Congratulations to WesTEC 2020 Award Winners

We are pleased to support the 29th annual Western Canada Operations Technical Excellence Conference (WesTEC) hosted by Dow Canada, continuing from previous years. Despite 2020 being an atypical year with the COVID-19 situation, many Dow employees continued to innovate and drive excellence in science and technology for a better future.

This year, we were delighted to be invited again by Analytical Methods Advisory Board member Dr. Jim Luong to contribute a congratulatory letter and sponsor the Best Lecture and Best Poster Prizes at the WesTEC 2020 event.

WesTEC, Best Lecture Award

Best Lecture Award winners Allison De Man and Jerome Wong with Catherine Costin Vice-President of Dow Canada and Site Director

WesTEC2020; Best Poster Award

Best Poster Award winners Wade Osicki and Todd Blumentrath (not pictured) with Catherine Costin, Vice-President of Dow Canada and Site Director

Congratulations to everyone for their research and development achievements!

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Welcome 2020 North and South American Editorial Board members!

 

The RSC US and Brazilian offices want to give a big welcome to our North and South American board members appointed in the past year!

 

Michelle Arkin, University of California San Francisco (USA)

RSC Chemical Biology Editorial Board Member

 

Curtis Berlinguette, University of British Columbia (Canada)

Journal of Materials Chemistry A / Materials Advances Associate Editor

 

Lin Chen, Northwestern University (USA)

Chemical Science Associate Editor

 

Zhongwei (John) Chen, University of Waterloo (Canada)

Energy & Environment Book Series, Editor in Chief

 

Jianjun Cheng, University of Illinois Urbana Champaign (USA)

Biomaterials Science Editor in Chief (formerly Associate Editor)

 

Wendell Coltro, Universidade Federal de Goiás (Brazil)

Analytical Methods Associate Editor

 

Neil Donahue, Carnegie Mellon University (USA)

Environmental Science: Atmospheres Editor in Chief

 

Norm Dovichi, University of Notre Dame (USA)

Analyst Editor in Chief

 

Leanne Gilbertson, University of Pittsburgh (USA)

Environmental Science: Nano Editorial Board Member

 

Jen Heemstra, Emory University (USA)

RSC Chemical Biology Editorial Board Member

 

Corey Hopkins, University of Nebraska Medical Center (USA)

Drug Discovery Book series, Series Editor

 

CJ Li, McGill University (Canada)

ChemComm Associate Editor (previously Green Chemistry Associate Editor)

 

Jennifer Love, University of Calgary (Canada)

Chemical Society Reviews Editorial Board Chair (previously Catalysis Science & Technology Associate Editor)

 

Gabriel Merino, Cinvestav Mérida (Mexico)

Chemical Science Associate Editor

 

Shirley Nagagaki, Universidade Federal do Paraná (Brazil)

RSC Advances Editorial Board Member

 

Zaneta Nikolovska-Coleska, University of Michigan (USA)

RSC Chemical Biology Editorial Board Member

 

Dong Qin, Georgia Tech (USA)

Nanoscale / Nanoscale Advances Associate Editor

 

Joel Thornton, University of Washington (USA)

Environmental Science: Atmospheres Editorial Board Member

 

Doug Stephan, University of Toronto (Canada)

ChemComm Editorial Board Chair (previously Chemical Society Reviews Editorial Board Chair)

 

Stacey Wetmore, University of Lethbridge (Canada)

RSC Advances Editorial Board Member

 

Hua-Zhong (Hogan) Yu, Simon Fraser University (Canada)

Analyst Reviews Editor

 

Vassilia Zorba, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (USA)

JAAS Editorial Board Member

 

 

 

 

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RSC Desktop Seminars with Brazilian Chemical Society Organic Chemistry Division

RSC Desktop Seminars in Organic Chemistry with the Brazilian Chemical Society 2020 are an initiative from the Royal Society of Chemistry and the Brazilian Chemical Society to bring cutting-edge research directly to you!

Covid-19 has exposed us to a new reality where the virtual world is much more important than before. In order to keep our students engaged at the frontiers of Organic Chemistry, we have organized a weekly webinar series that is a joint collaboration between the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) and the Organic Chemistry Division of the Brazilian Chemical Society (SBQ). It is an alternative way to share work and interact with potential collaborators.

The sections will alternate between Brazilian and international speakers, in some cases with the opportunity for a selected Brazilian early career researcher to engage with the audience by presenting their recent independent career developments.

Program 24 September 2020 | 11:30 (BRT) | 15:30 (BST) 

11:30 Introductions and welcome
11:35 Early Career presentation with Q&A
11:55 Main Presentation with Q&A
12:55 Closing remarks

 

Registration:  https://www.rsc.org/events/detail/45400/rsc-desktop-seminars-with-brazilian-chemical-society-organic-chemistry-division-24-sept  

 


RSC Desktop Seminars in Organic Chemistry with the Brazilian Chemical Society will happen every week at 11:30 (BRT) and we will keep you updated about the registration links and program. We already have confirmed the following speakers and dates.

 

NEXT Speakers 

 

29 September  2020 

Registration: https://www.rsc.org/events/detail/45400/rsc-desktop-seminars-with-brazilian-chemical-society-organic-chemistry-division-29-sept

 

 

1 October  2020 (Exceptionally at 15:00 PM at BRT)

Closing webinar. This one will not be recorded



History of the Series

Those who registered received a link of the recording. Check your e-mail!

