Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Heinrich Emanuel Merck Award for Analytical Science 2022

Since 1988, Merck KGaA, Darmstadt has endowed the Heinrich-Emanuel-Merck Award for Analytical Science worth 15,000 EUR.

The award is intended for chemists up to the age of 45 at the time of the application deadline, working on the development of new analytical methods and their applications in areas of human interest. Their work should be directed towards the improvement of our conditions of life, providing solutions to analytical problems in the areas of life sciences, material sciences or environmental sciences.

The prize will be awarded at a special award ceremony at the EuroFAST2022, Nijmegen/the Netherlands, April 19–22, 2022.

The evaluation will be performed by a jury of 5 internationally recognized analytical scientists, chaired by Professor R. Zenobi, ETH Zurich.

Applications/nominations should be submitted until 31 December 2021 to:
Professor Dr Renato Zenobi
ETH Zurich
Laboratory of Organic Chemistry
HCI E 329
CH-8093 Zürich, Switzerland
E-Mail: zenobi@org.chem.ethz.ch

Self-applications are explicitly encouraged, as are nominations by a department, colleague or society.

Applications – preferably in English – must contain a brief scientific curriculum vitae including the applicant’s age and be based on one original paper that contains own research results, published within the last 3 years.

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Bioanalytical tools for enabling precision medicine – themed collection now published

The new themed collection Bioanalytical tools for enabling precision medicine for Analyst is now published.

The collection consists of papers and reviews on bioanalytical tools for enabling precision medicine. The field of healthcare continues to move from the inefficient, one-size-fits-all-patients medicine of today, toward the data-driven and personalised medicine of tomorrow. Articles in this collection cover bioanalytical tools for enabling precision medicine, including imaging, spectroscopy, machine learning and miniaturised technologies on both solid tumours and liquid biopsy samples. The focus of this collection is not limited to cancer but is relevant to other diseases such as cystic fibrosis, diabetes and infectious diseases.

This collection is co-guest edited by Analyst Advisory Board member Professor Steven Soper (The University of Kansas, Lawrence, USA) and Professor Andrew Godwin (Director, Molecular Oncology, The University of Kansas Medical Center, USA).

These articles will be *free to read until 10th November 2021

We hope you enjoy the collection!

Why not submit your high impact research to Analyst today?

*Access is free through an RSC account (free to register)

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Dr Prakash Chandra Mondal: New Analyst Advisory Board Member

We are pleased to welcome Dr Prakash Chandra Mondal (Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, India) to the Analyst Advisory Board.


Dr. Mondal’s research interests lie at the interface of chemistry, physics, and biology, creating new multifunctional molecular nanofilms that are suitable for studying charge-transport phenomena under a series of external stimuli such as solvents, electric and magnetic fields and thermal effects. He completed doctoral study on “surface chemistry of photo and electroactive metal-polypyridyl complexes” and obtained his PhD at the University of Delhi (India) in 2013.

Subsequently, he moved to the Weizmann Institute of Science (Israel) to join Professor Ron Naaman’s research group for his postdoctoral work, where he studied spin-dependent electrochemical charge-transfer processes in chiral molecules embedded on ferromagnetic electrodes. In 2016, he joined Professor Richard McCreery’s Group at the National Institute for Nanotechnology (Canada), focusing on carbon-based molecular electronics. He was a Marie-Curie post-doctoral fellow (November 2017–March 2019) and worked with Professor Eugenio Coronado at ICMoL, the University of Valencia (Spain) prior to joining the Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur (India) as an Assistant Professor in April 2019.

More details about the research activity of the Mondal group can be found here.

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Emerging Investigator Series – Rebecca Whelan

Analyst is delighted to introduce our latest Emerging Investigator, Rebecca Whelan! You can read Dr Whelan’s paper, Affinity-free enrichment and mass spectrometry analysis of the ovarian cancer biomarker CA125 (MUC16) from patient-derived ascites, and find out more about her in the interview below!


Rebecca Whelan was born and raised in various small Wisconsin towns. She earned her B.A. with a double major in Chemistry and English from Lawrence University in Appleton, WI. She then moved west, joining Dick Zare’s lab at Stanford University for graduate work. Her focus there was the development of biosensor detectors for capillary electrophoresis (CE) separations. CE separations and affinity recognition remained core themes during her postdoc with Bob Kennedy at the University of Michigan and the start of her independent career at Oberlin College. Rebecca established a vigorous bioanalytical chemistry research program centered on undergraduate scholars at Oberlin and remained there for 14 years. She was excited to have the chance to relocate to the University of Notre Dame in August 2018. The Whelan lab at Notre Dame works in bioanalytical chemistry, using molecular recognition, small-scale separations, and mass spectrometry to characterize and detect ovarian cancer biomarkers.


