Materials Horizons Emerging Investigator Series – Danqing Liu

Novel butterfly-shaped organic semiconductor and single-walled carbon nanotube composites for high performance thermoelectric generators

An infographic showcasing the design of new butterfly-shaped organic semiconductors

This week, we are delighted to present our latest infographic highlighting fantastic work by  et al. on a series of novel butterfly-shaped organic semiconductors by contorting the pentacenone/anthrone cores with steric substitutions! Learn more in the infographic below or get the full story from their Materials Horizons article.

This Communication was also featured in our Emerging Investigator series, find out more about this series here and check out the full interview with Danqing in this Editorial.

Novel butterfly-shaped organic semiconductor and single-walled carbon nanotube composites for high performance thermoelectric generators
Lai Wei, Hongfeng Huang, Chunmei Gao, Danqing Liu and Lei Wang
Mater. Horiz., 2021, 8, 1207-1215

Meet the authors

Danqing Liu, Shenzen University, China

Danqing Liu received her BSc degree in 2010 from the University of Science and Technology of China, and earned her PhD degree in Chemistry at the Chinese University of Hong Kong in 2014. She joined Shenzhen University as an assistant professor in the College of Material Science and Engineering in 2015. Currently, her research group focuses on organic semiconductors and electronic devices, including organic/hybrid thermoelectrics and organic field effect transistors.

Don’t forget to check out the Emerging Investigator series interview with Danqing in this Editorial.

Lei Wang, Shenzen University, China

Lei Wang conducted his MSc and PhD study in the Guangzhou Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, from 2001 to 2006. He then joined Shenzhen University and was promoted to full professor in 2011. Prof. Wang is currently the dean of College of Material Science and Engineering of Shenzhen University and the director of Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Polymer Science and Technology. His research interests include highly branched polymers, proton exchange membrane materials for fuel cells, conductive polymers, and organic thermoelectric materials.

Lai Wei, Shenzen University, China

Lei Wei received his MSc degree from East China Normal University in 2013, and obtained his PhD degree from Université Paris-Sud in 2018. He then completed Postdoctoral Fellowship in Shenzhen University from 2019–2020. He is now a senior scientist at BGI-Shenzhen. His research interests focus on organic semiconductor materials, natural product chemistry, and asymmetric organic catalysis.

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Materials Horizons Emerging Investigator Series – Juan José Vilatela

Tough sheets of nanowires produced floating in the gas phase

An infographic highlighting a new universal route to produce continuous sheets of inorganic nanowires

We are pleased to share with you our latest infographic highlighting the excellent work by  et al. on the synthesis of silicon nanowires directly assembled through their growth suspended in a gas stream, with textile-like properties and an order-of-magnitude higher toughness than monolithic analogues! Learn more in the infographic below or get the full story from their Materials Horizons article.

This Communication was also featured in our Emerging Investigator series, find out more about this series here and check out the full interview with Juan José in this Editorial.

Tough sheets of nanowires produced floating in the gas phase
Richard S. Schäufele, Miguel Vazquez-Pufleaua and Juan J. Vilatela
Mater. Horiz., 2020, 7, 2978-2984

Infographic describing the content of the article: Tough sheets of nanowires produced floating in the gas phase

Meet the authors

Image of Juan Jose Vilatela

Juan José Vilatela, IMDEA Materials, Spain

Juan José Vilatela has a PhD from the Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy of the University of Cambridge (2009). He leads a research group at IMDEA Materials, focused on the development of macroscopic materials made up of nanobuilding blocks in a way that the unique properties at the nanoscale are preserved through the assembly process and a new generation of high-performance engineering materials is produced. He has coordinated several academic and industrial research projects related to nanomaterials, including an ERC Starting Grant. He has been awarded the 2016 young investigator award by the European Society for Composite Materials and the 2018 “Miguel Catalán” under 40 investigator award by the Madrid Regional Government. In 2021 he co-founded Floatech, a spin-off company pursuing the industrialisation of a new sustainable process for the fabrication of Si anodes for the next generation of Lithium-ion batteries. Find the group on Twitter: @MNGMaterials

Don’t forget to check out the Emerging Investigator series interview with Juan José in this Editorial.

