Organ-, Body- and Disease-on-a-Chip Thematic Collection

We are pleased to announce Lab on a Chip‘s first Thematic Collection in 2017, Organ-, Body- and Disease-on-a-Chip!

We are delighted to announce that Michael Shuler (Cornell University, USA) will be acting as Thought Leader for this collection. His research focuses on “Body-on-a-Chip” devices applied to evaluate different treatments for cancer, such as multi-drug resistant cancer. Read Michael Shuler’s recent Editorial for more information.

The questions we aim to address in this collection are whether these emerging technologies will improve both drug development and the regulation of human exposure to chemicals. What technical challenges remain? What will be the most effective way to utilize this emerging technology? Can this technology lead to cost effective, measurable improvements in human health? Our goal is to highlight the new advances in this growing field with an emphasis on the interface between the technological advancements and high impact applications of organ-, body- and disease-on-a-chip technologies.

Interested in submitting to the collection? 

If you are interested in submitting to the series, please get in touch with the Lab on a Chip Editorial Office at loc-rsc@rsc.org and provide us with the following information:

  • A short CV, highlighting your publication record in the area
  • A title and abstract of your proposed submission

Articles will be published as they are accepted and collated into an online Thematic Collection, which will receive extensive promotion. Read the collection so far – rsc.li/organonachip

The final submission deadline is 31st March 2018

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Pioneers of Miniaturization Lectureship 2017

We are delighted to announce that Aaron Wheeler is 2017 winner of the “Pioneers of Miniaturization” Lectureship!

The 12th “Pioneers of Miniaturization” Lectureship, sponsored by Dolomite and Lab on a Chip , is for early to mid-career scientists who have made extraordinary or outstanding contributions to the understanding or development of miniaturised systems.

This “Pioneers of Miniaturization” Lectureship will be presented to Aaron at the µTAS 2017 Conference in Georgia, USA on 22-26 October 2017. Aaron will receive a certificate, a monetary award and will give a short lecture during the conference.

Many congratulations to Professor Aaron Wheeler on this achievement from the Lab on a Chip!

 

About the Winner

Aaron Wheeler earned his PhD in Chemistry at Stanford University in 2003. After a postdoctoral fellowship at UCLA, he joined the faculty at the University of Toronto in 2005, with primary appointment in the Department of Chemistry and cross-appointments in the Institute for Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering and the Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research.

Professor Wheeler has been recognized with a number of honours including the E.W.R. Steacie Memorial Fellowship from the Canadian National Sciences and Engineering Research Council, the Arthur F. Findeis Award from the American Chemical Society, and the Joseph Black Award from the Royal Society of Chemistry. He has authored more than 100 peer-reviewed publications and has served as Associate Editor of Lab on a Chip since 2013.

Wheeler’s research group develops microfluidic tools to solve problems in chemistry, biology, and medicine. A key technology used by the group is digital microfluidics  (DMF), a technique in which fluidic droplets are manipulated on the surface of an array of electrodes coated with a hydrophobic insulator. In recent years DMF has matured into a highly enabling liquid-handling technology which has a strong foothold in several fields ranging from chemical synthesis to clinical sample analysis to tissue engineering.

Learn about the Wheeler group online http://microfluidics.utoronto.ca/ or on twitter at @Wheeler_Lab.

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Droplet-Based Single-Cell Sequencing

We are pleased to announce the latest Thematic Collection in Lab on a ChipDroplet-Based Single-Cell Sequencing!

We are delighted that Lab on a Chip Advisory Board member David A Weitz (Harvard University, USA) is Thought Leader of this collection!

The droplet-based single-cell sequencing field is now advancing very rapidly. Large numbers of studies are underway to collect and explore the new information that is now accessible with single-cell RNA-seq. Improvements to microfluidics are advancing rapidly and extensions to other sequencing methods are also being developed, developing the investigations to probe information beyond mRNA alone. This has rapidly become a burgeoning field, where microfluidic techniques are essential and where droplet-based microfluidics has enabled a major advance.

For more context, please read the editorials “Perspective on droplet-based-single cell sequencing” by David Weitz and “InDrops and Drop-seq technologies for single-cell sequencing” by Allon Klein and Evan Macosko.