  1. Your recent Emerging Investigator Series paper focuses on analysis of an ovarian cancer biomarker, using mass spectrometry. How has your research evolved from your first article to this most recent article?

Our first article on using mass spectrometry to analyse ovarian cancer biomarker CA125 (MUC16) was a method development paper, in which we showed the compatibility of suspension trapping with this large mucin protein (Anal Bioanal Chem, 2020, 412, 6361-6370). That study used two commercially available sources of CA125, one being a truncated variant expressed in CHO cells, and the other being full-length protein isolated from pooled human biofluids. The innovation in this most recent paper is analysing the CA125 isolated from the biofluids of individual ovarian cancer patients.

 

  1. What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?

We are excited—and humbled—by the opportunity to continue working with samples from individuals with ovarian cancer. As we apply our bottom-up proteomics analysis strategy to samples derived from a larger number of individuals, we will look both for what is shared among samples and what is unique to individuals. The possibility of breaking through the current paradigm of how CA125 is detected to find a personalized CA125 signature that is detectable by mass spectrometry is very exciting to us. Such an innovation would generate new opportunities in personalized care for this serious disease. At the same time, we will continue to push the analytical performance of our method, lowering the limit of detection and improving quantitation through targeted analysis.

 

  1. In your opinion, what is the biggest advantage to using a mass spectrometry based assay, over other possible methods of analysis?

CA125 is currently detected through an immunoassay that has remain largely unchanged for decades. As with any immunoassay, what the assay really detects is an epitope, which in this case is mostly likely a discontinuous peptide sequence. Amazingly, the epitopes of CA125 have not been definitively identified (although we, and others, are actively working on that!) We wondered: what if some CA125 proteoforms in a patient’s blood happen to contain fewer epitopes, or happen to present epitopes in configurations that are not detectable by the immunoassay? Such samples would be incorrectly assessed as containing less CA125 than they actually do, which could have significant clinical implications. Mass spectrometry side-steps this dependence on epitope recognition completely.

 

  1. What do you find most challenging about your research?

CA125 (MUC16) is a challenging analyte. It’s the second-largest protein in the human body, with a variable molecular weight of 3 to 5 MDa, depending on its glycosylation. Like many other mucin proteins, it’s sticky: after all, one of its biological functions is to make mucus! In practical terms, this large size and stickiness means that if you aren’t careful, the protein will adsorb irreversibly to tips and tubes while also sticking to itself. In previous work, my group used this stickiness to advantage, performing aptamer selection inside tubes to which CA125 had adsorbed (J. Nucleic Acids, 2017, Article ID 9879135, 9 pages). For quantitation, however, the stickiness poses an obstacle that must be overcome. In addition to the analyte’s innate challenge, we work with a challenging sample matrix: crude human biofluid is our starting material. Any analyst who has tried to transition an assay from well-controlled conditions (commercially available analyte dissolved in buffer) to real-life samples knows that complexity and challenge abound in the real world. We firmly believe, however, that analytical researchers must strive to work within this complexity, because that it how real benefit to human health can be achieved.

 

  1. At which upcoming conferences or events may our readers meet you?

Naviya Schuster-Little—the graduate student who is first author on this paper—will be presenting at Pittcon 2021 in a virtual session (Tuesday, March 9, 8:30 am – 8:50 am) and would love to hear your feedback and answer your questions! I am a devoted attendee of the Midwestern Universities Analytical Chemistry Conference (MUACC) and the Gordon Research Conference on Bioanalytical Sensors, as well as Pittcon.

 

  1. How do you spend your spare time?

Music is a big part of my life. I’ve had several stints as a DJ on college radio stations in cities where I’ve lived, including Appleton, Wisconsin (WLFM) and Oberlin, Ohio (WOBC). I also love to cook (vegetarian, mostly) and go on rambles in places both familiar and unfamiliar.

 

  1. Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?

I’m from a family of educators and can’t imagine a life that does not involve teaching in some capacity. As an undergraduate, I completed an English major as well as a Chemistry major and edited my college’s literary magazine. After college, I seriously considered earning a PhD in 17th century English literature (I love John Donne!) or an MFA in poetry. So maybe I would be a teacher of writing or literature.


If you are interested in reading other articles from the Emerging Investigator Series, you can find them here.

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Congratulations to Analyst Associate Editor, Jaebum Choo!

Analyst would like to offer congratulations to our Associate Editor, Jaebum Choo (Chung-Ang University), for his achievement winning the Taikyue Ree Academic Award, presented by the Korean Chemical Society.

