Archive for the ‘Board News’ Category

Amy E. Herr – Our New Advisory Board Member!

 

We are delighted to announce our new Advisory Board member – Amy E. Herr!

Amy E. Herr is the Lester John & Lynne Dewar Lloyd Distinguished Professor of Bioengineering at the University of California, Berkeley and a Chan Zuckerberg (CZ) Biohub Investigator. Prior to joining UC Berkeley, she was a staff member at Sandia National Laboratories (Livermore, CA), earned Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University, and completed her B.S. in Engineering and Applied Science with honors from the California Institute of Technology. Her research has been recognized by the NIH New Innovator Award, NSF CAREER Award, Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship (Chemistry), and DARPA Young Faculty Award. Professor Herr has chaired the Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on the Physics & Chemistry of Microfluidics. She is an elected Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE), an entrepreneur, and was recently elected to the US National Academy of Inventors.  Her research program lies at the intersection of engineering design, analytical chemistry, and targeted proteomics – with a recent focus on cytometry spanning fundamental biological to clinical questions.

 

Read Amy’s recent papers in Lab an a Chip:

 

High-selectivity cytology via lab-on-a-disc western blotting of individual cells

John J. Kim, Elly Sinkala and Amy E. Herr

A lateral electrophoretic flow diagnostic assay

Robert Lin, Arunan Skandarajah, Rachel E. Gerver, Hector D. Neira, Daniel A. Fletcher and Amy E. Herr

 

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Hang Lu- Our new Associate Editor


We are delighted to announce our new Associate Editor – Hang Lu!

Hang Lu is the Love Family Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Georgia Tech. She graduated summa cum laude from UIUC with a B.S. in Chemical Engineering, and obtained her Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering in 2003 from MIT working with Klavs Jensen and Martin Schmidt. Before starting at Georgia Tech in 2005, she was a postdoc with neurogeneticist Cori Bargmann at UCSF and Rockefeller U. Her current research interests are microfluidics and its applications in neurobiology, systems biology, cancer, and biotechnology.

Hang has previously been a member of the Lab on a Chip Advisory Board. You can read some of her recent publications in the Journal below.

 

Hang will be handling papers from 1st February 2017, so submit your best work to her!

 

Hydrogel-droplet microfluidic platform for high-resolution imaging and sorting of early larval Caenorhabditis elegans

Auillaume Aubry, Mei Zhan and Hang Lu

An automated programmable platform enabling multiplex dynamic stimuli delivery and cellular response monitoring for high-throughput suspension single-cell signaling studies

Luye He, Ariel Kniss, Adriana San-Miguel, Tel Rouse, Melissa L. Kemp and Hang Lu

 

 

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New Lab on a Chip Associate Editor: Joel Voldman

We are very pleased to announce our newest Associate Editor – Joel Voldman!

Joel is a Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, MA. His research is at the intersection of biology and microtechnology, applying microfabrication technology to illuminate biological systems, especially at the cellular level. His group develops technologies that enhance or enable the acquisition of information from cells. Joel’s work builds upon various disciplines: electrical engineering, microfabrication, bioengineering, surface science, fluid mechanics and mass transport. He takes a quantitative approach to designing  technology, using both analytical and numerical modelling to gain fundamental understanding of the technologies.  You can find out more about Joel’s research on his homepageJoel adds “Having been a reader of and contributor to Lab on a Chip since its inception, I am looking forward to helping the journal and the microfluidics community to publish the best microfluidics research here.

Joel will be handling papers from 1 January 2017, so submit your best work to him!

Read Joel’s recent Lab on a Chip paper which was also featured in Chemistry World:

Monitoring sepsis using electrical cell profiling
Javier Prieto, Hao-Wei Su, Han Wei Hou, Miguel Pinilla Vera, Bruce Levy, Rebecca Baron, Jongyoon Han and Joel Voldman
Lab Chip, 2016, 16, 4333-4340
DOI: 10.1039/C6LC00940A

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Abraham (Abe) Lee – Our new Editor-in-Chief

Lab on a Chip is delighted to announce Professor Abe Lee as its new Editor-in-Chief.

Abraham (Abe) Lee is the William J. Link Professor and Chair of the Biomedical Engineering (BME) Department with an appointment also in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE) at the University of California, Irvine in the USA.  He also serves as the Director of the “Center for Advanced Design & Manufacturing of Integrated Microfluidics” (CADMIM), an NSF I/UCRC currently with more than 10 industrial members.  Over his career, Abe has developed a series of lab-on-a-chip devices for biomedical and biotechnological applications.  His current research focuses on the development of active integrated microfluidics and droplet microfluidic platforms for the following applications:  point-of-care and molecular diagnostics, “smart” theranostic microparticles for early detection and treatment, sample preparation for cell sorting and enrichment, single cell processing and analysis, and organ-on-chip devices for drug screening.  His research has also contributed to the founding of several start-up companies.