4 August 2020

 

11 August 2020

18 August 2020

25 August 2020

3 September 2020

10 September 2020

17 September 2020

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PAN-NANO-2020: a unique event before the crisis

The second Pan-American Nanotechnology Conference

PAN-NANO-2020 happened Mar 4-7, 2020 in Águas de Lindoia-SP, just before the Covid-19 crisis struck Brazil. During that week, we were aware of the situation spreading in the world, but Brazil had just a few cases and social distancing was only a distant idea. Águas de Lindoia has hot springs where people normally go to relax and is attractive due its mild climate. The organizers prepared for the uncertainties (with masks and alcohol-gel), and around 200 attendees, in total, were present. This conference was a joint effort between several engaged institutions with common interests and the same continent, the Americas.

Being “Pan-American”, related to North, South and Central America collectively, the organizers used their common scientific subject, NANO, to create the PAN-NANO event. The purpose was to develop useful and sustainable applications of nanotechnologies throughout the Pan-American region by understanding nanotechnology and nanoparticles’ behavior in biological, chemical and environmental systems.

The Royal Society of Chemistry had already sponsored its first edition, and the journals Nanoscale, Nanoscale Advances, Nanoscale Horizons and Environmental Science: Nano saw a good opportunity to get involved with a such variety of communities, which include Physicists, Chemists and Engineers. 

RSC supported Prof Rebecca Kapler (U. Wisconsin-Milwaukee), who gave a plenary talk on Interactions at the Nano-Bio Interface Across Biological Systems. The talk showed the significant variation in these interactions due to differences in the biological characteristics of organisms and the environments where they are found. She highlighted how it is necessary to probe the molecular interactions that occur at the interface of the nanomaterial and the places where the material comes in contact with the organism. In addition, she discussed the molecular interaction of nanomaterials across species. On the same day, RSC promoted a special Meet the Editor event, in a “Pint-of-Science” like format, to attract the audience and encourage them to have a beer and relax during the discussions. 

Elizabeth and Rebecca gave an overview of RSC, promoted the main RSC journals in the area, as well databases and books. Finally, Prof Rebecca gave general tips on how to submit and write, giving inside information on the article life cycle. Some slides supported the talk, but the audience got involved in a vivid discussion on publication motivation; Editors’ expectations; and the importance of showing novelty, comparing with the existing work and including backup citations.

Finally, at the end of the conference, RSC awarded two poster prizes, each consisting of £100 book voucher and certificate from Nanoscale and Environmental Science: Nano. We would like to congratulate the winners shown below receiving their prizes at the closing ceremony:

Poster prize winners with Prof Debora Frigi Rodrigues (Houston University), the winners Kayla Kurtz (University of Rhode Island) and Izaac Sit (University of California, San Diego), and also Profs Rebecca Klaper (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee), Isabel C. Escobar (University of Kentucky) and Ademar Benevolo Lugão (IPEN/CNEN).

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Wrapping up BRAZIL 2019: Theory, Materials, Microfluidics, She/Her, Natural Products and SBQ-Sul in 2019

 

Copacabana Beach landscape during the 2019-2020 New Year´s Eve

The year of 2019 left us some time ago. In the Southern Hemisphere, end of the year celebrations are different: outdoors, hot and part of the summer holiday season. The Northern Hemisphere still finds it difficult to understand that if it is summer, it is our time of the year to take big holidays. As yet, I will tell you a  secret: the water spins around in the sink in an counterclockwise direction. For us, down here, it is time to wrap up our thoughts, hope for a better year and begin the next one slowly (always keeping an eye on Carnival).

So, to show you all how we closed the year, here are our last events of 2019.

Similar to at the Brazilian Chemical Society Meeting in 2019, where a Women’s Hub was created and a prize named after Prof Dr Vanderlan Bolzani awarded, sections discussing Women in Science issues were held at the BrazMedChem symposium and at the 20th CBCat. Discussion included numbers from Academia (data from CNPq) to show how women are progressing as whole in Chemistry (or Science) but are not achieving as many higher decision-making positions as men. The big question: why is that? There are multiple answers and still lots of discussion to be had.

Prof. Marisa Orth gave a nice overview at the CBCat with numbers from a CNPq database and Prof Heloise Pastore moderated a friendly discussion with the audience. One thing was obvious: men have to take part in this as an important agent to change the future. These numbers corroborate with our recently launched Report on Gender Bias in Publishing.

Later on in September, in a different location (Federal University of Pelotas-UFPel-RS), our recent recipient of the JAAS Lectureship, Prof Marcia Mesko, with the RSC Brazil office’s support, coordinated a panel discussion totally dedicated to diversity and inclusion of women, the “She/Her on Science”, with lectures and panel discussions dedicated to the subject.

With experienced and young female researchers in the discussions [Profs Drs Márcia Barbosa (UFRGS), Maysa Furlan (CAPES and UNESP), Ethel Wilhelm, Lucielli Savegnago,  Márcia Mesko, Mariana Vieira, Rosélia Spanevello (all from UFPel), Laura Fonseca (UFSM), Vanderlan Bolzani (UNESP), Fernanda Staniscuaski (UFRGS), Hellen Stulzer (UFSC), Marina Prigol (UNIPAMPA), Paola Mello (UFSM), Marina Trevisan (UFRGS)], the subjects varied between challenges for young female scientists in the South, parenthood in science, gender equity, awards’ impact, institutional action on gender inclusion and perspectives from new young female talent. We still have a long way to go, but those discussions, happening over and over again, will wake up the world, and especially will wake up women to be present and active in discussions and acts. Support to get support, that is how things change, little by little, grain by grain!

