/chemical physics aspects of quantum computing and quantum information storage and will welcome contributions from experimental and theoretical communities working on atomic, molecular, and optical aspects of emerging quantum information technology. Contributions focusing on application of quantum computing to physical problems are also welcome.

We welcome contributions of articles for this the collection including Communications, Full Papers and Perspectives. Please see our Author Guidelines for further information.

If you are interested in submitting a manuscript but are facing issues with the deadline or other aspects of the publishing process due to COVID-19, please get in touch to discuss options with the Editorial Office.

Deadline for submissions: 30 July 2020

Articles can be submitted via our website: mc.manuscriptcentral.com/pccp. Please mention on submission that your manuscript is intended for this themed collection.

All articles will be subject to our fair and impartial peer-review process in the normal way. Accepted articles will be published online in a citeable form as soon as they are ready.

Please contact the Editorial Office with any questions you may have.

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