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RSC Desktop Seminars with Brazilian Chemical Society Organic Chemistry Division

RSC Desktop Seminars in Organic Chemistry with the Brazilian Chemical Society 2020 are an initiative from the Royal Society of Chemistry and the Brazilian Chemical Society to bring cutting-edge research directly to you!

Covid-19 has exposed us to a new reality where the virtual world is much more important than before. In order to keep our students engaged at the frontiers of Organic Chemistry, we have organized a weekly webinar series that is a joint collaboration between the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) and the Organic Chemistry Division of the Brazilian Chemical Society (SBQ). It is an alternative way to share work and interact with potential collaborators.

The sections will alternate between Brazilian and international speakers, in some cases with the opportunity for a selected Brazilian early career researcher to engage with the audience by presenting their recent independent career developments.

Program 18 August 2020 | 11:30 (BRT) | 15:30 (BST) and next ones

11:30 Introductions and welcome
11:35 Early Career presentation with Q&A
11:50 Main Presentation with Q&A
12:45 Closing remarks
13:00 Close

Registration:  www.rsc.li/seminar-18aug

 


RSC Desktop Seminars in Organic Chemistry with the Brazilian Chemical Society will happen every week at 11:30 (BRT) and we will keep you updated about the registration links and program. We already have confirmed the following speakers and dates.

 

NEXT Speakers 

 

25 August 2020 
Prof. Dr. Corinna Schindler Prof. Dr. Julio Pastre (Early Career)
University of Michigan Universidade de Campinas-UNICAMP
Title: Catalytic Carbonyl-Olefin Metathesis Title: Continuous Flow Synthesis of the URAT1 Inhibitor Lesinurad

 

3 September 2020 (this day we will have 3 Early Career talks of 15 min each)
Prof. Dr. Fernanda Rosa (Early Career) Prof. Dr. Louis Sandjo (Early Career)
Universidade Estadual de Maringá-UEM Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina-UFSC
Title: From acyclic to cyclic Beta-enamino  diketones: versatile intermediates for the regioselective synthesis of aza-heterocycles                   Title: Dereplication strategy by LC-ESI-MS for rapid identification of natural products in anti-inflammatory and antiprotozoal food by-products and food mixtures
Prof. Dr. Airton Salles (Early Career)
Universidade de Campinas-UNICAMP
Title: Forget the Fancy Stuff: Green Chemistry made Simple to Build Interesting Molecules

 

10 September  2020 
Prof. Dr. Cristiano Raminelli Prof. Dr. Fernanda Finelli (Early Career)
Univ. Federal de São Paulo-UNIFESP Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro – UFRJ-IPPN
Title: TMS-Aryl Trifluoromethanesulfonates in Benzyne Chemistry: Limitations and New Challenges Title: Investigations on drug discovery and process development through photoredox and organocatalysis

 

17 September  2020 
Prof. Dr. Liane Rossi Prof. Dr. Marcelo Rodrigues (Early Career)
Universidade de São Paulo-USP Universidade de Brasília-UnB
Title: Update on selective hydrogenations catalyzed by gold Title: Nanotechnology and Sustainable Agriculture: Challenges and Solutions

 

24 September  2020 
Prof. Dr. Corolina Andrade Prof. Dr. Igor Jurberg (Early Career)
Universidade Federal de Goiás-UFG Universidade de Campinas-UNICAMP
Title: Artificial Intelligence Based Platforms for Accelerating Drug Repositioning and Discovery for Neglected and Emerging Diseases Title: The Power of Conjugation: Visible Light-Mediated Transformations of Aryldiazoacetates

 

29 September  2020 
Prof. Dr. Luiz Cláudio A. Barbosa Prof. Dr. Jefferson Princival (Early Career)
Univ. Federal de Minas Gerais-UFMG Universidade Federal de Pernambuco-UFPE
Title: Advances in tetronamide chemistry: synthesis of natural and unnatural bioactive compounds Title: Improving biocatalytic process for sustainable conversion of small polyfunctional building blocks

 

1 October  2020 (to be confirmed)

 

 


History of the Series

Those who registered received a link of the recording. Check your e-mail!

4 August 2020

 

11 August 2020

 

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Medicinal and Catalysis Chemistry in Brazil: New Directions ⇔ and Beyond

The Royal Society of Chemistry office in São Paulo recently supported and sponsored two events in Brazil that sound like opposites to each other. Similarities appeared on two fronts: difficulties in keeping science running, such as promoting events, and the role of Women in Science, both live discussions. Pirinópolis in Goias State with its historical landscape and natural beauty hosted the 9th edition of the Brazilian Medicinal Chemistry Symposium, BrazMedChem. The region is known for its falls, food and local culture, which includes “Cavalhada“.