Jaebum Choo is a Professor in the Department of Chemistry at Chung-Ang University. He obtained a PhD in Molecular Spectroscopy at Texas A&M University in 1994. From 1995-2019, he was a faculty member of Hanyang University. He was a Director of the “Center for Integrated Human Sensing System” (ERC, 2009-2013) and a BK21+ Director of Bionano Fusion Technology Program (2013-2019) supported by National Research Foundation of Korea. Professor Choo became a Baik Nam Distinguished Professor in 2015 due to his excellent academic achievements. His main research areas are SERS, biosensors, micro-devices and molecular spectroscopy. His current research programs are centered on the development of highly sensitive optical nano-sensor systems for rapid and sensitive in vitro diagnostics.Jaebum Choo

Please join us in offering our sincere congratulations to Jaebum!

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Top 10 Most Accessed Analyst Articles – April – June 2019

The following Analyst articles from the last 12 months were the top 10 most read from April – June 2019.

All the articles have been made free to access for the next month. Take a look and let us know what you think, either here or on twitter @analystrsc.

 

Reviews

Review: a comprehensive summary of a decade development of the recombinase polymerase amplification

Jia Li, Joanne Macdonald and Felix von Stetten

Analyst, 2019,144, 31-67

DOI: 10.1039/C8AN01621F

 

Advances in mass spectrometry based single-cell metabolomics

Kyle D. Duncan, Jonas Fyrestam and Ingela Lanekoff

Analyst, 2019,144, 782-793

DOI: 10.1039/C8AN01581C

 

A review of sorting, separation and isolation of cells and microbeads for biomedical applications: microfluidic approaches

Arash Dalili, Ehsan Samiei and Mina Hoorfar

Analyst, 2019,144, 87-113

DOI: 10.1039/C8AN01061G

 

Advances in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates for lipid and protein characterization: sensing and beyond

Ian Bruzas, William Lum, Zohre Gorunmez and Laura Sagle

Analyst, 2018,143, 3990-4008

DOI: 10.1039/C8AN00606G

 

Partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) for classification of high-dimensional (HD) data: a review of contemporary practice strategies and knowledge gaps

Loong Chuen Lee, Choong-Yuen Liong and Abdul Aziz Jemain

Analyst, 2018,143, 3526-3539

DOI: 10.1039/C8AN00599K

 

Advancing single-cell proteomics and metabolomics with microfluidic technologies

Yifan Liu, Xuyue Chen, Yiqiu Zhang and Jian Liu

Analyst, 2019,144, 846-858

DOI: 10.1039/C8AN01503A

 

Papers

Merging metabolomics and lipidomics into one analytical run

Michaela Schwaiger, Harald Schoeny, Yasin El Abiead, Gerrit Hermann, Evelyn Rampler, and Gunda Koellensperger

Analyst, 2019,144, 220-229

DOI: 10.1039/C8AN01219A

 

Near-infrared fluorescent aza-BODIPY dyes for sensing and imaging of pH from the neutral to highly alkaline range

Christoph Staudinger, Johanna Breininger, Ingo Klimant and Sergey M. Borisov

Analyst, 2019,144, 2393-2402

DOI: 10.1039/C9AN00118B

 

A near-infrared fluorescent probe for evaluating endogenous hydrogen peroxide during ischemia/reperfusion injury

Runfeng Xu, Yue Wang, Huiyan You, Liangwei Zhang, Yunqing Wang and Lingxin Chen

Analyst, 2019,144, 2556-2564

DOI: 10.1039/C9AN00243J

 

Qualitative analysis of antibody–drug conjugates (ADCs): an experimental comparison of analytical techniques of cysteine-linked ADCs

Malin Källsten, Rafael Hartmann, Konstantin Artemenko, Sara Bergstrӧm Lind, Fredrik Lehmann and Jonas Bergquist

Analyst, 2018,143, 5487-5496

DOI: 10.1039/C8AN01178H

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Congratulations to poster prize winners at The 21st Australia and New Zealand Electrochemistry Symposium

The 21st Australia and New Zealand Electrochemistry Symposium was held on Tuesday 30th April at Queensland University of Technology, Australia.

The symposium was a huge success, with many fantastic posters being presented. The RSC sponsored five posters for the event, with Analyst Associate Editor Professor Damien Arrigan presenting each of the winners with their certificiates,

And the winners are…

Mostafa Kamul Masud

William Adamson

Sashini Hapuarachchi

Luke Gundry

Chen Jia

 

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Analyst themed issue on Next wave advances in single cell analyses

We are delighted to draw your attention to the recent Analyst themed issue highlighting work on next wave advances in single cell analyses focusing on emerging analytical advances in metabolomic, lipidomic, proteomic, and glycomic approaches – as well as high-dimensional approaches that unify multiple aspects of single-cell biology and medicine.

This collection was put together by Guest Editors Takehiko Kitamori (University of Tokyo, Japan), Amy E. Herr (University of California, Berkeley, USA), Ulf Landegren (Uppsala University, Sweden) and Masood Kamali-Moghaddam (Uppsala University, Sweden), who worked hard to create this issue and ensure that its content was of the highest quality. An Editorial by the Guest Editors prefaces the collection.