Finally the year ended with five meetings in a row. The RSC office supported them in different ways and the organizers did a very good job in raising awareness of the RSC and our journals. The Brazilian Materials Research Society (B-MRS) organized its annual meeting, the XVIII Brazilian MRS, involving the community of materials research.  It was held in Balneário Camboriú-SC,  September 22-26th, 2019. Parallel sections with varied subjects covering Physics to Chemistry, mixed with Engineering, had the participation of several Latin American Materials Research Societies. RSC promoted J. Mat. Chem. A, J. Mat. Chem. B, J. Mat. Chem. C, Mat. Horizons, Nanoscale and Nanoscale Horizons  and their respective prizes and lectureships there. As a pre-meeting promotion, the RSC organzied a Virtual issue on Materials with authors from Latin America

 

Cristie Luis Kugelmeier-UFSCar (Soft Matter + Biomaterials Sci + Molecular Systems and Design & Engineering £100 cash prize and certificate) for his symposium presentation on “Advances in steel metallurgy and applications”;
Maya Alencar Medeiros-UFSCar (ChemSci £100 book voucher) for her poster  on “Materials and Fabrication Processes for Aeronautic and Space Applications”;
Danilo Waismann Losito-UNIFESP (NanoscaleNanoscale Horinzons + Nanoscale Advances £100 cash prize and certificate) for his symposium presentation on “Molecular Sieves: synthesis and applications”;
Julia Andrea Carpenter-ETH, Switzerland (J. Mat. Chem. A, J. Mat. Chem. B, J. Mat. Chem. C, £100 cash prize and certificate) for his symposium presentation on “Biological, biopolymer-based and bio-inspired materials”; from left to right

 

 

The Microfluidics Workshop that celebrated the long term collaboration between Brazil and Argentina happened in Cordoba, Argentina.

Then the XX Brazilian Symposium on Theoretical Chemistry was held in the Northeast of the country, João Pessoa-PB, where we also provided RSC lanyards as promotional items. The community is broad, varying from calculations for Inorganic/Organic Chemistry and data handling to Analytical Chemistry, in addition to pure Physical Chemistry.

As one of the last events we attended in 2019, the 7th Brazilian Conference on Natural Products was held at a military facility-IME. The Brazilian Army is well known for its intense research on flora and fauna of the country, for surveillance reasons and biodiversity security. So, vast knowledge is held by the military in the natural products area. During the conference, we had an RSC table with lanyards and Prof Peter Leadlay from Cambridge University as one of the highlights of the meeting.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    

                 

 

Discussions on local biodiversity and the future of science with the expected budget constraints were important for the future of the area, which was once pioneering when Brazil was considered a sub-developed country. Now, we have to protect biodiversity and change the way natural products are seen.

The Rio landscape certainly helped:

Finally, at the end of the year, RSC and the British Government joined forces and presented two seminars during the Regional South Meeting of the Brazilian Chemical Society. The meeting was held a UCS (University of Caxias do Sul) a community university. The region is well known for its regional development linked to basic industries and crops, and also a huge German-Italian immigration community.

RSC contributed a How to Publish seminar, talking about the mission and vision of RSC, as well as what our journals can offer for authors in the country, along with other offerings, such as Chemistry World and our databases such as ChemSpider and MarinLit. Afterwards, the Chevening director in Brazil, Dr James Edward, presented the Chevening Brazil program, how these scholarships work and its objectives: to find leaders coming from the hard sciences, who normally don´t apply. The SBQ-Sul was a good audience for both RSC and Chevening. 

Watch our space for 2020!

 

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Medicinal and Catalysis Chemistry in Brazil: New Directions ⇔ and Beyond

The Royal Society of Chemistry office in São Paulo recently supported and sponsored two events in Brazil that sound like opposites to each other. Similarities appeared on two fronts: difficulties in keeping science running, such as promoting events, and the role of Women in Science, both live discussions. Pirinópolis in Goias State with its historical landscape and natural beauty hosted the 9th edition of the Brazilian Medicinal Chemistry Symposium, BrazMedChem. The region is known for its falls, food and local culture, which includes “Cavalhada“.

Carvalhada parade during the meeting

More and more, the natural products and computational fields are embracing medicinal chemistry. It was interesting to see how the discussion about gender equality, career progress and interactions with pharma companies were inserted into the program. The conference benefited from a panel discussion on “Women in Medicinal Chemistry: Why so Few?” with Sylvie Garneau-Tsodikova, Maria Cristina Nonato, Vanderlan Bolzani and Gunda Georg. All of them talked about their own experiences and actions to overcome the difficulties in teaching MedChem to young female students and conducting research in the area as a woman.

Prof. Garneau-Tsodikova gave an emotional testimonial about balancing motherhood and research when she saw another professor in the audience with her baby in a sling. It was a sign that everything is possible and having a family is a natural part of women’s lives.

M. Cristina Nonato, G. Georg, Sylvie  Garneau-Tsodikova and Vanderlan Bolzani

Sylvie Garneau-Tsodikova and and Vanderlan Bolzani

Sylvie Garneau-Tsodikova giving her scientific talk.

