Analytical Methods Impact Factor highest ever: 1.94!

Analytical Methods, 2014, Issue 1We are delighted to announce our highest Impact Factor* yet with 1.94!

Analytical Methods has continued its impressive growth. The journal maintains its position as a place to publish exciting research on early applied demonstrations of new analytical methods with clear societal impact.

Submissions focus on the advancement of analytical technologies for wider application by the international scientific community. Areas covered include developments within the fields of healthcare, pharmaceuticals and biomedical diagnostics, environmental and forensic analysis, heritage science, agricultural science and food products, industrial process development and product validation.

The Editorial office thanks all of our Board members, authors, readers and reviewers for their continued support.

We invite you to submit your latest piece of high impact work with us here.

Click through to see how the other Royal Society of Chemistry journals did.

*The Impact Factor provides an indication of the average number of citations per paper. Produced annually, Impact Factors are calculated by dividing the number of citations in a year by the number of citeable articles published in the preceding two years. Data based on 2013 Journal Citation Reports®, (Thomson Reuters, 2014).

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Close encounters of the fatty acid kind

Jason Woolford writes about an Analytical Methods article in Chemistry world

A new strategy for analysing fatty acids could one day play a role in determining whether or not life exists on other worlds.

It’s an exciting time in our search for life beyond Earth. New exoplanets are discovered almost daily by the Kepler space observatory. The Cassini mission to Saturn and the Mars Exploration Rovers have transformed our understanding of the solar system. Finding at least simple microscopic life seems only a matter of time and clues to recognise extraterrestrial microorganisms may come by identifying fatty acids from their cell membranes.

Labelling the fatty acids with a fluorescent dye allows them to be detected via laser induced fluorescence

Peter Willis and a team of researchers at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in California, US, have developed a microchip analyser that distinguishes a broad range of fatty acids by the length of their carbon chains. Willis says that this is an important advance because ‘different microorganisms have cell membranes with different carbon chain length signatures.’ Algal fatty acids, for example, tend to be around the C20/C22 mark whereas bacterial fatty acids are typically C16/C18 in length. ‘So by measuring these molecules in an unknown sample we can gain information about what organisms were present, even if the sample is very old and the organisms are no longer alive.’

Why not read the full article in Chemistry World now!

Microchip nonaqueous capillary electrophoresis of saturated fatty acids using a new fluorescent dye
M. L. Cable, A. M. Stockton, M. F. Mora, K. P. Hand and P. A. Willis
Anal. Methods, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY01243G

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Analytical Methods Poster Prizes: Gordon Research Conference on Bioanalytical Sensors

Analytical Methods Executive Editor Anna Simpson and Editor in Chief Susan Lunte congratulate the poster prize winners at the Gordon Research Conference on Bioanalytical Sensors, June 22nd to 27th, 2014, Salve Regina University, Newport, USA.

We are pleased to announce that the four Analytical Methods Poster Prizes from the recent Gordon Research Conference on Bioanalytical Sensors: Twenty First Century Technologies for Probing Biological Systems, held at the Salve Regina University in Newport, USA, have been awarded to the following young investigators and postdocs:

 Yong Zeng

 Hitomi Mukaibo

 Young Zeng (University of Kansas)  Hitomi Mukaibo (University of Rochester)

 Mariam Ayub

 Stephanie Walter

 Mariam Ayub (University of Oxford)  Stephanie Walter (Tufts)

 

Congratulations to all of the winners!

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Recent HOT articles in Analytical Methods

Take a look at our new hot articles just published in Analytical Methods. These papers are all free to read for the next few weeks. We hope you enjoy reading them!

Handheld and non-destructive methodologies for the compositional investigation of meteorite fragmentsHandheld and non-destructive methodologies for the compositional investigation of meteorite fragments
Vincenza Crupi, Alessandra Giunta, Barry Kellett, Francesca Longo, Giacomo Maisano, Domenico Majolino, Antonella Scherillo and Valentina Venuti
Anal. Methods, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY00253A

Electrochemical detection of pathogenic bacteria by using a glucose dehydrogenase fused zinc finger protein
Jinhee Lee, Atsuro Tatsumi, Koichi Abe, Wataru Yoshida, Koji Sode and Kazunori Ikebukuro
Anal. Methods, 2014,6, 4991-4994
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY00977K

A signal on aptamer-based electrochemical sensing platform using a triple-helix molecular switch
Yudan Du, Yinfei Mao, Xiaoxiao He, Kemin Wang, Genping Yan, Jinquan Liu and Yonghong Wang
Anal. Methods, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY00807C

