Nanoscale 2023 Lunar New Year Collection

Lunar New Year collection

A collection of our most popular articles from Asia

To celebrate the Lunar New Year, we are delighted to highlight some of the most popular articles, determined by their citations and page views, published in Nanoscale last year by corresponding authors based in countries celebrating the Lunar New Year.

Read the collection now

Nanoscale Chinese New Year promotional graphic with a red background and an image of a gold rabbit surrounded by flowers. Text reads: "Nanoscale Wishes you a Happy Chinese New Year 2023, May you enjoy a very prosperous and productive year of the rabbit".

All of the articles in the collection are free to access until the end of February 2023. Read some of the featured articles below.

Halide perovskite single crystals: growth, characterization, and stability for optoelectronic applications
Yunae Cho, Hye Ri Jung and William Jo
Nanoscale, 2022, DOI: 10.1039/D2NR00513A

Ultrathin Ti-doped WO3 nanosheets realizing selective photoreduction of CO2 to CH3OH
Peiquan Ling, Juncheng Zhu, Zhiqiang Wang, Jun Hu, Junfa Zhu, Wensheng Yan, Yongfu Sun and Yi Xie
Nanoscale, 2022, DOI: 10.1039/D2NR02364D

Nanoparticle-induced chemoresistance: the emerging modulatory effects of engineered nanomaterials on human intestinal cancer cell redox metabolic adaptation
Zhuoran Wu, Magdiel Inggrid Setyawati, Hong Kit Lim, Kee Woei Ng and Chor Yong Tay
Nanoscale, 2022, DOI: 10.1039/D2NR03893E

Highly-efficient radiative thermal rectifiers based on near-field gap variations
Bei Yang and Qing Dai
Nanoscale, 2022, DOI: 10.1039/D2NR04350E

Improved zT in Nb5Ge3–GeTe thermoelectric nanocomposite
Jing Cao, Xian Yi Tan, Ning Jia, Da Lan, Samantha Faye Duran Solco, Kewei Chen, Sheau Wei Chien, Hongfei Liu, Chee Kiang Ivan Tan, Qiang Zhu, Jianwei Xu, Qingyu Yan and Ady Suwardi
Nanoscale, 2022, DOI: 10.1039/D1NR06962D

 

We hope you enjoy reading these popular articles and wish you a happy, healthy and prosperous year of the rabbit!

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Measuring the Nanoscale – Theoretical Models and Molecular Probe Experiments

An infographic depicting a new model for investigating the properties of hot charge carriers at semiconductor surfaces

A self-consistent model to link surface electronic band structure to the voltage dependence of hot electron induced molecular nanoprobe experiments

Peter A. Sloan and Kristina R. Rusimova

Nanoscale Adv., 2022,4, 4880-4885, DOI: 10.1039/D2NA00644H

 

 

 

Meet the authors

Photo of Dr Kristina R. Rusimova

 

Dr Kristina R. Rusimova obtained her PhD in atomic manipulation with the scanning tunnelling microscope from the University of Bath in 2016. Following a short postdoctoral position in photonics, she joined the Department of Physics at the University of Bath as an independent Prize Fellow in 2018 and as a tenured Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in 2021. In 2022 she was part of the team awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry’s Faraday Division Horizon Prize for the discovery of chiroptical harmonic scattering. Her research interests include single molecule manipulation, quantum optics, advanced materials, and speciality optical fibres.

 

 

Photo of Dr Peter A. Sloan

 

Dr Peter A. Sloan received an undergraduate Masters degree in Chemical Physics from the University of Edinburgh in 1999 and a PhD from the University of Birmingham in 2004. He was a Royal Society (International Outgoing) Fellow 2004-2005 in the group of Nobel Laureate Prof John C. Polanyi at the University of Toronto. He gained an independent Lectureship (Assistant Professor) position at the University of Bath in 2010 and was promoted to Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor) in 2016. Peter’s research has focused on using atomic manipulation with an STM to measure and uncover the physics of hot-electrons at semi-conductor surfaces. He is also a founder and the overall Director of the Bath Physics Observatory.