Prof. Garneau-Tsodikova’s scientific talk was “Towards understanding, engineering, and developing novel nonribosomal peptide enzymes” and she was also pleased to see local schools invited to take part of the event, with some experiments to showcase what chemistry can do and call their attention to science in general. RSC engaged with the meeting in different ways: Prof Gonçalo Bernardes officially received his Lectureship certificate from Prof. Garneau-Tsodikova, an RSC Medicinal Chemistry (formerly known as MedChemComm) Associate Editor, right before giving his talk:

Prof. Gonçalo is part of the Advisory Board of Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry (OBC). We also co-supported an Early Career Award for Prof. Luis O Ragasini from USP-RP:

At the final ceremony, RSC offered four poster prizes (as book vouchers and electronic subscriptions) and the proud winners are shown below:

Guilherme M. Silva (USP-RP) receiving his OBC poster prize from Prof Angelo de Fátima (UFMG)

Micael Cunha – USP.SP receiving his RSC Advances poster prize from Prof Vanessa Pasqualotto (UFG)

Francisco L. de Oliveira supervisor (Prof G. Zanatta – UFC) receiving the MedChemComm poster prize from Prof Alexandre Orsato (UEL)

Daniel Carvalho Santos – UNIFESP receiving his MedChemComm poster prize from Prof Gustavo Trossini (USP)

We also had the opportunity to see the interactions of many institutions and companies with the researchers, such as DNDi and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, who were present to discuss the future of drugs for neglected diseases.

This brings me to the next event that happened almost at the same time, the 20th edition of the Brazilian Congress on Catalysis, CBCat in São Paulo. The organizers managed to engage both catalysis companies and energy ones as well. If Brazilian researchers keep up these interactions, the research landscape will change, as well as the way academia communicates with industry and the other way around. It is past time to break the barriers of innovation. During the Catalysis Congress, the main goal was to show how catalysis can be applied to different fields, from organic synthesis to fuels. Again, the discussion around CO2 used as a feedstock or as an energy building block brought together different views. 

At the final ceremony and with the support of two of our Editorial Board Members, RSC was able to provide four poster prizes (as book vouchers) from the following journals:

…and the proud winners are shown below:

Thatiane Veríssimo Dos Santos (UFAL-AL) receiving his RSC Advances poster prize from Prof Heloise Pastore (Editorial Board member, RSC Advances – UNICAMP)

Christian Carlos De Sousa (UFF-RJ) receiving his ChemComm poster prize from Prof Javier Perez-Ramirez (Editor in Chief, Catalysis Science & Technology – ETH Zurich)

Wesley F. Monteiro (PUC-RS) receiving his Dalton Trans./New J. Chem. poster prize from Prof Javier Perez-Ramirez (Editor in Chief, Catalysis Science & Technology -ETH Zurich)

Letícia Rasteiro (IQSC/USP-SC) receiving his Catalysis Science & Technology/PCCP poster prize from Prof Javier Perez-Ramirez (Editor in Chief, Catalysis Science & Technology -ETH Zurich)

 

 

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Congratulations to Prize Winners at the 28th Annual WesTEC

Among the many events that the Royal Society of Chemistry supports in North America is the Western Canada Operations Technical Excellence Conference , or WesTEC, which is an internal technology conference, held annually by Dow Canada, and has been showcasing research and development in the industrial sector for nearly three decades. In the fall of last year, the 28th Dow Canada WesTEC conference was held in Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta on October 24th, 2019. This year’s event was attended by the president of Dow Canada, Global Technology Center Director, Director of Core R&D, and Dow Canada Vice-president of manufacturing, along with about 200 colleagues.

Pictured from left to right: Dr. Billy Bardin, Global Tech Center Director, Dr. Tonya Stockman, Associate Director, Analytical Science, and Best Poster Award Winner, Ms. Sanny Chan at the 28th WesTEC in Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta, on October 24th, 2019.

As in previous years, the RSC sponsored prizes for Best Poster and Best Lecture. This year, the Best Poster prize was awarded to Ms. Sanny Chan, and the Best Lecture prize was awarded to Mr. Dan Thompson. The winners received their awards from Dr. Billy Bardin, Dow Global Tech Center Director and Dr. Tonya Stockman, Dow Associate Director of Analytical Science. Congratulations to the prize winners for their accomplishments!

Pictured from left to right: Dr. Billy Bardin, Global Tech Center Director, Dr. Tonya Stockman, Associate Director, Analytical Science, and Best Lecture Award Winner, Mr. Dan Thompson, at the 28th WesTEC in Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta, on October 24th, 2019.

The conference was underpinned by Dow’s new SEEK TOGETHER™ brand platform, which reflects the company’s deeply held belief in the power of partnerships. The partnership between WesTEC and the Royal Society of Chemistry was initiated through the efforts of former Analytical Methods Editorial Board member, Dr. Jim Luong. The conference proceedings also included a congratulatory letter from Professor Dame Carol Robinson, President of the Royal Society of Chemistry and Dr. Deborah Nicoll-Griffith, President of the Canadian Society for Chemistry, to recognize Dow Canada’s commitment to sustainable innovation and to diversity and inclusion. Both societies are pleased to support this ongoing partnership with Dow as it strives to be a customer-centric, sustainable, innovative and inclusive materials science company and look forward to the continued advancement of science and technology through industry. 

 

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Awards, Prizes, and Lectureships: Open for Nominations

Royal Society of Chemistry Prizes and Awards

Do you know an outstanding chemist who deserves recognition? This is your chance to raise awareness of those who are making a positive impact in the chemical sciences. The Royal Society of Chemistry aims to use our international platform to showcase outstanding researchers from all areas of the chemical sciences through a variety of awards and prizes. There are over 60 awards and prizes that are now accepting nominations for 2020, including team awards that allow self-nomination. 

