Life in the Fast Lane

An in-depth review of the physical laws governing microscale inertial flow regimes provides design rules enabling novel devices to order and spatially separate particles in complex fluids. Webwriter Aleksandra writes more…

Microscale Inertial Flow Regimes

The Reynolds number, ratio of inertial to viscous forces, is low for most microfluidic platforms and has been approximated to zero to model most microscale fluid flows as linear and time-reversible (Stoke’s flow). Yet Dino Di Carlo’s group at the University of California- Los Angeles, among others, have shown that microfluidic systems in which Reynolds’ number ranges from 1 to 100 exhibit non-negligible inertial effects. These forces lead to separation and ordering of particles within channels by stream line crossing due to effects from the channel geometries (lift forces from the channel wall and velocity profile shear gradient). Inertial lift forces are regulated by the channel dimensions and geometry, particle diameter, and flow rate.[1]

Experimentally-derived intuitions have guided researchers to use the effects of inertial lift forces to produce high throughput flow cytometers to isolate bacteria from diluted blood samples,[2] systems capable of probing the deformability of cells to evaluate metastatic potential[3, 4] and platforms combined with Dean flow in curved channels to increase mixing of fluids or spirals to improve separation of particles.[5] Yet the physical underpinnings guiding these channel designs have been limited.

In this review, Amini and colleagues tackle many of the relationships which are important to create new devices by taking advantage of the unique contribution of inertial forces at the microscale. The behavior of non-Newtonian fluids (i.e., whole blood), the role of particle shape on focusing, particle-particle interactions, and the effect of protrusions along the channel length on flow (pillars, herringbone structures) are also discussed and can open exciting new applications in medical diagnostics, chemical synthesis, manufacturing of materials, and beyond. Inertial microfluidics platforms are en route to commercialization by Johnson & Johnson to sort rare circulating tumor cells from whole blood at 10 million cells per second (CTC-iChip[6]).

Download the full review for free* for a limited time only!

Inertial microfluidic physics
Hamed Amini, Wonhee Lee and Dino Di Carlo. Lab on a Chip, 2014, 14, 2739-2761.
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00128A

References:
[1] D. Di Carlo, Lab on a Chip, 2009, 9, 3038-3046.
[2] A. J. Mach and D. Di Carlo, Biotechnol. Bioeng., 2010, 107, 302-311.
[3] J. S. Dudani, et al, Lab on a Chip, 2013, 13, 3728-3734.
[4] S. C. Hur, et al, Lab on a Chip, 2011, 11, 912-920.
[5] J. M. Martel and M. Toner, Scientific Reports, 2013, 3.
[6] E. Ozkumur, et al, Sci. Transl. Med., 2013, 5, 179ra47.

*Access is free through a registered RSC account until 25th August 2014 – click here to register

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200th Issue of Lab on a Chip

We are delighted to announce the publication of our 200th issue of Lab on a Chip- how we have grown!

Launched in 2001, publishing 2 issues with a total of 31 articles that year, LOC is now publishing 24 issues a year. Many of the young researchers that published in the first issue have now become Professors themselves, and many have gone on to become award winners. Read the full editorial by our Editor, Harp Minhas to find out more!

This picture shows how the image of LOC has developed from the original cover to the LOC we are familiar with today.

To celebrate this achievement, we have made all of the HOT articles in the 200th issue of LOC free* to access throughout August. Click on the links below to download.

Ana I. Barbosa, Ana P. Castanheira, Alexander D. Edwards and Nuno M. Reis
Lab Chip, 2014, 14, 2918-2928
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00464G
Yu-Chih Chen, Yu-Heng Cheng, Hong Sun Kim, Patrick N. Ingram, Jacques E. Nor and Euisik Yoon
Lab Chip, 2014, 14, 2941-2947
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00391H

Lab on a Chip itself has had an enormous influence on the development of the field, by setting very high scientific standards, by providing a common forum and vocabulary, by highlighting significant results, and by attracting some of the best scientists. The journal, and Harp Minhas as the spirit of the journal, have provided a coherence to Lab-on-a-chip science and technology that have had enormous influence in channeling the direction of the field”

Professor George Whitesides, Chair of Editorial Board, Lab on a Chip

*Access is free through a registered RSC account until 31st August 2014 – click here to register

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New challenges spawn new innovations

Lab on a Chip is committed to supporting early career scientists, and it is because of this that we are both proud and very pleased to introduce the publication of the 2014 edition of our Emerging Investigators issue.

