PCCP Tulip2015 Awards

We are delighted to announce the winners of the PCCP Tulip2015 awards that were given at the Tulip2015 Summer School on Modern Developments in Spectroscopy in Noordwijk in the Netherlands. This year, there were two winners of the prize, best presentation went to Sana Habka of CEA Saclay, France for her poster on “Gas Phase Spectroscopy of Zwitterionic Complexes” and best layout went to Ana Krin of Max-Planck-Institut für Struktur und Dynamik der Materie, Hamburg, Germany  for her poster on “Enantiomer Identification in Mixtures Using Broadband Microwave Spectroscopy”. The winners each received a certificate and a cash prize.

Pictured (left): Prof. Wybren Jan Buma (co-chair of the Tulip Summer School), Prof. Jennifer Herek (co-chair of the Tulip VI Summer School), Sana Habka (PCCP Poster prize winner for best presentation) and Prof. Paul Corkum (lecturer at Tulip2015 and presenting the award on behalf of the committee of all 6 Tulip lecturers).

Pictured (right): Prof. Wybren Jan Buma, Prof. Jennifer Herek, Prof. Paul Corkum, and Ana Krin (PCCP Poster prize winner for best poster layout/text).

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Recent HOT PCCP Articles

Check out the following HOT articles, these have all been made free to access for a limited time:

Hidden photoinduced reactivity of the blue fluorescent protein mKalama1
Russell B. Vegh, Dmitry A. Bloch, Andreas S. Bommarius, Michael Verkhovsky, Sergei Pletnev, Hideo Iwaï, Anastasia V. Bochenkova and Kyril M. Solntsev
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5CP00887E, Paper

Rayleigh light scattering properties of atmospheric molecular clusters consisting of sulfuric acid and bases
Jonas Elm, Patrick Norman and Kurt V. Mikkelsen
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5CP01012H, Paper

Comparison of the plasmonic performances between lithographically fabricated and chemically grown gold nanorods

Lei Shao, Yuting Tao, Qifeng Ruan, Jianfang Wang and Hai-Qing Lin   Physicochemical design and analysis of self-propelled objects that are characteristically sensitive to environments
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015,17, 10861-10870
DOI: 10.1039/C5CP00715A, Paper

Order and disorder around Cr3+ in chromium doped persistent luminescent AB2O4 spinels
Neelima Basavaraju, Kaustubh R. Priolkar, Didier Gourier, Aurélie Bessière and Bruno Viana
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015,17, 10993-10999
DOI: 10.1039/C5CP01097G, Paper

Physicochemical design and analysis of self-propelled objects that are characteristically sensitive to environments

Satoshi Nakata, Masaharu Nagayama, Hiroyuki Kitahata, Nobuhiko J. Suematsu and Takeshi Hasegawa
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015,17, 10326-10338
DOI: 10.1039/C5CP00541H, Perspective

Strong field laser control of photochemistry

Ignacio R. Solá, Jesús González-Vázquez, Rebeca de Nalda and Luis Bañares
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5CP00627A, Perspective

Nuclear quantum tunnelling in enzymatic reactions – an enzymologist’s perspective  Strong field laser control of photochemistry
Linus O. Johannissen, Sam Hay and Nigel S. Scrutton
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5CP00614G, Perspective

Internal heavy atom effects in phenothiazinium dyes: enhancement of intersystem crossing via vibronic spin–orbit coupling
Angela Rodriguez-Serrano, Vidisha Rai-Constapel, Martha C. Daza, Markus Doerr and Christel M. Marian
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5CP00194C, Paper

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

2015 PCCP – Chemical Society of Japan Prizes

We are delighted to announce the winners of the 2015 PCCP Prizes for Outstanding Achievement of Young Scientists in Physical Chemistry and Chemical Physics. These were awarded by Dr Robert Parker (CEO of the Royal Society of Chemistry) and Dr Anna Simpson (PCCP Editor) at a prize ceremony held at the 95th Annual Meeting of the Chemical Society of Japan at Nihon University, College of Science and Technology on 27th March. The winners each received a commemorative book, a PCCP Prize certificate and a financial award.