We recognize the importance of valuing all members of our community and as a professional body and voice for the chemical science community, we believe that we have a responsibility to promote inclusivity and accessibility in order to improve diversity. In line with our commitment to support diversity and inclusion, it is important for nominators to note that the guidelines for the number of years since completing a PhD are suggestions rather than rigid boundaries. We understand that some of the most deserving nominees may have had challenging or unusual career paths, and aim to recognize researchers and educators from a wide variety of backgrounds including those who have taken non-traditional career paths. We don’t require that nominators be senior researchers, and encourage people from all career levels to nominate their peers and colleagues and tell us about the people who you feel have made a difference.


Lectureships to Recognize Early- and Mid-Career Researchers

Award

Nomination Deadline

ChemComm Emerging Investigator Lectureship November 29th 2019
ChemSocRev  Pioneering Investigator Lectureship November 29th 2019
Polymer Chemistry Lectureship November 30th 2019
Biomaterials Science Lectureship November 30th 2019
Soft Matter Lectureship November 30th 2019
JAAS Emerging Investigator Lectureship January 31st 2020
Analyst Emerging Investigator Lectureship February 29th 2020

In addition to RSC-wide awards, several of our high-quality journals present lectureships to researchers in various stages of their careers. The winners of these awards are nominated by members of their community and carefully considered by the journal Editorial Boards. Not only are publications and citations considered as factors in the decision, but also engagement with and service to the community. Make sure to nominate colleagues before the deadlines, summarized here, and you can find more information about each of these below.


ChemComm Emerging Investigator Lectureship 2020

ChemComm Banner

The ChemComm Emerging Investigator Lectureship recognizes emerging scientists in the early stages of their independent academic career. Eligible nominees should have completed their PhD in 2012 or later but appropriate consideration will be given to those who have taken a career break or followed a different study path. The recipient of the lectureship will be invited to present a lecture at three different locations over a 12-month period, with at least one of these events taking place at an international conference. The recipient will receive a contribution of £1500 towards travel and accommodation costs for their lectures, as well as a certificate. The recipient will be asked to contribute a review article for the journal.

Learn more and submit your nomination. The nomination deadline is November 29th, 2019.


ChemSocRev Pioneering Investigator Lectureship 2020

The ChemSocRev Pioneering Investigator Lectureship recognizes mid-career scientists who have firmly established themselves in their independent careers, continuously publish innovative work, and have pioneered several research areas. Eligible nominees should have completed their PhD between January 2004 and December 2011, but appropriate consideration will be given to those who have taken a career break or followed a different study path. The recipient of the lectureship will be invited to present a lecture at three different locations over a 12-month period, with at least one of these events taking place at an international conference and will receive a contribution of £1500 towards travel and accommodation costs for their lectures, as well as a certificate. The recipient will also be asked to contribute a review article for the journal.

The 2019 ChemSocRev Pioneering Investigator Lectureship was awarded to Professor Yujie Xiong from the University of Science and Technology of China this past summer. Prof Xiong presented his lecture at the International Symposium on Energy Conversion and Storage Materials Conference 2019 in Brisbane, Australia on July 31st, 2019, at the European Research Society 2019 Fall meeting in Warsaw, Poland on September 17th, 2019, and the his third lecture will soon be determined.

Learn more and submit your nomination. The nomination deadline is November 29th, 2019.


Biomaterials Science Lectureship

Coinciding with the presentation of the 2019 Biomaterials Science Lectureship to Professor April Kloxin from the University of Delaware at the European Society for Biomaterials Meeting in September 2019, nominations for the for the 2020 Biomaterials Science Lectureship were opened and will be accepted through November 30th 2019. We are pleased to congratulate Prof Kloxin for winning the 2019 award and to recognize her achievement in advancing the field. The winner of the 2020 Biomaterials Science Lectureship, which will be announced in April 2020, will be asked to present a lecture at the 11th World Biomaterials Congress, taking place in Glasgow in May 2020. The recipient will also be asked to contribute a lead article to the journal and will have their work showcased free of charge on the front cover of the issue in which their article is published.

This annual award was established in 2014 to recognize an early-career researcher who has made a significant contribution to the field of biomaterials science. Candidates should be independent researchers who are at an early stage of their independent career; this is typically within approximately 12 years of attaining their doctorate or equivalent degree, but appropriate consideration will be given to those who have taken a career break, for example for childcare leave, or followed an alternative study path. Nominators do not have to be senior researchers and nominations from community members at all levels are encouraged. Candidates will be notified of their nomination and asked to provide three recent articles that reflect their current research. They will be assessed by a shortlisting panel made up of Biomaterials Science Advisory Board members as well as a previous lectureship winner. The shortlisted candidates will be assessed by the journal’s Editorial Board and selected using an anonymous poll.Selection is not based simply on quantitative measures. Consideration will be given to all information provided in the letter of recommendation and candidate CV, including research achievements and originality, contributions to the biomaterials community, innovation, collaborations and teamwork, publication history, and engagement with Biomaterials Science. 

Learn more and submit your nomination. The nomination deadline is November 30th, 2019.


Polymer Chemistry Lectureship

The Polymer Chemistry Lectureship was established in 2015 to honor an early-career researcher who has made significant contributions to the field of polymer chemistry. The 2019 Lectureship was awarded to Dr. Frederick Wurm from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research after consideration of many worthy nominations.The recipient is chosen by the Editorial Board from a list of candidates nominated by the community. Nominations are now being accepted through the end of November. Candidates should be independent researchers, having completed PhD and postdoctoral studies, actively pursuing research within the polymer chemistry field, and having made a significant contribution to the field. They should be at an early stage of their independent career, which is generally within 15 years of attaining their doctorate or equivalent degree, but appropriate consideration will be given to those who have taken a career break, for example for childcare leave, or followed an alternative study path.

