HOT Articles in EES

The following HOT articles have been highlighted by the reviewers of the articles as being particularly interesting or significant pieces of research. These are all free to access until 30/9/2015. The order they appear in the list has no meaning or ranking.


Sodium intercalation chemistry in graphite
Haegyeom Kim, Jihyun Hong, Gabin Yoon, Hyunchul Kim, Kyu-Young Park, Min-Sik Park, Won-Sub Yoon and Kisuk Kang
Journal Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5EE02051D, Paper

C5EE02051D GA


Broadband and ultrahigh optical haze thin films with self-aggregated alumina nanowire bundles for photovoltaic applications
Gumin Kang, Kyuyoung Bae, Minwoo Nam, Doo-Hyun Ko, Kyoungsik Kim and Willie J. Padilla
Journal Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5EE01757B, Communication

C5EE01757B GA


Functional integration of Ni–Mo electrocatalysts with Si microwire array photocathodes to simultaneously achieve high fill factors and light-limited photocurrent densities for solar-driven hydrogen evolution
Matthew R. Shaner, James R. McKone, Harry B. Gray and Nathan S. Lewis
Journal Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5EE01076D, Paper

C5EE01076D GA


Reducing the charging voltage of a Li–O2 battery to 1.9 V by incorporating a photocatalyst
Yang Liu, Na Li, Shichao Wu, Kaiming Liao, Kai Zhu, Jin Yi and Haoshen Zhou
Journal Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5EE01958C, Communication

C5EE01958C GA


Biomass oxidation to formic acid in aqueous media using polyoxometalate catalysts – boosting FA selectivity by in-situ extraction
Jenny Reichert, Birgit Brunner, Andreas Jess, Peter Wasserscheid and Jakob Albert
Journal Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5EE01706H, Paper

C5EE01706H GA


Balancing the bioeconomy: supporting biofuels and bio-based materials in public policy
Jim Philp
Journal Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5EE01864A, Opinion

C5EE01864A GA


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Battery Buffer: Layered oxide that shrinks when ions intercalated

Battery electrodes are typically made from layered oxide materials. However, these layered oxides often undergo a positive ’strain effect’ or expansion when ions are incorporated into their structure. This can leads to inferior long-term cycling stability and reduced battery safety. However, scientists at the Chinese Academy of Sciences, have synthesised a negative strain layered oxide, Na0.5NbO2, which exhibits high stability, a long cycling life and an impressive rate performance. This material shrinks on intercalation of sodium ions which is thought to be a result of enhanced interlayer Na–O interactions and weakened Nb–Nb and Nb–O bonding. The researchers have also found that the material is suitable as an independent electrode material and as a buffer in composite electrodes, yet the high cost of niobium and the difficulty of synthesis may limit its future application. The lattice shrinks upon intercalation of sodium ions

Want to know more?

Read the full article in Chemistry World by Laura Fisher.

Or, take a look at the original article which is free to access until 9th September 2015:

Anti-P2 structured Na0.5NbO2 and its negative strain effect” by X. Wang et al.DOI:10.1039/C5EE01745A

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Water splitting using a single catalyst

Electrochemical water splitting typically requires two catalysts, one to evolve oxygen and one for hydrogen. However, scientists lead by Xile Hu at EPFL in Lausanne, Switzerland, have discovered that nickel phosphide can act as a catalyst, evolving both hydrogen oxygen from water simultaneously. Nickel phosphide was loaded onto a carbon electrode in an alkaline electrolyser which lead to the material adopting a core-shell structure, with a nickel phosphide core and an active nickel oxide species on the outside. The team observed successful water splitting, with the evolution of both hydrogen and oxygen and a current density of 10mA/cm2 at a low water splitting potential of 1.63V.

Want to know more?

Read the full article in Chemistry World by Osman Mohamed.

Or, take a look at the original article which is free to access until 7th August 2015:

Ni2P as a Janus catalyst for water splitting: the oxygen evolution activity of Ni2P nanoparticles” by L-A. Stern et al., DOI: 10.1039/C5EE01155H

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EES 2015 Readers’ Choice Lectureship

EES was delighted to present the 2015 Energy & Environmental Science Readers’ Choice Lectureship to Dr Miguel A. Modestino of EPFL, Switzerland, at the International Symposium on Energy Conversion and Storage that took place between 31 May-1st June at the Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IPE-CAS), Beijing, China.