 

 

 

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment and what do you find most challenging about your research?

  • Dr Peter Sloan: Our work has the chance to show that state-of-the-art atomic manipulation can be used to help real-world problems. The most challenging aspect is learning how to make true measurement of what we’re after, rather than say having the influence of the arbitrary experimental parameters or limitations of the apparatus muddy the waters.
  • Dr Kristina Rusimova: Experimental automation has been the backbone for most of our recent scientific breakthroughs. I am excited about the prospect of opening up our automation protocols to the scanning probe microscopy community worldwide through open source software and combining them with machine learning algorithms, which could push surface science to an entirely new level.

 

How do you feel about Nanoscale Advances as a place to publish research on this topic?

  • Dr Peter Sloan: Nanoscale Advances is a fantastic place to publish. It is highly regarded, fast reviewing and we had some of the best, most fair, and rigorous reports we’ve had.
  • Dr Kristina Rusimova: The submission and review process have been smooth, efficient, and rigorous. Nanoscale Advances has a well-established portfolio of scanning probe microscopy research, and our paper sits nicely within it.

 

Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?

  • Dr Peter Sloan: Work with good people. Have a work-life balance rather than think you have a work-life balance.
  • Dr Kristina Rusimova: Don’t be scared of rejection and learn how (and when) to say “no”. Have fun with your science.
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Nanoscale: Looking back at 2022

Looking back at 2022

An overview of the exciting events, activities and news for Nanoscale from 2022

2022 was another great year for nanoscience research and now that the year has come to an end, we want to share some of the exciting events and activities that happened last year for Nanoscale. Thank you for your engagement last year and for enabling the journal to continue to support the community. We look forward to another great year for the journal and nanoscience research in 2023.

Board updates

We welcomed Professor Gianaurelio (Giovanni) Cuniberti (TU Dresden, Germany), Professor Christian Klinke (University of Rostock, Germany), Professor Zhiqun Lin (National University of Singapore, Singapore), Professor Janet Macdonald (Vanderbilt University, USA) and Professor Teresa Pellegrino (Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Italy) to the Editorial Board of Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances as Associate Editors.

Professor Gianaurelio (Giovanni) Cuniberti, Professor Christian Klinke, Professor Zhiqun Lin, Professor Janet Macdonald and Professor Teresa Pellegrino.

Professor Chunying Chen (National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of China, China), Professor Yamuna Krishnan (University of Chicago, USA), Professor Liberato Manna (Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Italy) and Professor Paolo Samorì (Université de Strasbourg, France) all completed their final terms as Associate Editors for Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances in 2022 and joined our Advisory Board. We would like to thank them for their excellent service to the journal and community over many years.

Along with Professor Chen, Professor Krishnan, Professor Manna and Professor Samorì, we welcomed five other new Nanoscale Advisory Board members in order to better represent the ever-increasing diversity of our authors and readers.

  • Guohua Jia, Curtin University, Australia
  • Katharina Landfester, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Germany
  • Lakshminarayana Polavarapu, University of Vigo, Spain
  • Narayan Pradhan, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, India
  • Hyeon Suk Shin, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, South Korea

Discover our full list of the Nanoscale Advisory Board.

Outstanding reviewers

Nanoscale once again recognised the significant contributions that our reviewers have made to the journal and highlighted our 2021 Outstanding Reviewers for Nanoscale.

By now, it is a good old tradition that Nanoscale recognizes its Outstanding Reviewers. Key in terms of guaranteeing the quality and impact of Nanoscale is the peer review process. As such, peer review depends not only on the excellence of the reviews but also on their timeliness. All of it comes on top of the many burdens that we face as active researchers. At the heart of the peer review process are carefully drafted reviews; they provide a valuable service that we owe to the scientific community in general, and to the readers of Nanoscale in particular. I want to extend a big thank you to these Outstanding Reviewers and everyone else who has reviewed manuscripts for Nanoscale”. – Professor Dirk Guldi, Editor-in-Chief

Emerging investigators

We were proud to present our 2022 Emerging Investigators collection, recognizing the rising stars of nanoscience and nanotechnology by gathering some of the very best work from researchers in the early stages of their independent careers.

