2024 Lunar New Year Collection

Happy Lunar New Year

Happy Chinese and Lunar New Year from everyone on the Nanoscale Horizons, Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances teams! To celebrate the start of the Year of the Dragon, we are delighted to highlight some of the most popular articles published in our nanoscience journals last year by corresponding authors based in countries celebrating the Lunar New Year.

Read the collection now

Nanoscale Horizons, Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances Lunar New Year promotional graphic with a red background and an image of a gold dragon surrounded by clouds and fireworks. Text reads: " Wishing you a Happy Lunar New Year 2024, May you enjoy a very prosperous and productive year of the Dragon".

All of the articles in these collections are free to access until the end of March 2024. We hope you enjoy reading these popular articles and wish you a happy, healthy and prosperous year of the dragon!

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Themed collection: Multicomponent plasmonic hybrid nanoarchitectures

Read our new collection in Nanoscale Advances

We are delighted to introduce our new themed collection focusing on multicomponent plasmonic hybrid nanoarchitectures with precisely tailored properties for emerging applications!

Guest Edited by Hao Jing (George Mason University, USA)

This collection in Nanoscale Advances features burgeoning research on a variety of multifunctional plasmonic nanoparticles with synergistically reinforced properties. Articles cover the rational design, synthesis and characterization of multicomponent plasmonic hybrid nanoarchitectures with tailored chemical and physical properties, as well as their utilization in a wide variety of applications.

 

A small selection of the papers are featured below, all open access.

Raman encoding for security labels: a review
Dong Yu, Wei Zhu and Ai-Guo Shen
Nanoscale Adv., 2023, 5, 6365-6381

Correlating structural changes in thermoresponsive hydrogels to the optical response of embedded plasmonic nanoparticles
Kamila Zygadlo, Chung-Hao Liu, Emmanuel Reynoso Bernardo, Huayue Ai, Mu-Ping Nieh and Lindsey A. Hanson
Nanoscale Adv., 2024, 6, 146-154

Bimetallic copper palladium nanorods: plasmonic properties and palladium content effects
Andrey Ten, Claire A. West, Soojin Jeong, Elizabeth R. Hopper, Yi Wang, Baixu Zhu, Quentin M. Ramasse, Xingchen Ye and Emilie Ringe
Nanoscale Adv., 2023, 5, 6524-6532

 

Did you know?

At Nanoscale Advances, our themed collections are built by collaboration between our Guest Editors and expert Associate Editors. Our Guest Editors guide the scope and curate the contributions in our collections but all submissions are handled through peer review by our team of resident Associate Editors. This means that as an author you receive a consistent experience, and as a reader you can trust the quality of the science being presented.

 

If you have an idea for a topical collection in your research field, we’d love to hear from you! Get in touch here.

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Spotlight on a recent exciting article in Nanoscale Advances

Experimental and theoretical evidence for unprecedented strong interactions of gold atoms with boron on boron/sulfur-doped carbon surfaces

Nanoscale Advances publishes experimental and theoretical work across the breadth of the nanoscienes, which are open access and free to read. We are excited to highlight a recent article on the detection of direct Au-B interactions in nanomaterials with the potential for controlling the dynamics of metal atoms on fabricated matrices and a new-generation of nano-devices with wide applications.

In this post, we share insights from our interview with the authors of this paper titled “Experimental and theoretical evidence for unprecedented strong interactions of gold atoms with boron on boron/sulfur-doped carbon surfaces“.

 

Insights from the authors of a recent Nanoscale Advances article

What aspect of your research are you most excited about at the moment?

“The prospect of using new techniques to explore the chemistry of metals on the nanoscale level, not only for understanding the chemistry of biologically essential metals, but also for applications in disease diagnosis and drug design.”

What do you find most challenging about your research?

