Archive for the ‘Web theme issues’ Category

Nucleic Acids: new life, new materials – web themed issue now published!

Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry, ChemComm and RSC Advances are delighted to announce the publication of a timely web collection on:

Nucleic Acids: new life, new materials

Guest-edited by:

Michael Gait (MRC, Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK) Nadrian Seeman (New York University, USA)
Makoto Komiyama (University of Tsukuba, Japan) Oliver Seitz (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany)
David Liu (Harvard University, USA) Jason Mickelfield (University of Manchester, UK)


Through over 70 communications, full papers, feature articles and perspectives, this collection guides the reader through the most recent and exciting findings in nucleic acids research and applications in emerging areas.

Some of the work presented in this virtual collection is also dedicated to the memory of Professor Har Gobind Khorana (1922 – 2011) and Dr Daniel McGillivray Brown (1923 – 2012) acknowledging their legacy to the nucleic acids community.

“The ingenuity of nucleic acids chemists is formidable, particularly in the newly emerging areas involving DNA architecture combined with novel chemical modifications and material composites. This web collection nicely showcases this potential.”
Read this and more in the guest-editors’ Editorial for the issue


As a taster, this collection of articles includes:

Pyridostatin analogues promote telomere dysfunction and long-term growth inhibition in human cancer cells
Sebastian Müller, Deborah A. Sanders, Marco Di Antonio, Stephanos Matsis, Jean-François Riou, Raphaël Rodriguez and Shankar Balasubramanian
Org. Biomol. Chem., DOI: 10.1039/C2OB25830G, Paper

A clocked finite state machine built from DNA
Cristina Costa Santini, Jonathan Bath, Andy M. Tyrrell and Andrew J. Turberfield
Chem. Commun., DOI: 10.1039/C2CC37227D

Theoretical model of substrate-assisted self-assembly of DNA nanostructures
Shogo Hamada and Satoshi Murata
RSC Adv., DOI: 10.1039/C2RA20764H

Reduction of metal ions by boranephosphonate DNA
Subhadeep Roy, Magdalena Olesiak, Petra Padar, Heather McCuen and Marvin H. Caruthers
Org. Biomol. Chem., DOI: 10.1039/C2OB26661J

Dehydration from conserved stem regions is fundamental for ligand-dependent conformational transition of the adenine-specific riboswitch
Vinit Kumar, Tamaki Endoh, Kentaro Murakami and Naoki Sugimoto
Chem. Commun., DOI: 10.1039/C2CC34506D

DNA glycoclusters and DNA-based carbohydrate microarrays: From design to applications
François Morvan, Sébastien Vidal, Eliane Souteyrand, Yann Chevolot and Jean-Jacques Vasseur
RSC Adv., DOI: 10.1039/C2RA21550K

The bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP: probing interactions with protein and RNA binding partners using cyclic dinucleotide analogs
Carly A. Shanahan and Scott A. Strobel
Org. Biomol. Chem., DOI: 10.1039/C2OB26724A

A DNA based five-state switch with programmed reversibility
Jonathan R. Burns, Søren Preus, Daniel G. Singleton and Eugen Stulz
Chem. Commun., DOI: 10.1039/C2CC35799B

Two-photon excitation of the fluorescent nucleobase analogues 2-AP and tC
R. S. K. Lane and S. W. Magennis
RSC Adv., DOI: 10.1039/C2RA21881J

…and many more.

We hope that you will find this collection enjoyable and stimulating to read!

Please feel free to send the link to the issue to other researchers who you think may be interested.

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Check out our Foldamer Chemistry web themed issue

The Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry web theme issue focussing on the exciting area of foldamer chemistry is now available for you to access, with 21 articles for you to read, 4 of which have so far appeared on the covers of issues.

Here are some of the popular articles that others have been reading:

Regio- and diastereoselective fluorination of alicyclic β-amino acids
Loránd Kiss, Enikő Forró, Santos Fustero and Ferenc Fülöp
Org. Biomol. Chem., 2011, 9, 6528-6534
DOI: 10.1039/C1OB05648D

Conformational stability of collagen triple helices functionalized in the Yaa position by click chemistry
Roman S. Erdmann and Helma Wennemers
Org. Biomol. Chem., 2012, 10, 1982-1986
DOI: 10.1039/C2OB06720J

Stereoselective preparation of β,γ-methano-GABA derivatives
David J. Aitken, Ludovic Drouin, Sarah Goretta, Régis Guillot, Jean Ollivier and Marco Spiga
Org. Biomol. Chem., 2011, 9, 7517-7524
DOI: 10.1039/C1OB06095C

Design and synthesis of trans-3-aminopyran-2-carboxylic acid (APyC) and α/β-peptides with 9/11-helix
Gangavaram V. M. Sharma, Kodeti Srinivas Reddy, Shaik Jeelani Basha, Kondreddi Ravinder Reddy and Akella V. S. Sarma
Org. Biomol. Chem., 2011, 9, 8102-8111
DOI: 10.1039/C1OB06279D

To read the rest of this great web themed issue… CLICK HERE

                             What do you think if this area of chemistry? Do you have a favourite article from the collection?
Let us know your thoughts by leaving a comment below.