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Materials Horizons Emerging Investigator Series – Sahika Inal

Monitoring supported lipid bilayers with n-type organic electrochemical transistors

An infographic highlighting the first example of a bio-functionalized n-type polymer and an n-type OECT interfacing a biomimetic platform

We are pleased to share with you an infographic highlighting the fantastic work by Sahika Inal et al. on the synthesis of an n-type semiconducting polymer functionalized with bio-inspired, lysine-based side chains for an organic electrochemical transistor-based ion channel sensor! Check out the infographic below to learn more or get the full story from their Materials Horizons article linked below.

This Communication was also featured in our Emerging Investigator series, find out more about this series here and check out the full interview with Sahika in this Editorial.

Monitoring supported lipid bilayers with n-type organic electrochemical transistors
Malak Kawan, Tania C. Hidalgo, Weiyuan Du, Anna-Maria Pappa, Róisín M. Owens, Iain McCulloch and Sahika Inal
Mater. Horiz., 2020, 7, 2348-2358

Meet the authors

Sahika Inal, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Saudi Arabia

Sahika Inal is an Associate Professor of Bioengineering with affiliations in Electrical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). She has a B.Sc. degree in Textile Engineering from Istanbul Technical University (Turkey), an M.Sc. in Polymer Science, and a Ph.D. in Experimental Physics, both from the University of Potsdam (Germany). She completed her postdoctoral training at the Center of Microelectronics of Provence of the Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Saint-Étienne (France). Her expertise is in polymer science and bioelectronic devices, particularly in the photophysics of conjugated polymers, characterization of polymer films and the design of biosensors and actuators. The Inal lab exploits the functionalities of organic electronic materials, investigates ionic/electronic charge transport, and designs electronic devices that record/stimulate biological signals. Find Sahika on Twitter: @InalSahika

Don’t forget to check out the Emerging Investigator series interview with Sahika in this Editorial.

Malak Kawan, University of Cambridge, UK

Malak is currently a PhD candidate in Clinical Neuroscience at the University of Cambridge working on developing biohybrid implantable devices for the brain to improve biocompatibility and tissue integration. She received her BS from the University of Delaware in Neuroscience in 2017 with a focus on Chemistry and was working on neurobehavioural studies. She obtained her MS from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in 2019 in the research area of bioelectronics and worked on integrating lipid bilayers with electrochemical transistors for ion channel recordings. Find Malak on Twitter: @KawanMalak

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Materials Horizons Emerging Investigator Series – Prashun Gorai

Computational discovery of promising new n-type dopable ABX Zintl thermoelectric materials

 

An infographic highlighting the computational prediction of new thermoelectric materials

We are delighted to share with you an infographic highlighting the fantastic work by Prashun Gorai et al. on the computational prediction of new thermoelectric materials using a chemical replacements in structure prototype (CRISP) approach! Check out the infographic below to learn more or get the full story from their Materials Horizons article linked below.

This article was featured in our Emerging Investigator series, find out more about this series here and check out the full interview with Prashun in this Editorial.

 

Computational discovery of promising new n-type dopable ABX Zintl thermoelectric materials
Prashun Gorai,
Mater. Horiz., 2020,7, 1809-1818

Meet the authors

Prashun Gorai, Colorado School of Mines, USA

Dr. Prashun Gorai is a research assistant professor in the Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering at the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) with a joint faculty appointment at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). He obtained his B.Tech in Chemical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology Madras in 2008, and his PhD (also in Chemical Engineering) from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) in 2014. Subsequently, he worked as a postdoctoral fellow at CSM and NREL, from 2014-2017. He received a graduate student fellow award from the American Vacuum Society in 2009. In 2012 and 2013, he was a recipient of the Dow Chemical graduate fellowship. The Royal Society of Chemistry has recognized him as an outstanding peer reviewer for the J. Materials Chemistry A in 2018 and 2019. At CSM and NREL, his team utilizes first-principles computations and data informatics to accelerate the discovery of novel functional materials for thermoelectrics, photovoltaics, solid-state energy storage, and power electronics. In the quest to discover novel functional materials, his team aims to map unexplored/under-explored chemical spaces with targeted computational searches. Beyond discovery, his team is also interested in predicting and modelling defect properties of materials. Details about his team can be found on the 3D Materials Lab webpage.

