Outstanding Reviewers for Biomaterials Science in 2019

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Biomaterials Science in 2019, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Dr Peng Huang, Shenzhen University, ORCID: 0000-0003-3651-7813

Dr Yongzhuo Huang, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, ORCID: 0000-0001-7067-8915

Dr Yang Li, Harvard Medical School, ORCID: 0000-0001-8186-2435

Dr Jiao Jiao Li, University of Sydney, ORCID: 0000-0002-3584-6765

Prof. Kui Luo, Sichuan University, ORCID: 0000-0002-3536-1485

Prof. Li Tang, EPFL (École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne), ORCID: 0000-0002-6393-982X

Prof. Guping Tang, Zhejiang University, ORCID: 0000-0003-3256-740X

Dr Yun-Long Wu, Xiamen University, ORCID: 0000-0001-6426-6340

Dr Zhen Yang, Houston Methodist Research Institute, ORCID: 0000-0001-9763-6766

Dr Bingran Yu, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, ORCID: 0000-0003-4912-5632

We would also like to thank the Biomaterials Science board and the biomaterials community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

 

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé. You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre.

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Enhanced optical imaging agents to guide surgical removal of brain tumors

Obtaining real-time visual information and feedback is vital for surgeons while removing tumors located in the brain, where a lack of precision can lead to catastrophic surgical complications and reduced life expectancy. During surgery, the human eye can identify only anatomical structures and is unable to detect features at the molecular level, which makes it challenging for surgeons to differentiate tumor tissue from surrounding normal brain tissue. Fluorescence-guided surgery attempts to overcome this limitation and relies on the administration of a fluorescent dye which accumulates within the tumor and produces light which in turn is captured and visualized using a camera.

Researchers from Guangzhou, China have recently engineered microglial cells into optical imaging agent vehicles, achieving more accurate brain tumor imaging for fluorescence-guided surgery compared with the commercially used tracer 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA).

Fluorescence images of BV2-Fe accumulation at tumor sites in vivo

First, they activated BV2 microglial cells with citric-acid coated iron oxide nanoparticles (CIONPs) and loaded them with near-infrared fluorescent dye DiD (DiDBV2-Fe). Priming the cells with iron oxide nanoparticles downregulated M2 markers associated with the immunoresponse, and upregulated expression levels of genes that promote transportation of cells across the blood–brain barrier (BBB), thus achieving a two-fold favorable effect.

Next, they assessed the administration of DiDBV2-Fe in glioblastoma-bearing mice models via two routes:. intravenous and intracarotid artery injection. The latter route resulted in more efficient accumulation of activated cells in the brain tumor, 2.2 times higher than that of 5-ALA, 8 hours after application. Maximum fluorescence intensity images of brain tissues acquired at various timepoints from 2 to 24 hours using near-infrared imaging revealed clear tumor border demarcation. Confocal microscopy of harvested brain tumor sections showed noticeable co-localization of DiDBV2-Fe with the Ki67 positive tumor cells along with a significantly higher tumor-to-brain fluorescence ratio compared with 5-ALA (4.54 vs. 1.81).

Finally, they evaluated the in vivo preliminary safety of DiDBV2-Fe in comparison to 5-ALA. Administering DiDBV2-Fe did not induce acute liver injury, phototoxic or hypersensitivity reactions until a certain threshold was reached. In addition, the engineered microglia did not induce gene expression changes of the detected immunoregulatory proteins, unlike 5-ALA which induced both phototoxic and photoallergic reactions.

Taken together, the results indicate that these engineered microglial cells can serve as biological homing vehicles – in seeking out tumors and delivering optical imaging agents, which in turn can help surgeons navigate and identify tumor tissue via fluorescence during surgery.

To find out more please read:

Engineering microglia as intraoperative optical imaging agent vehicles potentially for fluorescence-guided surgery in gliomas

Ling Guo, Xiaochen Zhang, Runxiu Wei, Gaojie Li, Bingzhi Sun, Hongbo Zhang, Dan Liu, Cuifeng Wang and Min Feng

Biomater. Sci., 2020, 8, 1117-1126.

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2020 Biomaterials Science Lectureship

The Biomaterials Science Lectureship is an annual award that honours an early-career researcher for their significant contribution to the biomaterials field. The recipient is selected by the Biomaterials Science Editorial Board from a list of candidates nominated by the community.