“The challenges posed by dynamic metallomics- those of defining on the nanoscale the oxidation states of metal ions, the nature of the coordinated ligands, as well as their coordination geometries and tracking changes on timescales of nanoseconds to years.
Our paper shows we have come close to achieving this for a single gold atom. We dream of using a similar approach to unravel the chemistry of the formation and properties of metallic iron and copper nanocrystals in the brain [https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/sciadv.abf6707]”

How do you feel about Nanoscale Advances as a place to publish research on this topic?

“Perfect for our current discoveries which are based not only on experimental studies using state-of-the-art techniques, but also on challenging theoretical calculations.”

What is one piece of career-related advice or wisdom that you would like to share with early career scientists?

“Enjoy the excitement of discovery research- the unexpected findings that open up totally new areas of research. That was how our research on single-metal-atom coordination chemistry began!”

Meet the authors

Samya Banerjee (MRSC) received his PhD in 2015 from the Indian Institute of Science. Subsequently, he was a postdoctoral fellow at Johns Hopkins University, USA, a Royal Society-SERB Newton International Fellow at the University of Warwick, UK (with Prof. Peter J. Sadler), and a postdoctoral fellow at the Georg-August Universität Göttingen, Germany. He is currently an Assistant Professor at the Indian Institute of Technology (BHU), India. Recently, he was awarded a 2022 Dalton Division Horizon Prize by the Royal Society of Chemistry for pioneering work on “catalysis of redox reactions in cancer cells by synthetic organometallic complexes”. His research interests include the development of metal-based anticancer, antibacterial and antimalarial drugs.

Juliusz A. Wolny graduated in Chemistry at the University of Wrocław and completed his PhD thesis in inorganic chemistry. He worked in the area of synthetic chemistry and molecular spectroscopy in the groups of Professors Mikołaj F. Rudolf in Wrocław, Alex von Zelewsky in Fribourg, and Hans Toftlund in Odense. He has also worked in the area of applied quantum chemistry and synchrotron spectroscopy in the group of Professor Alfred X. Trauwein in Lübeck. Since 2006, he has been a researcher at the University of Kaiserslautern in the group of Professor Volker Schünemann. His scientific interest involves the spin-crossover effect, vibrational spectroscopy, conventional and synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy and application of quantum chemical methods to inorganic complexes.

 

Mohsen is a senior EM staff scientist at the electron Physical Science Imaging Centre (ePSIC) at the Diamond Light Source. His main research is currently on the use of Scanning Electron Nanobeam Diffraction (SEND) for better statistical characterisation of engineering materials via development of automated data analysis workflows combined with script-controlled data collection on the electron microscope. He completed his PhD at the University of Alberta (Edmonton, Canada) in 2010, with thesis on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterisation of beam-sensitive Mg-based hydride systems.

Dedication to Professor Nicolas Barry: Nicolas obtained his PhD at Neuchâtel University in Switzerland in 2011. He was then awarded a research fellowship by the Swiss National Science Foundation to join the Sadler lab in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Warwick. His research on organometallic precious metal carborane complexes encapsulated in polymer micelles opened up an entirely new area of research. Unexpectedly, TEM studies of such micelles with Richard Beanland and Peter Sadler at Warwick led to the discovery that irradiation of these nanoparticles in a TEM instrument rapidly generates a graphenic lattice containing precious metal atoms which migrate to form molecules, clusters and nanocrystals. That work initiated several subsequent studies on single-metal-atom coordination chemistry, and the role of dopants in the formation of metal nanocrystals, including that on gold reported in this current Nanoscale Advances paper. In 2014 he was awarded a Leverhulme Early Career Research Fellowship to initiate an independent career at Warwick, and in 2016 a Royal Society University Research Fellowship, which he took up at the University of Bradford. In 2020 he was appointed to a Professorship there. He excited school students with his enthusiasm for chemistry, leading an exhibit entitled ‘Molecular Music – the sound of chemistry’ at the 2019 Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition, in partnership with Ilkley Grammar School, turning the vibrations in molecules into musical notes. He was a highly talented metal coordination chemist. His research collaborators, colleagues, school-students, friends, and family alike all miss him greatly.