The goal of this collection is to highlight the new advances in this growing field, with an emphasis on the interface between the technological advancements and high impact applications of droplet-based single-cell sequencing.

Interested in submitting to the collection?

If you are interested in contributing to the droplet-based single-cell sequencing collection, please get in touch with the Lab on a Chip Editorial Office at loc-rsc@rsc.org and provide the following information:

  • A short CV, highlighting your publication record in this area
  • A title and abstract of your proposed submission

Articles will be published as they are accepted and collated into an online Thematic Collection, which will receive extensive promotion.

Final submission deadline: 30th April 2018 

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New YouTube Videos

Automated and controlled mechanical stimulation and functional imaging in vivo in C. elegans

 
On-chip cell sorting by high-speed local-flow control using dual membrane pumps

 
Photoelectrochemical ion concentration polarization: membraneless ion filtration based on light-driven electrochemical reactions

 

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Meet our new Advisory Board members!

Oscar Ces is a Professor in Chemistry at Imperial College London, UK. He is a leading specialist in soft condensed matter, chemical biology, microfluidics, artificial cells, single cell analysis and lipid membrane mechanics.
 Daniel Irimia is an Associate Professor of Surgery and Deputy Director of the BioMEMS Resource Center at the Center for Engineering in Medicine (CEM) at Massachusetts General Hospital, USA. He is an internationally recognized expert in bioengineered microsystems for cellular chemotaxis and other functional assays.
  Sunghoon Kwon is an Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Seoul National University, South Korea. His research interests include optofluidic nanofabrication, BioMEMS, bioengineering, biophotonics, ultrasmall laser projection display, and human computer interfaces.
   Weihua Li is a Senior Professor for the School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering at Wollongong University, Australia. His research focuses on magnetorheological (MR) fluids and MR elastomers and their applications, dynamics and vibration control, microfluidics and nanofluidics and lab on a chip.
  Chwee Teck Lim is a NUSS professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the National University of Singapore. His research focuses on human disease biomechanics & mechanobiology, microfluidic technologies for disease detection, diagnosis and therapy and 2D materials for biomedical applications.
Nam-Trung Nguyen is Director of the Queensland Micro- and Nanotechnology Centre at Griffith University, Australia. His research is focused on microfluidics, nanofluidics, micro/nanomachining technologies, micro/nanoscale science, and instrumentation for biomedical applications.
David Sinton is a Professor and Canada Research Chair in Microfluidics and Energy at the University of Toronto. His research involves the study and application of small scale fluid mechanics (microfluidics, nanofluidics, and optofluidics) for use in energy systems and analysis.
  Hongkai Wu is Associate Professor for the Microfluidics Group at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. His research focuses on the interdisciplinary frontiers of microfluidics, bioanalytical science and materials chemistry.
  Chaoyong James Yang is a Professor in Chemical Biology at Xaimen University, China. His current research centers on microfluidics, molecular recognitions, DNA self-assembly and early diagnosis of cancer.
  Roland Zengerle is the Head of Laboratory for MEMS Applications and co-director of Hahn-Schickard at the University of Freiburg, Germany. He specializes in lab-on-a-chip systems, contact-free microdosage technologies and applications, miniaturized and implantable drug delivery systems, analysis and modeling of porous electrodes in batteries and fuel cells and biofuel cells.
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New YouTube Videos

Size-Tunable Microvortex Capture of Rare Cells

 
Droplet-based light-sheet fluorescent microscopy for high-throughput sample preparation, 3-D imaging and quantitative analysis on a chip

 
Organs-on-Chips with combined multi-electrode array and transepithelial electrical resistance measurement capabilities

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New YouTube Videos

A Versatile Microfluidic Device for High Throughput Production of Microparticles and Cell Microencapsulation

 
Universal signal generator for dynamic cell stimulation

 

Deterministic trapping, encapsulation and retrieval of single-cells

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2017 Art in Science Competition

Get your entries in before the deadline on 23rd October 2017 (23:59 Honolulu, Hawaii, USA time)

 

The µTAS 2017 Conference will feature the 10th Art in Science competition entitled ‘Under the Looking Glass: Art from the World of Small Science‘, sponsored and supported by National Institute of Standards and TechnologyLab on a ChipMicroTAS and the Chemical and Biological Microsystems Society.