Dr Kanyi PuThis year we are delighted to award the Lectureship to Dr Kanyi Pu (Nanyang Technological University). He will present the Biomaterials Science lecture and receive his award at the 11th World Biomaterials Congress in Glasgow, UK in May 2020.

Dr. Pu is an Associate Professor in the School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering (SCBE) at Nanyang Technological University. He is a highly cited researcher (2019 web of science), and the associate editor for ACS Applied Polymer Materials and Biomaterials Research, and Young Star Editor of Nano Research. He did his MS (2007) at Fudan University in China, his PhD (2011) at National University of Singapore in Singapore, and his postdoctoral training at Stanford University School of Medicine.

Dr. Pu has made significant contributions to the development of molecular imaging probes and technologies, particularly for photoacoustic imaging, chemiluminescence imaging and afterglow imaging. He is well known for his work on semiconducting polymer nanomaterials (SPNs) for molecular imaging, phototherapy and photoregulation. He is the inventor of the polymeric nanoreporters for molecular afterglow imaging and the molecular optical renal reporters for early diagnosis of acute kidney injury (AKI).

With a h-index of 65 (Jan 2020), he has won a number of awards for his creative work, including the distinguished lectureship award from the Chemistry Society of Japan, Wiley award for contribution in bioscience, young investigator travel award, and young innovator award in nanobiotechnology by Nano Research. He is the member of board of directors of Chinese American Society of Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology (CASNN). He also sits on the editorial advisory board of Advanced Functional Materials, Bioconjugate Chemistry, ACS Applied Bio Materials, Advanced Biosystems, Journal of Nanobiotechnology and ChemNanoMat.

To learn more about Kanyi’s research, have a look at his recent publications in Biomaterials Science and our sister journals:

Recent progress in the development of near-infrared organic photothermal and photodynamic nanotherapeutics
Houjuan Zhu, Penghui Cheng, Peng Chen and Kanyi Pu
Biomater. Sci., 2018, 6, 746-765

Near-infrared fluorescence probes to detect reactive oxygen species for keloid diagnosis
Penghui Cheng, Jianjian Zhang, Jiaguo Huang, Qingqing Miao, Chenjie Xu and Kanyi Pu
Chem. Sci., 2018, 9, 6340-6347

Near-infrared absorbing amphiphilic semiconducting polymers for photoacoustic imaging
Dong Cui, Chen Xie, Yan Lyu, Xu Zhen and Kanyi Pu
J. Mater. Chem. B, 2017, 5, 4406-4409

Multilayered semiconducting polymer nanoparticles with enhanced NIR fluorescence for molecular imaging in cells, zebrafish and mice
Houjuan Zhu, Yuan Fang, Xu Zhen, Na Wei, Yu Gao, Kathy Qian Luo, Chenjie Xu, Hongwei Duan, Dan Ding, Peng Chen and Kanyi Pu
Chem. Sci., 2016, 7, 5118-5125

Please join us in congratulating Kanyi on his award!

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We are very pleased to welcome Professor Xinyuan Zhu to the Biomaterials Science Editorial Board. Read on to learn more about him!

Xinyuan Zhu is a full Professor of Polymer Science and Engineering at the School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, and Distinguished Professor of SJTU. Zhu focuses his research on the controlled preparation and biomedical applications of functional materials, including hyperbranched polymer synthesis, supramolecular polymer chemistry, drug and gene delivery, interactions between cells and polymers. He is a recipient of China National Funds for Distinguished Young Scientists (2010), and Cheung Kong Distinguished Professor (Ministry of Education of China, 2019). A number of his scientific research achievements have been applied in industries.

Read some of Xinyuan’s research below!

Methotrexate–Mn2+ based nanoscale coordination polymers as a theranostic nanoplatform for MRI guided chemotherapy
Yan Wu, Li Xu, Jiwen Qian, Leilei Shi, Yue Su, Youfu Wang, Dawei Li and Xinyuan Zhu
Biomater. Sci., 2020, 8, 712-719

Tirapazamine-embedded polyplatinum(iv) complex: a prodrug combo for hypoxia-activated synergistic chemotherapy
Dongbo Guo, Shuting Xu, Wumaier Yasen, Chuan Zhang, Jian Shen, Yu Huang, Dong Chen and Xinyuan Zhu
Biomater. Sci., 2020, 8, 694-701

Site-dependent fluorescence enhanced polymers with a self-restricted GFP chromophore for living cell imaging
Wenbin Fan, Hongping Deng, Lijuan Zhu, Chunlai Tu, Yue Su, Leilei Shi, Jiapei Yang, Linzhu Zhou, Li Xu and Xinyuan Zhu
Biomater. Sci., 2019, 7, 2421-2429

All these articles are currently FREE to read until 29th February 2020!

