Archive for the ‘Focus on Topics’ Category

Focus on: Nanoparticle Delivery Systems

Developing nanoparticle formulations that can deliver drugs more effectively to the target sites with enhanced efficacy and reduced side effects has been an overarching goal in the field of nanobiotechnology. Dendrimers, micelles, and liposomes represent three major classes of nanoparticles that have shown promising results in drug delivery and bio-sensing.  Each type of nanoparticle has its own strengths and limitations in terms of the desirable payload, site of action, duration of action, release profile, and dosing frequency. Therefore, it is imperative to engineer these classical nanoparticle delivery systems for specific drug delivery application.

Nanoparticle delivery system

This month we focus on four articles published in Biomaterials Science reporting the recent advances in leveraging those different nanoparticle delivery systems for efficient, controlled, and targeted delivery of therapeutic agents.

1. Nucleobase-modified polyamidoamine-mediated miR-23b delivery to inhibit the proliferation and migration of lung cancer
Haobo Han, Jiebing Yang, Yudi Wang, Wenqi Chen, Jiawen Chen, Yan Yang and Quanshun Li
Biomater. Sci., 2017, 5, 2268. DOI: 10.1039/c7bm00599g

In the current study, the authors aimed to further improve the transfection efficiency and biocompatibility of conventional polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers. To this end, the surface of PAMAM was chemically modified with 2-amino-6-chloropurine. This modification further enhanced the carrier/DNA interaction via the fine balance of hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interaction. Compared to the prototype PAMAM, the modified PAMAM demonstrated higher transfection efficiency. In an in vitro model, this gene carrier delivered miR-23b, a potent anti-proliferative and anti-invasive agent, more efficiently into A549 cancer cells, indicating the potential of this carrier in cancer nanotherapy.

2. Novel poly(vinyl alcohol)-based amphiphilic nanogels by non-covalent boric acid crosslinking of polymeric micelles
Hen Moshe, Yuval Davizon, Maya Menaker Raskin and Alejandro Sosnik
Biomater. Sci., 2017, 5, 2295. DOI: 10.1039/c7bm00675f

Poor physical stability often presents as a major drawback for polymeric micelles. The authors addressed this issue by non-covalent crosslinking of a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) based polymeric micelles system with boric acid. Compared to the non-crosslinked control, this novel micelles demonstrated improved physical stability under harsh environment. More interestingly, these micelles could be spray-dried and efficiently consolidated into dry powders which were able to regenerate back into the original nanoparticles upon re-dispersion. This non-covalently crosslinked micelles also maintained good mucoadhesiveness and cytocompatibility.

3. Codelivery of sorafenib and GPC3 siRNA with PEI-modified liposomes for hepatoma therapy
Weitong Sun, Yong Wang, Mingyue Cai, Liteng Lin, Xiaoyan Chen, Zhong Cao, Kangshun Zhu and Xintao Shuai
Biomater. Sci., 2017, 5, 2468. DOI: 10.1039/c7bm00866j

Combination therapy using chemotherapeutic drugs and siRNA represents a promising strategy that can potentially induce and/or enhance the synergistic anticancer effects. To overcome the individual drawbacks of sorafenib and gene therapy, the authors developed a PEI based liposome system which allow the co-delivery of GPC3 siRNA and hydrophobic sorafenib molecule. The drug loaded liposomal delivery system displayed enhanced anticancer effects by suppressing the expression of the anti-apoptotic GPC3 gene and the proliferative cyclin D1 gene simultaneously in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) HepG2 cells. Further, the improved therapeutic effects of this delivery system was demonstrated in an in vivo xenograft model.

4. Dimeric camptothecin-loaded RGD-modified targeted cationic polypeptide-based micelles with high drug loading capacity and redox-responsive drug release capability
Zhaopei Guo, Xingzhi Zhou, Mengze Xu, Huayu Tian, Xuesi Chen and Meiwan Chen
Biomater. Sci., 2017, 5, 2501. DOI: 10.1039/c7bm00791d

To tackle the low bioavailability problem of camptothecin, the authors devised a novel polymeric micelles system composed of cationic polypeptide poly-lysine-block-poly-leucine, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide. The micelles system increased drug encapsulation efficiency, drug loading capacity, and physical stability of camptothecin. The RGD moiety further enhanced the intracellular uptake of micelles due to the cellular targeting capability of RGD sequence. Importantly, the drug loaded micelles effectively inhibited the proliferation of malignant MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells by inducing cellular apoptosis and decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential.

