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Food & Function issue 4 now online

Food & Function issue 4 is now online and you can read it here.

Food & Function issue 4 coverThe front cover highlights a study which demonstrates that the addition to bread of guar gum and whole grain corn flour with an elevated amylose content  improves the course of glycaemia. 

The Paper, from Linda Ekström and colleagues from Lund University in Sweeden, aims to investigate the possibility of modulating glycaemia, insulinaemia and perceived satiety of white bread as frequent hyperglycaemia is associated with oxidative stress and subclinical inflammation, thereby increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

This article is free to read for 6 weeks!

On the possibility to affect the course of glycaemia, insulinaemia, and perceived hunger/satiety to bread meals in healthy volunteers, Linda M. N. K. Ekström, Inger M. E. Björck and Elin M. Östman, Food Funct., 2013, 4, 522-529

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Top 10 most accessed articles in 2012

Do you want to know what your colleagues were reading during 2012? The following articles in Food & Function were the most accessed over the course of the year:

Nuts, especially walnuts, have both antioxidant quantity and efficacy and exhibit significant potential health benefits
Joe A. Vinson and Yuxing Cai
Food Funct., 2012, 3, 134-140
DOI: 10.1039/C2FO10152A, Paper

Anti-inflammatory activity of natural dietary flavonoids
Min-Hsiung Pan, Ching-Shu Lai and Chi-Tang Ho
Food Funct., 2010, 1, 15-31
DOI: 10.1039/C0FO00103A, Review Article

Transcription profiles of LPS-stimulated THP-1 monocytes and macrophages: a tool to study inflammation modulating effects of food-derived compounds
Wasaporn Chanput, Jurriaan Mes, Robert A. M. Vreeburg, Huub F. J. Savelkoul and Harry J. Wichers
Food Funct., 2010, 1, 254-261
DOI: 10.1039/C0FO00113A, Paper

Effects of tea and coffee on cardiovascular disease risk
Siv K Bøhn, Natalie C Ward, Jonathan M Hodgson and Kevin D Croft
Food Funct., 2012, 3, 575-591
DOI: 10.1039/C2FO10288A, Review Article

Espresso coffees, caffeine and chlorogenic acid intake: potential health implications
Thomas W. M. Crozier, Angelique Stalmach, Michael E. J. Lean and Alan Crozier
Food Funct., 2012, 3, 30-33
DOI: 10.1039/C1FO10240K, Paper

Review of in vitro digestion models for rapid screening of emulsion-based systems
David Julian McClements and Yan Li
Food Funct., 2010, 1, 32-59
DOI: 10.1039/C0FO00111B, Review Article

Whole grain cereals: functional components and health benefits
Rafael Borneo and Alberto Edel León
Food Funct., 2012, 3, 110-119
DOI: 10.1039/C1FO10165J, Review Article

Development of oral food-grade delivery systems: Current knowledge and future challenges
Revital Cohen Benshitrit, Carmit Shani Levi, Sharon Levi Tal, Eyal Shimoni and Uri Lesmes
Food Funct., 2012, 3, 10-21
DOI: 10.1039/C1FO10068H, Review Article

The metabolism and analysis of isoflavones and other dietary polyphenols in foods and biological systems
Stephen Barnes, Jeevan Prasain, Tracy D’Alessandro, Ali Arabshahi, Nigel Botting, Mary Ann Lila, George Jackson, Elsa M. Janle and Connie M. Weaver
Food Funct., 2011, 2, 235-244
DOI: 10.1039/C1FO10025D, Review Article

Insights into the metabolism and microbial biotransformation of dietary flavan-3-ols and the bioactivity of their metabolites
Maria Monagas, Mireia Urpi-Sarda, Fernando Sánchez-Patán, Rafael Llorach, Ignacio Garrido, Carmen Gómez-Cordovés, Cristina Andres-Lacueva and Begoña Bartolomé
Food Funct., 2010, 1, 233-253
DOI: 10.1039/C0FO00132E, Review Article

Take a look at the articles and then post your thoughts and comments below.

Interested in submitting your own work to Food & Function? Submit online today, or email us with your suggestions.

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Webinar: The power of modern HPTLC

Chemistry World Webinars logo

Join Chemistry World and Advion for a webcast on the latest developments in HPTLC technology.

WHAT: Professor Morlock from the University of Giessen, Germany, will give an overview of current HPTLC methodology, explore some examples of HPTLC-MS coupling and review other current hyphenations in HPTLC. By the end of this free webinar, you will be able to:
- Recognise the power of modern HPTLC
- Learn about current hyphenations in HPTLC
- Understand the principle of elution-based HPTLC-MS
- Recognise how HPTLC hyphenations efficiently support analyses

WHEN: Wednesday, 20 March 2013 – 15:00 GMT

HOW: Click here to register (free)

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Food & Function issue 3 – now online!