Abe takes on the he role from Professor George Whitesides, our previous Editor-in-Chief to whom we are extremely grateful for his vision and leadership throughout a period of continued success for the journal. Abe was the first Lab on a Chip Associate Editor who started handling papers in 2011 and now we look forward to working with him as the Editor-in-Chief of the journal towards an even more dynamic and exciting future for Lab on a Chip! Abe adds “I am humbled and honoured to take on the role of Editor-in-Chief for Lab on a Chip.  Now in its 16th year, Lab on a Chip is built on the pioneering visions of “giants of miniaturization”, most notably the founding Managing Editor Harp Minhas and Editor-in-Chief Andreas Manz, followed by George Whitesides’ leadership the last 5 years. The journal has soundly established itself as the leading journal for micro- and nano-scale science and technologies towards the ultimate goal of miniaturizing, accelerating and automating chemical and biological laboratory processes on a “chip-scale” platform. As I assume my new position and announce our new scope, I would like to take this opportunity to wish you a most fulfilling New Year in 2017. ” More details on the revised scope of Lab on a Chip are on the journal webpage.

 

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Introducing our new Lab on a Chip Advisory Board members

We are delighted to welcome our new Advisory Board members!

Yoshinobu Baba – Nagoya University

Yoshinobu is a Professor in the Department of Advanced Medical Science Graduate School of Medicine at Nagoya University. His major area of interest is nanobiosicence and nanobiotechnology for omics, systems biology, cancer diagnosis, cancer therapy regenerative medicine, and molecular in vivo imaging.

Jean-Christophe Baret – University of Bordeaux, France

Jean-Christophe is a Professor at the University of Bordeaux. His research group focuses on the fundamental study of interfaces in liquid systems through the dynamics of droplets, bubbles and emulsions.

Anja Boisen – Technical University of Denmark, Denmark

Anja is a Professor in the Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology at the Technical University of Denmark.  Her research group focuses on development and application of micro and nano mechanical sensors and microfabricated solutions for oral drug delivery. The group also explores integration of micro and nano sensors onto centrifugal microfluidic platforms.

Qun Fang – Zhejiang University

Qun is a Qiushi Distinguished Professor in the Department of Chemistry at Zhejiang University, and the Director of Institute of Microanalytical Systems at Zhejiang University. His research interests include microfluidic analysis, capillary electrophoresis, flow injection analysis, and miniaturization of analytical instruments, especially the development of automated and high-throughput droplet-based microfluidic analysis and screening techniques.

Martin A. M Gijs – EPFL, Switzerland

Martin is Professor in the School of Engineering at EPFL and Head of the Laboratory of Microsystems. His present interests are in developing technologies for novel magnetic devices, new microfabrication technologies for microsystems fabrication in general and the development and use of microsystems technologies for microfluidic and biomedical applications in particular.

Noo Li Jeon – Seoul National University, South Korea

Noo Li is a Professor at the School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University. His research group use cell culture and microfluidic techniques to investigate biological processes.

Gwo-Bin Lee – National Tsing Hua University

Gwo-Bin is a Professor at the National Tsing Hua University. His research interests are on nano-biotechnology, micro/nanofluidics and their biomedical applications. He is currently developing integrated micro/nano systems incorporated with nano/biotechnology for a variety of applications, including fast diagnosis of infectious diseases, screening of biomarkers for cancer and cardiovascular diseases, and optofluidics.

Hang Lu – Georgia Institute of Technology, USA

Hang is a Professor at the School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology. Her research group work at the interface of engineering and biology. They engineer BioMEMS and microfluidic devices to address questions across a variety of disciplines.

Adrian Neild – Monash University, Australia

Adrian is an Associate Professor and Director of Research in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department at Monash University. His research interest are focused on non-linear ultrasound including acoustic radiation forces and acoustic streaming as well as viscosity, microfluidic systems, micron-scale particle and biological cell handling, air-coupled ultrasound, transducer design, non-destructive testing, and finite-element analysis.

Nicole Pamme – University of Hull, UK

Nicole is a Professor in Analytical Chemistry at the University of Hull. Following her PhD, where she worked on single particle analysis in microfluidic chips, Nicole spent a year in Japan, working as an independent research fellow in the International Centre for Young Scientists (ICYS) at the National Institute for Materials Science. She has been at the University of Hull since 2005 and is currently Director of Research.

Sámuel Sánchez – Institute of Bioengineering of Catalonia, Spain

Sámuel leads the lab-in-a-tube and nanorobotic biosensors research group at the Institute of Bioengineering of Catalonia. His research focuses on the design of miniaturized devices that bridge multidisciplinary fields from material science, chemistry and biology. His research group studies a broad range of phenomena occurring at the interface between materials and biology, from fundamental studies to applications.