Congratulations to all the featured researchers on their important work so far in the field. Meet the featured authors in our Profile article.

Themed collections

Nanoscale published 11 themed collections in 2022, and we have many more exciting themed collections planned.

Editor’s choice collections

Nanoscale published an Editor’s Choice Collection on Functional MOFs and COFs selected by Paolo Samorì (University of Strasbourg, France). Look out for the upcoming collections that we will be publishing throughout 2023!

Journal metrics

This year we were pleased to see that Nanoscale’s impact factor increased to 8.307 in the 2021 Journal Citation Reports (Clarivate Analytics, 2022), with over 370k monthly downloads and a fast time to peer reviewed first decision of 35 days. These are just a few of the many metrics that can be used to measure the journal’s reach, quality and impact.

Nanoscale metrics based on 2021 data promotional graphic.

HOT articles

Finally, be sure to read the exciting articles featured in the 2022 Nanoscale HOT Article Collection.

 

The Nanoscale team wish you a Happy New Year!

With best wishes,

Dr Heather Montgomery
Managing Editor, Nanoscale

 

 

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Celebrating Nanoscience in China!

Nanoscale Advances is a collaborative venture between the Royal Society of Chemistry and the National Center for Nanoscience and Technology (NCNST) in Beijing, China. We publish quality research across the breadth of nanoscience and nanotechnology.

Our Chinese authors and readers are a core part of our journal community. To celebrate our Chinese authors, we have selected some of our most popular articles over the last year. Some of these articles are listed below, or you can click the button below to read the full collection. All articles are gold open access so free to read!

Read the collection

Realization of a multi-band terahertz metamaterial absorber using two identical split rings having opposite opening directions connected by a rectangular patch

Ben-Xin Wang, Wei Xu, Yangkuan Wu, Zhuchuang Yang, Shengxiong Lai and Liming Lu 

Nanoscale Adv., 2022,4, 1359-1367

All-inorganic perovskite nanocrystals: next-generation scintillation materials for high-resolution X-ray imaging

Lu Lu, Mingzi Sun, Tong Wu, Qiuyang Lu, Baian Chen and Bolong Huang

Nanoscale Adv., 2022,4, 680-696

SERS spectral evolution of azo-reactions mediated by plasmonic Au@Ag core–shell nanorods

Mengen Hu, Zhulin Huang, Rui Liu, Ningning Zhou, Haibin Tang and Guowen Meng

Nanoscale Adv., 2022,4, 4730-4738

Nanoscale Advances is pleased to have some prominent members of the nanoscience and nanothechnology community on our team:

  • Chunli Bai, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China
  • Qing Dai, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of China, China
  • Quan Li, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, China
  • Ling-Dong Sun, Peking University, China
  • Jinlan Wang, Southeast University, China
  • Manzhou Zhu, Anhui University, China
  • Chunying Chen, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of China, China
  • Xingyu Jiang, Southern University of Science and Technology, China
  • Changming Li, Southwest University, China
  • Zhigang Shuai, Tsinghua University, China
  • Hong-Bo Sun, Tsinghua University, China
  • Xiaoming Sun, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, China
  • Zhiyong Tang, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, China
  • Jianfang Wang, Chinese University of Hong Kong, China
  • Xiaojun Wu, University of Science and Technology of China, China
  • Yujie Xiong, University of Science and Technology of China, China
  • Hongxing Xu, Wuhan University, China
  • Lin Xu, Nanjing Normal University, China
  • Ya Yang,Beijing Institute of Nanoenergy and Nanosystems, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China
  • Hua Zhang, City University of Hong Kong, China

Thank you again to all for your support. We look forward to the exciting developments ahead for Nanoscale Advances!

 

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Nanoscale Advances is now indexed in PubMed Central

We are delighted to announce that Nanoscale Advances was recently accepted and fully indexed in PubMed Central (PMC). Produced by the U.S. National Institutes of Health’s National Library of Medicine (NIH/NLM), PMC is an archive of biomedical and life sciences literature – all of which is open access and completely free to read!

