New You Tube Videos

Time Capsule: An autonomous sensor and recorder based on diffusion-reaction 
 
 
  
Wide bandwidth power amplifier for frequency-selective insulator-based dielectrophoresis 
 
 
   
Microfluidic Mixing of Nonpolar Liquids by Contact Charge Electrophoresis 
 
  
 
Controlled stimulation-burst targeted release by smart decentered core-shell microcapsules in gravity and magnetic field 
 
   
On-demand control of microfluidic flow via capillary-tuned solenoid microvalve suction 
 
 
  
Catalytic oxygen production mediated by smart capsules to modulate elastic turbulence under laminar flow regime 
 
 
  
Electrowetting on Dielectrics for Manipulating Oil Drops and Gas Bubbles in Aqueous-Shell Compound Drops 
 
  
 
ElectroTaxis-on-a-Chip (ETC): an Integrated Quantitative High-throughput Screening Platform for Electrical Field-Directed Cell Migration 
 
 
  
A reliable, programmable acoustofluidic pump powered by oscillating sharp-edge structures 
 
  
 
DLD Pillar Shape Design for Efficient Separation of Spherical and Non-spherical Bioparticles 

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Top ten most accessed LOC articles in Q2 2014

This month sees the following articles in Lab on a Chip that are in the top ten most accessed April – June:-

Deformability-based cell classification and enrichment using inertial microfluidics 
Soojung Claire Hur, Nicole K. Henderson-MacLennan, Edward R. B. McCabe and Dino Di Carlo 
Lab Chip, 2011,11, 912-920 
DOI: 10.1039/C0LC00595A 

Microfluidic approaches for cancer cell detection, characterization, and separation 
Jian Chen, Jason Li and Yu Sun    
Lab Chip, 2012,12, 1753-1767 
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC21273K 
 
Recent advances in microfluidic techniques for single-cell biophysical characterization 
Yi Zheng, John Nguyen, Yuan Wei and Yu Sun    
Lab Chip, 2013,13, 2464-2483 
DOI: 10.1039/C3LC50355K 
 
Cell patterning with a heptagon acoustic tweezer – application in neurite guidance 
F. Gesellchen, A. L. Bernassau, T. Déjardin, D. R. S. Cumming and M. O. Riehle    
Lab Chip, 2014,14, 2266-2275 
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00436A 
 
Simple modular systems for generation of droplets on demand 
Krzysztof Churski, Michal Nowacki, Piotr M. Korczyk and Piotr Garstecki    
Lab Chip, 2013,13, 3689-3697 
DOI: 10.1039/C3LC50340B 

Paper-based microfluidic point-of-care diagnostic devices 
Ali Kemal Yetisen, Muhammad Safwan Akram and Christopher R. Lowe    
Lab Chip, 2013,13, 2210-2251 
DOI: 10.1039/C3LC50169H 

Hydrogel bioprinted microchannel networks for vascularization of tissue engineering constructs 
Luiz E. Bertassoni, Martina Cecconi, Vijayan Manoharan, Mehdi Nikkhah, Jesper Hjortnaes, Ana Luiza Cristino, Giada Barabaschi, Danilo Demarchi, Mehmet R. Dokmeci, Yunzhi Yang and Ali Khademhosseini   
Lab Chip, 2014,14, 2202-2211 
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00030G 

A robust diffusion-based gradient generator for dynamic cell assays 
Javier Atencia, Gregory A. Cooksey and Laurie E. Locascio   
Lab Chip, 2012,12, 309-316 
DOI: 10.1039/C1LC20829B 
 
Pneumatic valves in folded 2D and 3D fluidic devices made from plastic films and tapes 
Gregory A. Cooksey and Javier Atencia  
Lab Chip, 2014,14, 1665-1668 
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00173G 

A microfluidic tubing method and its application for controlled synthesis of polymeric nanoparticles 
Jidong Wang, Wenwen Chen, Jiashu Sun, Chao Liu, Qifang Yin, Lu Zhang, Yunlei Xianyu, Xinghua Shi, Guoqing Hu and Xingyu Jiang   
Lab Chip, 2014,14, 1673-1677 
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00080C 
 
Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting an article to Lab on a Chip? Then why not submit to us today or alternatively email us your suggestions