Anderson Shum – University of Hong Kong, China

Anderson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and the University of Hong Kong. His research area covers microscaled fluid dynamics, biomedical applications of microfluidics, eye-on-a-chip, and all-aqueous microfluidics; and his  main area of expertise include droplet microfluidics, emulsion-templated materials and microscaled interfacial phenomena.

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Introducing our new Lab on a Chip Editorial Board members!

Please join us in welcoming Dino Di Carlo, Piotr Garstecki and Shoji Takeuchi to the Lab on  a Chip Editorial Board!

Dino Di Carlo, University of California at Los Angeles

Dino is Professor and Vice Chair of the Department of Bioengineering and a Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of California at Los Angeles. He also Directs the Cancer Nanotechnology Program of the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. His research group are currently focusing on exploiting unique physics, microenvironment control, and the potential for automation associated with miniaturized systems for applications in basic biology, medical diagnostics, and cellular engineering.

Piotr Garstecki, Polish Academy of Sciences

Piotr is a Professor at the Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences. He currently leads the Research Group of Microfluidics and Complex Fluids. The group conducts research on fundamental aspects of the physics of soft matter systems and develops microfluidic tools for chemistry and biology.


Shoji Takeuchi, University of Tokyo

Shoji is a Professor in the Center for International Research on Integrative Biomedical Systems (CIBiS), Institute of Industrial Science (IIS), University of Tokyo. Since 2008, he has been a director of Collaborative Research Center for Bio/Nano Hybrid Process at IIS. His current research interests include 3D tissue fabrication, implantable devices, artificial cells/lipid bilayer systems, and biohybrid MEMS.

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New Lab on a Chip Associate Editor: Petra S. Dittrich

At Lab on a Chip we are very pleased to announce our newest Associate Editor – Petra Dittrich!

Petra is Associate Professor for Bioanalytics at the Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering. Her research in the field of lab-on-chip-technologies focuses on the miniaturization of high-sensitivity devices for chemical and biological analyses, and microfluidic-aided organization of materials.

Petra’s research group develop miniaturized devices (lab-on-chip technology or microfluidics) for applications in the life sciences. Their interdisciplinary approach combines chemical, physical, biological and engineering aspects of microfluidics-based technology. You can find out more about her research on her homepage: http://www.dittrich.ethz.ch/

Petra is now handling papers so submit your paper to her today!

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Introducing Editorial Board member David Walt

The fifth Introducing series post is all about new Editorial Board member David Walt. We’re very pleased to welcome David to the board and here he introduces his background and research vision:

David R. Walt is Robinson Professor of Chemistry, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Professor of Genetics, and Professor of Oral Medicine at Tufts University and is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor.  Dr. Walt is the Founding Scientist of Illumina, Inc. and has been a Director and Chairman of its Scientific Advisory Board since 1998. Dr. Walt is also the Founding Scientist of Quanterix Corporation and has been a Director and Chairman of its Scientific Advisory Board since 2007. He has received numerous national and international awards and honors for his fundamental and applied work in the field of optical sensors and arrays.  Dr. Walt is a member of the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences. He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.  He received a B.S. in Chemistry from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. in Chemical Biology from Stony Brook University

RESEARCH VISION: “The ability to observe single molecules has become routine as a result of improvements in light sources, detectors, signal processing algorithms, and molecular constructs with built-in amplification.  Single molecule studies enable ultra-sensitive measurements.  After all, one cannot measure things more precisely than by counting molecules.  In contrast to bulk measurements, where millions of molecules or more are observed and only an average result can be obtained, single molecule studies provide the ability to observe the heterogeneities within populations, including rare outliers with unusual properties.  Micro and nanofluidics will be critical technologies to confine single molecules in ultra-small volumes to facilitate their observation and detection.   My laboratory focuses on measuring single molecules and single cells.  Our single molecule work spans fundamental enzymology to ultra-sensitive detection of proteins and nucleic acids.  Single cell studies enable us to observe the distribution of cellular activities in a population that may enable us to elucidate how rare cells lead to diseases such as cancer.  We employ a wide range of tools including microarrays, microwells, microspheres, and microfluidics.”
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Introducing Editorial Board member Mark Gilligan

We’re very happy to welcome new Editorial Board member Mark Gilligan in this week’s Introducing series post. He describes his unusual path from aerospace engineering to commercial successes in developing  microfluidics for an ever-increasing range of applications:

Mark studied Aerospace engineering at Cranfield, and after that worked in both Formula 1 for Benetton and Aerospace for BAe Commercial aircraft. Mark then went on to work for Pitney Bowes in the US developing franking machines and Philips in the Netherlands developing the first DVD drives. Then in 1997 Mark moved to work for a technology consulting consultancy called The Technology Partnership (TTP) and started working on the interfaces between Engineering and Life Sciences. One major project at TTP was called Myriad, and involved working in conjunction with seven pharmaceutical companies to develop highly automated robotic systems for parallel chemistry to make potential drug candidates. The outcome of this project was sold to Mettler Toledo and a new business unit was formed and built with Mark leading the R&D of that new company. Once this company was built in 2000, Mark moved into New Ventures for Mettler, investigating and acquiring businesses in automated chemistry.