Determination of spatial and temporal variability of pH and dissolved oxygen concentrations in a seasonally hypoxic semi-enclosed marine basin using continuous monitoring

Timothy Sullivan, Ciara Byrne, Luke Harman, John Davenport, Rob McAllen and Fiona Regan
Anal. Methods, 2014,6, 5489-5497
DOI: 10.1039/C3AY42162G

Electromembrane extraction followed by high performance liquid chromatography: an efficient method for extraction and determination of morphine, oxymorphone, and methylmorphine from urine samplesElectromembrane extraction followed by high performance liquid chromatography: an efficient method for extraction and determination of morphine, oxymorphone, and methylmorphine from urine samples
Yadollah Yamini, Ali Pourali, Shahram Seidi and Maryam Rezazadeh
Anal. Methods, 2014,6, 5554-5565
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY00480A

Determination of parabens in human urine by liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry
Shaoyou Lu, Shihan Gong, Shengtao Ma, Xiangying Zeng, Zhiqiang Yu, Guoying Sheng and Jiamo Fu
Anal. Methods, 2014,6, 5566-5572
DOI: 10.1039/C3AY42063A

Amplified detection of bleomycin based on an electrochemically driven recycling strategy
Shan Lu, Mei Yang, Xiaoxi Li, Xinjian Liu, Yongmei Yin and Ya Cao
Anal. Methods, 2014,6, 5573-5577
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY00989D

Preconcentration and determination of chromium species by cloud point extraction-flame atomic absorption spectrometry
Limin Zhang, Xuelei Li, Xiaoyan Wang, Wentao Wang, Xiangshu Wang and Huayun Han
Anal. Methods, 2014,6, 5578-5583
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY00922C

A review of sample preparation methods for quantitation of small-molecule analytes in brain tissue by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)
Pei Li and Michael G. Bartlett
Anal. Methods, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY00915K

Detection of Escherichia coli in potable water using personal glucose meters
Ravi Chavali, Naga Siva Kumar Gunda, Selvaraj Naicker and Sushanta K. Mitra
Anal. Methods, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY01249F

A new screening method for recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains based on their xylose fermentation ability measured by near infrared spectroscopy
A new screening method for recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains based on their xylose fermentation ability measured by near infrared spectroscopy
Hiroyuki Morita, Tomohisa Hasunuma, Maria Vassileva, Akihiko Kondo and Roumiana Tsenkova
Anal. Methods, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY00785A

Kernel k-nearest neighbor classifier based on decision tree ensemble for SAR modeling analysis
Xin Huang, Qing-Song Xu, Dong-Sheng Cao, Yi-Ping Luo and Yi-Zeng Liang
Anal. Methods, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY00836G

Cotton fabric as an immobilization matrix for low-cost and quick colorimetric enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)
Saeedeh Bagherbaigi, Emma P. Córcoles and Dedy H. B. Wicaksono
Anal. Methods, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY01071J

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Forbidden Fruit Now Edible: New Mass Spectrometry Approach for Food Pesticide Detection

To ensure high crop yield, the addition of pesticides to crops may seem like a necessary evil. However, most applied chemicals have adverse side-effects to our health. Consequently, simple, effective, and accurate methods of pesticide detection is critical for safe food consumption. Unfortunately, most direct methods of pesticide detection that do not require sample preparation can only provide qualitative results. Furthermore, methods that are capable of quantitative analysis require complicated, time-consuming procedures of sample preparation prior to analysis. Anastasia Albert from the University of Muenster, Carsten Engelhard from the University of Siegen and other colleagues from Germany have evaluated ambient desorption/ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (ADI-HR-MS) for quantitative pesticide detection in fruit, and have devised a streamlined procedure for effective analysis. Find out more about their discovery by accessing the link below:

ADI-HR Mass Spectrometry for Pesticide Detection in Fruit

ADI-HR Mass Spectrometry for Pesticide Detection in Fruit

Rapid and quantitative analysis of pesticides in fruits by QuEChERS pretreatment and low-temperature plasma desorption/ionization orbitrap mass spectrometry

Anastasia Albert, Andrea Kramer, Simon Scheeren and Carsten Engelhard

Anal. Methods, 2014, Advance Article

DOI: 10.1039/C4AY00103F

Leave a comment to share your thoughts with us!

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HOT articles in Analytical Methods

Take a look at our new hot articles just published in Analytical Methods. These papers are all free to read for the next few weeks. Enjoy the reading!