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Foldamer Chemistry web themed issue now published

Here Prof. Ferenc Fülöp, University of Szeged, gives a brief introduction to Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry‘s Foldamer Chemistry web themed issue:

The syntheses and structural and functional investigations of peptide oligomers that adopt designed compact conformations have become challenging tasks in recent decades. β-Amino acids, among them cyclic β-amino acids, find a broad range of use as building blocks for the preparation of modified analogues of biologically active peptides. The peptidomimetic approach in drug research is of significant potential. Since their discovery, the field of foldamers has come of age as a branch of chemistry, and synthetic self-organizing polymers have infiltrated almost all chemical disciplines, either as tools or as topics of fundamental science.

The interest in foldamers originated in the challenge to mimic the structural behaviour of biomolecules with synthetic sequences. This challenge was quickly answered: beautiful structures and programmable self-organization can be achieved with non-natural molecules. Various synthetic methodologies have led to novel building blocks becoming accessible, and a further source of diversity is the combination of different monomer types within a single sequence. Different amino acid homologues can be coupled in specific patterns (α,β-peptides, β,γ-peptides, etc.), all resulting in novel secondary structure patterns. Moreover, the coupling of aromatic building blocks with aliphatic monomers has been achieved, and short βαγ- and βαδ-peptide sequences have recently been described, which points to the practically limitless number of possible combinations. The building-up of higher-order structures from foldamers is a further great challenge and an important trend in the field. The diversity of peptidic foldamers is currently passing through a ramping-up process at all levels.

The present web themed issue covers the syntheses of β-amino acid monomers, and discusses the syntheses, structural investigations and applications of foldamers.

Click here to see all of the articles in the web themed issue

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Collagen triple helices and click chemisry on the cover of OBC issue 10

Welcome to OBC issue 10!

OBC‘s cover this week features work by Helma Wennemers et al. at the University of Basel (Switzerland), who have used click chemistry to introduce moieties as sterically demanding as monosaccharides into the Yaa position of collagen model peptides, and studied the effect of different triazolyl derivatives as well as the configuration of the functionalized proline residue on the thermal stability of the collagen triple helices.

Conformational stability of collagen triple helices functionalized in the Yaa position by click chemistry

Roman S. Erdmann and Helma Wennemers
Org. Biomol. Chem., 2012, 10, 1982-1986
DOI: 10.1039/C2OB06720J

As with all of our cover articles, it will be FREE to access for the next 6 weeks

This article is part of OBC‘s web-themed issue on Foldamer Chemistry – View the full collection of articles here

The issue also contains:

three ‘Hot Articles’

and that’s just a taster… we hope you enjoy the whole issue!

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HOT article: (D)-sugars from (L)-amino acids – a step closer to understanding the origin of life

A conundrum for anyone studying the prebiotic world is how chirality first occurred, and why D-sugars are the natural isomers, whereas natural amino acids have the L-configuration. In this hot paper Paul Clarke and Christopher Hayes from the Universities of York and Nottingham have shown how carbohydrates could have formed in prebiotic conditions by producing (D)-erythrose and (D)-threose sugars with (L)-amino acid catalysts.

Having first used proline esters to catalyse the aldol reaction of TIPS-protected glycolaldehyde in water with good yields and moderate diastereo- and enantioselectivity, the group hypothesised that other proteinogenic amino acids (i.e. amino acids found in proteins) could also catalyse this reaction.  Using N-methyl derivatives of the amino acid esters of (L)-alanine, (L)-leucine and (L)-valine they were able to produce the expected sugars, but were surprised to see that the (D)-enantiomer was the major product in all reactions. “This offers one potential explanation to account for the relationship between (L)-amino acids and (D)-sugars in nature” concludes Clarke.

This remarkable find has obviously generated a lot of interest in both scientific and the wider press: see articles in The Daily Mail, The Huffington Post, on Science Daily or the press release from University of York.

Asymmetric organocatalytic formation of protected and unprotected tetroses under potentially prebiotic conditions
Laurence Burroughs, Paul A. Clarke, Henrietta Forinto, James A. R. Gilks, Christopher J. Hayes,  Matthew E. Vale , William Wade and Myriam Zbytniewski
DOI: 10.1039/C1OB06798B

This article is also part of our joint web theme issue with ChemComm on Organocatalysis and as with all our hot articles will be free to access for 4 weeks.

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Have you seen our recent review articles? New routes to indoles, carbohydrates for drug discovery, artificial nucleobases & more

During 2011 we published a number of topical reviews on a wide range of topics by expert researchers in their fields.  We’ve collected some of them below but take a look here for the whole list, we hope you’ll find something interesting in your area!