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Welcome to our new Associate Editors Professor Lino Ferreira and Professor Khuloud Al-Jamal

We are very pleased to welcome Professor Lino Ferreira and Professor Khuloud Al-Jamal to the Biomaterials Science Editorial Board. Read more to learn all about them!

Lino Ferreira is the director of the Biomaterials and Stem Cell-Based Therapeutics research group at Center of Neurosciences and Cell Biology (CNC), at the University of Coimbra, Portugal, and the CNC coordinator of the MIT-Portugal Program. His current interests include the development of nanomateriais to track and manipulate exogenous and endogenous stem cells, and the development of 3D biomaterials to create synthetic stem cell niches in order to study and maximize the therapeutic potential of stem cells. For his work, he has recently received an European Research Council prize.

Read some of Lino’s research below!
A photodynamic antibacterial spray-coating based on the host–guest immobilization of the photosensitizer methylene blue
Tian-tian Yao, Jing Wang, Yun-fan Xue, Wei-jiang Yu, Qiang Gao, Lino Ferreira, Ke-Feng Ren and Jian Ji
J. Mater. Chem. B, 2019,7, 5089-5095

Intracellular delivery of more than one protein with spatio-temporal control
Miguel M. Lino, Susana Simões, Sónia Pinho and Lino Ferreira
Nanoscale, 2017,9, 18668-18680

Inflammatory modulation of stem cells by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)-detectable nanoparticles
Sezin Aday, Jose Paiva, Susana Sousa, Renata S. M. Gomes, Susana Pedreiro, Po-Wah So, Carolyn Ann Carr, Lowri Cochlin, Ana Catarina Gomes, Artur Paivad and Lino Ferreira
RSC Adv., 2014,4, 31706-31709

 

Professor Khuloud T. Al-Jamal is a Chair of Drug Delivery & Nanomedicine, King’s College London. She is also a registered pharmacist at the General Pharmaceutical Council. She started her academic career as a lecturer at King’s College London in 2011. She completed her pre-registration pharmacy training at The University College London Hospital and was awarded the Overseas Research Award Scheme (ORSA) Scholarship from The University of London (2000-2004) to complete her PhD in Drug Delivery from UCL-School of Pharmacy. She was awarded the prestigious CW Maplethorpe Research and Teaching Postdoctoral Fellowship from The University of London (2005-2007) to explore the use of cationic dendrimers as anti-angiogenic agents for growth inhibition of solid and metastatic tumours.

She has developed an extensive experience in designing and developing novel nanoscale delivery systems including dendrimers, liposomes, quantum Dots (QDs), polymers, viral vectors, chemically functionalised carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide. Her current work involves pre-clinical translation of novel nanomaterials designed specifically for drug, protein, nucleic acids and radionuclide delivery for therapeutic or diagnostic applications.

Learn more about Khuloud by reading some of her research articles below!

Design of antibody-functionalized carbon nanotubes filled with radioactivable metals towards a targeted anticancer therapy
Cinzia Spinato, Aritz Perez Ruiz de Garibay, Magdalena Kierkowicz, Elzbieta Pach, Markus Martincic, Rebecca Klippstein, Maxime Bourgognon, Julie Tzu-Wen Wang, Cécilia Ménard-Moyon, Khuloud T. Al-Jamal, Belén Ballesteros, Gerard Tobias and Alberto Bianco
Nanoscale, 2016,8, 12626-12638

Synthesis of double-clickable functionalised graphene oxide for biological applications
Kuo-Ching Mei, Noelia Rubio, Pedro M. Costa, Houmam Kafa, Vincenzo Abbate, Frederic Festy, Sukhvinder S. Bansal, Robert C. Hider and Khuloud T. Al-Jamal
Chem. Commun., 2015,51, 14981-14984

Cellular uptake mechanisms of functionalised multi-walled carbon nanotubes by 3D electron tomography imaging
Khuloud T. Al-Jamal, Hannah Nerl, Karin H. Müller, Hanene Ali-Boucetta, Shouping Li, Peter D. Haynes, Joerg R. Jinschek, Maurizio Prato, Alberto Bianco, Kostas Kostarelos and Alexandra E. Porter
Nanoscale, 2011,3, 2627-2635

 

As Biomaterials Science Associate Editors, Lino and Khuloud will be handling submissions to the journal. Why not submit your next paper to their Editorial Office?