Determination of boron in silicon without use of additional complexing agents
Matthias Balski, Franziska Emmerling, Heinrich Kipphardt and Ulrich Panne 
Anal. Methods, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY00410H, Paper

Rapid and quantitative analysis of pesticides in fruits by QuEChERS pretreatment and low-temperature plasma desorption/ionization orbitrap mass spectrometry
Anastasia Albert, Andrea Kramer, Simon Scheeren and Carsten Engelhard 
Anal. Methods, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY00103F, Paper

Time-gated fluorescence sensor for silver ions using Mn:CdS/ZnS quantum dots/DNA/gold nanoparticle complexes
Xiaoyan Leng, Dawei Huang, Chenggang Niu, Xiaoyu Wang, Guangming Zeng and Qiuya Niu 
Anal. Methods, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3AY42129E, Paper

Rapid measurement of total polyphenols content in cocoa beans by data fusion of NIR spectroscopy and electronic tongue
Xingyi Huang, Ernest Teye, Livingstone K. Sam-Amoah, Fangkai Han, Liya Yao and William Tchabo 
Anal. Methods, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY00223G, Paper

Protein/peptide purification by three-well OFFGEL electrophoresis with immobilized ultra narrow pH gradient gels
Elena Tobolkina, Fernando Cortés-Salazar, Liang Qiao and Hubert H. Girault 
Anal. Methods, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY00088A, Paper

A formaldehyde trace gas sensor based on a thermoelectrically cooled CW-DFB quantum cascade laser
Jingsong Li, Uwe Parchatka and Horst Fischer 
Anal. Methods, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3AY41964A, Paper

New insights on blue pigments used in 15th century paintings by synchrotron radiation-based micro-FTIR and XRD
Nati Salvadó, Salvador Butí, Miguel A. G. Aranda and Trinitat Pradell 
Anal. Methods, 2014,6, 3610-3621
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY00424H, Paper

Real-time detection of chemical warfare agent simulants in forensic samples using active capillary plasma ionization with benchtop and field-deployable mass spectrometers
Morphy Dumlao, Pablo Martinez-Lozano Sinues, Maryia Nudnova and Renato Zenobi 
Anal. Methods, 2014,6, 3604-3609
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY00303A, Paper

Determination of iodinated X-ray contrast agents in pharmaceutical formulations and artificial urine samples by differential pulse voltammetry
Piotr Markowski, Katarzyna Piwowar and Irena Baranowska 
Anal. Methods, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY00538D, Paper

Amplified fluorescence sensing of miRNA by combination of graphene oxide with duplex-specific nuclease
Shuang Guo, Fan Yang, Yulin Zhang, Yong Ning, Qunfeng Yao and Guo-Jun Zhang 
Anal. Methods, 2014,6, 3598-3603
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY00345D, Paper

Which spectroscopic technique allows the best differentiation of coffee varieties: comparing principal component analysis using data derived from CD-, NMR- and IR-spectroscopies and LC-MS in the analysis of the chlorogenic acid fraction in green coffee beans
Sagar Deshpande, Rasha M. El-Abassy, Rakesh Jaiswal, Pinkie Eravuchira, Bernd von der Kammer, Arnulf Materny and Nikolai Kuhnert 
Anal. Methods, 2014,6, 3268-3276
DOI: 10.1039/C3AY41970C, Paper

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Dr Stuart Chalk – new Advisory Board member for Analytical Abstracts

Analytical Abstracts would like to welcome a new Advisory Board member to the Board: Dr Stuart Chalk.

Stuart Chalk

Stuart Chalk

Dr. Stuart J. Chalk is an Associate Professor in the Department of Chemistry. Dr. Chalk’s research emphasis is in the areas of environmental monitoring, XML tools for Chemical Informatics, linked chemical data, and the semantic web. Dr. Chalk joined UNF in 1996.  Since then he has received an Undergraduate Teaching Award, published the first two UNF patents, and was co-PI on an NSF funded grant for the Analytical Sciences Digital Library (http://www.asdlib.org), a digital library for the enhancement of analytical science education.  In 1997 he created the Flow Analysis Database, an online resource for searching the flow analysis literature (http://www.fia.unf.edu/).

Currently, Dr. Chalk is working on colorimetric methods of analysis for the determination of cyanide, nitrate/nitrite and phosphate/arsenate.  He is the software and metadata architect of an open source electronic laboratory notebook called the Eureka Research Workbench and designer of the Experiment Markup Language (ExptML), a markup language created to capture and store research data from scientific experiments (http://exptml.sourceforge.net). Dr. Chalk is also one of the authors of the Lower St. Johns River Report (http://www.sjrreport.com), a City of Jacksonville Environmental Protect Board grant, and is the curator/developer of the UNF Environmental Center’ Digital Archive project.