The prizewinners:

Dr. Manabu Kanno of Tohoku University for his work on ”Laser Control of Attosecond Electron Dynamics Nonadiabatically Coupled with Femtosecond Molecular Vibrations

Dr. Michio Yamada of Tokyo Gakugei University for his work on”Unveiling the Unique Structures and Chemical Reactivities of Endohedral Metallofullerenes

Dr. Taniyuki Furuyama of Tohoku University) for his work on ”Development of azaporphyrin complexes with main-group elements

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Why does a lobster change colour when you cook it?

When you cook a lobster you will see a striking colour transformation from dark blue to orange-pink and until now, the cause for this has been subject to debate.  Although the presence of astaxanthin, a carotenoid, is known to be responsible for the change, a recent PCCP article has shed light on exactly how.

In an international collaboration, Dr. John Halliwell at the University of Manchester and his group, have found that astaxanthin is present as a negatively charged enolate ion in the uncooked blue lobster. On heating, the enolate bonds break down and release orange-pink astaxanthin causing the colour change. This discovery has been made as a result of the combined interdisciplinary expertise in physical organic, biological and theoretical chemistry as well as spectroscopy.

Interested to know more?

Read the full article in Chemistry World by William Bergius.

Or, take a look at the original Open Access research article:

On the origin and variation of colours in lobster carapace, Shamima Begum, Michele Cianci, Bo Durbeej, Olle Falklöf, Alfons Hädener, John R. Helliwell, Madeleine Helliwell, Andrew C. Regan and   C. Ian F. Watt, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, DOI: 10.1039/C4CP06124A



Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

The 8th Annual Nanoscience Technology Symposium

PCCP is delighted to announce that the journal is sponsoring the 8th Annual Nanoscience Technology Symposium, NanoFlorida2015, to be held on 12th-15th May, at Florida State University, USA.

Topics to be covered include:

  • Synthesis and characterization of novel materials
  • Optical and electronic properties
  • Integration into photovoltaic and light emitting devices
  • Functionalization strategies
  • Sensor design
  • Imaging of cells and tissues
  • Drug delivery vehicles

Visit the website for further information and to submit an abstract, the abstract submission deadline is 31st March.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

New Associate Editor for PCCP

Professor Martin Pumera has become PCCP’s newest Associate Editor.

Martin Pumera is an Assoc. Prof. at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. He received his PhD at Charles University, Czech Republic, in 2001. After two postdoctoral stays (in the USA, Spain), he joined the National Institute for Materials Science, Japan, in 2006 for a tenure-track arrangement and stayed there until Spring 2008 when he accepted a tenured position at NIMS.

In 2009, Prof. Pumera received a ERC-StG award and in 2010 joined NTU. Prof. Pumera has broad interests in nanomaterials, microsystems and electrochemistry, in the specific areas of 1D and 2D materials, micro/nanomotors, lab on a chip, sensing and energy storage devices. He published over 300 peer-reviewed articles.

On behalf of Professor Pumera and the rest of our Editorial Board, we would like to invite you to submit your best work to PCCP.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Austrian Physical Society becomes co-owner of PCCP

PCCP is delighted to announce that the Österreichische Physikalische Gesellschaft (OePG) has recently become the nineteenth society to co-own PCCP. Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics (PCCP) is proud to be a Society journal and is published by the Royal Society of Chemistry on a not-for-profit basis for the benefit of the whole scientific community.

Wolfgang E. Ernst, President of the OePG, says ‘The Österreichische Physikalische Gesellschaft is very happy to be on board with PCCP as a new co-owner. Many groups in the physics institutes of Graz, Innsbruck, Linz, and Vienna participate in research projects, the results of which perfectly fit the mission of PCCP. I am confident that 2015 will be an excellent year for the partnership between PCCP and the Österreichische Physikalische Gesellschaft.’

Javier Aoiz, Chair of PCCP‘s Ownership Board and representative of the Spanish Royal Society of Chemistry, says ‘On behalf of the full Ownership Board, it is a pleasure to welcome the Österreichische Physikalische Gesellschaft as a new co-owner of PCCP.  The Austrian Physical Society has become the twentieth Society from 19 different European and non-European countries participating in, what was since its very inception, an exciting project.

PCCP was launched in 1999, and since then the number of papers published each year has grown by three and a half times; in 2014, the journal published almost 4,000 papers. It is now a well-established journal and a sure reference in the interdisciplinary field of Physical Chemistry-Chemical Physics covering a broad scope of cutting-edge scientific subjects.

