New YouTube Videos

Towards microfluidic-based depletion of stiff and fragile human red cells that accumulate during blood storage 

  

Development of the centrifugal multiplex RT-LAMP—ICS microdevice for influenza A virus subtyping 
   

Microfluidic Continuous Flow Digital Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) 

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Dancing Magnetotactic Bacteria wins the 2014 microTAS Video Competition

Researchers teach bacteria to line dance!

Lab on a Chip congratulates Tijmen Hageman and colleagues, winners of the first μTAS Video Competition, created in partnership with Dolomite Microfluidics and supported by the CBMS (the Chemical and Biological Microsystems Society).

At the μTAS conference in October 2014 Lab on a Chip Executive Editor, Harpal Minhas (above left) and  Dolomite Microfluidics Group Chief Sales Officer, Omar Jina (above right) presented Tijmen (above middle) with his award and a $2500 gift certificate to spend on dolomite equipment.

Prior to the conference, μTAS participants were invited to submit short, scientifically or educationally focused videos. The winning group, a collaboration of researchers from the University of Twente and the Korean Institute of Science and Technology produced a video demonstrating that bacteria can be manipulated by a magnetic field by using magnets to teach bacteria to line dance – and it looks like they had a lot of fun during the making!

Watch ‘Line Dancing Magnetotactic Bacteria‘ online now!


Ph.D student, Tijmen Hageman directed the video titled ‘Magnetotactic Bacteria.’

“The idea of dancing bacteria existed for some time already, and we decided to make it all in the style of Texas. We think we succeeded in introducting these extraordinary organisms to the public in a remarkable way and hope it will have made our research more visible,” he explains.

Like many studens, Tijmen is currently undecided about what to do after completion of his Ph.D. “I have some years left, and who knows…more videos prehaps” he says.

Tijmen can not take full credit for the winning video and we would also like to congratulate the following for their contribution:

Andreas Manz: Actor (bacteria)

Tijmen Hageman: Actor, director

Marc Pichel: Writer/ideas, cultivation

Caspar Abelmann: Animations

Line dancers: Ahyeon Gyeon, Jaewon Hwang, Jang Mi, Sangin Park, Jooyoung Im, Deepti Mittal, Marc Pichel and Tijmen Hageman

And the rest of the team for ideas and feedback!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

New YouTube Videos

A microfluidic device and automatic counting system for the study of C. elegans reproductive aging  

 
High-throughput Mapping of Brain-wide Activity in Awake and Drug-responsive Vertebrates  

 
Microfluidic cellular enrichment and separation through differences in viscoelastic deformation  

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

The Sphere wins the 2014 Art in Science Competition

Congratulations to David Castro, winner of Under the Looking Glass: Art from the World of Small Science, sponsored by NIST and Lab on a Chip.

The winning photograph for the seventh annual art in science competition was announced last week at the µTAS 2014 Conference. The research group, from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia were presented with a certificate and a financial reward. Their photograph will be featured on the cover of an upcoming issue of Lab on a Chip. Make sure you don’t miss it – register for our e-alerts now!

And the winning photograph is… THE SPHERE

More about ‘The Sphere’

Photographed by David Castro and David Conchouso, is the top view of a rotating 40uL aqueous droplet, suspended at the interface between two fluids, inside a square cuvette. The droplet contains an assay of functionalized latex beads, agglutinating in the presence of human C-reactive protein. This entry was selected as the winning photograph due to its aesthetic eye appeal, artistic allure and scientific merit.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

New YouTube Videos

Design of a 2D no-flow chamber to monitor hematopoietic stem cells

Multiplexed Fluidic Plunger Mechanism for the Measurement of Red Blood Cell Deformability

A droplet-to-digital (D2D) microfluidic device for single cell assays

Self-Powered One-Touch Blood Extraction System: Novel Polymer-Capped Hollow Microneedle Integrated with Pre-Vacuum Actuator

A Quantitative Microfluidic Angiogenesis Screen for Studying Anti-Angiogenic Therapeutic Assay

Inducing microscopic thermal lesions for the dissection of functional cell networks on a chip

Electrokinetic Study on 3D Nanochannel Networks Constructed by Spatially Controlled Nanoparticle Assembly

Droplet microfluidic system for sequential generation of lipid bilayers and transmembrane electrical recordings

A Siphonage Flow and Thread-based Low-cost Platform Enables Quantitative and Sensitive Assay

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Lectureship presented to Sangeeta Bhatia

Congratulations to Dr. Sangeeta N. Bhatia, winner of  the 2014 Corning Inc./Lab on a Chip Pioneers of Miniaturisation Lectureship.


