2016 MicroTAS Video Competition

Lab on a Chip is proud to announce the third μTAS Video Competition, in partnership with Dolomite Microfluidics and supported by μTAS and Chemical and Biological Microsystems Society (CBMS).

We invite registered μTAS partipants to submit short videos (see terms and conditions below) that are either scientifically or educationally focused. Videos may be fun, artistic or just surprising and unusual in order to meet these criteria.

Dolomite Microfluidics, innovators in microfluidic solutions, are sponsoring this competition with the prize of €2500 worth of Dolomite equipment.

If you have an idea for a video that you would like to share with the μTAS community read the entry conditions below!

Deadline: 10 October 2016

Terms and Conditions

  • Only participants registered for the MicroTAS conference can take part and submit videos.
  • Videos must be either scientific (demonstrating interesting aspects) or educational (enhancing understanding) with respect to micro- or nanofluidics.
  • Videos can be enhanced by audio, animations, or annotations.
  • Videos should be no longer than 2 minutes with a file size less than 25 Mbytes (please use appropriate video compression).
  • Videos must be viewable on a PC without special software (.mpg, .mp4, .mov, .avi or .wmv).
  • All videos are submitted on the basis that they may be used by LOC and/or CBMS for promotional purposes in any form.
  • Assessment by an international panel of judges will take place at MicroTAS 2016 and the judges’ decision will be final
  • The prize will be awarded at MicroTAS 2016, and a voucher for the equipment will be presented to the person submitting the winning entry.
  • The video submission deadline is the end of Monday, 10th October, 2016 (Honolulu, Hawaii, USA time).

Video Award Submission Process – Easy 3 Step Process

Step 1. Sign-In to the Electronic Form using your Registration Number

Please have your Registration Number accessible. If you are unable to locate your Registration Number, please contact info@microtas2016.org.

Step 2. Fill in information on Electronic Submission Form

Step 3. Upload Your Video

All entries are to be submitted online via this website as .mpg, .mp4, .mov, .avi or .wmv. Once your entry has been successfully  uploaded and submitted, you will be given an entry number and you will be sent a confirmation email with the information your provided, minus the video. The ability to submit a video will close at the end of Monday, 10 October 2016 (Honolulu, Hawaii, USA time).

Good luck!

Previous winners:

MicroTAS 2015 Conference, Gyeongju, Korea
Spin Me Right Round

David Kinahan, Ducrée Labs, Dublin City University, Ireland

MicroTAS 2014 Conference, San Antonio, Texas, USA
Magnetotactic Bacteria
Tijmen Hageman, KIST Europe GmbH, Germany

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Pioneers of Miniaturization Lectureship 2016

We are delighted to announce that Dr. Daniel Irimia is the winner of the 2016 “Pioneers of Miniaturization” Lectureship.

The 11th “Pioneers of Miniaturization” Lectureship, sponsored by Lab on a Chip and Corning Incorporated, and supported by the Chemical and Biological Microsystems Society (CBMS), is for early to mid-career scientists who have made extraordinary or outstanding contributions to the understanding or development of miniaturised systems.

This “Pioneers of Miniaturization” Lectureship will be presented to Daniel at the µTAS 2016 Conference in Dublin, Ireland, 9-13 October 2016. Daniel will receive a certificate, a monetary award and will give a short lecture during the conference.

Many congratulations to Dr. Daniel Irimia on this achievement from the Lab on a Chip team

About the winner

Dr. Daniel Irimia is a bioengineer trained as a physician and passionate about understanding the clinical consequences of neutrophil activities during disease. He received his Ph.D. in bioengineering from the University of Illinois, Chicago in 2002 before becoming a Research Fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Daniel is currently an Associate Professor in Surgery and Bioengineering and Deputy Director of the BioMEMS Resource Center at the Center for Engineering in Medicine, USA. His research is focused on designing sophisticated tools to measure relevant neutrophil behavior with the highest precision. He leads a team of scientists and doctors that employ microfluidic devices and novel measurements of neutrophil functions to monitor burn patients, optimize treatments, and uncover neutrophil-targeting interventions that could prevent infections and sepsis in burn patients.

As the organizer of the Cell World Races, aimed at encouraging scientists and clinician-researchers to utilize microfluidic tools in their research for higher level of precision and detail, Daniel increases the awareness for the technological changes taking place in the field of cell motility. This has been featured on the front page of Wall Street Journal (March 2014) and in 2012 Daniel was one of the winners of the Wellcome Image Awards for the depiction of “Cancer cells in motion.”

For more details on Dr. Daniel Irimia’s research please visit his homepage.