Dr Yisong Han is currently Scientific Officer at the University of Warwick, where he provides advanced scientific and technical support for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) instruments. Before joining Warwick, he gained extensive postdoctoral research experience in characterising a variety of materials using TEM related techniques. He completed his PhD at the University of Nottingham in 2007.

 

 

Dr Houari Amari is a Research Group Leader at the Leibniz institute for crystal growth (Berlin, Germany). He obtained his MSc (Hons.) from the University of Strasbourg (France) and his Ph.D. from the University of Sheffield (United Kingdom). His Ph.D. was related to investigations of novel semiconductors using advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Dr Amari’s actual research is focused on achieving atomic-level structural and chemical characterization of a wide range of materials, including semiconductors and dielectrics, using in-situ TEM.

Prof. Beanland is academic director of Warwick’s Electron Microscopy facility and holds a personal chair in the Department of Physics at the University of Warwick, with interests in electron diffraction, structure solution, and atomic-scale characterisation of materials.

Volker Schünemann studied physics at the University of Hamburg and did his PhD thesis under the supervision of Alfred X. Trautwein at the University of Lübeck, where he worked on the synthesis and characterization of iron nanoparticles in zeolites. This was his first exposure to temperature- and field-dependent Mössbauer spectroscopy. Subsequently, in 1993, he did postdoctoral work on bimetallic FeRh particles in the group of W.M.H. Sachtler at Northwestern University, Evanston, USA. Here the focus was on catalytic properties in CO hydrogenation. After his return in 1994 to the group of Alfred X. Trautwein to the University of Lübeck, he started to work on biological applications of Mössbauer spectroscopy and investigated different classes of iron-containing proteins such as heme and iron-sulfur proteins. In 2004, he became a professor at the University of Kaiserslautern and established a laboratory for temperature- and field-dependent Mössbauer spectroscopy. The focus of his group is on the study of the function and electronic and dynamical properties of iron centers in nature (iron proteins) and coordination chemistry (e.g., spin-crossover compounds, molecular magnets, and biomimetic iron complexes) using conventional and synchrotron-based Mössbauer spectroscopy. Quantum chemical calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) are also used to better understand electronic and dynamic properties.

Peter obtained his BA, MA and DPhil at the University of Oxford. Subsequently he was a Medical Research Council Research Fellow at the University of Cambridge and National Institute for Medical Research. From 1973-96 he was Lecturer, Reader and Professor at Birkbeck College, University of London, and from 1996-2007 held the Crum Brown Chair of Chemistry at the University of Edinburgh. In 2007, he took up a Chair in Chemistry at the University of Warwick as Head of Department, where he is now a Professor. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry, the Royal Society of Edinburgh, and the Royal Society of London, an EPSRC RISE Fellow (Recognising Inspirational Scientists and Engineers), a Fellow of the European Academy of Sciences, and an Honorary Fellow of the Chemical Research Society of India, and the Chinese Chemical Society. He was awarded the Royal Society 2022 Davy Medal, and 2022 Royal Society of Chemistry Dalton Horizon Team Prize.

 

We congratulate the authors on their impactful work and wish them success in their future academic research!

 

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Professor Eva Hemmer joins the Associate Editor team

Professor Eva Hemmer joins the Associate Editor team

Welcome to Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances!

 

Photo of Professor Eva Hemmer.We are delighted to welcome Professor Eva Hemmer, University of Ottawa, Canada, as a new Associate Editor working across Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances.

Eva Hemmer is an Associate Professor of Materials Chemistry at the University of Ottawa. She received her PhD (2008) in materials science from Saarland University, Germany. After a postdoctoral experience at Tokyo University of Science, Japan, with Prof. K. Soga (2009-2012), she moved to Canada to become a joint Alexander von Humboldt postdoctoral fellow with Profs. F. Vetrone and F. Légaré at INRS-EMT, Montreal (2012-2015).

In 2016, Eva joined the University of Ottawa, where her research team focused on new designs of upconverting and near-infrared-emitting rare-earth-based nanoparticles for bioimaging, optoelectronic, and optomagnetic applications.