In 2001 Mark left Mettler Toledo to found Syrris, which has now grown to be a world leader in cutting edge tools and technologies for synthetic chemistry, including microreactors. As Syrris grew, a number of multipurpose microfluidics technologies were developed and an increasingly diverse range of partners sought to access them. This lead to the formation of Dolomite Microfluidics in 2005, which then won a large UK government grant to create a Microfluidic Application Centre. This trend of starting new brands has carried on and now Mark is the CEO of the Blacktrace Group of companies which includes Syrris, Dolomite and a number of other brands which are all collectively focussed on Productisation of Science.

PRACTICAL MICROFLUIDICS: Mark’s interests specifically in microfluidics are around generating practical real world solutions to make microfluidics become an increasingly commercially successful technology. This is about spotting the common issues across multiple application areas and developing underlying technology and componentry to solve these issues. Together with this component focus, Mark is interested in standards around formats and interconnectivity. Mark is application area agnostic, however, microdroplets are currently a strong theme across a number of areas from molecular biology to food and drug delivery. Mark is focussed on providing workable solutions by designing, developing and arranging manufacture, marketing and sales. However, although Dolomite has its own clean rooms for prototyping of devices, Mark’s team works with many other companies for volume manufacture of microfluidic devices.

Overall,  Mark is passionate about getting new capabilities in science and technology to be used by wider and wider audiences by a focus on practical easy to use development into commercially viable products.

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Introducing Editorial Board Member Holger Becker

For the third post in the Introducing series, here we’re very happy to introduce you to Editorial Board member Holger Becker and his research vision, including the development of lab on a chip technology to marketable products:

Dr Holger Becker is co-founder and CSO of microfluidic ChipShop GmbH. He obtained physics degrees from the University of Western Australia/Perth and the University of Heidelberg in 1990 and 1991 respectively. He started to work on miniaturized systems for chemical analysis during his PhD thesis at the Institute for Applied Physics at Heidelberg University, where he obtained his PhD on miniaturized chemical surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensors in 1995. Between 1995 and 1997 he was a Research Associate at the Department of Chemistry at Imperial College in London with Prof. Andreas Manz. In 1998 he joined Jenoptik Mikrotechnik GmbH where he was responsible for the realisation of a polymer-based microfabrication production line. Since then, he founded and led several companies in the field of microsystem technologies in medicine and the life sciences, for which he was nominated for the German Founder’s Prize in 2004. He lead the Industry Group of the German Physical Society between 2004 and 2009, and is the current chair of the SPIE ‘‘Microfluidics, BioMEMS and Medical Microsystems’’ conference as well as co-chair for MicroTAS 2013. Besides serving on the Editorial Board of “Lab-on-a-Chip”, he is a member of the General Advisory Board of MANCEF (Micro and Nanotechnology Commercialization Education Foundation), the expert panel on “Security Research” of the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology as well as several other advisory boards and is acting as a regular reviewer of project proposals on a national and international level.

 

RESEARCH VISION: As lab-on-a-chip technologies make tremendous progress on their transition from a purely scientific topic to a commercially usable enabling technology, our work in industry concentrates on three main fields: In the area of the design of microfluidic structures, a clear trend towards fully integrated devices, i.e. devices which can perform a complete analytical or diagnostic process from sample input to result output, can be observed. We have over the years developed a microfluidic toolbox which allows a rapid development and validation of such integrated devices. The second field is the development of commercially viable back-end processing technologies. In higher volume production, these processes such as heterogeneous integration of sensors, filters or membranes, assembly, bonding, reagent storage or surface modifications, can make up to 80% of the overall manufacturing cost of a microfluidic device and many solutions which are used by the academic community cannot be scaled to higher volume manufacturing. For a commercial success however, manufacturing cost play a decisive role and research into these processes is therefore vital for the industry. The third field is the adoption of application cases onto a microfluidic platform. In order to run in a miniaturised format, existing protocols and assays have to be modified with respect to reagent composition, volumes, flow rates, timing and other parameters. We have therefore established an application lab with possibilities for processes like biomolecule deposition, reagent lyophilisation, cell culture or real-time PCR to name just a few. In our experience, a successful commercialization of a microfluidic system needs to address all the issues mentioned above in addition to a thorough business planning. It is nice to see that more and more microfluidics-enabled products are making it onto the market.
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