Shrinking Lab-on-a-Chip to Lab-in-a-Tube

Throughout a series of Lab on a Chip Focus Articles Samuel Sánchez, research group leader at Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems and recently elected as “innovator of the year 2014”, will be highlighting cutting-edge reports based on miniaturized devices that bridge functional materials and bio-related applications. And first up we have…Lab-in-a-Tube!

Lab-on-a-chip already scales down several components and integrates them into one device, but now scientists are working toward shrinking this further to develop entire laboratories inside an ultra-compact architecture such as a small tube. Samuel discusses the concept and advantages of the lab-in-a-tube before highlighting remarkable cell studies that have already been performed using microtubes.

Lab-in-a-tube systems can combine several functionalities such as optical or electrochemical sensing and is therefore used in various detection systems. Samuel describes the developments in this area, leading to the fabrication of a highly sensitive rolled-up optofluidic ring resonator – fully integrated into lab-on-a-chip devices of course!

Label-free detection systems using the lab-in-a-tube concept

Finally, Samuel discusses the challenges of controlling fluid flow at the micro scale and the use of self-powered on-chip micropumps. As one of Samuel’s main interests, catalytic micropumps will be discussed further in an upcoming Focus Article.

Samuel’s full article ‘Lab-in-a-tube systems as ultra-compact devices’ can be downloaded for free* on our website. We hope you enjoy reading his summary of recent advances in this new and exciting concept of chip integration.

Don’t miss Samuel’s next focus article – register for our e-alerts now!

*Access is free through a publishing personal account. It’s quick, easy and free to register.

More about Samuel Sánchez

Samuel earned his PhD in Analytical Chemistry from the Autonomous University of Barcelona in 2008. After a short period as an Assistant Professor, he worked in Japan at the National Institute for Materials Science. In 2010 he moved to the Institute for Integrative Nanoscience at the Leibniz Institute in Dresden where he was leading the “Biochemical Nanomembranes” group. He is now leading the independent research group at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems. Samuel has received several awards for his work including the Guinness World Record® for “The smallest man-made jet engine” in 2010, the IIN-IFW Research Prize 2011, the ERC-Starting Grant 2012 “Lab-in-a-tube and Nanorobotic Biosensors (LT-NRBS).” Recently, Samuel has been names as Spain’s top innovators under 35 by the Spanish edition of the journal MIT Technology Review.

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Another four articles make it into the Top 10%

The Top 10% represents our highest impact papers, which demonstrate a breakthrough in device technology or methodology, or demonstrate important new results. The papers included are chosen by our Editor from among the Lab on a Chip HOT articles, which score highly in peer review.

We’ve added four new papers to the Top 10%. Download your copies by clicking the links below…

Paper: 1000-fold sample focusing on paper-based microfluidic devices
Tally Rosenfeld and Moran Bercovici
Lab Chip, 2014,14, 4465-4474
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00734D, Paper

Graphical abstract: 1000-fold sample focusing on paper-based microfluidic devices

Paper: The pumping lid: investigating multi-material 3D printing for equipment-free, programmable generation of positive and negative pressures for microfluidic applications
Stefano Begolo, Dmitriy V. Zhukov, David A. Selck, Liang Li and Rustem F. Ismagilov
Lab Chip, 2014,14, 4616-4628
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00910J, Paper

Graphical abstract: The pumping lid: investigating multi-material 3D printing for equipment-free, programmable generation of positive and negative pressures for microfluidic applications

Paper: Application of an acoustofluidic perfusion bioreactor for cartilage tissue engineering
Siwei Li, Peter Glynne-Jones, Orestis G. Andriotis, Kuan Y. Ching, Umesh S. Jonnalagadda, Richard O. C. Oreffo, Martyn Hill and Rahul S. Tare
Lab Chip, 2014,14, 4475-4485
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00956H, Paper

Graphical abstract: Application of an acoustofluidic perfusion bioreactor for cartilage tissue engineering

Communication: Optofluidic lasers with a single molecular layer of gain
Qiushu Chen, Michael Ritt, Sivaraj Sivaramakrishnan, Yuze Sun and Xudong Fan
Lab Chip, 2014,14, 4590-4595
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00872C, Communication

Graphical abstract: Optofluidic lasers with a single molecular layer of gain

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New You Tube videos

Integrated Perfusion and Separation System for Entrainment of Insulin Secretion from Islets of Langerhans 
 
Microfluidic static droplet array for analyzing microbial communication on a population gradient 
 
A lung-on-chip array with an integrated bio-inspired respiration mechanism 

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New You Tube Videos

Droplet-based microfluidics at the femtolitre scale 

 

Dynamic acoustic field activated cell separation (DAFACS) 


 
Simultaneous metering and dispensing of multiple reagents on passively controlled microdevice solely by finger pressing 