Carvalhada parade during the meeting

More and more, the natural products and computational fields are embracing medicinal chemistry. It was interesting to see how the discussion about gender equality, career progress and interactions with pharma companies were inserted into the program. The conference benefited from a panel discussion on “Women in Medicinal Chemistry: Why so Few?” with Sylvie Garneau-Tsodikova, Maria Cristina Nonato, Vanderlan Bolzani and Gunda Georg. All of them talked about their own experiences and actions to overcome the difficulties in teaching MedChem to young female students and conducting research in the area as a woman.

Prof. Garneau-Tsodikova gave an emotional testimonial about balancing motherhood and research when she saw another professor in the audience with her baby in a sling. It was a sign that everything is possible and having a family is a natural part of women’s lives.

M. Cristina Nonato, G. Georg, Sylvie  Garneau-Tsodikova and Vanderlan Bolzani

Sylvie Garneau-Tsodikova and and Vanderlan Bolzani

Sylvie Garneau-Tsodikova giving her scientific talk.

Prof. Garneau-Tsodikova’s scientific talk was “Towards understanding, engineering, and developing novel nonribosomal peptide enzymes” and she was also pleased to see local schools invited to take part of the event, with some experiments to showcase what chemistry can do and call their attention to science in general. RSC engaged with the meeting in different ways: Prof Gonçalo Bernardes officially received his Lectureship certificate from Prof. Garneau-Tsodikova, an RSC Medicinal Chemistry (formerly known as MedChemComm) Associate Editor, right before giving his talk:

Prof. Gonçalo is part of the Advisory Board of Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry (OBC). We also co-supported an Early Career Award for Prof. Luis O Ragasini from USP-RP:

At the final ceremony, RSC offered four poster prizes (as book vouchers and electronic subscriptions) and the proud winners are shown below:

Guilherme M. Silva (USP-RP) receiving his OBC poster prize from Prof Angelo de Fátima (UFMG)

Micael Cunha – USP.SP receiving his RSC Advances poster prize from Prof Vanessa Pasqualotto (UFG)

Francisco L. de Oliveira supervisor (Prof G. Zanatta – UFC) receiving the MedChemComm poster prize from Prof Alexandre Orsato (UEL)

Daniel Carvalho Santos – UNIFESP receiving his MedChemComm poster prize from Prof Gustavo Trossini (USP)

We also had the opportunity to see the interactions of many institutions and companies with the researchers, such as DNDi and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, who were present to discuss the future of drugs for neglected diseases.

This brings me to the next event that happened almost at the same time, the 20th edition of the Brazilian Congress on Catalysis, CBCat in São Paulo. The organizers managed to engage both catalysis companies and energy ones as well. If Brazilian researchers keep up these interactions, the research landscape will change, as well as the way academia communicates with industry and the other way around. It is past time to break the barriers of innovation. During the Catalysis Congress, the main goal was to show how catalysis can be applied to different fields, from organic synthesis to fuels. Again, the discussion around CO2 used as a feedstock or as an energy building block brought together different views. 

At the final ceremony and with the support of two of our Editorial Board Members, RSC was able to provide four poster prizes (as book vouchers) from the following journals:

…and the proud winners are shown below:

Thatiane Veríssimo Dos Santos (UFAL-AL) receiving his RSC Advances poster prize from Prof Heloise Pastore (Editorial Board member, RSC Advances – UNICAMP)

Christian Carlos De Sousa (UFF-RJ) receiving his ChemComm poster prize from Prof Javier Perez-Ramirez (Editor in Chief, Catalysis Science & Technology – ETH Zurich)

Wesley F. Monteiro (PUC-RS) receiving his Dalton Trans./New J. Chem. poster prize from Prof Javier Perez-Ramirez (Editor in Chief, Catalysis Science & Technology -ETH Zurich)

Letícia Rasteiro (IQSC/USP-SC) receiving his Catalysis Science & Technology/PCCP poster prize from Prof Javier Perez-Ramirez (Editor in Chief, Catalysis Science & Technology -ETH Zurich)

 

 

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Congratulations to the ACS Reaction Mechanisms Conference poster prize winners!

We want to say congratulations to the winners of the RSC poster prizes at the recent ACS Reaction Mechanisms Conference, hosted by University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada!

Juliet Macharia won the prize from Catalysis Science & Technology. Juliet is originally from Kenya and is now a fourth-year Ph.D. candidate in the field of organic chemistry at the Binghamton University in New York. Juliet says her career in science was led by curiosity. She wants to understand how and why things happen the way they do to provide a “path to illumination of the many mysteries of the universe.”