Don’t forget to check out the Emerging Investigator series interview with Prashun in this Editorial.

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Horizons Community Board collection: Optical and Photonic Materials

Optical and Photonic Materials

A new online article collection guest edited by members of the Horizons Community Boards

The Community Boards that support Materials Horizons and Nanoscale Horizons provide a platform for early career researchers to share their experiences and ideas on scientific publishing. Working together and sharing their unique expertise, our Community Board members have recommended several key topics where significant, rapid progress has been made in the last two years. Today we are delighted to share their selected top articles published in the Horizons journals showcasing the most important advances in optical and photonic materials and devices.

This collection is guest edited by Xiaolu Zhuo (CIC biomaGUNE, Spain), Li Na Quan (Virginia Tech, USA), and Qingchen Dong (Shanghai University, China). To get to know our guest editors, check out their Editorial article introducing this collection.

 

Read the collection

Read the introductory editorial

 

We hope you enjoy reading this collection.

With best wishes,

Dr Michaela Muehlberg

Executive Editor, Materials Horizons

Dr Heather Montgomery

Managing Editor, Nanoscale Horizons

 

 

 

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Horizons Community Board collection: Solar Energy Conversion

Solar Energy Conversion

A new online article collection guest edited by members of the Horizons Community Boards

The Community Boards that support Materials Horizons and Nanoscale Horizons provide a platform for early career researchers to share their experiences and ideas on scientific publishing. Working together and sharing their unique expertise, our Community Board members have recommended several key topics where significant, rapid progress has been made in the last two years. Today we are delighted to share their selected top articles published in the Horizons journals showcasing the most important advances in solar energy conversion.

This collection is guest edited by Rebecca Gieseking (Brandeis University, USA), Alexandra Ramadan (University of Oxford, UK), and Jungki Ryu (UNIST, Republic of Korea). To get to know our guest editors, check out their Editorial article introducing this collection.

 

Read the collection

Read the introductory editorial

 

We hope you enjoy reading this collection.

With best wishes,

Dr Michaela Mühlberg

Executive Editor, Materials Horizons

Dr Heather Montgomery

Managing Editor, Nanoscale Horizons

 

 

 

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Welcome to our new Scientific Editor David Scanlon

We are delighted to welcome our new Materials Horizons Scientific Editor to the journal’s Editorial Board: David Scanlon of University College London, UK (ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9174-8601)
“I am very much looking forward to supporting the computational materials science community and the wider materials science community as a Scientific Editor for Materials Horizons. Computational research is now a vital partner for experimental research as we search for the next generation of advanced materials, and I am excited to see the best and brightest new ideas being submitted to Materials Horizons.”
David Scanlon is Chair of Computational Materials Design at the Department of Chemistry, University College London, where he leads the Scanlon Materials Theory Group (SMTG). David gained his BA.(Mod) Computational Chemistry in 2006 and PhD in Chemistry in 2011 from Trinity College Dublin, where he carried out his research under the supervision of Professor Graeme W Watson. In 2011 he moved to the UK to University College London (UCL) to take up a Ramsay Fellowship in the Department of Chemistry, hosted by Professor Sir Richard Catlow, FRS. In September of 2013 he was appointed to a Lectureship in the Department of Chemistry at UCL, a joint appointment with Diamond Light Source, and was promoted to Reader in 2016 and Professor in 2018. He is an ERC Starting grant holder (2018-2023), and was awarded the the Harrison-Meldola Memorial Prize in 2015 and the Materials Chemistry Division Early Career Award in 2021 from the RSC. His group’s work is at the forefront of the global effort to explore new materials based on computations and to advance the capacity of first principles calculations to predict materials properties. The group is currently working on new materials for Li- ion batteries, understanding novel materials for photovoltaics and photocatalysis, and optimising materials for thin film displays. The group regularly publishes with experimental groups working in complementary areas of materials science from around the globe.

Read some of David’s recent Articles:
Latest directions in p-type transparent conductor design
J. Mater. Chem. C, 2021, Advance Article
J. Mater. Chem. A, 2021, Advance Article
Mater. Horiz., 2021, Advance Article

Submit your best work to David and our team of Scientific Editors now! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.
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Welcome to our new Editorial Board Chair, Martina Stenzel

Please join us in welcoming our new Editorial Board Chair to Materials HorizonsProfessor Martina Stenzel of the University of New South Wales, Australia (ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6433-4419).
“I have been with Materials Horizons since the beginning of the journal, and I always liked how the journal tried to involve researchers at various stages of their career. For me it is important to be inclusive and have a journal that represents all researchers and is respectful of their opinion. As Editorial Board Chair I would like to see that Material Horizons reflects the changes in science and the society.”