The recipient of the award will be asked to present a lecture at the Warwick Polymer Meeting in 2020, where they will also be presented with the award. The Polymer Chemistry Editorial Office will provide financial support to the recipient for travel and accommodation costs. The recipient will also be asked to contribute a lead article to the journal and will have their work showcased free of charge on the front cover of the issue in which their article is published. 

Learn more and submit your nomination. The nomination deadline is November 30th, 2019.


Soft Matter Lectureship

If you know an early-career researcher that you believe deserves recognition for her or his contribution to the soft matter field, the Soft Matter Lectureship is your opportunity to highlight their work to leaders in the community.  Nominations for the 2020 Soft Matter Lectureship are now being accepted, since the start of September through November 30th 2019.The recipient of the award will be asked to present a lecture at an international conference in 2020, where they will also be presented with the award. The Soft Matter Editorial Office will provide financial support to the recipient for travel and accommodation costs. The 2019 Soft Matter Lectureship award was presented to Professor Tim White from the University of Colorado, Boulder. Prof White gave his lecture at the 5th International Soft Matter Conference, held in Edinburgh from June 3-7, 2019. 

Candidates should be independent researchers who have completed their PhD and postdoctoral studies and actively pursuing research in the soft matter field. They should be an early stage of their independent career, generally about 12 years out from attaining their PhD, although this is, of course, only a loose guideline and nominations for candidates who have taken an alternate study or career path are welcome. Selection is not based simply on quantitative measures. Consideration will be given to all information provided in the letter of recommendation and candidate CV, including research achievements and originality, contributions to the soft matter community, innovation, collaborations and teamwork, publication history, and engagement with Soft Matter. 

Learn more and submit your nomination. The nomination deadline is November 30th, 2019.


JAAS Emerging Investigator Lectureship

The JAAS Emerging Investigator Lectureship recognizes and supports an emerging scientist working in the area of atomic spectrometry in the early stages of their independent career. The winner of the 2019 JAAS Emerging Investigator Lectureship was announced earlier this year and we are pleased to congratulate Dr. Maria Costas-Rodriguez from the University of Ghent.

To be eligible, nominees will be have published in JAAS  and should generally have finished their PhD in the last ten years, although that is simply a guideline and not a hard boundary for those who have followed a different career trajectory. The recipient of the lectureship will present their research at a relevant high-profile international meeting (to be agreed with the Editorial Office) and receive a contribution of £2000 to cover associated travel and accommodation costs. They will be awarded a certificate and asked to contribute a Primary Research or Review Article to JAAS. Nominations should be received by the Editorial Board by January 31st, 2020 for consideration. 

The Editorial Office will screen each nomination for eligibility and draw up a shortlist of candidates based on the nomination documents provided. The lectureship winner will be selected by the JAAS Editorial Board based on the originality, quality, impact and significance of the candidate’s research, as highlighted in their nomination.

Learn more and submit your nomination. The nomination deadline is January 31st, 2020.


Analyst Emerging Investigator Lectureship

Now in it’s third cycle, the Analyst Emerging Investigator Lectureship is an excellent platform to recognize an early-career researcher in the analytical sciences. This biannual award was established in 2016 to raise the profile of the analytical sciences to the wider scientific community and general public. The winner of the 2018 Analyst Emerging Investigator Lectureship was Professor Wei Min from Columbia University. He received his award at the SciX 2018 meeting, where he also presented his plenary lecture.

Nominees will typically will be within 10 years of completing a PhD, although consideration will be given to candidates who have taken an alternate study or career path.The editorial team will screen each nomination for eligibility and draw up a shortlist of candidates based on the information provided by nominators. The recipient of the Lectureship will then be selected by the Analyst Editorial Board. The award winner will receive up to £2,000 towards travel costs to attend and present a lecture and will receive an invitation to contribute a review to Analyst in the following year. 

Learn more and submit your nomination. The nomination deadline is February 29th, 2020.

 


Other 2019 and 2020 Lectureships

Keep an eye out for other lectureships and prizes throughout the year, as the calls for nominations and announcements vary by different journals. Here is some information on the other lectureships that the RSC offers and the typical timelines when you can expect to submit nominations.

Energy & Environmental Science Readers’ Choice Lectureship 2019

Recognizing and supporting those at an early stage of their independent career within the fields of energy and environmental sciences, the lectureship is a platform for early career researchers to showcase their research to the wider scientific community. Formerly based on the most-read articles within the journal in a given year, we are delighted to announce that from 2019, the EES Lectureship will be awarded through a nominations process, whereby nominations of candidates are invited from our fantastic community. The winner of the 2019 Lectureship will be announced in early 2020. The winner of the 2018 Energy & Environmental Science Readers’ Choice Lectureship was Professor Guo-Liang Chai from Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter (FJIRSM), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). 

PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship 2019 and 2020

Nominations were accepted  in June and July of this year and the winner, who is decided at the fall Editorial Board meeting will be announced soon. Selected articles published by winners have been showcased in a special PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship themed collection. Look for next year’s call for nominations in the spring of 2020, and nominations are typically accepted throughout June and July before the winner is announced in the late fall or early winter.