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New You Tube Videos

 A microfluidic system for studying the behavior of zebrafish larvae under acute hypoxia 


 

 
Visualization and characterization of interfacial polymerization layer formation 

 

Oxidized Liquid Metal Based Microfluidic Platform for Tunable Electronic Devices Applications 

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October’s HOT Free Articles

These HOT articles, published in October 2014 were recommended by our referees and are free* to access for 4 weeks

Optofluidic lasers with a single molecular layer of gain
Qiushu Chen, Michael Ritt, Sivaraj Sivaramakrishnan, Yuze Sun and Xudong Fan
Lab Chip, 2014,14, 4590-4595
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00872C, Communication

A self-powered one-touch blood extraction system: a novel polymer-capped hollow microneedle integrated with a pre-vacuum actuator
Cheng Guo Li, Manita Dangol, Chang Yeol Lee, Mingyu Jang and Hyungil Jung
Lab Chip, 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00937A, Paper


Design of a 2D no-flow chamber to monitor hematopoietic stem cells
Théo Cambier, Thibault Honegger, Valérie Vanneaux, Jean Berthier, David Peyrade, Laurent Blanchoin, Jerome Larghero and Manuel Théry
Lab Chip, 2015,15, 77-85
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00807C, Paper


Take a look at our Lab on a Chip 2014 HOT Articles Collection!

*Access is free until 5.01.14 through a publishing personal account. It’s quick, easy and free to register!

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Femtofluidic droplet manipulation now possible

a ChemistryWorld article by Megan Tyler

We’ve had microfluidics. We’ve even had nanofluidics. But now, scientists have gone a step smaller by pushing femtofluidics into the realms of possibility.

Droplet microfluidics enables assays and reactions to be performed in droplets of reagent that are just a few nanolitres or picolitres in volume. The main advantages of this are that reactions can be performed in a massively parallel manner using hardly any reagent, and further miniaturisation to give femtolitre droplets promises to enable even higher-throughput with even lower reagent use.

Please visit ChemistryWorld to read the full article .

Droplet-based microfluidics at the femtolitre scale*
Marie Leman, Faris Abouakil, Andrew D. Griffiths and Patrick Tabeling
Lab Chip
, 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC01122H

*Access is free through a registered RSC account until 13 November 2014 – click here to register

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New YouTube Videos

Towards microfluidic-based depletion of stiff and fragile human red cells that accumulate during blood storage 

  

Development of the centrifugal multiplex RT-LAMP—ICS microdevice for influenza A virus subtyping 
   

Microfluidic Continuous Flow Digital Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) 

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Dancing Magnetotactic Bacteria wins the 2014 microTAS Video Competition

Researchers teach bacteria to line dance!

Lab on a Chip congratulates Tijmen Hageman and colleagues, winners of the first μTAS Video Competition, created in partnership with Dolomite Microfluidics and supported by the CBMS (the Chemical and Biological Microsystems Society).

At the μTAS conference in October 2014 Lab on a Chip Executive Editor, Harpal Minhas (above left) and  Dolomite Microfluidics Group Chief Sales Officer, Omar Jina (above right) presented Tijmen (above middle) with his award and a $2500 gift certificate to spend on dolomite equipment.

Prior to the conference, μTAS participants were invited to submit short, scientifically or educationally focused videos. The winning group, a collaboration of researchers from the University of Twente and the Korean Institute of Science and Technology produced a video demonstrating that bacteria can be manipulated by a magnetic field by using magnets to teach bacteria to line dance – and it looks like they had a lot of fun during the making!

Watch ‘Line Dancing Magnetotactic Bacteria‘ online now!


Ph.D student, Tijmen Hageman directed the video titled ‘Magnetotactic Bacteria.’

“The idea of dancing bacteria existed for some time already, and we decided to make it all in the style of Texas. We think we succeeded in introducting these extraordinary organisms to the public in a remarkable way and hope it will have made our research more visible,” he explains.

Like many studens, Tijmen is currently undecided about what to do after completion of his Ph.D. “I have some years left, and who knows…more videos prehaps” he says.

Tijmen can not take full credit for the winning video and we would also like to congratulate the following for their contribution:

Andreas Manz: Actor (bacteria)

Tijmen Hageman: Actor, director

Marc Pichel: Writer/ideas, cultivation

Caspar Abelmann: Animations

Line dancers: Ahyeon Gyeon, Jaewon Hwang, Jang Mi, Sangin Park, Jooyoung Im, Deepti Mittal, Marc Pichel and Tijmen Hageman

And the rest of the team for ideas and feedback!

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New YouTube Videos

A microfluidic device and automatic counting system for the study of C. elegans reproductive aging  

 
High-throughput Mapping of Brain-wide Activity in Awake and Drug-responsive Vertebrates  

 
Microfluidic cellular enrichment and separation through differences in viscoelastic deformation  

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