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New YouTube Videos

 A Microfabricated Optofluidic Ring Resonator for Sensitive, High-Speed Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds 
 
Single molecule DNA intercalation in continuous homogenous elongational flow 
 
 
Flow-Scanning Optical Tomography 
 
 
Flow-induced immobilization of glucose oxidase in nonionic micellar nanogels for glucose sensing 
 
 
Continuous Flow C. elegans sorting system with integrated optical fiber detection and laminar flow switching 
 

A soft microchannel decreases polydispersity of droplet generation 
 

Magnetic Steering Control of Multi-Cellular Bio-Hybrid Microswimmers 
 
  
An integrated CMOS quantitative-polymerase-chain-reaction lab-on-chip for point-of-care diagnostics 
 
 
A Smartphone Controlled Handheld Microfluidic Liquid Handling System 
 

Phaseguides as Tunable Passive Microvalves for Liquid Routing in Complex Microfluidic Networks 

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Another three articles make it into the Top 10%

The Top 10% represents our highest impact papers, which demonstrate a breakthrough in device technology or methodology, or demonstrate important new results. The papers included are chosen by our Editor from among the Lab on a Chip HOT articles, which score highly in peer review.

We’ve added four new papers to the Top 10%. Download your copies by clicking the links below…

Research Paper: Human airway musculature on a chip: an in vitro model of allergic asthmatic bronchoconstriction and bronchodilation
Alexander Peyton Nesmith, Ashutosh Agarwal, Megan Laura McCain and Kevin Kit Parker
Lab Chip, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00688G, Paper

Graphical abstract: Human airway musculature on a chip: an in vitro model of allergic asthmatic bronchoconstriction and bronchodilation

Research Paper: On-demand weighing of single dry biological particles over a 5-order-of-magnitude dynamic range
Bin-Da Chan, Kutay Icoz, Wanfeng Huang, Chun-Li Chang and Cagri A. Savran
Lab Chip, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00765D, Paper

Graphical abstract: On-demand weighing of single dry biological particles over a 5-order-of-magnitude dynamic range

Communication: Time Capsule: An autonomous sensor and recorder based on diffusion-reaction

Lukas C Gerber, Liat Rosenfeld, Yunhan Chen and Sindy K Y Tang
Lab Chip, 2014, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00640B, Communication

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Lab on a Chip’s Top 2013 Cited Papers

Here are our papers, published in 2011-2012, that received the highest number of citations in 2013 – free* to access for a limited time only!

In order to celebrate our new Impact Factor of 5.75, the following highly cited articles are free to access until 30th September 2014. Click on the links to download!

Graphical abstract: Commercialization of microfluidic point-of-care diagnostic devicesCommercialization of microfluidic point-of-care diagnostic devices
Curtis D. Chin, Vincent Linder and Samuel K. Sia
Lab Chip, 2012,12, 2118-2134
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC21204H, Critical Review
From themed collection Focus on USA

Microengineered physiological biomimicry: Organs-on-Chips
Dongeun Huh, Yu-suke Torisawa, Geraldine A. Hamilton, Hyun Jung Kim and Donald E. Ingber
Lab Chip, 2012,12, 2156-2164
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40089H, Frontier

Droplet microfluidics for high-throughput biological assays
Mira T. Guo, Assaf Rotem, John A. Heyman and David A. Weitz
Lab Chip, 2012,12, 2146-2155
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC21147E, Critical Review

Human gut-on-a-chip inhabited by microbial flora that experiences intestinal peristalsis-like motions and flow
Hyun Jung Kim, Dongeun Huh, Geraldine Hamilton and Donald E. Ingber
Lab Chip, 2012,12, 2165-2174
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40074J, Paper

Ensembles of engineered cardiac tissues for physiological and pharmacological study: Heart on a chip
Anna Grosberg, Patrick W. Alford, Megan L. McCain and Kevin Kit Parker
Lab Chip, 2011,11, 4165-4173
DOI: 10.1039/C1LC20557A, Paper

Pinched flow coupled shear-modulated inertial microfluidics for high-throughput rare blood cell separation
Ali Asgar S. Bhagat, Han Wei Hou, Leon D. Li, Chwee Teck Lim and Jongyoon Han
Lab Chip2011,11, 1870-1878
DOI: 10.1039/C0LC00633E, Paper