We are sure the journal will benefit from the participation of the OePG and that the contribution from Austrian scientists will soar in the near future.’

To celebrate this new partnership, PCCP has created a collection of top cited articles from authors based in Austria to showcase some of the great Austrian research published recently in the journal. These articles are free to read until 28th February 2015.

PERSPECTIVES:
Understanding photosynthetic light-harvesting: a bottom up theoretical approach
Thomas Renger and Frank Müh
DOI: 10.1039/c3cp43439g, Perspective

ORIGINAL RESEARCH:
Matter–wave interference of particles selected from a molecular library with masses exceeding 10000 amu
Sandra Eibenberger, Stefan Gerlich, Markus Arndt, Marcel Mayor and Jens Tüxen
DOI: 10.1039/C3CP51500A, Paper

A step towards the a priori design of ionic liquids
Heiko Niedermeyer, Claire Ashworth, Agnieszka Brandt, Tom Welton and Patricia A. Hunt
DOI: 10.1039/C3CP50521A, Paper

Internal state thermometry of cold trapped molecular anions
Rico Otto, Alexander von Zastrow, Thorsten Best and Roland Wester
DOI: 10.1039/C2CP43186F, Paper

Polarisabilities of alkylimidazolium ionic liquids
Katharina Bica, Maggel Deetlefs, Christian Schröder and Kenneth R. Seddon
DOI: 10.1039/C3CP43867H, Paper

N-site de-methylation in pyrimidine bases as studied by low energy electrons and ab initiocalculations
D. Almeida, D. Kinzel, F. Ferreira da Silva, B. Puschnigg, D. Gschliesser, P. Scheier, S. Denifl, G. García, L. González and P. Limão-Vieira
DOI: 10.1039/C3CP50548K, Paper

The relevance of interfaces for oxide ion transport in yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thin films
Matthias Gerstl, Gernot Friedbacher, Frank Kubel, Herbert Hutter and Jürgen Fleig
DOI: 10.1039/C2CP42347B, Paper

Long-range Li+ dynamics in the lithium argyrodite Li7PSe6 as probed by rotating-frame spin–lattice relaxation NMR
V. Epp, Ö. Gün, H.-J. Deiseroth and M. Wilkening
DOI: 10.1039/C3CP44379E, Paper

Electron attachment to the dipeptide dialanine: influence of methylation on site selective dissociation reactions
Benjamin Puschnigg, Stefan E. Huber, Michael Probst, Katrin Tanzer, Violaine Vizcaino, Filipe Ferreira da Silva, Paul Scheier, Paulo Limão-Vieira and Stephan Denifl
DOI: 10.1039/C3CP44230F, Paper

Irreversible thermochromism in copper chloride Imidazolium Nanoparticle Networks
Martin Kronstein, Konstantin Kriechbaum, Johanna Akbarzadeh, Herwig Peterlik and Marie-Alexandra Neouze
DOI: 10.1039/C3CP50430A, Paper

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

New Associate Editors for PCCP

We are delighted to welcome three new Associate Editors to PCCP, Bo Albinsson, Luis Bañares and Henry F. Schaefer III. All three Associate Editors will start handling submissions very soon, so we encourage you to submit your best work to these Editorial Offices now.

Bo Albinsson
Bo Albinsson is professor in Physical Chemistry at Chalmers University of Technology in Göteborg, Sweden. He is currently vice head of the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering with responsibility for the graduate training (presently over 200 PhD students in four graduate schools) and will become the Director of the Chalmers Area of Advance for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology beginning in 2015. Albinsson has a long-standing interest in mechanisms for energy and electron transfer reactions with relevance for solar energy research and he has lately been involved in developing DNA nanostructures with photo redox active functionalizations. 13 students have completed their PhD under the supervision of Bo Albinsson and he has published over 120 refereed scientific publications in mostly high impact journals.

Luis Bañares
Professor Bañares is Chair of Physical Chemistry and Director of the Centre for Ultrafast Lasers at Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), Spain. He received his PhD in Chemistry from UCM in 1990. Following postdoctoral research associate positions at California Institute of Technology (USA) and Universität Würzburg (Germany) with Fulbright and Alexander von Humboldt fellowships, respectively, he joined UCM as an assistant professor, associate professor and since 2007 as full professor. His research interests are related to experimental and theoretical chemical reaction dynamics and femtochemistry. His work focuses on the understanding of fundamental chemical reactions and photodissociation processes at a molecular level.