Read these articles for free until 10 January 2018

About the webwriterYingfei Xue

Yingfei Xue is a web writer for Biomaterials Science. Currently, he is a PhD candidate and graduate student researcher in Dr. Shilpa Sant lab at the University of Pittsburgh, USA.  His research focus on nano-/micro-technology in novel heart valve therapy. Find him on Twitter: @Phil_Xue or connect with him on ResearchGate

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Biomimetic materials collection – free until 23rd August

Biomaterials ScienceIf you’re a regular visitor to the Biomaterials Science blog you’ve probably already seen last weeks ‘Call for Papers on Biomimetic Materials’. Hopefully we’ll be able to highlight some interesting Biomaterials Science articles on this area soon– but in the meantime here are a few articles from Journal of Materials Chemistry and Soft Matter which I hope you’ll enjoy. They’re all free to read until 23rd August.   

Opinion
Innovation through imitation: biomimetic, bioinspired and biokleptic research
Andrea E. Rawlings, Jonathan P. Bramble and Sarah S. Staniland, Soft Matter, 2012, 8, 2675-2679

Feature Article
Biomimetic composites and stem cells interaction for bone and cartilage tissue regeneration
N. Naveena,  J. Venugopal,  R. Rajeswari,  S. Sundarrajan,  R. Sridhar,  M. Shayanti,  S. Narayanan and S. Ramakrishna, J. Mater. Chem., 2012, 22, 5239-5253

Review
Proteins in biomimetic membranes: promises and facts
Renate L. C. Naumann, Christoph Nowak and Wolfgang Knoll, Soft Matter, 2011, 7, 9535-9548

Click here to see all the articles

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Call for Papers: Biomimetic Materials

Biomaterials Science Biomaterials Science invites you to submit your next high impact article on ‘Biomimetic Materials’ to the journal.

Publishing only very high quality articles, the journal will cover the fundamental science of biomaterials though to their biomedical applications, including ‘biomimetic materials’.

Articles will be free to access* until the end of 2014 giving your article the widest possible audience.

We encourage you to support Biomaterials Science and not-for-profit publishing by contributing to the journal. You can find our online submission system at: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/bmsci

Don’t forget to keep up with the latest news from Biomaterials Science you can Like us on Facebook, Follow us on Twitter or sign up for the newsletter.

Sign up for the Biomaterials Science RSS feed or Table of Contents alert to find out about the first articles once they’re published online.

*Individuals can access the content by signing up for an RSC Publishing Personal Account. Existing institutional RSC journal subscribers, with registered IP, have automatic access. Other institutions can register for free access.

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Call for Papers & Free Access to Reviews on ‘Nanomaterials for Biomedical Applications’

Biomaterials ScienceBiomaterials Science is inviting submissions on ‘Nanomaterials for biomedical applications’

Publishing only very high quality articles, the journal will cover the fundamental science of biomaterials though to their biomedical applications, including ‘Nanomaterials for Biomedical Applications’.

Articles will be free to access* until the end of 2014 giving your article the widest possible audience. You can find our online submission system at: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/bmsci

Nanomaterials for biomedical applications is an important topic covered by Biomaterials Science so to celebrate the launch, and highlight this part of the journal scope, we’ve made a selection of reviews from across RSC journals free to read until 3rd August.

1. Feature Article: Fluorescent dye-doped silica nanoparticles: new tools for bioapplications
Se Won Bae, Weihong Tan and Jong-In Hong,
Chem. Commun., 2012, 48, 2270-2282

2. Review: Graphene: a versatile nanoplatform for biomedical applications
Yin Zhang, Tapas R. Nayak, Hao Hong and Weibo Cai,
Nanoscale, 2012, 4, 3833-3842

Click here to read the full list of articles

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A collection of articles on “Delivery systems” – free for 4 weeks

Biomaterials ScienceTo highlight another area of the scope of Biomaterials Science Delivery systems – we’re making a collection of articles from across RSC journals free for 4 weeks. I hope you enjoy reading them. 