Deformability-based cell classification and enrichment using inertial microfluidics
Soojung Claire Hur, Nicole K. Henderson-MacLennan, Edward R. B. McCabe and Dino Di Carlo
Lab Chip, 2011,11, 912-920
DOI: 10.1039/C0LC00595A, Paper

Microfluidic fabrication of microengineered hydrogels and their application in tissue engineering
Bong Geun Chung, Kwang-Ho Lee, Ali Khademhosseini and Sang-Hoon Lee
Lab Chip, 2012,12, 45-59
DOI: 10.1039/C1LC20859D, Critical Review

Automated cellular sample preparation using a Centrifuge-on-a-Chip
Albert J. Mach, Jae Hyun Kim, Armin Arshi, Soojung Claire Hur and Dino Di Carlo
Lab Chip, 2011,11, 2827-2834
DOI: 10.1039/C1LC20330D, Paper

Tumour cell identification by means of Raman spectroscopy in combination with optical traps and microfluidic environments
Sebastian Dochow, Christoph Krafft, Ute Neugebauer, Thomas Bocklitz, Thomas Henkel, Günter Mayer, Jens Albert and Jürgen Popp
Lab Chip, 2011,11, 1484-1490
DOI: 10.1039/C0LC00612B, Paper

*Access is free through a registered RSC account – click here to register

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New YouTube Videos

Single-Neuron Axonal Pathfinding under Geometric Guidance: Low-Dose-Methylmercury Developmental Neurotoxicity Test 

  

Finger-Powered Microfluidic Systems Using Multilayer Soft Lithography and Injection Molding Processes 

 

Integrated Immunoisolation and Protein Analysis of Circulating Exosomes Using Microfluidic Technology 

 

A microfluidic approach for investigating multicomponent systems thermodynamics at high pressures and temperatures 

On the flow topology inside droplets moving in rectangular microchannels 

 
 
A Microfluidic Linear Node Array for the Study of Protein-Ligand Interaction 

 

Cavity-Induced Microstreaming for Simultaneous On-Chip Pumping and Size-Based Separation of Cells and Particles 

 

Three-dimensional Flash Flow Microreactor for Scale-up Production of Monodisperse PEG-PLGA Nanoparticles 

Visualizing oil displacement with foam in a microfluidic device with permeability contrasts 

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Whole-in-One: one chamber to amplify DNA from single cells

Researchers at Virginia Tech create an elegant device to perform DNA amplification starting from whole cells by taking advantage of diffusivity differences in PCR components.

Diffusion can be friend or foe in the microscale regime, depending on the application. For active mixing, relying on diffusion can lengthen reaction time and thereby decrease reaction efficiency. But for separating reaction products, low ratios of convection to diffusion (Péclet number) enable control over elements based on their diffusivity[1]. Professors Luke Achenie and Chang Lu from the chemical engineering department at Virginia Tech took advantage of this diffusion-enabled control to combine cell lysis and PCR reactions in ‘one pot’ with temporal separation of how components add to the chamber due to diffusivity differences. Separation of cell lysis and DNA amplification steps in PCR is important as many traditional chemical reagents for cell lysis inhibit polymerases used in PCR and Phusion polymerases tolerant to surfactant lysis reagents are incompatible with downstream SYBR green dyes.

The device consists of a single reaction chamber connected on both sides to two separate loading chambers. A hydration line ensures minimal evaporation during the PCR cycle in the main chamber. The loading chambers are opened in sequence to let molecules into the reaction chamber via two-layer control valves. The substantial difference in reagent diffusivity in the lysis and amplification processes allow diffusion gradients to drive molecules from new solutions contacting the reaction chamber and replace reagents from previous steps without disturbing the DNA of interest. Taq polymerase and proteins are two orders of magnitude larger in diffusivity than typical (50 kb) DNA fragments, while primers, dNTPs, and lysis buffers are three orders smaller. Relying solely on diffusion to deliver reagents to the main chamber increases the time of the reaction, but this can be addressed by elevating the temperature or increasing concentration of starting reagents in the loading chambers.

The authors showed the functionality of their device with purified human genomic DNA as well as single cells. This work opens up new capabilities to perform multi-step preparation and amplification assays for DNA in a single chamber starting directly from few cells to a single cell.