“I have been reviewing research papers for quite some time now, including for the Nanoscale family, and always enjoyed it as a great opportunity to get to see brand new research in materials chemistry that is also relevant to my own work on optical nanomaterials. I am very excited to take on this new role as member of the editorial board, looking forward to deepening and broadening this experience when engaging with authors, reviewers, and the editorial team.” – Professor Eva Hemmer

We welcome you to submit your latest work on nanomaterials for bioimaging, optoelectronics and magnetics to her editorial office for consideration.

Submit your latest research

Explore some of Professor Hemmer’s recent articles below.

Graphical abstract for Core–multi-shell design: unlocking multimodal capabilities in lanthanide-based nanoparticles as upconverting, T2-weighted MRI and CT probes.

Core–multi-shell design: unlocking multimodal capabilities in lanthanide-based nanoparticles as upconverting, T2-weighted MRI and CT probes
Nan Liu, Christian Homann, Samuel Morfin, Meghana S. Kesanakurti, Nicholas D. Calvert, Adam J. Shuhendler, Tom Al and Eva Hemmer*
Nanoscale, 2023, DOI: 10.1039/D3NR05380F

 

Graphical abstract for Luminescence thermometry using sprayed films of metal complexes.

Luminescence thermometry using sprayed films of metal complexes
Riccardo Marin, Natalie C. Millan, Laura Kelly, Nan Liu, Emille Martinazzo Rodrigues, Muralee Murugesu* and Eva Hemmer*
J. Mater. Chem. C, 2022, DOI: 10.1039/D1TC05484H

 

Graphical abstract for Cubic versus hexagonal – phase, size and morphology effects on the photoluminescence quantum yield of NaGdF4:Er3+/Yb3+ upconverting nanoparticles.

Cubic versus hexagonal – phase, size and morphology effects on the photoluminescence quantum yield of NaGdF4:Er3+/Yb3+ upconverting nanoparticles
Marta Quintanilla,* Eva Hemmer,* Jose Marques-Hueso, Shadi Rohani, Giacomo Lucchini, Miao Wang, Reza R. Zamani, Vladimir Roddatis, Adolfo Speghini, Bryce S. Richards and Fiorenzo Vetrone*
Nanoscale, 2022, DOI: 10.1039/D1NR06319G

 

Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances are high-impact international journals, publishing high-quality experimental and theoretical work across the breadth of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Our broad scope covers cross-community research that bridges the various disciplines involved with nanoscience and nanotechnology.

Please join us in welcoming Professor Hemmer to Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances and we hope you will consider Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances for your future submissions.

Best wishes,

Dr Heather Montgomery
Managing Editor, Nanoscale
Dr Jeremy Allen
Executive Editor, Nanoscale Advances
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Our most popular 2023 articles

The most popular Nanoscale articles from 2023

We wanted to share with you some of the most popular articles published in Nanoscale over the last year, determined by their citations, downloads and altmetric scores.

Read the most popular Nanoscale articles

All of the articles in the collection are free to access until the end of February 2024. Discover some of the featured articles below.

Reviews

Graphical abstract for In vivo applications of micro/nanorobots.

In vivo applications of micro/nanorobots
Cagatay M. Oral and Martin Pumera*
Nanoscale, 2023, DOI: 10.1039/D3NR00502J

 

Graphical abstract for Recent advances in self-healing polyurethane based on dynamic covalent bonds combined with other self-healing methods.

Recent advances in self-healing polyurethane based on dynamic covalent bonds combined with other self-healing methods
Ze-Wei An, Rui Xue, Kang Ye, Hui Zhao,* Yang Liu, Peng Li, Zhen-Ming Chen, Chong-Xing Huang and  Guo-Hua Hu
Nanoscale, 2023, DOI: 10.1039/D2NR07110J

 

Graphical abstract for Assessment of biomass-derived carbon dots as highly sensitive and selective templates for the sensing of hazardous ions.