The picture shows Lab on a Chip Executive Editor, Harpal Minhas (Left) and Director of Polymer processing in Organic & Biochemical Technologies, Science & Technology at Corning Incorporated, Ed Fewkes (right) presenting Sangeeta (middle) with her award earlier this week at the µTAS 2014 Conference.

The 9th ‘Pioneers of Ministurisation‘ Lectureship, is for extraordinary or outstanding contributions to the understanding or development of miniaturised systems and was presented to Dr Bhatia at the µTAS 2014 Conference in San Antonio, Texas in October 2014. Dr Bhatia received a certificate, $5000 and gave a short lecture at the conference. Further information, including past winners, can be viewed on our homepage.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

September’s HOT Free Articles

These HOT articles, published in September 2014 were recommended by our referees and are free* to access for 4 weeks

1000-fold sample focusing on paper-based microfluidic devices
Tally Rosenfeld and Moran Bercovici
Lab Chip, 2014,14, 4465-4474
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00734D

A reliable and programmable acoustofluidic pump powered by oscillating sharp-edge structures
Po-Hsun Huang, Nitesh Nama, Zhangming Mao, Peng Li, Joseph Rufo, Yuchao Chen, Yuliang Xie, Cheng-Hsin Wei, Lin Wang and Tony Jun Huang
Lab Chip, 2014,14, 4319-4323
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00806E

Application of an acoustofluidic perfusion bioreactor for cartilage tissue engineering
Siwei Li, Peter Glynne-Jones, Orestis G. Andriotis, Kuan Y. Ching, Umesh S. Jonnalagadda, Richard O. C. Oreffo, Martyn Hill and Rahul S. Tare
Lab Chip, 2014,14, 4475-4485
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00956H


Take a look at our Lab on a Chip 2014 HOT Articles Collection!

*Access is free until 28.11.14 through a publishing personal account. It’s quick, easy and free to register!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

New YouTube Videos

ElectroTaxis-on-a-Chip (ETC): an Integrated Quantitative High-throughput Screening Platform for Electrical Field-Directed Cell Migration 

 
 
  
 
A 3D-Printed Microcapillary Assembly for Facile Double Emulsion Generation 

 
  
 
 
The pumping lid: Investigating multi-material 3D printing for equipment-free, programmable generation of positive and negative pressures for microfluidic applications 

 
   
 
Chip-off-the-old-rock: The study of reservoir-relevant geological processes with real-rock micromodels 

 
 
  
 
Self-powered Imbibing Microfluidic Pump by Liquid Encapsulation: SIMPLE  

 
 
  
 
Controlled Incremental Filtration:  A simplified approach to design and fabrication of high-throughput microfluidic devices for selective enrichment of particles 

 
 
  
Pressure Stabilizer for Reproducible Picoinjection in Droplet-based Microfluidic Systems 

 
 
  
 

Ultra-rapid prototyping of flexible, multi-layered microfluidic devices via razor writing 

 
 
  
Manipulating and quantifying temperature-triggered coalescence by microcentrifugation 
 

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Oil reserves put under the microscope with new lab-on-a-rock

a ChemistryWorld article by Susannah May

The microfluidic model is etched into a calcite crystal

Scientists in Canada have developed a new microfluidic model carved from rock, which can replicate the conditions found in underground oil reservoirs in a laboratory with more accuracy than ever before. Using it to study the processes that occur in these reservoirs could lead to greater oil yields.

David Sinton’s group, at the University of Toronto, hope that the model they’ve developed will allow them to properly study the rock structure, and see how it’s affected by oil extraction techniques. The techniques could then be optimised to make them much more efficient.

To read the full article please visit ChemistryWorld.

Chip-off-the-old-rock: the study of reservoir-relevant geological processes with real-rock micromodels*
Wen Song, Thomas W. de Haas, Hossein Fadaei and David Sinto.
Lab Chip
, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00608A

*Access is free through a registered RSC account until 13 November 2014 – click here to register

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Dolomite and Lab on a Chip Productizing Science® Competition 2015

Submission Deadline 30th April 2015

Have you made a great scientific discovery but are not sure how to convert it into a commercially successful product?

The Dolomite Centre, in collaboration with Lab-on-a-Chip journal and Integrative Biology journal are pleased to announce that the Dolomite and Lab on a Chip Productizing Science® Competition 2015 will open on the 1st of October 2014

Click on the links below to find out more:

What is the competition about?

How do I enter?

Important dates

Requirements for participation and abstract guidelines

Good Luck!

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)