Emerging Investigators

Guest edited by Dino di Carlo, Helene Andersson-Svah and Yanyi Huang, this issue celebrates the best and brightest amongst early career miniaturisation scientists around the world. Their editorial reflects on the past before introducing the upcoming challenges that new generations of investigators are facing. These challenges are demonstrated in the range of topics covered in this issue.

Read the full Emerging Investigator themed collection now – we hope you enjoy the articles

This issue features three HOT articles, which received particularly high scores at peer review. They are free* to access for a limited time only so click on the links below to download the full articles

Wei Liu, Yaqian Li, Siyu Feng, Jia Ning, Jingyu Wang, Maling Gou, Huijun Chen, Feng Xu and Yanan Du
Lab Chip, 2014, 14, 2614-2625
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00081A
Lab Chip, 2014, 14, 2626-2634
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00039K
J.-P. Frimat, M. Bronkhorst, B. de Wagenaar, J. G. Bomer, F. van der Heijden, A. van den Berg and L. I. Segerink
Lab Chip, 2014, 14, 2635-2641
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00050A

*Access is free through a registered RSC account untill 22nd September 2014 – click here to register

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Free access to HOT articles

These HOT articles were recommended by our referees and are free to access for 4 weeks*

Hepatic organoids for microfluidic drug screening
Sam H. Au, M. Dean Chamberlain, Shruthi Mahesh, Michael V. Sefton and Aaron R. Wheeler  
Lab Chip, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00531G, Paper

Graphical abstract: Hepatic organoids for microfluidic drug screening
Delayed voltammetric with respect to amperometric electrochemical detection of concentration changes in microchannels
Raphaël Trouillon and Martin A. M. Gijs  
Lab Chip, 2014,14, 2929-2940
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00493K, Paper

Graphical abstract: Delayed voltammetric with respect to amperometric electrochemical detection of concentration changes in microchannels
 
A droplet-based heterogeneous immunoassay for screening single cells secreting antigen-specific antibodies
Samin Akbari and Tohid Pirbodaghi  
Lab Chip, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00082J, Communication

Graphical abstract: A droplet-based heterogeneous immunoassay for screening single cells secreting antigen-specific antibodies
A lab-in-a-briefcase for rapid prostate specific antigen (PSA) screening from whole blood
Ana I. Barbosa, Ana P. Castanheira, Alexander D. Edwards and Nuno M. Reis  
Lab Chip, 2014,14, 2918-2928
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00464G, Paper
Graphical abstract: A lab-in-a-briefcase for rapid prostate specific antigen (PSA) screening from whole blood

Induced charge electroosmosis micropumps using arrays of Janus micropillars
Joel S. Paustian, Andrew J. Pascall, Neil M. Wilson and Todd M. Squires  
Lab Chip, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00141A, Paper

Graphical abstract: Induced charge electroosmosis micropumps using arrays of Janus micropillars
Nanoshuttles propelled by motor proteins sequentially assemble molecular cargo in a microfluidic device
Dirk Steuerwald, Susanna M. Früh, Rudolf Griss, Robert D. Lovchik and Viola Vogel  
Lab Chip, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00385C, Paper

Graphical abstract: Nanoshuttles propelled by motor proteins sequentially assemble molecular cargo in a microfluidic device
Femtosecond laser 3D micromachining: a powerful tool for the fabrication of microfluidic, optofluidic, and electrofluidic devices based on glass
Koji Sugioka, Jian Xu, Dong Wu, Yasutaka Hanada, Zhongke Wang, Ya Cheng and Katsumi Midorikawa  
Lab Chip, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00548A, Critical Review

Graphical abstract: Femtosecond laser 3D micromachining: a powerful tool for the fabrication of microfluidic, optofluidic, and electrofluidic devices based on glass
Continuous microcarrier-based cell culture in a benchtop microfluidic bioreactor
F. Abeille, F. Mittler, P. Obeid, M. Huet, F. Kermarrec, M. E. Dolega, F. Navarro, P. Pouteau, B. Icard, X. Gidrol, V. Agache and N. Picollet-D’hahan  
Lab Chip, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00570H, Paper

Graphical abstract: Continuous microcarrier-based cell culture in a benchtop microfluidic bioreactor
Multiplexed immunoassay based on micromotors and microscale tags
D. Vilela, J. Orozco, G. Cheng, S. Sattayasamitsathit, M. Galarnyk, C. Kan, J. Wang and A. Escarpa  
Lab Chip, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00596A, Paper