1. Communication: Redox-sensitive polymeric nanoparticles for drug delivery
Hanjoung Cho,  Jungeun Bae,  Vivek K. Garripelli,  Joel M. Anderson,  Ho-Wook Jun and Seongbong Jo, Chem. Commun., 2012,48, 6043-6045

2. Review: Self-assembly of biodegradable polyurethanes for controlled delivery applications
Mingming Ding,  Jiehua Li,  Hong Tan and Qiang Fu, Soft Matter, 2012,8, 5414-5428

3. Critical Review: Functionalized mesoporous silica materials for controlled drug delivery
Piaoping Yang,  Shili Gai and Jun Lin, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2012,41, 3679-3698

Click here to read the full collection of articles

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Materials for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative medicine – Free for 4 weeks

Biomaterials ScienceIf you’re a regular reader of our blog hopefully you’ve already read about the launch of Biomaterials Science; but in case you haven’t Biomaterials Science is a new journal published by RSC Publishing in collaboration with the Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences, Kyoto University, Japan. You can read about the scope of Biomaterials Science here, but briefly Biomaterials Science will cover the fundamental science of biomaterials through to their biomedical applications.

Biomaterials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine is an important topic covered by Biomaterials Science so to celebrate the launch, and highlight the area, we’ve made a selection of articles from across RSC journals free to read for 4 weeks.
 

Click here for the full list of free articles

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Highlighting the Molecular Design of Biomaterials

Biomaterials Science has a broad scope that covers the fundamental science of biomaterials through to their biomedical applications. We’ll be highlighting different areas of the scope over the next few months and this week its…

Molecular Design of Biomaterials

To celebrate this we’ve made a few articles published in RSC journals free to access for 4 weeks. I hope you enjoy reading them. 

Naoto Saito ,  Kaoru Aoki ,  Yuki Usui ,  Masayuki Shimizu ,  Kazuo Hara ,  Nobuyo Narita ,  Nobuhide Ogihara ,  Koichi Nakamura ,  Norio Ishigaki ,  Hiroyuki Kato ,  Hisao Haniu ,  Seiichi Taruta ,  Yoong Ahm Kim and Morinobu Endo
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2011, 40, 3824-3834

2. Feature Article: A material’s point of view on recent developments of polymeric biomaterials: control of mechanical and biochemical properties
Varvara Gribova ,  Thomas Crouzier and Catherine Picart
J. Mater. Chem., 2011, 21, 14354-14366

3. Emerging Area: Emerging area: biomaterials that mimic and exploit protein motion 
William L. Murphy
Soft Matter
, 2011, 7, 3679-3688

Cameron P. Brown ,  Federico Rosei ,  Enrico Traversa and Silvia Licoccia
Nanoscale, 2011, 3, 870-876

5. Paper: Tuning the swelling and mechanical properties of pH-responsive doubly crosslinked microgels using particle composition
Ruixue Liu ,  Amir H. Milani ,  Jennifer. M. Saunders ,  Tony J. Freemont and Brian R. Saunders
Soft Matter, 2011, 7, 9297-9306

 Biomaterials Science

Articles in Biomaterials Science will be free to access* until the end of 2014 so they’ll reach the widest possible audience. We hope you’ll support Biomaterials Science by submitting your next article to the journal.

*Individuals can access the content by signing up for an RSC Publishing Personal Account. Existing institutional RSC journal subscribers, with registered IP, have automatic access. Other institutions can register for free access.

Sign up sign up for the Biomaterials Science RSS feed or Table of Contents alert to read the first articles once they’re published online.

To keep up with the latest news you can Like us on Facebook or Follow us on Twitter.

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Do you want your next paper to be read all over the world?

Biomaterials Science cover imageHopefully you’ve seen our previous announcements, but if you missed them RSC Publishing and the Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences, Kyoto University, Japan are launching a new journal – Biomaterials Science. This will be an international, high impact journal bringing together the molecular and mesoscopic interactions of biomaterials and their applications.

Articles in Biomaterials Science will be free to access* until the end of 2014 which means they will reach the widest possible audience. We invite you to support Biomaterials Science and not-for-profit publishing by submitting your next article: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/bmsci

If you’re wondering what the journal will cover you can read About Biomaterials Science here, but briefly Biomaterials Science has a broad scope that covers the fundamental science of biomaterials through to their biomedical applications. We’ll be highlighting different areas of the scope over the next few months but to start off with…

Mesoscopic science of cells and materials

Biomaterials Science will publish articles covering fundamental and applied research on Mesoscopic science of cells and materials. To celebrate this we’ve made a few articles published in RSC journals free to access for 4 weeks. I hope you enjoy reading them. 

Don’t forget Biomaterials Science is now accepting submissions. Please don’t hesitate to contact the editorial office if you have any questions. We look forward to receiving your work.

*Individuals can access the content by signing up for an RSC Publishing Personal Account. Existing institutional RSC journal subscribers, with registered IP, have automatic access. Other institutions can register for free access.

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