Assessment of biomass-derived carbon dots as highly sensitive and selective templates for the sensing of hazardous ions
Permender Singh, Arpita, Sandeep Kumar,* Parmod Kumar, Navish Kataria, Vinita Bhankar, Krishan Kumar,* Ravi Kumar, Chien-Te Hsieh* and Kuan Shiong Khoo*
Nanoscale, 2023, DOI: 10.1039/D3NR01966G

 

Communications

Graphical abstract for Support-facet-dependent morphology of small Pt particles on ceria.

Support-facet-dependent morphology of small Pt particles on ceria
Henrik Eliasson, Yubiao Niu, Richard E. Palmer, Henrik Grönbeck and Rolf Erni*
Nanoscale, 2023, DOI: 10.1039/D3NR04701F

 

Graphical abstract for Enhanced water transportation on a superhydrophilic serial cycloid-shaped pattern.

 

Enhanced water transportation on a superhydrophilic serial cycloid-shaped pattern
Defeng Yan, Yi Lu, Jinming Liu, Yang Chen, Jing Sun and Jinlong Song*
Nanoscale, 2023, DOI: 10.1039/D3NR02180G

 

Graphical abstract for Photon pairs bi-directionally emitted from a resonant metasurface.

Photon pairs bi-directionally emitted from a resonant metasurface
Changjin Son,* Vitaliy Sultanov, Tomás Santiago-Cruz, Aravind P. Anthur, Haizhong Zhang, Ramon Paniagua-Dominguez, Leonid Krivitsky, Arseniy I. Kuznetsov and Maria V. Chekhova
Nanoscale, 2023, DOI: 10.1039/D2NR05499J

 

We hope you enjoy reading these popular articles and would be delighted if you would consider Nanoscale for your next submission.

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Call For Papers: Nanocatalysis

Call For Papers: Nanocatalysis

Guest edited by Zhiqun Lin, In Young Kim and Michelle Personick

We are delighted to announce a call for papers for our latest online themed collection in Nanoscale on Nanocatalysis that is being guest edited by Dr Zhiqun Lin (National University of Singapore, Singapore), Dr In Young Kim (Ewha Womans University, South Korea) and Dr Michelle Personick (University of Virginia, USA).

Nanocatalysis open call for papers promotional graphic. Includes photos of the guest editors Zhiqun Lin, In Young Kim and Michelle Personick. Open for submissions until 18 March 2024.

Nanocatalysis represents an exciting subfield in nanoscience and nanotechnology which involves the use of nanomaterials and subnano-sized materials (nanoclusters, diatoms, single atoms) as catalysts for a wide variety of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic applications. Along with significant advances in nanomaterial design and synthesis assisted by machine learning, in-situ/ex-situ characterization techniques, and computational chemistry, the past several decades have witnessed a flood of research activities in this rapidly evolving area with most of the studies focusing on the effects of size, shape, chemical composition and morphology on catalytic properties and performance. This has led to the development of highly effective catalysts with enhanced activity, selectivity, and stability. This special themed collection aims to provide a platform to showcase the recent progress and challenges in the field of nanocatalysis. The scope of the collection is broad, including but not limited to:

  • Novel design and synthesis strategies
  • Homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis
  • Theoretical understanding of the catalytic mechanisms
  • Reaction pathway optimization
  • Nanointerface engineering
  • Support effects
  • Dynamic evolution of active sites
  • Applications in electrocatalysis, photocatalysis, photoelectrocatalysis, and thermocatalysis, etc.
  • Advanced characterization techniques

We hope that readers will find this themed collection informative and useful for the rational design and construction of highly efficient nanocatalysts to enable sustainable technologies for catalysis. This call for papers is open for the following article types:

  • Communications
  • Full papers

Open for submissions until 18 March 2024

If you would like to contribute to this themed collection, you can submit your article directly through the Nanoscale online submission system. Please mention that this submission is an open call contribution to the Nanocatalysis collection in the “Themed issues” section of the submission form and add a “Note to the Editor” that this is from the Open Call. The Editorial Office reserves the right to check suitability of submissions in relation to the scope of both the journal and the collection, and inclusion of accepted articles in the final themed issue is not guaranteed.