Lab on a Chip/Dolomite Pioneers Lectureship 2019 and 2020

The “Pioneers of Miniaturization” Lectureship, sponsored by Dolomite and Lab on a Chip, is for early to mid-career scientists who have made extraordinary or outstanding contributions to the understanding or development of miniaturized systems. The winner of the 2019 “Pioneers of Miniaturization” Lectureship was announced in July of this year; the award was presented to Professor Hang Lu from Georgia Tech at the µTAS 2019 Conference, which was held in Basel, Switzerland, on October 27-31 2019. Look for the call for the 2020 Pioneers of Miniaturization Lectureship in early spring of 2020, typically accepting nominations in March-May. 

Journal of Materials Chemistry Emerging Investigator Lectureship

The Journal of Materials Chemistry Emerging Investigator Lectureship winner is determined by the Editors-in-Chief of Journal of Materials Chemistry A, B, and C. The 2019 winner was announced on September 30th, 2019. Congratulations to Professor Qiang Zhang from Tsinghua University! Look for the call for nominations for the 2020 award in June and July of 2020.

MedChemComm Emerging Investigator Lectureship 2019

The recipient of the 2019 MedChemComm Emerging Investigator Lectureship was announced in March of this year; congratulations to Professor Amanda Hargrove from Duke University on winning the award. MedChemComm is undergoing a transformation! We are excited to announce that starting in 2020, the journal will be called RSC Medicinal Chemistry – a change that will allow the journal’s title to better reflect the content that it publishes – research articles and reviews, and not only communications. Look for more information on lectureships next year.

Natural Product Reports Emerging Investigator Lectureship 2019 and 2020

Nominations were open for the 2020 Natural Product Reports Emerging Investigator Lectureship in August and September 2019 and the winner will be announced in the late winter or early spring of 2020. The winner of the 2019 Natural Product Reports Emerging Investigator Lectureship was awarded to Professor Mohammad R. “Mo” Seyedsayamdost from Princeton University and he was presented with his award at the 2019 spring ACS Meeting in Orlando. 

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Recognizing the Brazilian Chemistry Community

The Royal Society of Chemistry’s Brazilian Connections

While many people can properly guess that  the Royal Society of Chemistry originated in the UK, they may not be aware of just how far we’ve come, literally, since our British beginnings in 1841. Over 175 years later, we have offices around the world, including one in beautiful São Paulo, the most populous city in Brazil and in the Southern Hemisphere. The city has one of the most vibrant and thriving economies in Latin America, but even though the country has seen growth in the science and engineering research sector over the last decade, times are hard right now for academics in Brazil. In the spirit of internationalization, our office in Brazil has been working hard to promote the science that is being accomplished here to our colleagues around the world. 

It certainly helps that we’re located next to the Science and Innovation Network in Brazil, one of the British government’s strategic partnerships in 30 countries/territories, that aim to mutually benefit both the UK and host-country. Through the RSC’s physical presence in this partner nation, we can forge strong UK-Brazil interactions that support research and innovation for the whole world. We have been working with other partners to create networking opportunities that put researchers in the global spotlight, and lubricate the group gears in the search for solutions to global problems. It is a win-win situation. You interact more, you expose yourself, you embrace big problems and that helps push to solve local (and often critically necessary) ones.

One of our long-term Brazilian partners is Sociedade Brasileira de Química (SBQ), the Brazilian Chemical Society; as a not-for-profit organization like the RSC and as a scholarly and professional society, SBQ supports the chemical sciences in Brazil and even publishes its own Journal of the Brazilian Chemical Society, which it makes freely available to read to advance science literacy. The RSC’s support of SBQ has been historical and since 2007 we have been taking part in the SBQ annual meeting.

The Brazilian Chemistry Certificate of Distinction

For 2019, the IYPT, apart from the splashing success of our IYPT lanyards, we decided to take a step forward and award the researchers who have been publishing with us in the last 2 years. As a publisher, we measure engagement by publication numbers. More importantly, we want to recognize engagement, and we hope this boosts publications further and leads to further engagement. As examples, we took part of some Newton Fund Brazil activities and also the Brazil-UK Year of Science and Innovation. We worked together with our recent partner, CNPq, Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico (CNPq) – the Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development – which is a part of the Ministry of Science and Technology under the Brazilian federal government. Joining forces with CNPq, we put the new prize together: the Brazilian Chemistry Certificate of Distinction. The idea was to recognize researchers with outstanding publication records and give back the opportunity for networking, to help make the awardees gain further recognition and encourage the new ones in the game to look for opportunities.

During the 42th Annual Meeting of the Brazilian Chemical Society in Joiville last May, we presented the prize winners. During the honor ceremony we presented the two awardees. Firstly, representing Women in Chemistry, Prof Dirce Pozebon from UFGRS, was awarded. Prof Pozebon publshed 6 Articles in 2017-2018 which collectively received 39 citations. Prof Eufrânio N. Silva Jr from UFMG, was awarded after publishing 8 Articles in 2017-2018, which received 42 citations. He was not able to attend, but Prof Luis Claudio Barbosa from UFMG (one of our FRSC) represented him during the ceremony.

Prof Dirce Pozebon (3rd from the left) from UFRGS receiving her prize certificate from the hands of Prof Alsion Hulme (representing RSC), Prof Vanderlan Bolzani (representing the CNPq president João Luiz Filgueiras de Azevedo) and Prof Norberto Pereira Lopes (representing SBQ).