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7th International Conference on Stem Cell Engineering 2019

December 11 – 13, 2019
Conference locationHotel Barcelona Center, Barcelona, Spain

Human-based tissue models are emerging as new tools to understand human development, for regenerative therapy as well as disease modeling or rug discovery. In past years we have witnessed development of novel human based multicellular systems from various type of stem cells via using self-organization capacity of cells. These cellular systems were named organoids, gastruloids, synthetic embryos based on the similarities to their in vivo counterparts. The 7th International Conference on Stem Cell Engineering 2019 will bring together interdisciplinary group of scientists to discuss basics to translational aspects of these human based models as well as emerging computational and engineering technologies that can be employed to achieve the fullest potential of such cellular systems. The conference will be held on December 11-13, 2019 in Barcelona, Spain.

Submit an abstract, register and learn more about STEM CELL 2019 aiche.org/stemcell

Interested in sponsoring and/or exhibiting at this event? Contact sales@aiche.org

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Trapping circulating tumor cells using a “lock and key” biomimetic interface

Written by Mr Zhenwei Ma (McGill University)

Sherlock Holmes solves mysterious cases often by identifying footprints and odor left by the suspects at the crime scenes. Scientists are now trying to trap notoriously rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the bloodstream by imprinting their unique topologies and residual biomolecules for efficient early tumor detection.  

The presence of CTCs is a dangerous signal for tumor progression, as they leak into the blood stream from the primary tumor and could potentially invade to other organs, causing metastasis. Unfortunately, they’re extremely rare and thus hard to identify, which poses great challenges for early tumor diagnosis. In a recent publication in Biomaterials Science, Gao et al from Shanghai Jiao Tong University developed a cell-imprinted biomimetic interface, which could intelligently recognize and efficiently capture CTCs, with an over 55% capture efficiency towards spiked MCF-7 cells, a human breast cancer cell line, from rabbit whole blood samples.

Graphical abstract for article c9bm01008d

The mechanism behind is the synergy of “lock and key” topological and molecular interactions at the cell-biomaterials interface. Using target CTCs as an imprint template, they created a substrate mimicking their topologies and specific immunoaffinity. By leveraging soft lithography, hierarchical micro/nano-structures of CTCs could be recapitulated on an elastomer substrate (PDMS) to modulate cell adhesion behaviour: cell cytoskeleton staining showed that MCF-7 cells captured on the imprinted surface exhibited abundant filopodia and lamellipodia structures, while they showed an approximately spherical structure on flat substrate, indicating weak topographic interaction. Native proteins originating from CTC’s extracellular matrix (ECM) was anchored in the imprinted substrates providing artificial recognition receptors for selective CTC capture. This is supported by the significantly higher MCF-7 cells capture efficiency on MCF-7 imprinted substrates comparing to HeLa-cell (a human-cervical-cancer cell line) imprinted ones. Anti-EpCAM, a natural antibody, was also introduced to accelerate the CTC-substrate interactions. These interactions turned out to play a decisive role in cell capture, followed by that with plastic receptors.

By recapitulating the topological and chemical microenvironment of CTCs, this biomimetic cell-imprinted substrates demonstrate potential for rare cancer cell capture. Considering the significant roles of tissue ECM stiffness and viscoelasticity in metastasis, and the strong integrin-mediated focal adhesion at the CTCs-biomaterial interface, it might be interesting to incorporate mechanical signals into the interface design in the future for enhanced CTCs capture.

Read the full article for FREE until the 9th October!

Cell-imprinted biomimetic interface for intelligent recognition and efficient capture of CTCs, by Su Gao, Shuangshuang Chen and Qinghua Lu

About the web writer

Zhenwei Ma is currently a Ph.D. candidate in Mechanical Engineering at McGill University. He holds a M.E. degree in Chemical Engineering at McGill University and a B.E. degree in Chemical Engineering from Sichuan University. Find out more about him here.

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Nominations open for the 2020 Biomaterials Science Lectureship

Do you know an early-career researcher who deserves recognition for their contribution to the biomaterials field?

Now is your chance to put them forward for the accolade they deserve.

Biomaterials Science is pleased to announce that nominations are now being accepted for the 2020 Biomaterials Science Lectureship award. This annual award was established in 2014 to honour an early-stage career scientist who has made a significant contribution to the biomaterials field.