Please also note that all submissions will undergo our normal rigorous peer review processes including an initial assessment prior to peer review, and that peer review and acceptance are not guaranteed.

If you have any questions about the journal or the collection, then Edward Gardner, the Development Editor for Nanoscale, would be happy to answer them. You can contact him by emailing the journal inbox.

With best wishes,

Professor Zhiqun Lin (National University of Singapore, Singapore)
Professor In Young Kim (Ewha Womans University, South Korea)
Professor Michelle Personick (University of Virginia, USA)

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Nanoscale: Looking back at 2023

Looking back at 2023

An overview of the exciting events, activities and news for Nanoscale from 2023

2023 was another great year for nanoscience research and recognition in the field, with the award of the Chemistry Nobel Prize to Moungi Bawendi, Louis Brus and Alexei Ekimov for the discovery, synthesis, and development of quantum dots. Now that the year has come to an end, we want to share some of the exciting events and activities that happened last year for Nanoscale. Thank you for your engagement last year and for enabling the journal to continue to support the community. We look forward to another great year for the journal and nanoscience research in 2024.

Board updates

Professor Chunli Bai (Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China) was appointed as Honorary Editor-in-Chief. Professor Bai was one of the inaugural Editors-in-Chief of both Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances, working with the Royal Society of Chemistry for the past 14 years. We would like to thank him for his ongoing support of the journals and nanoscience community and look forward to working with him in this new role.

We welcomed Professor Yue Zhang (University of Science and Technology Beijing, China) as our new Editor-in-Chief working across Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances, joining Professor Dirk Guldi (Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany) as co-Editor-in-Chief for the journals.

Photos of Chunli Bai, Yue Zhang and Dirk Guldi.

Emerging investigators

We were proud to present our 2023 Emerging Investigators collection, recognizing the rising stars of nanoscience and nanotechnology by gathering some of the very best work from researchers in the early stages of their independent careers.

Congratulations to all the featured researchers on their important work so far in the field. Meet the featured authors in our Profile article.

Themed collections

Nanoscale published 16 themed collections in 2023, and we have many more exciting themed collections planned.

International Women’s Day

To celebrate International Women’s Day 2023 we highlighted some of the excellent female researchers publishing impactful work in nanoscience in a special collection published in Nanoscale Horizons, Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances. The collection featured work led by female scientists around the world and showcased the impact these leading individuals have on the research published within our nanoscience journals.

Explore our Women in Nanoscience collection

If you have published in Nanoscale in 2023, and either the first and/or corresponding author of your article is a woman, you can feature in our 2024 collection! Please contact the Editorial office with the title of your article, DOI and a headshot photo of the eligible author by 1 March 2024 if you wish to be included in the collection, which will be promoted this International Women’s Day, 8 March 2024. At the Royal Society of Chemistry, we foster a culture of inclusion of women from all walks of life and look forward to continuing to celebrate all of the wonderful women in nanoscience.

Editor’s choice collections

We showcased a variety of articles in collections curated by our editors. Our Associate Editor Professor Xiaogang Liu (National University of Singapore, Singapore) selected some outstanding recent publications to feature in an Editor’s Choice Collection on Photon Upconversion.

We collated several other topical collections throughout the year with our companion journal Nanoscale Horizons to promote some of our best work in certain areas.

We also highlighted the Nanoscale Most Popular 2022 Articles and celebrated a variety of events throughout the year with special collections.

Look out for the upcoming collections that we will be publishing throughout 2024!

Outstanding reviewers

We once again recognised the significant contributions that our reviewers have made to the journal and highlighted our 2022 Outstanding Reviewers for Nanoscale.