Dr Modestino was awarded the lectureship as his Energy & Environmental Science publication, ‘Design and cost considerations for practical solar-hydrogen generators‘, was one of the most downloaded articles in 2014. Dr Modestino gave a presentation entitled ‘Unconventional water splitting approaches towards scalable solar-hydrogen generators’ which followed on from the work outlined in this article.

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EES Poster Prizes at the International Symposium on Energy Conversion and Storage

We recently awarded a number of Energy & Environmental Science poster prizes at the International Symposium on Energy Conversion and Storage that took place between 31 May-1st June at the Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IPE-CAS), Beijing, China. The symposium was organised by the Royal Society of Chemistry and was hosted by  Energy & Environmental Science Advisory Board member Dan Wang and attended by Executive Editor Anna Simpson.

The winners:

Yu Xin Zhang, Chongqing University, China

Hao Ren, IPE-CAS, China

Jiangyan Wang, IPE-CAS, China

Mingyuan Ma, University of Science and Technology in Beijing, China

Ruiqin Wang, China University of Petroleum (East China), China

Junqiang Zhang, China University of Petroleum (East China), China

Rui Zhang, Humboldt-Universität zu Berli, Germany

Yue Lu, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland

Haonan Si, University of Science and Technology in Beijing, China

Hongjie Tang, University of Science and Technology in Beijing, China

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Huge rise in EES Impact Factor to 20.52

We are delighted to announce a further huge rise in the Impact Factor* of Energy & Environmental Science to 20.52.

Energy & Environmental Science is now the #1 ranking journal in three subject categories; Chemical Engineering, Energy & Fuels, and Environmental Science.

This great news demonstrates that the journal continues to attract and publish important, very high-quality, agenda-setting research, while providing great author service.

We wish to thank all our Board members, authors and referees for their fantastic support – Energy & Environmental Science is your journal.

Please do continue to submit your best work to Energy & Environmental Science. We look forward to further success in the months and years ahead.

Check out the following selection of highly cited articles that contributed to this Impact Factor:

Verónica Palomares,  Paula Serras, Irune Villaluenga, Karina B. Hueso, Javier Carretero-Gonzálezb and Teófilo Rojo
DOI: 10.1039/C2EE02781J

James M. Ball, Michael M. Lee, Andrew Hey and Henry J. Snaith
DOI: 10.1039/C3EE40810H

Huilin Pan, Yong-Sheng Hu and Liquan Chen
DOI: 10.1039/C3EE40847G

Linfei Lai, Jeffrey R. Potts, Da Zhan, Liang Wang, Chee Kok Poh, Chunhua Tang, Hao Gong, Zexiang Shen, Jianyi Lin and Rodney S. Ruoff
DOI: 10.1039/C2EE21802J

Hao Jiang, Pooi See Lee and Chunzhong Li
DOI: 10.1039/C2EE23284G

*The Impact Factor provides an indication of the average number of citations per paper. Produced annually, Impact Factors are calculated by dividing the number of citations in a year by the number of citeable articles published in the preceding two years. Data based on 2014 Journal Citation Reports®, (Thomson Reuters, 2015).
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HOT Articles in EES

The following HOT articles have been highlighted by the reviewers of the articles as being particularly interesting or significant pieces of research. These are all free to access until 18/06/2015. The order they appear in the list has no meaning or ranking.


A thermodynamic tank model for studying the effect of higher hydrocarbons on natural gas storage in metal–organic frameworks
Hongda Zhang, Pravas Deria, Omar K. Farha, Joseph T. Hupp and Randall Q. Snurr
DOI: 10.1039/C5EE00808E, Paper

C5EE00808E GA


Hydrogen or batteries for grid storage? A net energy analysis
Matthew A. Pellow, Christopher J. M. Emmott, Charles J. Barnhart and Sally M. Benson
DOI: 10.1039/C4EE04041D, Analysis

C4EE04041D GA


A quantitative analysis of the efficiency of solar-driven water-splitting device designs based on tandem photoabsorbers patterned with islands of metallic electrocatalyst
Yikai Chen, Ke Sun, Heather Audesirk, Chengxiang Xiang and Nathan S. Lewis
DOI: 10.1039/C5EE00311C, Paper

C5EE00311C GA


Metal–organic frameworks and their derived nanostructures for electrochemical energy storage and conversion
Wei Xia, Asif Mahmood, Ruqiang Zou and Qiang Xu
DOI: 10.1039/C5EE00762C, Review Article