Graphical abstract: Multiplexed immunoassay based on micromotors and microscale tags
Double emulsions from a capillary array injection microfluidic device
Luoran Shang, Yao Cheng, Jie Wang, Haibo Ding, Fei Rong, Yuanjin Zhao and Zhongze Gu  
Lab Chip, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00698D, Communication

Graphical abstract: Double emulsions from a capillary array injection microfluidic device
SU-8 as a material for lab-on-a-chip-based mass spectrometry
Steve Arscott  
Lab Chip, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00617H, Tutorial Review

Graphical abstract: SU-8 as a material for lab-on-a-chip-based mass spectrometry
Sorting drops and cells with acoustics: acoustic microfluidic fluorescence-activated cell sorter
Lothar Schmid, David A. Weitz and Thomas Franke  
Lab Chip, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00588K, Paper

Graphical abstract: Sorting drops and cells with acoustics: acoustic microfluidic fluorescence-activated cell sorter
Physics and technological aspects of nanofluidics
Lyderic Bocquet and Patrick Tabeling  
Lab Chip, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00325J, Frontier

Graphical abstract: Physics and technological aspects of nanofluidics

 *Free access to individuals is provided through an RSC Publishing personal account. It’s quick, easy and more importantly – free – to register!

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New YouTube videos

Circle-to-circle amplification on a digital microfluidic chip for amplified single molecule detection 
 
 
  
 
Rapid isolation and diagnosis of live bacteria from human joint fluids by using an integrated microfluidic system 
 
  
 
Microfluidic on-demand droplet merging using surface acoustic waves  
 
 
  
Induced charge electroosmosis micropumps using arrays of Janus micropillars 
 
 
  
Nanoshuttles propelled by motor proteins sequentially assemble molecular cargo in a microfluidic device  
 
 
   
Marangoni Self-Propelled Capsules in a Maze: Pollutants ‘Sense and Act’ in Complex Channel Environments 
 
 
  
Digital Biology and Chemistry 
 
   
Split and flow: reconfigurable capillary connection for digital microfluidic 
 
 
   
Single-step microfluidic fabrication of soft monodisperse polyelectrolyte microcapsules by interfacial complexation 
 
   
A Novel Picoliter Droplet Array for Parallel Real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction Based on Double-inkjet Printing 

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Organ–organ interactions could compound nanoparticle damage

Full Chemistry World article by Mary MacLeod, Publishing Editor at the Royal Society of Chemistry

A microfluidic device that recreates interactions between the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and the liver to give a more realistic assessment of nanoparticle toxicity has detected liver tissue injury at lower nanoparticle concentrations than expected following experiments with liver tissue only.

Many studies look at the beneficial medical effects of nanoparticles, however, Mandy Esch explains that her work in Michael Shuler’s lab at Cornell University is checking for adverse effects.

To read the full article, please visit Chemistry World.

Body-on-a-chip simulation with gastrointestinal tract and liver tissues suggests that ingested nanoparticles have the potential to cause liver injury
Mandy B. Esch, Gretchen J. Mahler, Tracy Stokol and Michael L. Shuler
Lab Chip, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00371C, Paper

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New Video Competition at microTAS 2014!

Lab on a Chip is proud to announce the first μTAS Video Competition, created in partnership with Dolomite Microfluidics and supported by the CBMS (the Chemical and Biological Microsystems Society).

We invite registered μTAS participants to submit short videos (see full conditions of entry below) that are either scientifically or educationally focused. Videos may be fun, artistic or just surprising and unusual in order to meet these criteria.

Dolomite Microfuidics, innovators in microfluidic solutions, have generously agreed to support this competition with $2500 worth of Dolomite equipment as the prize.

If you think you have the necessary visual science to take home the prize money, have a read of the entry conditions below!


Video Award Submission Process – Easy 3 Step Process

Step 1. Sign-In to the Electronic Form Using Your Registration Number (submissions can be made between July 25 and October 10, 2014. Form available at www.microTAS2014.org from July 25)

Please have your Abstract/Manuscript Number accessible. If you are unable to locate your Abstract/Manuscript Number, please contact info@microTAS2014.org.

Step 2. Fill in Remaining Information on Electronic Submission Form

Please fill in remaining information on the electronic submission form including title of image and your caption.