The recipient of the award will be asked to present a lecture at the 11th World Biomaterials Congress in Glasgow in May 2020, where they will also be presented with the award. The Biomaterials Science Editorial Office will provide financial support to the recipient for travel and accommodation costs.

The recipient will also be asked to contribute a lead article to the journal and will have their work showcased free of charge on the front cover of the issue in which their article is published.

Professor April Kloxin

2019 winner Professor April Kloxin

Previous winners

2019 – April Kloxin, University of Delaware, USA

2018 – Zhen Gu, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill & North Carolina State University, USA

2017 – Zhuang Liu, Soochow University, China

2016 – Fan Yang, Stanford University, USA

2015 – Joel Collier, Duke University, USA

2014 – Suzie Pun, University of Washington, USA

Eligibility

To be eligible for the lectureship, candidates should meet the following criteria:

  • Be an independent researcher, having completed PhD and postdoctoral studies
  • Be actively pursuing research within the biomaterials field, and have made a significant contribution to the field
  • Be at an early stage of their independent career (this should be within 12 years of attaining their doctorate or equivalent degree, but appropriate consideration will be given to those who have taken a career break, for example for childcare leave, or followed an alternative study path)

Although the Biomaterials Science Lectureship doesn’t explicitly reward support of or contributions to the journal, candidates with a history of either publishing in or refereeing for the journal would be viewed favourably.

Selection

  • Eligible nominated candidates will be notified of their nomination, and will be asked to provide 3 recent articles that they feel represent their current research.
  • All eligible nominated candidates will be assessed by a shortlisting panel, made up of members of the Biomaterials Science Advisory Board and a previous lectureship winner.
  • The shortlisting panel will consider the articles provided by the candidates as well as their CVs and letters of nomination.
  • Shortlisted candidates will be further assessed by the Biomaterials Science Editorial Board, and a winner will be selected based on an anonymous poll.
  • Selection is not based simply on quantitative measures. Consideration will be given to all information provided in the letter of recommendation and candidate CV, including research achievements and originality, contributions to the biomaterials community, innovation, collaborations and teamwork, publication history, and engagement with Biomaterials Science.

Nominations

  • Nominations must be made via email to biomaterialsscience-rsc@rsc.org, and should include a short CV (3 page maximum length) and a brief letter of nomination (1 page maximum length).
  • Self-nomination is not permitted
  • Nominators do not need to be senior researchers, and we encourage nominations from people at all career levels
  • As part of the Royal Society of Chemistry, we believe we have a responsibility to promote inclusivity and accessibility in order to improve diversity. Where possible, we encourage each nominator to consider nominating candidates of all genders, races, and backgrounds.
  • Candidates outside of the stated eligibility criteria may still be considered

Nominations should be submitted no later than 30th November 2019.

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2019 Biomaterials Science Lectureship awarded to April Kloxin

The Biomaterials Science Lectureship is an annual award that honours an early-career researcher for their significant contribution to the biomaterials field. The recipient is selected by the Biomaterials Science Editorial Board from a list of candidates nominated by the community.

Professor April Kloxin This year we are delighted to award the Lectureship to Professor April Kloxin (University of Delaware). She will present her Biomaterials Science lecture and receive her award at the European Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting in Dresden, Germany in September 2019.

April Kloxin obtained her B.S. (Summa Cum Laude) and M.S. in Chemical Engineering from North Carolina State University and Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Colorado, Boulder, as a NASA Graduate Student Research Program Fellow.  She trained as a Howard Hughes Medical Institute postdoctoral research associate at the University of Colorado before joining the faculty at the University of Delaware in 2011.

Her group aims to create unique materials with multiscale property control for addressing outstanding problems in human health. Her research currently focuses on the design of responsive biomaterials and development of controlled, dynamic models of disease and regeneration.  Her honors include the ACS PMSE Arthur K. Doolittle Award, a Susan G. Komen Foundation Career Catalyst Research award, a NSF CAREER award, and a Pew Scholars in Biomedical Sciences award.