Deadline 23rd October 2017 at 23:59 Honolulu, Hawaii, USA time

Since the earliest publications of the scientific world, the aesthetic value of scientific illustrations and images has been critical to many researchers. The illustrations and diagrams of earlier scientists such as Galileo and Da Vinci have become iconic symbols of science and the scientific thought process.

In current scientific literature, many scientists consider the selection of a publication as a “cover article” in a prestigious journal to be very complimentary.

Are you attending the µTAS 2017 Conference?
Would you like your image to be featured on the cover of Lab on a Chip?
Would you like to win a financial reward?

To draw attention to the aesthetic value in scientific illustration while still conveying scientific merit, NIST, LOC and CBMSare sponsoring this annual competition. Applications are encouraged from authors in attendance of the µTAS Conference and the winner will be selected by a panel of judges.

Applications must show a photograph, micrograph or other accurate representation of a system that would be of interest to the µTAS community and be represented in the final manuscript or presentation given at the Conference.

They must also contain a brief caption that describes the illustration’s content and its scientific merit. The winner will be selected on the basis of aesthetic eye appeal, artistic allure and scientific merit. In addition to having the image featured on the cover of Lab on a Chip, the winner will also receive a financial prize at the Conference.


Art in Science Competition Submission Process

Step 1. Sign-In to the Electronic Form Using Your Abstract/Manuscript Number

Step 2. Fill in Remaining Information on Electronic Submission Form

Step 3. Upload Your Image

Good Luck!

You can also take a look at the winners from last year on our blog.

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Freshwater from any water: a miniature hybrid water treatment and desalination system

Written by Darius Rackus, postdoctoral researcher at University of Toronto

With global freshwater supplies in decline, it is becoming more and more important to develop new technologies for water treatment. Given that much of the world is covered in saltwater, desalination is becoming an attractive option for generating fresh drinking water. However, the energy and capital costs of desalination can be prohibitive. Portable and scalable systems for water treatment and desalination would be useful in delivering freshwater to those who need it. Further, portable desalination systems would be particularly useful during humanitarian crises that arise due to intense weather events (e.g., hurricanes, tsunamis) in coastal regions.

Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have recently developed a proof-of-concept microfluidic device for water treatment and desalination using electrochemical methods. The device uses two electrochemical techniques for water purification; electrocoagulation to remove particulate matter (including microorganisms) and ion concentration polarization to desalinate the water. In electrocoagulation, a sacrificial anode is oxidized to release metal coagulants that bind up and flocculate material in the water. Ion concentration polarization utilizes an electric field across an ion exchange membrane to generate an ion-rich and an ion-poor region, which can then be separated. The microfluidic device designed by Choi et al. uses one common pair of electrodes across several microchannels to achieve both electrocoagulation and ion concentration polarization. This has the advantage of minimizing power consumption as no extra power is needed to couple the two treatment methods. In their report, they demonstrated that the new hybrid device could remove nearly 90% of E. coli cells and approximately 95% of particulate matter as well as bring salt concentrations down from 20 mM NaCl to 8.6 mM NaCl (a drinkable level).

The work presented in this report lays the foundation for a truly universal and portable water treatment system. Someday you will be able to take water from any source—waste, seawater, or freshwater—and turn it into fresh clean drinking water. This will not only help those who do not have regular access to freshwater, but will be a great tool to have on hand in emergency situations.

To download the full article for free* click the link below:

Integrated pretreatment and desalination by electrocoagulation (EC)–ion concentration polarization (ICP) hybrid
Siwon Choi, Bumjoo Kim and Jongyoon Han
Lab Chip, 2017, 17, 2076-2084
DOI: 10.1039/C7LC00258K

*Free to access until 7th July 2017.


About the Webwriter

Darius Rackus is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Toronto working in the Wheeler Lab. His research interests are in combining sensors with digital microfluidics for healthcare applications.”

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New YouTube Videos

A scalable self-priming fractal branching microchannel net chip for digital PCR


Automatic concentration and reformulation of PET tracers via microfluidic membrane distillation


Rapid Large Area Fabrication of Multiscale Through-hole Membrane

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