Step 3. Upload Your Video

All entries are to be submitted in MP4 or MOV format online via this website. Entries will not be accepted by email, fax, or post. Once your entry has been successfully uploaded and submitted, you will be given an entry number and you will be sent a confirmation email with the information you provided, minus the image. The ability to submit an image will close Friday, 10 October 2014 at 23:59 Honolulu, Hawaii, USA time (HST. GMT minus 10 hours).


Conditions of entry:

1. Only registered participants can take part/submit videos

2. Videos must be either scientific (demonstrating interesting aspects) or educational (enhancing understanding) with respect to micro or nanofluidics

3. Videos can be presented in a fun way

4. Videos can be presented in an artistic way

5. Videos can be presented in a surprising or unusual way

6. Videos can be enhanced by audio, animations or annotations, if necessary

7. Videos should be no longer than 2 minutes in length and file sizes must be compressed as much as possible for submission

8. Videos must be viewable on a PC without bespoke software

9. All submissions are submitted on the basis that they may be used by Lab on a Chip and/or CBMS for promotional purposes in any form

10. Judging by an international panel of judges will take place at μTAS 2014. The judge’s decision will be final and no discussion will be entertained.

11. The prize will be awarded at μTAS 2014 and a written voucher  for the equipment will be handed over to the person submitting the winning entry.


Finally, just for a bit of inspiration, here’s a classic Lab on a Chip video from our YouTube Channel…enjoy!


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Themed Issue dedicated to Kahp-Yang Suh

We are delighted to announce the publication of our themed issue dedicated to Kahp-Yang SUh

An extraordinarily insightful and productive scientist in the field of nanotechnology, material science and bio-inspired systems, Kahp-Yang Suh has published over 200 articles over his short academic life.

Guest edited by Pilnam Kim, Noo Li Jeon and Ali Khademhosseini, this issue includes seven research papers concerning various areas of lab-on-a-chip, written by friends and colleagues of Khap-Yang and includes contributions on a  range of topics related to Kahp-Yang’s work. These papers demonstrate the directions in which lab-on-a-chip and intelligent manufacturing of biomaterials could contribute to the development of the next generation of healthcare systems.

Click here to read the full collection, celebrating Kahp-Yang’s contribution to microfluidics research.

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The winning challenge is antibiotics!

Longitude Prize 2014 is a challenge with a £10 million prize fund to help solve one of the greatest issues of our time. It is being run and developed by Nesta, with the Technology Strategy Board as launch funding partner.

Antibiotic Resistance

http://www.longitudeprize.org/

Over the past month, members of the public have been voting for six  challenges to win the Longitude Prize and last week it was announced that antibiotics was the winning category.

The development of antibiotics has been vital to our survival, adding 20 years to each persons life on average – but antimicrobial resistance is threatening to cause antibiotics to become ineffective in the future. Along with the development of new antibiotics, diagnostics are crucial in ensuring that patients receive appropriate treatment; to help us to monitor infection and to conserve the therapies we have by only administrating to those that really need them.

The challenge for Longitude Prize 2014 will be set to create a cheap, accurate, rapid and easy-to-use point of care test kit to identify bacterial infections.

We are working with a number of learned societies to develop community initiatives to bring researchers from different disciplines together to stimulate research in the infections disease area. Supporting the Longitude Prize challenge, we have made the following relevant Lab on a Chip articles free* to access for a limited time, so click on the links below and download them today!

Time Lapse Investigation of Antibiotic Susceptibility using a Microfluidic Linear Gradient 3D Culture Device
Zining Hou,   Yu An,   Karin Hjort,   Klas Hjort,  Linus Sandegren and   Zhigang WU
Lab Chip, 2014, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00451E

Antimicrobial susceptibility assays in paper-based portable culture devices
Frédérique Deiss, Maribel E. Funes-Huacca, Jasmin Bal, Katrina F. Tjhung and   Ratmir Derda

Lab Chip, 2014,14, 167-171
DOI: 10.1039/C3LC50887K


* Access is free through a registered RSC account – click here to register
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Microfluidic Applications

Lab on a Chip Industry Workshop

Microfluidic Applications

Join our event on Facebook and find out who else is attending!

August 2-3 2014 in Dalian, China

This workshop focuses on the innovative developments in Lab-on-a-Chip technology and the applications of microfluidics in diagnostics, biological, material, pharmaceutical, and environmental sciences. For more information, please visit the official webpage.

Register now – deadline is July 15th 2014

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