Food & Function, issue 3, 2013, front coverThe latest issue of Food & Function is now available to read online.

In this month’s issue, the front cover highlights research by Zhaoping Li and colleagues from the University of California, Los Angeles, USA who report the beneficial health effects of adding Hass avocado to hamburgers.  The team found that ingesting the avocado with the hamburger patty led to beneficial anti-inflammatory and vascular health effects.  Participants in the study who ate 250 g of beef (without avocado) experienced a significant decrease in vascular reactivity, increase of serum IL-6 and NFκB activation in PBMCs – symptoms which could be reduced by adding avocado to meat sandwiches.

Read the full article for free for 6 weeks:

Hass avocado modulates postprandial vascular reactivity and postprandial inflammatory responses to a hamburger meal in healthy volunteers, Zhaoping Li, Angela Wong, Susanne M. Henning, Yanjun Zhang, Alexis Jones, Alona Zerlin, Gail Thames, Susan Bowerman, Chi-Hong Tseng and David Heber, Food Funct., 2013, 4, 384-391

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Food & Function welcomes new Advisory Board members

Food & Function would like to welcome seven internationally renowned researchers to the Food & Function Editorial Advisory Board team.

Zhen-yu Chen, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Research interests: cholesterol metabolism, antioxidants and ageing, nutraceuticals and functional foods

Peter Clifton, Baker IDI Heart & Diabetes Institute, Australia
Research interests: prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease and its risk antecedents, obesity and diabetes, by dietary means

Edith Feskens, Wageningen University, The Netherlands
Research interests: nutrition and health, obesity, cardiovascular diseases, metabolism, adipose tissue, fatty acids, fibre, diabetes mellitus, genetic polymorphism

Duo Li, Zhejiang University, China
Research interests: food bioactivity, food safety evaluation, relationship between non-communicable diseases and habitual dietary intake, evaluation of novel food and potential natural nutrient resources and how nutrients, food ingredients and natural products influence the expression of select genes

Young-Joon Surh, Seoul National University, South Korea
Research Interests: Cancer Prevention through Dietary Phytonutrients, investigate signal transduction mediated by redox-sensitive transcription factors including NF-kappa B, AP-1, p53, STAT3, and Nrf2.

Rob van Dam, National University of Singapore, Singapore
Research Interests: Nutritional Epidemiology, dietary determinants of obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Gow-Chin Yen, National Chung Hsing University, Taiwan
Research Interests: molecular mechanisms of free radical-induced damage, natural antioxidants in food and mechanisms of prevention of oxidative damage, functional foods and nutraceuticals, phytochemical chemoprevention

Many of these esteemed researchers are already strong supporters of the journal being authors and referees and their invaluable experience will now contribute to the development of the Journal. We are delighted to welcome them to the Advisory Board.

Stay up to date with the latest developments from Food & Function by signing up for free table of contents alerts, and read issue 1 for free online.

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Food & Function Volume 4, Issue 2 is now online

Food & Function Volume 4 Issue 2 CoverIssue 2 of Food & Function is now online and the cover highlights a paper by Maria Luz Fernandez and co-workers from the University of Connecticut, USA. 

Egg intake improves carotenoid status by increasing plasma HDL cholesterol in adults with metabolic syndrome
Christopher N. Blesso, Catherine J. Andersen, Bradley W. Bolling and Maria Luz Fernandez 

In their study daily intake of 3 whole eggs for 12 weeks, as part of a carbohydrate restricted dietary intervention for weight loss, increased both plasma and lipoprotein lutein and zeaxanthin, two sister carotenoids found in egg yolk. They demonstrate that egg yolk may represent an important food source to improve plasma carotenoid status in a population at high risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes.

Read the article online, free for 6 weeks!

Stay up to date with the latest developments from Food & Function by signing up for free table of contents alerts.

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Food & Function issue 1, 2013 now online!

Welcome to the first issue of Food & Function for 2013!  Read the Editorial by Professor Gary Williamson and Sarah Ruthven here.

The front cover of this issue features work by Alan Crozier and colleagues from the University of Glasgow, UK, and Welch Foods Inc., USA. The team investigated the aromatic compounds that result from colonic catabolism of Concord grape juice using an in vitro model of colonic fermentation. After consuming the grape juice substantial quantities of (poly)phenolic compounds reach the large intestine, where they are degraded to bioactive phenolic acids and aromatic compounds, which pass through the circulatory system before being excreted in the urine. The in vivo fate of these catabolites following absorption in the colon was also investigated by GC-MS. It was found that 40% of ingested (poly)phenolic compounds in Concord grape juice pass from the small to the large intestine and contributes to the increased bioavailabilty of the Concord grape polyphenolics.