Stuart joins the rest of the Advisory Board in the oversight of the Royal Society of Chemistry’s premier current awareness and information retrieval service for analytical scientists.

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Rapid blood test for critically ill newborns

Test for methylarginines in newborn infants

Test for methylarginines in newborn infants

Developing an analytical technique for use in the field of neo-natal intensive care presents a significant challenge to researchers. Newborn infants who are very premature and unwell can’t safely provide large blood samples for analysis, and a fast turn-around of lab results is crucial for a life-saving diagnosis.

Methylarginines (MAs) are nitric oxide synthase inhibitors which have been linked to respiratory problems in newborns. Researchers led by Susan Lunte at the University of Kansas, USA, report the use of capillary electrophoresis (CE) to measure and track methylarginine concentrations in infant blood plasma for the first time. Their newly developed sample preparation and separation methods are specifically designed to cope with low volume plasma samples, and the results confirm that infants in neo-natal intensive care units (NICUs) have extremely high MA levels.

Click the link below to read more… This article will be free to access until June 7th.

Determination of methylarginines in infant plasma by CE-LIF
Thomas H. Linz and Susan M. Lunte
Anal. Methods, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY00340C

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HOT articles in Analytical Methods

Take a look at our new HOT articles just published in Analyst and free for you for the next couple of weeks: Graphical abstract: Determination of biochemical parameters in human serum by near-infrared spectroscopy

Determining striatal extracellular glutamate levels in xCT mutant mice using LFPS CE-LIF
Srivani Borra, Elizabeth A. McCullagh, David E. Featherstone, Phillip M. Baker, Michael E. Ragozzino and Scott A. Shippy
Anal. Methods, 2014,6, 2916-2922
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY00392F, Paper

Ultrasound-assisted cloud point extraction coupled with flame atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of lead and cadmium in water samples
Zonghao Li, Jiaxi Chen, Mousheng Liu and Yaling Yang
Anal. Methods, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY00211C, Paper

Determination of biochemical parameters in human serum by near-infrared spectroscopy
J. L. García-García, D. Pérez-Guaita, J. Ventura-Gayete, S. Garrigues and M. de la Guardia
Anal. Methods, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3AY42198H, Paper

Colorimetric detection of mercury based on a strip sensor
Changrui Xing, Liqiang Liu, Xun Zhang, Hua Kuang and Chuanlai Xu
Anal. Methods, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3AY42002G, Paper

Synthesis, cytotoxicity and bioimaging of a novel Hg2+ selective fluorogenic chemosensor
Muhammad Saleem, Razack Abdullah, Anser Ali, Bong Joo Park, Eun Ha Choi, In Seok Hong and Ki Hwan Lee Graphical abstract: Colorimetric detection of ATP with DNAzyme: design an activatable hairpin probe for reducing background signals and improving selectivity
Anal. Methods, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY00314D, Paper

Determination of methylarginines in infant plasma by CE-LIF
Thomas H. Linz and Susan M. Lunte
Anal. Methods, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY00340C, Paper

Colorimetric detection of ATP with DNAzyme: design an activatable hairpin probe for reducing background signals and improving selectivity
Weiju Chen, Yaping Hu, Jishan Li, Yinhui Li, Junhui Bai, Jing Zheng and Ronghua Yang
Anal. Methods, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AY00380B, Communication

To view these article for free, please register for a free RSC account here

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A new PLS method for studying nonlinearity

Laura Ruvuna is guest web writer for Analytical Methods. She is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, USA.

Statistical methods such as partial least squares (PLS) and principle component analysis (PCA) have been used to process vibrational spectra in order to understand certain trends between samples and their spectra. However, these methods and similar ones break down when the variables demonstrate a nonlinear relationship.

Guangzaho Huang and researchers at Wenzhou University explored updating a genetic algorithm to process nonlinear data. They found that this genetic algorithm PLS (GS-PLS) model performed more effectively than other PLS models did, particularly when nonlinearity was the primary restricting factor.  The GS-PLS worked in both simulated data sets and using near infrared spectra from different materials.

To read more about this new method, click the link below. It will be free to read until May 11th.

A segmented PLS method based on genetic algorithm
Guangzao Huang,  Xiukai Ruan,  Xiaojing Chen,  Dongxiu Lina and  Wenbin Liua
Anal. Methods, 2014, 6, 2900-2908
DOI: 10.1039/C3AY41765D

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