Henry F. Schaefer
Dr. Schaefer is currently Graham Perdue Professor of Chemistry and Director of the Center for Computational Quantum Chemistry at the University of Georgia, USA. He received his B.S. degree in chemical physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Ph.D. degree in chemical physics from Stanford University. For 18 years he served as a professor of chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley. His research involves the use of state-of-the-art computational hardware and theoretical methods to solve important problems in molecular quantum mechanics.

All three Editors will start to handle manuscripts soon, so we encourage you to submit now to these three new Editorial offices.

Take a look at some of the recent contributions the new Associate Editors have made to PCCP:

Triplet–triplet annihilation photon-upconversion: towards solar energy applications
Victor Gray, Damir Dzebo, Maria Abrahamsson, Bo Albinsson and Kasper Moth-Poulsen
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2014, DOI: 10.1039/C4CP00744A, Perspective

Imaging the stereodynamics of methyl iodide photodissociation in the second absorption band: fragment polarization and the interplay between direct and predissociation
Marta G. González, Javier D. Rodríguez, Luis Rubio-Lago and Luis Bañares
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2014, DOI: 10.1039/C4CP03823A, Paper

Proton-transfer in hydrogenated guanine–cytosine trimer neutral species, cations, and anions embedded in B-form DNA
Yuexia Lin, Hongyan Wang, Yingxi Wu, Simin Gao and Henry F. Schaefer III
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2014, DOI: 10.1039/C3CP54904F, Paper

New PCCP Associate Editors: Bo Albinsson (left), Luis Bañares (centre) and Henry F. Schaefer (right).

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Rivers, Trees And The Many Structures Of Carbon Nanotubes

Written by Victoria Parkes, Guest web writer based at the University of Nottingham

When a river comes up against an obstacle, it will split and flow around it before joining up again, thereby forming a central island. Similarly, carbon nanotubes can be grown to split apart and then re-join through the judicious use of metal catalysts. The authors of this communication, Hasegawa and Kohno, identified this phenomenon and coined the term ‘origami mechanism’ to describe it.

My river analogy is, however, a rather simplistic take on what they found. In order to draw a more accurate comparison I must turn to tree limbs. Imagine a branch with a linear split; there will be a hole in the middle, flanked by bare timber, and the bark will be effectively split into two halves with clearly defined edges. This would be equivalent to the carbon nanotube splitting into two ribbons with terminal edges, before reforming into an entire nanotube, as one might expect to observe.

However, this does not entirely tally with what Hasegawa and Kohno actually found. Their findings align more closely with the example of a wisteria, which has co-dominant stems, which grow apart and then re-fuse as the plant twists around itself as it grows. The difference here is that each of the stems, whilst apart, still retains a full covering of bark, as it is a distinct branch. Indeed, the authors found that the nanoribbons take the form of entire flattened nanotubes before they join up again.

Of course, the reality is more complex still, and you can’t beat reading about it in the authors’ own words, which incidentally, I strongly encourage you to do.

Splitting and joining in carbon nanotube/nanoribbon/nanotetrahedron growth
Takayuki Hasegawa and Hideo Kohno
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, DOI: 10.1039/C4CP05139D

Graphical abstract: Splitting and joining in carbon nanotube/nanoribbon/nanotetrahedron growth

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Zeolites net new carbon allotropes

Chemistry World article written by Jonathan Midgley.

Previously unknown carbon allotropes have been predicted by scientists exploring their links with well-known network topologies. The new structures are highly stable and transparent, some with larger optical band gaps than diamond.

Advanced computational techniques are leading the search for new forms of carbon and other group 14 elements. Now, Davide Proserpio from the University of Milan, Italy, and co-workers, have shown that fundamental network descriptors known about and catalogued for many years can help predict as well as classify and compare allotropes.

Interested to know more?

Read the full article in Chemistry World by Jonathan Midgley.

Take a look at the original Open Access research article:

From zeolite nets to sp3 carbon allotropes: a topology-based multiscale theoretical study
Igor A. Baburin, Davide M. Proserpio, Vladimir A. Saleev and Alexandra V. Shipilova
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, DOI: 10.1039/C4CP04569F

Six new carbon allotropes

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)