Download the full article today – for free*

Diffusion-based microfluidic PCR for “one-pot” analysis of cells

Sai Ma, Despina Nelie Loufakis, Zhenning Cao, Yiwen Chang, Luke E Achenie and Chang Lu
DOI:10.1039/C4LC00498A

References: [1] T. M. Squires and S. R. Quake, Reviews of Modern Physics, 2005, 77, 977.

*Access is free through a registered RSC account until 19th September 2014 – click here to register

About the Webwriter


Sasha is a PhD student in bioengineering working with Professor Beth Pruitt’s Microsystems lab at Stanford University. Her research focuses on evaluating relationships between cell geometry, intracellular structure, and force generation (contractility) in heart muscle cells. Outside the lab, Sasha enjoys hiking, kickboxing, and interactive science outreach.

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Art in Science Competiton


The µTAS 2014 Conference is featuring an art in science competition titled Under the Looking Glass: Art from the World of Small Science

Deadline 25th October 2014

Since the earliest publications of the scientific world, the aesthetic value of scientific illustrations and images has been critical to many researchers. The illustrations and diagrams of earlier scientists such as Galileo and Da Vinci have become iconic symbols of science and the scientific thought process. In current scientific literature, many scientists consider the selection of a publication as a “cover article” in a prestigious journal to be very complimentary.

Are you attending the µTAS 2014 Conference?

Would you like your image to be featured on the cover of Lab on a Chip?

Would you like to win a financial reward?

To draw attention to the aesthetic value in scientific illustration while still conveying scientific merit, NIST and Lab on a Chip are sponsoring this annual award. Applications are encouraged from authors in attendance of the µTAS Conference and the winner will be selected by a panel of senior scientists in the field of µTAS. Applications must show a photograph, micrograph or other accurate representation of a system that would be of interest to the µTAS community and be represented in the final manuscript or presentation given at the Conference. They must also contain a brief caption that describes the illustration’s content and its scientific merit. The winner will be selected on the basis of aesthetic eye appeal, artistic allure and scientific merit. In addition to having the image featured on the cover of Lab on a Chip, the winner will also receive a financial award at the Conference.

Art Award Submission Process – Easy 3 Step Process

Step 1. Sign-In to the Electronic Form Using Your Abstract/Manuscript Number

Step 2. Fill in Remaining Information on Electronic Submission Form

Step 3. Upload Your Image

For full guidelines, have a look on the competition website.

Good Luck!

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2014 Insights Issue

Guest editor, George Whitesides, introduces this series of Insights in Lab on a Chip’s 200th editorial.

Collectively, these Insights demonstrate how the emphasis in LOC science and technology is shifting from foundational areas, such as methods of micofabrication and the physics of microscale flows, to serious explorations of uses and to demonstrations of applications. It is this research that provides the incentive for further and more extensive industrial engineering development and ultimately the incorporation into products. We hope you enjoy reading the collection as much as we did.

Frontiers


Energy: the microfluidic frontier

David Sinton
Lab Chip, 2014, 14, 3127-3134
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00267A


Physics and technological aspects of nanofluidics

Lyderic Bocquet and Patrick Tabeling
Lab Chip, 2014, 14, 3143-3158
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00325J


Smartphone technology can be transformative to the deployment of lab-on-chip diagnostics

David Erickson, Dakota O’Dell, Li Jiang, Vlad Oncescu, Abdurrahman Gumus, Seoho Lee, Matthew Mancuso and Saurabh Mehta
Lab Chip, 2014, 14, 3159-3164
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00142G


Critical Review

Biomedical imaging and sensing using flatbed scanners

Zoltán Göröcs and Aydogan Ozcan
Lab Chip, 2014, 14, 3248-3257
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00530A


Read the full themed collection online today!

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Another four articles make it into the Top 10%

By now you know the Top 10% story. But here’s a quick refresher:

The Top 10% represents our highest impact papers, which demonstrate a breakthrough in device technology or methodology, or demonstrate important new results. The papers included are chosen by our Editor from among the Lab on a Chip HOT articles, which score highly in peer review.

We’ve added four new papers to the Top 10%. Download your copies by clicking the links below…

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