Sequential one-pot combination of multi-component and multi-catalysis cascade reactions: an emerging technology in organic synthesis
Dhevalapally B. Ramachary and Sangeeta Jain
DOI: 10.1039/C0OB00611D

Carbohydrate chemistry in drug discovery
M. Carmen Galan, David Benito-Alifonso and Gregory M. Watt
DOI: 10.1039/C0OB01017K

Recent advances in indole syntheses: New routes for a classic target
Rubén Vicente
DOI: 10.1039/C1OB05750B

Chiral separation by enantioselective liquid–liquid extraction
Boelo Schuur, Bastiaan J. V. Verkuijl, Adriaan J. Minnaard, Johannes G. de Vries, Hero J. Heeres and Ben L. Feringa
DOI: 10.1039/C0OB00610F

Cascade polycyclisations in natural product synthesis
Edward A. Anderson
DOI: 10.1039/C1OB05212H

Targeting DNA base pair mismatch with artificial nucleobases. Advances and perspectives in triple helix strategy
Vincent Malnuit, Maria Duca and Rachid Benhida
DOI: 10.1039/C0OB00418A

Unlocked nucleic acid – an RNA modification with broad potential
Anna Pasternak and Jesper Wengel
DOI: 10.1039/C0OB01085E

Nitrogen cation–π interactions in asymmetric organocatalytic synthesis
Shinji Yamada and John S. Fossey
DOI: 10.1039/C1OB05228D

If you have an idea for a review article that hasn’t been covered and you would like to see included, contact the Editorial Office – we’d love to hear from you.

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HOT: Aquafoldamers as synthetic water channels

In this OBC Hot Paper Huaqiang Zeng and coworkers at the National University of Singapore have studied a series of water-binding aquafoldamers, illustrating their potential use for recognizing larger water clusters of diverse topologies and as synthetic water channels.

 

Reference:
Synthesis, structural investigation and computational modelling of water-binding aquafoldamers
Huaiqing Zhao, Wei Qiang Ong, Xiao Fang, Feng Zhou, Meng Ni Hii, Sam Fong Yau Li, Haibin Su and Huaqiang Zeng
Org. Biomol. Chem., 2012, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C1OB06609A

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HOT: new N-spiro quaternary ammonium salt phase-transfer catalysts from tartaric acid

Mario Waser et al. have designed new N-spiro quaternary ammonium salt-based catalysts from tartaric acid-derived TADDOLs.  The new catalysts catalyse the asymmetric α-alkylation of glycine Schiff bases in good yields and up to 93% ee.

Design, synthesis, and application of tartaric acid derived N-spiro quaternary ammonium salts as chiral phase-transfer catalysts
Mario Waser, Katharina Gratzer, Richard Herchl and Norbert Müller
DOI: 10.1039/C1OB06573D

This article is part of a joint ChemComm & OBC web theme issue on Organocatalysis.

Keep checking this page as further articles are added to the web theme issue.

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HOT: Organocatalytic approach to the enantioselective synthesis of alpha-arylcyclohexenones and derivatives



M. Belén Cid et al. at the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Spain, have devised a simple and efficient organocatalytic approach for the synthesis of alpha-aryl cyclohexenones and cyclohexanones, leading to ee up to 96% and complete diastereoselectivity, via a Michael addition and aldol reaction as key steps.

Highly rated by the reviewers and editorial office alike, this Hot Article will be FREE to access for the next 4 weeks.

This article is also part of a joint ChemComm & OBC web theme issue on Organocatalysis.

Keep checking this page as further articles are added to the web theme issue.

An organocatalytic approach to enantiomerically enriched α-arylcyclohexenones and cyclohexanones
Sara Duce, María Jorge, Inés Alonso, José Luis García Ruano and M. Belén Cid
Org. Biomol. Chem., 2011, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C1OB06356A, Paper
From collection Organocatalysis

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Organocatalysis – announcing a joint ChemComm–OBC web theme

We are delighted to announce a forthcoming ChemCommOrganic & Biomolecular Chemistry (OBC) web themed issue:

Organocatalysis

Guest editors: Keiji Maruoka (Kyoto University), Hisashi Yamamoto (University of Chicago), Liu-Zhu Gong (University of Science and Technology of China) and Benjamin List (Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung)

Submission deadline: 29th February 2012


We are now inviting submissions for this web theme, which will be a celebration of current achievements and future perspectives in this exciting field of research.

ChemComm and OBC are both welcoming urgent communications; OBC also welcomes full papers. Please feel free to submit to either or both journals.

All manuscripts will undergo strict peer review and should be very important and conceptually significant in accord with the ChemComm and OBC mandates.

Publication of the peer-reviewed articles will occur without delay to ensure the timely dissemination of the work. The articles will then be assembled on the RSC Publishing Platform as a web-based thematic issue, to permit readers to consult and download individual contributions from the entire series.

Communications for this web theme can be submitted anytime from now until 29th February using ChemComm’s and OBC’s web submission system. Please add the phrase ‘organocatalysis web theme‘ in the comments to the editor field.

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