Read the full article for free!

Colonic catabolism of dietary phenolic and polyphenolic compounds from Concord grape juice, Angelique Stalmach, Christine A. Edwards, Jo Lynne D. Wightman and Alan Crozier, Food Funct., 2012, 4, 52-62

You can keep up to date with the latest developments from Food & Function by signing up for free table of contents alerts and monthly e-newsletters.

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Is organic food more nutritious than non-organic food?

Different fertilisers and farming techniques affect the mineral content of plants in different ways

Different fertilisers and farming techniques affect the mineral content of plants in different ways

Scientists in Denmark have compared how organic and non-organic diets affect dietary mineral uptake in humans, focusing on copper and zinc. They found that there is no difference between the two diets when it comes to uptake and how the minerals are processed in the body.

Copper and zinc are two essential trace elements with unknown availability in organic verses non-organic diets. Alicja Budek Mark and colleagues at the University of Denmark investigated the content of these elements in non-organic versus all-organic diets fed to 20 men over 12 days. And Mark’s team assessed the in vivo absorption of zinc and copper by analysing faecal samples taken from the men during days 8–12.

Read the full article in Chemistry World.

Tweet: RT @ChemistryWorld There may be reasons to eat organic food, but improved mineral uptake isn’t one of them http://rsc.li/Zf6I6z 

Link to journal article
Consumption of organic diets does not affect intake and absorption of zinc and copper in men – evidence from two cross-over trials
Alicja Budek Mark, Emese Kápolna, Kristian H. Laursen, Ulrich Halekoh, Søren K. Rasmussen, Søren Husted, Erik H. Larsen and Susanne Bügel
Food Funct., 2013, Advanced Article
DOI: 10.1039/C2FO30247K

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Uncovering the secrets of tea

Tea

Flavanols from tea accumulate in the cell nucleus, which could help in understanding their beneficial health effects © Shutterstock

Everyone knows that a cup of tea is good for you, but the exact reasons for this are not clear. To discover the fundamentals of tea’s health benefits, scientists in Germany have investigated the interactions of compounds from tea with cells on a molecular level.

Both green and black tea contain  around 30,000 polyphenolic compounds, some of which have been shown to have numerous health benefits, including reducing cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and inflammation. Despite their positive effects, which have been seen in epidemiological findings and clinical trials, their exact biochemical mechanism is still not clear. Polyphenols can act as antioxidants, and for a long time this was thought to be the reason for their health benefits. However, recent studies have shown that this only plays a small part in their effectiveness.

Read the full article in Chemistry World.

Tweet: RT @ChemistryWorld We love a cup of tea at Chemistry World Towers but why exactly is it so good for you? http://rsc.li/TEfBON

Link to journal article
Phenolic promiscuity in the cell nucleus – epigallocatechingallate (EGCG) and theaflavin-3,3′-digallate from green and black tea bind to model cell nuclear structures including histone proteins, double stranded DNA and telomeric quadruplex DNA
Gediminas Mikutis, Hande Karaköse, Rakesh Jaiswal, Adam LeGresley, Tuhidul Islam, Marcelo Fernandez-Lahore and Nikolai Kuhnert
Food Funct., 2013, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C2FO30159H

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Food & Function issue 12 now published online

Issue 12 of Food & Function is now available to read online.

This month’s front cover highlights the review article by Juliet Gerrard and colleagues from New Zealand who look at the role the Maillard reaction has played in the formation of flavour compounds in dairy products.  There has been a lot of focus recently on the undesirable flavours produced through the Maillard reaction and how to minimize these, but the reaction also produces beneficial flavours as well.  This review looks at the reaction as the source of favourable flavours for cooked dairy products and the models used to study flavour formation in food systems.  They found that these models can be too simplified and are not easily applicable to complex food systems - identifying a gap which needs to be bridged.

The role of the Maillard reaction in the formation of flavour compounds in dairy products – not only a deleterious reaction but also a rich source of flavour compounds, Angela E. Newton, Antony J. Fairbanks, Matt Golding, Paul Andrewes and Juliet A. Gerrard, Food Funct., 2012, 3, 1231-1241

Your can read this article for free for 6 weeks!

You can keep up to date with the latest developments from Food & Function by signing up for free table of contents alerts and monthly e-newsletters.

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