Prof Luiz Claudio Barbosa from UFMG receiving Prof Eufrânio´s prize certificate from the hands of Prof Alison Hulme (representing RSC), Prof Norberto Pereira Lopes (representing SBQ) and Prof Vanderlan Bolzani (representing the CNPq president João Luiz Filgueiras de Azevedo).

 

 

The selection guidelines for the Brazilian Chemistry Certificate of Distinction can be found here. This prize it will contribute to winners in their dual roles as the researcher and the professor, with the opportunity to travel abroad to attend an international conference and/or spend some short period interacting with fellow colleagues. The prize includes money towards accommodation and travel from both CNPq and RSC. The Certificate of Distinction shows our commitment to recognizing our interactions with our communities in Brazil. It gives concrete ideas for the future stakeholders who embrace internationalization and networking tools, in giving back to the academic society the knowledge that science, in the end, brings to our lives. A nation with no investment into the scientific community does not flourish, as no progress can be made in the right direction.The scientific production in Brazil needs to be recognized, and the quality of the work done here can make an impact – if only, with all the differences we face and discuss, it is put to the task to solve technological problems. 

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Highlighting the 6th Annual Alberta Nano Research Symposium

NaNoTeCH: Elements of the Periodic Table in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

The Alberta Nano Research Symposium is co-hosted by the University of Alberta Nanotechnology Group and the University of Calgary nanoGroup, and this year it was held at the Shaw Convention Center in Edmonton, Alberta. The interdisciplinary nature of nanoscience and nanotechnology brings together researchers from a wide variety of backgrounds, which makes the Alberta Nano symposium attractive to individuals with backgrounds in Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Engineering, and Computer Science who were encouraged to share knowledge, develop collaborations, and celebrate their accomplishments with fellow experts in the nanotechnology field. The theme of this year’s symposium, NaNoTeCH: Celebrating the Periodic Table, was chosen to coincide the International Year of the Periodic Table (IYPT), and continued to highlight the diverse and collaborative nature of the field.

Alberta Nano Poster Prize Winners

Taylor Lynk, winner of the Chemical Science poster prize at the 2019 Alberta Nano Research Symposium

To recognize some of the outstanding research presented at the Alberta Nano symposium, the Royal Society of Chemistry sponsored two poster prizes to be awarded to the young researchers that presented their fascinating research and most impressed the judges. The winner of the Chemical Science poster prize was Taylor Lynk, an MSc Candidate in the McDermott Group at the University of Alberta, where she is focusing on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for the detection and quantification of natural plant products. Her poster showcased the application of this technique to cannabinoid and terpene detection as a method to provide chemical fingerprints for target molecules. Her poster, cleverly titled ‘The Hunger Games: In-Process Quality Control of Cannabis-Based Consumables,’ surely caught the attention of many attendees, as the recent legalization of cannabis in Canada and upcoming legislation processes has presented a clear unmet need for more advanced analytical tools for this rapidly-growing market. Before coming to Alberta, Taylor worked in the research lab of Prof Christa Brosseau at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Prof Brosseau’s lab focuses on sustainable chemistry and materials, and Taylor co-authored one of the group’s papers that was published in Analytical Methods earlier this year. You can follow Taylor on Twitter @taylorlynk and you can follow Mark McDermott on Twitter @MarkTMcDermott for more updates from the group. 

Nidhika Bhoria, winner of the Nanoscale Horizons poster prize at the 2019 Alberta Nano Research Symposium.

The winner of the Nanoscale Horizons prize was awarded to Nidhika Bhoria, an MSc student in the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Calgary, where she works with Prof Md Golam Kibria. Prof Kibria’s research group focuses on electrocatalysis and photocatalysis for the sustainable synthesis of hydrogen and ammonia, as well as carbon fuels or feedstocks, including CO2 conversion to high-value chemicals, which is the focus Nidhika’s work. She presented her poster on ‘Nanostructured MOF Catalysts for Electrochemical Reduction of Carbon dioxide.’ Her poster illustrated the selectivity for 2-carbon and higher products of carbon dioxide reduction, which could provide a basis high-throughput industrial-scale conversion. We look forward to seeing more of the research that both Taylor and Nidhika will be working on over the coming year and wish them the best in all of their endeavors. We will be happy to see the Alberta Nano Research Symposium return again next year and are excited to see how this unique and high-quality meeting continues to grow.  

Highlighting Elements in Nano and Materials Research

The Royal Society of Chemistry has also been celebrating the 150th anniversary of the Mendeleev periodic table, and with the addition of elements 113, 115, 117, and 118 to the 7th row of the periodic table in 2016 we were able to complete our beautiful ‘Visual Elements’ interactive periodic table; among our many IYPT-themed activities in the community, we have fun and informative educational resources, new funding and grant opportunities, and special collections we have been putting together from within and across our journals. Just as the Alberta Nano symposium encourages collaboration and diversity, we too have promoted further collaborative efforts across our journals. Many of our various IYPT-themed collections, like the Elements for Next Generation Batteries collection, feature international collaborations and cover rich and diverse aspects of the elements from multiple journals. This particular collection highlights the elements lithium, sodium, zinc, among other elements contained in new battery materials. Thanks to the teamwork and guest editing by Zhiqun Lin, Journal of Materials Chemistry A Associate Editor, from Georgia Institute of Technology, and Xiaodong Chen, Nanoscale Associate Editor from Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, it features papers from across the Materials and Nano journal portfolios, including Materials Horizons, Nanoscale Horizons, Journal of Materials Chemistry A and Nanoscale. We hope that you enjoy this and our other special collections as part of the International Year of the Periodic Table!

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