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New YouTube Videos

On-demand droplet splitting using surface acoustic waves

A microfluidic cell-trapping device for single-cell tracking of host–microbe interactions

The physical origins of transit time measurements for rapid, single cell mechanotyping

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New YouTube Videos

Time-lapse lens-free imaging of cell migration in diverse physical microenvironments

On-Chip Micromagnet Frictionometer Based on Magnetically Driven Colloids for Nano-Bio Interface

Real-time assessment of nanoparticle-mediated antigen delivery and cell response

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New YouTube Videos

Lab-on-a-disc for simultaneous determination of total phenolic content and antioxidant activity of beverage samples

Flow control using audio tones in resonant microfluidic networks: towards cell-phone controlled lab-on-a-chip devices

Microfluidic droplet trapping, splitting and merging with feedback controls and state space modelling

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New YouTube Videos

Integrative volumetric bar-chart chip for rapid and quantitative point-of-care detection of myocardial infarction biomarkers

Deterministic sequential isolation of floating cancer cells under continuous flow

Thermally robust and biomolecule-friendly room temperature bonding for the fabrication of elastomer-plastic hybrid microdevice

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What is the best way to study brain?

an article by Burcu Gumuscu, PhD researcher at University of Twente

Before the 1700’s, when dissection techniques were not yet available, the cause of mood changes were thought to be the replacement of liquids and vapors in the body. The biology of the brain has been better understood since the discovery of research and test tools. However, occupying only about 1/50 of the body mass, the brain is perhaps the most complicated organ to study. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke’s list of over 400 neurological disorders can be seen as a sound proof of this exciting- and frustrating- fact.

Figure 1. The effects of biomechanical forces on the brain

Biomechanical forces on neurons play a fundamental role in neuronal physiology, which, in turn, affect brain development and disorders. During the growth of neurons, the tension created by the biomechanical forces are suggested to influence the cells’ motor activities, gene expression, neurotransmitter release, together with neurite growth and network connections (Figure 1). Research on the biomechanical forces can definitely help us to understand how the brain works, but many questions related to these forces remain unanswered. Quantitative measurements of the cell activity seem to be the only possible path to find satisfying answers to those questions.

A comprehensive list of experimental techniques involving both conventional and alternative micro&nanotechnology approaches have been recently brought to the attention of scientific community by Di Carlo and his coauthors. In their recent critical review, both advantages and disadvantages of conventional toolsnamely motor-driven pressure, patch membrane pressure, osmotic pressure, fluid shear stresses, and deformation of flexible elastomers—, microtechnology toolsincluding atomic force microscopy, micropatterning, and some other potential techniques—, and nanotechnology toolssuch as ferromagnetic and piezoelectric nanoparticles— are discussed.

The literature reports provided in the paper suggest that micro and nanotechnology tools offer better spatiotemporal resolution and throughput when compared to conventional techniques. The cellular functions and the possible technologies for the characterization of those functions are further described (Figure 2). For instance, behind-the-scene biological mechanisms for recovery in traumatic brain injuries can be determined by applying the biomechanical forces at the right place and right time to ultimately mitigate the injuries.

Figure 2. The influence of biomechanical forces on the neuron functions and available technologies for their investigation.

This article, published on 26 April 2016, is included in the Lab on a Chip Recent HOT Articles themed collection.

To download the full article for free* click the link below:

Micro- and nano-technologies to probe the mechano-biology of the brain
Andy Tay, Felix E. Schweizer, and Dino Di Carlo
Lab Chip, 2016,16, 1962-1977
DOI: 10.1039/C6LC00349D, Critical Review

—————-

About the webwriter

Burcu Gumuscu is a PhD researcher in BIOS Lab on a Chip Group at University of Twente in The Netherlands. Her research interests include development of microfluidic devices for second generation sequencing, organ-on-chip development, and desalination of water on the micron-scale.

—————-

*Access is free until 15/08/2016 through a registered RSC account.

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New YouTube Videos

Multiplexing slanted spiral microchannels for ultra-fast blood plasma separation

Lab on a Stick: Multi-Analyte Cellular Assays in a Microfluidic Dipstick

Highly Efficient Adenoviral Transduction of Pancreatic Islets using a Microfluidic Device

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New YouTube Videos

Acoustically-Driven Thread-Based Tuneable Gradient Generators

A reconfigurable continuous-flow fluidic routing fabric using a modular, scalable primitive

Scaled particle focusing in a microfluidic device with asymmetric electrodes utilizing induced-charge electroosmosis

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Microfluidic generation of hollow Ca-alginate microfibers

Droplet Microfluidics with a Nanoemulsion Continuous Phase

Shrinking, Growing, and Bursting: Microfluidic Equilibrium Control of Water-in-Water Droplets

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Serial crystallography enhanced by graphene

A Lab on a Chip article highlighted in Chemistry World by Hannah Dunckley

Introducing graphene into microfluidic devices can make it easier to study proteins at an atomic level, scientists in the US have shown. Devices that are thinner and interfere less with the measurements allow larger and more intricate protein structures to be resolved using techniques that rely on probing thousands of microcrystals.

Not only does this reduce the device’s thickness, improving the signal-to-noise ratio, the graphene also acts as a barrier to prevent the sample evaporating. John Helliwell, an expert in crystallography at the University of Manchester in the UK, explains that preventing water loss from the crystal is ‘vital…because the sample hydration state needs to be preserved for its molecular integrity’.

Perry’s group are now focusing on shrinking down the dimensions and increasing the complexity of the device, as well as studying the structure of proteins involved in programmed cell death.

To read the full article visit Chemistry World.

Click the link below to read the original research paper published in Lab on a Chip for free*:

Graphene-based microfluidics for serial crystallography
Shuo Sui, Yuxi Wang, Kristopher W. Kolewe, Vukica Srajer, Robert Henning, Jessica D. Schiffman, Christos Dimitrakopoulos and Sarah L. Perry
Lab Chip
, 2016, Advance Article
DOI:
10.1039/C6LC00451B

*Article is free to access until 26/07/2016 through a RSC registered account – click here to register

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