Following a long-standing Nanoscale tradition, Outstanding Reviewers are recognized. Guaranteeing the quality and impact of Nanoscale is only made possible through a stringent peer review process. Two aspects stand out: on one hand, excellence of the reviews, and, on the other hand, timeliness. At the heart of peer review are carefully drafted reports. Reports that provide a valuable service to the scientific community and to the readers of Nanoscale. On this occasion, I want to extend a big thank you to these Outstanding Reviewers and everyone else who has reviewed manuscripts for Nanoscale.” – Professor Dirk Guldi, Editor-in-Chief

HOT articles

Finally, be sure to read the exciting articles featured in the 2023 Nanoscale HOT Article Collection.

 

The Nanoscale team wish you a Happy New Year!

With best wishes,

Dr Heather Montgomery
Managing Editor, Nanoscale

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Novel technique for monitoring magnetization dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles

To celebrate some of the excellent articles published in Nanoscale Advances this year, we asked some of our authors to discuss their work in more detail.

Check out the infographic below which summarises the key message from Everaert et al.’s work entitled ‘Monitoring magnetic nanoparticle clustering and immobilization with thermal noise magnetometry using optically pumped magnetometers‘.

 

Discover the key message from this article

 

Want to find out more? Read the full article here!

 

Monitoring magnetic nanoparticle clustering and immobilization with thermal noise magnetometry using optically pumped magnetometers

Katrijn Everaert, Tilmann Sander, Rainer Körber, Norbert Löwa, Bartel Van Waeyenberge, Jonathan Leliaert and Frank Wiekhorst

Nanoscale Adv., 2023,5, 2341-2351, DOI: 10.1039/D3NA00016H

 

 

 

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Correlating Structural and Electronic Properties of Nanodiamonds

To celebrate some of the excellent work that has recently been published in Nanoscale Advances, we asked some of our authors to discuss their work in more detail. In this post, we hear from Daria Miliaieva and her co-authors about their recently published article entitled “Absolute energy levels in nanodiamonds of different origins and surface chemistries“.

Discover the key message from this article

Meet the authors

 

 

Daria Miliaieva obtained her PhD in Materials and electrotechnology from the Czech Technical University in Prague in 2019 and was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Czech Academy of Sciences from 2020 to 2023. In 2023 she started her Marie Curie Postdoctoral Fellowship at Taltech in Estonia, working on novel chalcogenide materials for photovoltaics. Most of her interest is drawn to analyzing energetic bands in materials by a combination of techniques like UPS/XPS, Kelvin probe, electrochemical spectroscopy and DFT calculations.

 

 

 

 

 

Bohuslav Rezek graduated from Physics at the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics at Charles University in Prague in 1996. In 2001 he obtained PhD at the Czech Academy of Sciences (CAS) in the study of charge transport in silicon thin films for photovoltaics by using scanning probe techniques. After his PhD, he was doing research on diamond devices and interfaces in Germany, Switzerland and Japan. In 2006 he became a research team leader and Purkyne Fellow at the Institute of Physics CAS. In 2015 he became the head of the Physics department at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering of the Czech Technical University in Prague. In 2019 he became a full professor there. His research is focused on correlative microscopic and micro-spectroscopic analyses of semiconductor and organic materials towards opto-electronic and bio-electronic applications.

 

 

 

 

 

Jan Čermák obtained his PhD in optics and optoelectronics in 2010 at Charles University, Prague. He works at the Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences within the Department of Semiconductors. His scientific research is focused on the optoelectronic properties of carbon-based materials (polymers, diamond) related to photovoltaics. His approach to that is mainly via advanced electronic modes of atomic force microscopy under controlled illumination.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jaroslav Kuliček obtained a PhD in macromolecular chemistry from the Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Slovakia, in 2017 and was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Polymer Institute from 2017 to 2018. In 2018 he started his Postdoctoral Fellowship at Czech Technical University in Prague, focused on optoelectronic characterization of photoactive materials using micro-spectroscopic methods such as Confocal Raman and Photoluminescence, AFM/photo-KPFM, Kelvin Probe and Air Photoemission Spectroscopy.