In celebration, we would like to highlight some themed collections covering biomedicine and life science topics that feature articles published in Nanoscale Advances.

 

Nanoparticle-Based Cancer Therapies: Recent Progress and Future Challenges currently open for contributions

Advanced Functional Nanomaterials for Biomedical Applications

Recent Breakthroughs in Nanobiotechnology

Bioorthogonal and click chemistry: Celebrating the 2022 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

 

Our themed collections allow us to bring together experts in particular areas to highlight the latest advances in research. Nanoscale Advances offers an exceptionally broad international audience, being open access and discoverable in Scopus, Web of Science, Directory of Open Access Journals, and now PubMed Central!

Submit your article to Nanoscale Advances today, or find out more about the benefits of publishing with us.

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Detecting Cancerous Cells with Bio-compatible Gelatin-based Nanoprobes

An infographic highlighting gelatin-based nanoprobes that can detect cancerous cells during image-guided surgery

Protease-activated indocyanine green nanoprobes for intraoperative NIR fluorescence imaging of primary tumors
Kyekyoon (Kevin) Kim, Viktor Gruev, Hyungsoo Choi et al.
Nanoscale Adv., 2022,4, 4041-4050, DOI: 10.1039/d2na00276k

 

Meet the authors

This article reports the collaborative efforts of two research laboratories: Thin Film and Charged Particles (TFCP) Research Lab (PIs. Kyekyoon (Kevin) Kim and Hyungsoo Choi) and Biosensors Lab (PI. Viktor Gruev) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. TFCP Lab consists of multidisciplinary biomedical researchers formulating versatile biomaterial-based micro/nanoparticles incorporating drugs, fluorophores, and live-cells for various biomedical applications including the treatment of type-1 diabetes, ischemic stroke, and cancer. The scientists in Biosensors Lab are developing novel bio-inspired imaging technologies, highly sensitive and capable of differentiating multiple tumor-specific fluorophores, to provide surgeons with enhanced intraoperative imaging experiences during cancer surgery.

 

 

(a) What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment and what do you find most challenging about your research?

The exciting part is having opportunities to collaborate with many experts from different fields of science and engineering. The harmonious teamwork and support allow us to explore new ideas and conduct innovative research. The challenging part is finding the balance between innovation and clinical translation. Novelty in research offers new insights, but that wouldn’t necessarily lead to it being clinically acceptable. To ensure that we are doing translational research, we have to consider its relevance and applicability to patient-oriented healthcare.

 

(b) How do you feel about Nanoscale Advances as a place to publish research on this topic?

Nanoscale Advances is one of the fastest-growing journals, encompassing a wide scope of topics in nanotechnology. With that being said, we are excited to be able to showcase our work on such a platform.

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Themed collection: A path towards smart tailored nanomaterials

From design to synthesis, functionalization strategies and advanced characterizations

Guest Edited by Professor Chiara Battocchio (Roma Tre University, Rome, Italy), Professor Ilaria Fratoddi (Sapienza University of Rome, Italy) and Professor Barbara Capone (Roma Tre University, Rome, Italy).

In the last decades, a considerable effort has been focused on nanostructured materials (NMs), trying to find the correlation between structure and unexpected characteristics, which otherwise would not be possible at longer scales. NMs possess unique and widely tunable physicochemical properties, enabling unconventional applications to be achieved, ranging from nanomedicine, environmental science, catalysis to optoelectronics and energy conversion.

The design, synthesis and functionalization methods of NMs are oriented to a smart tailoring of the morpho-structural properties with the aim of improving their processability and applicability. However, the “perfect” material suitable for each application, requires precise control on the molecular and electronic structure as well as of the morphology of the nanomaterial.

Novel functionalised NMs require innovative design techniques, that foresee the creation of new paths where theoretical approaches walk side by side with modern synthetic methodologies and characterizations. The last decades saw the rise of theoretical and computational as a powerful tool to either predict on a mesoscopic scale (coarse graining, multiscale) the main features that would optimise the functionalisation of the designed materials, or to focus on very specific (atomistic) mechanisms unveiling the origins of specific properties in the materials.