Read the full collection now: http://rsc.li/advances-in-single-cell-analyses

All papers in the collection are free to access until the end of May 2019 with an RSC Publishing Account.

We hope you enjoy reading the full collection. Take a look at a small selection of excellent articles featured in the collection below:

Critical Review
High throughput screening of complex biological samples with mass spectrometry – from bulk measurements to single cell analysis

Emily E. Kempa, Katherine A. Hollywood, Clive A. Smith and Perdita E. Barran

Minireview
Recent advances in single cell manipulation and biochemical analysis on microfluidics

Dan Gao, Feng Jin, Min Zhou and Yuyang Jiang

Minireview
Advances in mass spectrometry based single-cell metabolomics

Kyle D. Duncan, Jonas Fyrestam and Ingela Lanekoff

Paper
Gel-based cell manipulation method for isolation and genotyping of single-adherent cells

Ryo Negishi, Reito Iwata, Tsuyoshi Tanaka, David Kisailus, Yoshiaki Maeda, Tadashi Matsunaga and Tomoko Yoshino

Paper
Dual cationic–anionic profiling of metabolites in a single identified cell in a live Xenopus laevis embryo by microprobe CE-ESI-MS

Erika P. Portero and Peter Nemes

 

Keep up to date with Analyst throughout the year by signing up for free table of contents alerts and monthly e-newsletters.

 

Versatile electrochemistry approaches themed collection – Submit now

Bioanalytical tools for enabling precision medicine themed collection – Submit now

SPEC2018: International Society of Clinical Spectroscopy themed issue – Read now

Analyst Emerging Investigator SeriesApply now

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SciX 2018, Atlanta, USA

SciX 2018, a conference featuring cutting edge developments in analytical sciences, instrumentation and unique applications, was held in Altanta, GA from October 21-26, 2018.

 

Award-Winning Scientists

The Analyst Emerging Investigator Lectureship 2018 recognizes an early career analytical scientist to raise the profile of the analytical sciences to the wider scientific community and general public. This year’s winner was Dr Wei Min, Columbia University, USA. His current research interests focus on developing novel optical spectroscopy and microscopy technology to address biomedical problems. In particular, his group has made important contributions to the development of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy and its broad application in biomedical imaging including bioorthogonal chemical imaging of small molecules and super-multiplex vibrational imaging.

Wei Min presents his Analyst Emerging Investigator Lecture

 

Analyst Chair Duncan Graham presents Wei Min with the Analyst Emerging Investigator Lectureship in Atlanta, USA

 

Wei gave a fascinating presentation during the Monday morning session, which was followed by a highly attended symposium of personally hand-picked speakers.

Symposium speakers: Juergen Popp, Duncan Graham, Richard Zare, Wei Min, Lingyan Shi, Katsumasa Fujita.

 

Congratulations Wei!

 

It also gives us great pleasure to announce that Analytical Methods Associate Editor Michael Roper and former Analytical Methods Editor-in-Chief Sue Lunte both received awards at SciX 2018.

Michael Roper was the recipient of the AES Mid-Career Award. After being presented with his award, Michael delivered a plenary lecture titled  “Electrophoretic Methods for Investigating Dynamic Behaviour of Pancreatic Cells”.

Analytical Methods Associate Editor Michael Roper (L) receives the AES Mid-Career Award.

 

The ANACHEM Award was awarded to Sue Lunte, who delivered her plenary lecture “Adventures in Electrically Driven Miniaturized Separations Systems for Bioanalysis” on Thursday 25th October.

Analytical Methods former Editor-in-Chief Sue Lunte (R) is presented with the ANACHEM Award by Professor Dana Spence.

 

We are extremely proud of Michael and Sue. Congratulations on well-deserved awards.

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Simple polymer tongue can taste the difference

Scientists in Germany have designed a simple polymer that can be used in a sensor to distinguish between similar fruit juices.

Sensors that analyse food, drink and drugs are important for quality control and preventing fraud. Chemo-optical sensors, or tongues, already exist for testing wine, coffee, whiskey and other beverages. Due to the complex nature of these samples, the tongues comprise a number of sensors, which undergo structural changes to provide a colour or fluorescence pattern in the presence of various analytes. Chemometric techniques then analyse the pattern, reporting the distinct ‘taste’ for each product.

Read the full article in Chemistry World >>>

This paper is free to access until 5th April, 2017:

Poly(p-phenyleneethynylene)-based tongues discriminate fruit juices
Jinsong Han, Benhua Wang, Markus Bender, Kai Seehafera and Uwe H.F. Bunz
Analyst, 2017,142, 537-543
DOI: 10.1039/C6AN02387H

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