Juliet Macharia with her poster

Juliet’s current research focuses on the chemistry of a class of compounds called “arylboronic acids”. These molecules are widely used in fine chemical, pharmaceutical, agrochemical, and modern-material industries due to their stability, easy preparation and environmental benign nature. The key step in many reactions employing arylboronic acids involves carbon-boron (C-B) bond cleavage. Due to the relative inertness of the C-B bond, the in-situ generation of a more reactive ‘boronate’ species is considered to be vital to the success of these reactions. Her goal is to determine the exact mechanism of C-B cleavage in reactions using a physical organic tool, Kinetic Isotope Effects (KIEs) at natural abundance. In the future, she will utilize the mechanistic information from these studies for the rational design and development of new catalytic processes.

Anna Lo, who works with Professor Jared Shaw at UC Davis, was the winner of the Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry prize. She says that she decided to pursue a career in chemistry to take advantage of the creative thinking and liberty in the practice of organic synthesis.

Anna Lo

Anna’s work focuses on two goals: (1) to elucidate conditions that provide reliable selectivity for additions to a-chiral imines, (2) to develop a mechanistic rationale for the deviating selectivity trends her research group observes. Stereoelectronic models such as the Felkin-Ahn model and Cram’s rules have been used as powerful tools in the asymmetric synthesis of complex synthetic targets. Due to their robust utility, Felkin-control and chelation-control have been generalized to imine stereocontrol, despite fundamental differences in reactivity between N-substituted imines and their carbonyl analogues. Recent work has illuminated a class of a-chiral aldehyde derived imines that deviate from previously well-established stereoelectronic models. This illuminated a gap in understanding of existing stereocontrol models, specifically when applied to N-substituted imines, which Anna is now investigating.

This conference sounds like it was a great event, and we’re glad to support young researchers as they build their careers!

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Certified Excellent: Congratulations Winners!

We are happy to announce the recipients of the 2018 Certificate of Excellence! Back for its second year, this special program was developed to recognize outstanding students who have shown special achievement in the chemical sciences. Join us in congratulating these stellar students who are being honored by their departments for their achievements. We first introduced the Certificate of Excellence in 2017 as a way to recognize the younger generation of students who have shown interest and curiosity and a passion for learning in the chemical sciences. If you’re interested in getting your department involved in future Certificate of Excellence programs, please contact us at americas-editorial@rsc.org.

 

 

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Meet the Royal Society of Chemistry at ACS National Meetings

We always enjoy meeting new people and catching up with familiar faces at ACS National Meetings, most recently in New Orleans.  We packed our schedules with talks during the day, learning about the latest and exciting developments across the chemical sciences.  Many of us attended sessions related to the Nexus of Food, Energy, and Water theme, which also aligns with the global challenges the RSC aims to support.

It was a good opportunity to congratulate Chemical Science Associate Editors Professors Kit Cummins and Mircea Dinca at MIT in person as they received ACS awards for their achievements.  Editor-in-chief Professor Daniel Nocera, Executive Editor Dr. May Copsey, and many other Chemical Science Board members discussed some exciting developments for our flagship journal – stay tuned for updates on the website and learn more about the Associate Editors!

Booth, ACS, RSC, Chemical Science, Environmental Science journals, New Orleans

Dr. May Copsey, Executive Editor for Chemical Science, Dr. Sam Keltie, Executive Editor for the Environmental Science journals, and Dr. Jenny Lee, Assistant Editorial Development Manager, meeting attendees at the RSC booth during opening night of the Expo.

While it’s challenging to keep up with the conference programming, we wanted to spend some time to meet conference attendees at the booth and organize separate gatherings.  Larger conferences are great since colleagues travel from our Cambridge, UK office.  The Meet the Editor event involving Executive Editor Dr. Sam Keltie and the Editor-in-chiefs for the three sister Environmental Science journals was a nice chance to talk about publishing, and to also continue the conversation with the environmental chemical sciences community during happy hour.

RSC, ACS, Environmental Science: Nano, Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology, ESN, ESW, ESPI, Meet the Editor, Booth, Sam Keltie, New Orleans

Meet the Editor event with Dr. Sam Keltie, Executive Editor of the Environmental Science journals, Prof. Kris McNeill, Editor-in-chief of Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts, Prof. Peter Vikesland, Editor-in-chief of Environmental Science: Nano, and Prof. David Cwiertny, Editor-in-chief of Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology.