Among others, the wet synthesis methods of nanomaterials possess a unique versatility to obtain different shapes, sizes and external functionalizing layers, which in turn prove to be an easy path for the customization of their properties.

Recently, the possibility to conjugate spectroscopic techniques with microscopy at nanometric level, as for example by combining X-ray spectroscopy with electron microscopy (SPELEEM), elicits a huge interest. Another issue that is having a very big development is the possibility to carry on X-ray photoemission experiments in non-UHV conditions, as in near ambient photoelectron spectroscopy (NAP), using a cell or an electrospray beam of nanoparticles in solution.

This collection focuses on the design, synthesis and advanced characterizations of functional NMs, e.g. metal, metal oxides, and hybrid nanoparticles by means of state-of-the-art spectroscopic and imaging techniques.

 

If you are interested in contributing to this collection please get in touch with the Editorial Office by email.

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Call for papers: Nanomaterials for gas sensing and delivery


Guest Editors: Run Zhang (The University of Queensland, Australia), Songjun Zeng (Hunan University, China), Rona Chandrawati (University of New South Wales, Australia)

To address challenges in the management of gases (including noxious gas and therapeutic gas), a series of nanoscale materials with fascinating structural, physical, and chemical characteristics have been developed for gas sensing and delivery in recent years. This themed collection in Nanoscale Advances aims to provide a forum for recent trends in the rapidly evolving field of nanomaterials for gas sensing and delivery. We welcome articles on the following topics:

  • synthetic strategies
  • theoretical understanding
  • regulation of nanomaterials with gas sensing properties
  • nanosensors for the detection and identification of gaseous molecules (e.g. gasotransmitters, noxious gases, gaseous pollutants, etc.)
  • theranostic nanotechnology for drug-like gases delivery for the treatment of various diseases (e.g. cancer, gastrointestinal and cardiovascular disorders, etc.)
  • nanomaterial engineered devices and scaffolds for gas detection and therapies
  • other gas-related sensing technology and treatment procedures

 

You are welcome to submit an original research article within the scope.

 

If you are interested in contributing to this collection please get in touch with the Editorial Office by email.

 

Manuscripts should be submitted via the Royal Society of Chemistry’s online submission service and the Editorial Office informed by email. Please add a “note to the editor” in the submission form when you submit your manuscript to say that this is a submission for the themed collection. The Editorial Office and Guest Editors reserve the right to check suitability of submissions in relation to the scope of the collection and inclusion of accepted articles in the collection is not guaranteed. All manuscripts will be subject to the journal’s usual peer review process. Accepted manuscripts will be added to the online collection as soon as they are online, and they will be published in a regular issue of Nanoscale Advances.

Please note that article processing charges apply to all articles submitted to Nanoscale Advances if, following peer-review, they are accepted for publication. Details of the APC and discounted rates can be found here.

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Call for papers: Nanoparticle-Based Cancer Therapies

Guest Editors: Catarina Pinto Reis (University of Lisbon, Portugal), Maria Manuela Gaspar (University of Lisbon, Portugal), Carlos A García-González (Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Spain)

In this collection we welcome articles on the following topics:

• drug carriers
• drug delivery
• biopolymers
• nanomaterials
• local and systemic delivery
• in situ delivery
• passive drug delivery
• targeted drug delivery
• nanoscale dosage forms
• nanomedicine
• supramolecular structures
• polymer conjugated
• pre-clinical studies
• in vitro models
• medical devices
• regulatory affairs

 

You are welcome to submit an original research article within the scope.

 

If you are interested in contributing to this collection please get in touch with the Editorial Office by email.

 

Manuscripts should be submitted via the Royal Society of Chemistry’s online submission service and the Editorial Office informed by email. Please add a “note to the editor” in the submission form when you submit your manuscript to say that this is a submission for the themed collection. The Editorial Office and Guest Editors reserve the right to check suitability of submissions in relation to the scope of the collection and inclusion of accepted articles in the collection is not guaranteed. All manuscripts will be subject to the journal’s usual peer review process. Accepted manuscripts will be added to the online collection as soon as they are online, and they will be published in a regular issue of Nanoscale Advances.