To learn more about April’s research, have a look at her recent publications in Biomaterials Science and our sister journals:

Designing well-defined photopolymerized synthetic matrices for three-dimensional culture and differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells
Elisa M. Ovadia,  David W. Colby  and  April M. Kloxin
Biomater. Sci., 2018,6, 1358-1370

Design of functionalized cyclic peptides through orthogonal click reactions for cell culture and targeting applications (Part of the 2018 ChemComm Emerging Investgators Issue)
 Paige J. LeValley,  Elisa M. Ovadia,  Christopher A. Bresette,  Lisa A. Sawicki,  Emanual Maverakis,  Shi Bai  and  April M. Kloxin 
Chem. Commun., 2018,54, 6923-6926

Design of thiol- and light-sensitive degradable hydrogels using Michael-type addition reactions (Part of the 2015 Polymer Chemistry Emerging Investgators Issue)
Prathamesh M. Kharkar,  Kristi L. Kiick  and  April M. Kloxin
Polym. Chem., 2015,6, 5565-5574

Design of thiol–ene photoclick hydrogels using facile techniques for cell culture applications
Lisa A. Sawicki  and  April M. Kloxin
Biomater. Sci., 2014,2, 1612-1626

Hydrogel scaffolds as in vitro models to study fibroblast activation in wound healing and disease
Megan E. Smithmyer,  Lisa A. Sawicki  and  April M. Kloxin 
Biomater. Sci., 2014,2, 634-650

 

Please join us in congratulating April on her award!

 

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Introducing our new Associate Editors Professor Jons Hilborn and Professor Fu-Jian Xu

 

In 2001 Jöns Hilborn was appointed to the head of the Polymer Chemistry program at the Department of Chemistry at Uppsala University in Sweden. He has extensive management experience from life science industry, start-up companies and coordination of European projects.

His research interests are in the design, synthesis and preparation of polymers and specifically materials for tissue scaffolds and as delivery vehicles. His group especially focuses on hydrogel matrices that act on endogenous cells to regenerate tissue. His laboratory combines chemistry, biology, engineering with medicine to bring their research findings from the lab bench to the clinic and commercial applications. He served as president of “Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine International Society” (TERMIS), of which he was a founding member. 

Read some of Jöns recent research in Biomaterials Science: 

Control of growth factor binding and release in bisphosphonate functionalized hydrogels guides rapid differentiation of precursor cells in vitro
Sujit Kootala, Yu Zhang, Sara Ghalib, Vladimir Tolmachev, Jöns Hilborn and Dmitri A. Ossipov
Biomater. Sci., 2016,4, 250-254

In situ forming interpenetrating hydrogels of hyaluronic acid hybridized with iron oxide nanoparticles
Malihe Kheirabadi, Liyang Shi, Reza Bagheri, Kourosh Kabiri, Jöns Hilborn and Dmitri A. Ossipov
Biomater. Sci., 2015,3, 1466-1474

Chondroitin sulfate derived theranostic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery
Oommen P. Varghese, Jianping Liu, Karthi Sundaram, Jöns Hilborn and Oommen P. Oommen
Biomater. Sci., 2016,4, 1310-1313

 

Fu-Jian Xu is a Professor and the executive director of Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials at Beijing University of Chemical Technology. His research interests include functional materials for drug/gene delivery, natural polysaccharides for wound healing, and surface modification for biomedical applications including antibacterial, antifouling, and biocompatible surfaces.

He was the recipient of the Top Young Talents of National Special Support Program (2012), National Science Fund for Distinguished Young Scholars of China (NSFC, 2013), Cheung Kong Distinguished Professor (Ministry of Education of China, 2014), and Distinguished Young Scientists Program of Beijing Universities (2018).

Learn more about Fujian by reading some of his research articles below:

Phthalocyanine functionalized poly(glycidyl methacrylate) nano-assemblies for photodynamic inactivation of bacteria
Wei Tong, Yanhua Xiong, Shun Duan, Xiaokang Ding and Fu-Jian Xu
Biomater. Sci., 2019, Advance Article

Multifunctional hybrids with versatile types of nanoparticles via self-assembly for complementary tumor therapy
Shun Duan, Jia Li, Nana Zhao and Fu-Jian Xu
Nanoscale, 2018, 10, 7649-7657

High-performance cationic polyrotaxanes terminated with polypeptides as promising nucleic acid delivery systems
Hai-Qing Song, Yu Qi, Rui-Quan Li, Gang Cheng, Nana Zhao and Fu-Jian Xu
Polym. Chem., 2018, 9, 2281-2289

PGMA-based gene carriers with lipid molecules
Chen Xu, Bingran Yu, Hao Hu, Muhammad Naeem Nizam, Wei Yuan, Jie Ma and Fu-Jian Xu
Biomater. Sci., 2016, 4, 1233-1243

Biomolecule-functionalized polymer brushes
Hui Jiang and Fu-Jian Xu
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2013, 42, 3394-3426

 

All these articles are currently FREE to read until the 31st May!

 

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