C5EE00762C GA


You can’t have an energy revolution without transforming advances in materials, chemistry and catalysis into policy change and action
Geoffrey A. Ozin
DOI: 10.1039/C5EE00907C, Perspective

C5EE00907C GA


A simple spiro-type hole transporting material for efficient perovskite solar cells
Paramaguru Ganesan, Kunwu Fu, Peng Gao, Ines Raabe, Kurt Schenk, Rosario Scopelliti, Jingshan Luo, Lydia H. Wong, Michael Grätzel and Mohammad Khaja Nazeeruddin
DOI: 10.1039/C4EE03773A, Communication

C4EE03773A GA

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Electricity harvested from magnetic noise

In Korea, Jungho Ryu and colleagues at the Korea Institute of Materials Science, have designed a magneto–mechano–electric generator that harvests magnetic energy from the environment.  It is made from a magnetostrictive single crystal composite that elongates and contracts in a low frequency magnetic field. The strain induced in this material outputs a voltage and Ryu’s team have demonstrated that their device can harvest energy from a vacuum pump cable to power 35 light emitting diodes. They are conducting further studies to improve its power density and the materials science community is excited about how this technology could be utilised in the future.

Want to know more?

Read the full article in Chemistry World by Heather Powell.

Or, take a look at the original article which is free to access until 15th June 2015:

Ubiquitous magneto-mechano-electric generator” by J. Ryu et al., DOI:10.1039/C5EE00414D

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Professor Henry Snaith elected Fellow of the Royal Society

Credit: University of Oxford

We are pleased to announce that Professor Henry Snaith, of the Clarendon Laboratory at Oxford University and Energy and Environmental Science Advisory Board member, has been elected a fellow of the Royal Society. Fellows of the Royal Society are elected for life through a peer review process on the basis of excellence in science and we would like to congratulate Henry on this achievement.

As head of the Photovolatic and Optoelectronic Device Group, Henry leads an interdisciplinary research team which focusses on optoelectronic materials synthesis, device development and characterisation with the primary focus of developing low cost photovoltaic concepts. Henry has pioneered the development of hybrid materials for energy and photovoltaics and the recent discovery of highly efficient perovskite solar cells has received much attention by the academic community and by industry as a low-cost alternative to silicon photovoltaics.

Read a selection of Henry’s papers – free to access until 15th June 2015:

Low-temperature processed meso-superstructured to thin-film perovskite solar cells, James M. Ball, Michael M. Lee, Andrew Hey and Henry J. Snaith, Energy Environ. Sci., 2013,6, 1739-1743, DOI: 10.1039/C3EE40810H

Formamidinium lead trihalide: a broadly tunable perovskite for efficient planar heterojunction solar cells, Giles E. Eperon, Samuel D. Stranks, Christopher Menelaou, Michael B. Johnston, Laura M. Herz and Henry J. Snaith, Energy Environ. Sci., 2014,7, 982-988, DOI: 10.1039/C3EE43822H

Sub-150 °C processed meso-superstructured perovskite solar cells with enhanced efficiency, Konrad Wojciechowski, Michael Saliba, Tomas Leijtens, Antonio Abate and Henry J. Snaith, Energy Environ. Sci., 2014,7, 1142-1147, DOI: 10.1039/C3EE43707H

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Membrane-less water splitting device

A water splitting electrolyser typically contains an ion-conducting membrane which separates the electrodes and keeps the oxygen and hydrogen apart, preventing explosion. However, these membranes are expensive and thus the development of a membrane-less electrolyser is an exciting advance. Researchers at Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne, led by Demetri Psaltis, have developed such a device by exploiting the Segré–Silberberg effect. The oxygen and hydrogen are kept separate as the distance between the two electrodes is less than a few hundred micrometres and they do not mix because lift forces in the narrow passage push them towards the wall they evolved from.This is a microfluidic device that provides promising proof-of-concept and the group are now attempting to scale up.

Want to know more?

Read the full article in Chemistry World by Isobel Marr.

Or, take a look at the original article which is free to access untill 1st June 2015:

A membrane-less electrolyzer for hydrogen production across the pH scale” by S. Mohammad H. Hashemi,  Miguel A. Modestino and Demetri Psaltis, DOI:10.1039/C5EE00083A

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