 

 

 

 

An interview with the authors

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment and what do you find most challenging about your research?

I am focusing on the investigation of optoelectronic properties of the materials that can be useful in photovoltaics. The most exciting is the speed of photovoltaic field development at all levels from the fundamental research with the novel materials predictions and discoveries and the new mechanism of charge generation and transport to the applications of PV materials in the new areas like agrivoltaics. It is exciting and at the same time challenging to keep up with the pace of the photovoltaic field development.

 

How do you feel about Nanoscale Advances as a place to publish research on this topic?

My current research is on the determination of the electronic structure of the nanoparticles and establishing the practical consequences of it. Nanoscale Advances covering nanoparticles and nanoelectronics is an appropriate journal to publish research on nanoparticle electronic properties.

 

Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other, early career scientists?

Move on when frustrated about the research, sometimes understanding things comes with time and persistence leads to success and perfection. Make use of all possible research stays and conferences to develop your skills and increase your chances of meeting the right people (for you) for making a good science together!

 

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Quantum Dots: A Nanoscience Nobel Prize

Quantum Dots: A Nanoscience Nobel Prize

We are delighted to present to you a special Nanoscale journal family collection dedicated to this year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry, a diverse set of works showcasing developments in quantum dots, covering a comprehensive range of topics including the synthesis, characterisation/optimisation, and application of these exciting materials. Among the well-received articles and reviews that we have selected from Nanoscale Horizons, Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances, several have been authored by one of the Nobel Prize winners Moungi G. Bawendi.

Button with link to themed collection.

We also asked one of our active Editorial Board members for Nanoscale, Nanoscale Advances, and Advisory Board member for Nanoscale Horizons, Professor Jonathan Veinot, for his thoughts on this year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry, as a researcher who works closely in the area:

“The discovery of quantum dots by Bawendi, Brus and Ekimov was a pivotal moment in the advancement of nanotechnology. It saw the emergence of a field of research that continues to hold the interest of countless researchers and the realization of a broad class of materials impacts many aspects of modern society ranging from energy generation to medicine to the television in your living room. Discoveries related to quantum dots and their role in society are sure to continue long into the future.”

— Jonathan Veinot (University of Alberta, Canada)

Promotional slide for collection on Quantum Dots: A Nanoscience Nobel Prize (QR code linked to collection included).

We hope that readers will enjoy learning about the breadth of research occurring in quantum dots from reading these papers and develop new ideas for utilizing these transformative materials. A small selection of the papers are featured below.

Stable, small, specific, low-valency quantum dots for single-molecule imaging
Jungmin Lee, Xinyi Feng, Ou Chen, Moungi G. Bawendi and Jun Huang
Nanoscale, 2018, 10, 4406-4414 DOI: 10.1039/C7NR08673C

Detection of high-energy compounds using photoluminescent silicon nanocrystal paper based sensors
Christina M. Gonzalez, Muhammad Iqbal, Mita Dasog, Davin G. Piercey, Ross Lockwood, Thomas M. Klapötkec and Jonathan G. C. Veinot
Nanoscale, 2014, 6, 2608-2612 DOI: 10.1039/C3NR06271F

Perovskite quantum dots encapsulated in electrospun fiber membranes as multifunctional supersensitive sensors for biomolecules, metal ions and pH
Yuanwei Wang, Yihua Zhu, Jianfei Huang, Jin Cai, Jingrun Zhu, Xiaoling Yang, Jianhua Shena and Chunzhong Li
Nanoscale Horiz., 2017, 2, 225-232 DOI: 10.1039/C7NH00057J

Biomolecule-derived quantum dots for sustainable optoelectronics Designing multifunctional quantum dots for bioimaging, detection, and drug delivery
Satyapriya Bhandari, Dibyendu Mondal, S. K. Nataraj and R. Geetha Balakrishna
Nanoscale Adv., 2019, 1, 913-936 DOI: 10.1039/C8NA00332G

We hope you enjoy reading the collection as we celebrate the 2023 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

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