We also were glad to connect with a few RSC Advances Associate Editors, Editorial Board member Professor James Batteas, and Executive Editor Dr. Andrew Shore where we discussed ideas to continue developing the latest Gold Open Access option within the RSC journals.  While these are only a few highlights of all the events we organized throughout the conference, we appreciated the many opportunities to hear everyone’s thoughts to guide our future activities.

RSC, ACS, RSC Members' Reception, New Orleans

RSC Members’ Reception with Dr. Guy Jones, Executive Editor for Data, pictured in the foreground.

We’d love to meet you at a future ACS National Meeting – you can usually catch most of us at the booth on the opening night of the Expo so we hope to see you soon!

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Northwestern University: Spotlight on Women in Science & Modern Career Paths

Women in Science Career Panel, from left to right: Dr. Stacey Tobin, Dr. Sadie Wignall, Dr. Stephanie Knezz, Dr. Dimitra Georganopoulou, and Dr. Jen Griffiths.

We recently visited the Department of Chemistry at Northwestern University, where we hosted a day of educational activities for graduate students and postdocs, including a career panel of women in science who chose to follow a range of traditional and alternative career paths.  Dr. Jen Griffiths from our Washington, DC office shared insights into the world of scholarly publishing and was joined by Northwestern alumni in traditional and non-traditional careers. During this engaging, informal session, attendees were able to ask questions, learn about challenges and opportunities the representatives had encountered, and hear some great advice and tips from successful women in science.


“I realized fairly early on that an academic career wasn’t for me, and I started seeking out seminars and roundtables on ‘alternative careers.’ “


Dr. Stacey Tobin noticed that unlike a lot of her peers, she really enjoyed writing as a graduate student. “I realized fairly early on that an academic career wasn’t for me, and I started seeking out seminars and roundtables on ‘alternative careers,'” she said. “One focused specifically on science writing, and the entire panel was made up of PhDs who found careers in various types of science writing—from journalism to regulatory writing, continuing medical education to advertising.” She also joined professional organizations as a student member, including the American Medical Writers Association and the Council for Science Editors, to take advantage of their educational programs and sought outside opportunities to write. “I contributed articles to the department newsletter, and took any opportunity I could to write and edit.”  Stacey built up her reputation as a skilled writer and knowledgeable scientist before starting her own firm, The Tobin Touch.


“When I discovered that I wanted my career to focus on teaching, I found my campus program that focuses on STEM teaching opportunities for graduate students and post-docs.” 


One common thread of the discussion was the importance of pursuing opportunities outside the lab to both discover interests and talents, as well as to gain practical experience. Dr. Stephanie Knezz, Assistant Professor of Instruction and Co-Director of General Chemistry Laboratory at Northwestern University says, “When I discovered that I wanted my career to focus on teaching, I found my campus program that focuses on STEM teaching opportunities for graduate students and post-docs. I was able to implement a project at a local community college “flipping” a traditional chemistry class and working on the corresponding curriculum development for a few lessons in the course.” She says that the experience not only gave her a better idea of the duties of an instructor and but also inspired a renewed motivation to continue her degree now that she could focus on a specific career goal.


“I’ve found that networking can be a great way to learn about career possibilities, and that informational interviews can be very helpful for learning about day-to-day aspects of a career.”


Dr. Sarah Kamper now oversees intellectual property protection for various chemistry and materials technologies as Invention Manager at the Innovation and New Ventures Office (INVO) at Northwestern. “I learned about IP law through attending a career panel focused on careers outside of academia or industry.” she says. “It sounded like a great way to stay connected to science while transitioning into more translational aspects away from the bench.”  Sarah also realized the power of networking by talking with former members of her lab who worked at law firms in tech transfer. “I’ve found that networking can be a great way to learn about career possibilities, and that informational interviews can be very helpful for learning about day-to-day aspects of a career.” Sarah also suggests looking to campus groups as a way to begin networking: “If anyone is unsure of where to start, some organizations have student or young professional networking events where you can efficiently meet many people in a few hours!”


“My best piece of advice is to figure out what aspect of your science you are most passionate about, find opportunities where you can get first-hand experience delving into that aspect, and use careful time management to make it work with your research.” 


We also asked the panelists what actions they recommend students take or what was especially helpful to focus on for graduate students and postdocs. Stephanie suggested spending some time and effort to uncover your interests and finding ways to take advantage of related opportunities. “My best piece of advice is to figure out what aspect of your science you are most passionate about, find opportunities where you can get first-hand experience delving into that aspect, and use careful time management to make it work with your research.” And she added, “If you are doing something you love (even if it’s not at the bench), you will almost definitely be more efficient in the lab than if you’re coming to lab everyday with the primary goal of just ‘getting through it.’ ”

 

 

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