Please note that article processing charges apply to all articles submitted to Nanoscale Advances if, following peer-review, they are accepted for publication. Details of the APC and discounted rates can be found here.

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Professor Gianaurelio (Giovanni) Cuniberti joins the Associate Editor team

Professor Gianaurelio (Giovanni) Cuniberti joins the Associate Editor team

Welcome to Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances!

Professor Gianaurelio (Giovanni) Cuniberti

We are delighted to welcome Professor Gianaurelio (Giovanni) Cuniberti, TU Dresden, Germany, as a new Associate Editor working across Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances.

Gianaurelio Cuniberti has been the Chair of Materials Science and Nanotechnology at TU Dresden since 2007 and is the founding director of the Dresden Center for Intelligent Materials. He is an Honorary Professor at the Division of IT Convergence Engineering of POSTECH and the Pohang University of Science and Technology, is Adjunct Professor for the Department of Chemistry at the University of Alabama, and a Guest Professor at SJTU. In 2018 he became a faculty member of the transcampus between TU Dresden and King’s College London.

His research interests include a wide range of areas from quantum dots, nanowires and nanotubes to biosystems, molecular and organic electronics, addressing transport phenomena, structural stability and the theory and modelling of electronic and structural properties of bottom-up nanoscale materials.

 

Submit your latest research to Professor Cuniberti’s Editorial Office

Read some of his recent papers below.

A wafer-scale two-dimensional platinum monosulfide ultrathin film via metal sulfurization for high performance photoelectronics
Jinbo Pang, Yanhao Wang, Xiaoxin Yang, Lei Zhang, Yufen Li, Yu Zhang, Jiali Yang, Feng Yang, Xiao Wang, Gianaurelio Cuniberti, Hong Liu and Mark H. Rümmeli
Mater. Adv., 2022, DOI: 10.1039/D1MA00757B

One-way rotation of a chemically anchored single molecule-rotor
Frank Eisenhut, Tim Kühne, Jorge Monsalve, Saurabh Srivastava, Dmitry A. Ryndyk, Gianaurelio Cuniberti, Oumaima Aiboudi, Franziska Lissel, Vladimír Zobač, Roberto Robles, Nicolás Lorente, Christian Joachim and Francesca Moresco
Nanoscale, 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D1NR04583K

Predicting the bulk modulus of single-layer covalent organic frameworks with square-lattice topology from molecular building-block properties
Antonios Raptakis, Arezoo Dianat, Alexander Croy and Gianaurelio Cuniberti
Nanoscale, 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D0NR07666J

Enhanced visible-light photodegradation of fluoroquinolone-based antibiotics and E. coli growth inhibition using Ag–TiO2 nanoparticles
Jiao Wang, Ladislav Svoboda, Zuzana Němečková, Massimo Sgarzi, Jiří Henych, Nadia Licciardello and Gianaurelio Cuniberti
RSC Adv., 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D0RA10403E

Coexistence of fluorescent Escherichia coli strains in millifluidic droplet reactors
Xinne Zhao, Rico Illing, Philip Ruelens, Michael Bachmann, Gianaurelio Cuniberti, J. Arjan G. M. de Visser and Larysa Baraban
Lab Chip, 2021, DOI: 10.1039/D0LC01204A

STM induced manipulation of azulene-based molecules and nanostructures: the role of the dipole moment
Tim Kühne, Kwan Ho Au-Yeung, Frank Eisenhut, Oumaima Aiboudi, Dmitry A. Ryndyk, Gianaurelio Cuniberti, Franziska Lissel and Francesca Moresco
Nanoscale, 2020, DOI: 10.1039/D0NR06809H

Please join us in welcoming Professor Cuniberti to Nanoscale and Nanoscale Advances!

Best wishes,

Dr Heather Montgomery Dr Jeremy Allen
Managing Editor, Nanoscale Executive Editor, Nanoscale Advances
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