Martina Stenzel studied chemistry at the University of Bayreuth, Germany, before completing her PhD in 1999 at the Institute of Applied Macromolecular Chemistry, University of Stuttgart, Germany. She then started working as a postdoctoral Fellow at the UNESCO Centre for Membrane Science and Technology at the University of New South Wales (UNSW), Sydney, Australia, before being appointed as lecture in 2002 at the same University. In 2012 she was promoted to full Professor and is now UNSW Scientia Professor and ARC (Australian Research Council) Laureate Fellow. In 2018 she was elected as Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science. Her research interest is focused on the synthesis of functional polymers nanoparticles and their use as drug delivery carriers. Martina has been a Scientific Editor on the Materials Horizons Editorial Board since June 2014.

Read her recent articles:

J. Mater. Chem. B, 2021, Advance Article

Mater. Horiz., 2020, 7, 1727-1758

Polym. Chem., 2020,11, 7253-7263

We would also like to take this opportunity to thank our previous Editorial Board Chair, Seth Marder, for eight years of service on Materials Horizons since its launch. He looks back on the first eight years of the journal:
“We set out some guiding principles for the creation of Materials Horizons and some distinguishing characteristics that we felt were important. Very specifically, Materials Horizons had the goal of providing the community with a multidisciplinary society-based journal that focuses broadly on the area of materials. I believe that we are, in our own small way, helping to invest in the future of our discipline and benefit from the valuable input. I am very grateful to have been given the opportunity to contribute to these activities.”

I hope you will join us in welcoming Martina and thanking Seth for his past contribution.

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Materials Horizons Outstanding Paper Award 2020

Celebrating the exceptional work published in Materials Horizons

Our annual Outstanding Paper Award celebrates some of the exceptional work published in Materials Horizons and Nanoscale Horizons, and the authors behind those articles. The winners were chosen by the Editorial and Advisory Boards based on the science presented and the work’s potential future impact, from papers published in 2020.

Read the Editorial about our winning papers and authors

Please join us in congratulating the winners of the 2020 Outstanding Paper Award and we hope that you enjoy reading their outstanding articles as much as we did.

Materials Horizons Outstanding Article 2020

An ambient-stable and stretchable ionic skin with multimodal sensation

Binbin Ying, Qiyang Wu, Jianyu Li and Xinyu Liu

Mater. Horiz., 2020, 7, 477–488

Materials Horizons Outstanding Article runner-up 2020

Stretchable, self-healing and tissue-adhesive zwitterionic hydrogels as strain sensors for wireless monitoring of organ motions

Xinjie Pei, Hua Zhang, Yang Zhou, Linjie Zhou and Jun Fu

Mater. Horiz., 2020, 7, 1872–1882

Materials Horizons Outstanding Review 2020

Evolution of self-healing elastomers, from extrinsic to combined intrinsic mechanisms: a review

Saul Utrera-Barrios, Raquel Verdejo, Miguel A. López-Manchado and Marianella Hernández Santana

Mater. Horiz., 2020, 7, 2882–2902

Read more about the prize winners and their research in our Editorial. Our sister journal Nanoscale Horizons has also announced its Outstanding Paper Award winners.  You can read all of the Materials Horizons and Nanoscale Horizons 2020 Outstanding Papers in our joint themed online collection:

Read the collection

With kind regards,

Dr Michaela Mühlberg
Executive Editor, Materials Horizons

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RSC Desktop Seminar series – Hosted by Materials Horizons and Nanoscale Horizons

Materials Horizons and Nanoscale Horizons are pleased to announce a free Webinar series featuring scientific talks from Editorial and Community Board Members on a range of topics.

RSC Desktop Seminars are an ongoing initiative from the Royal Society of Chemistry to bring cutting-edge research directly to you! Now, more than ever, there is a crucial need for sharing research, and each seminar in this series will feature presentations from Editorial and Community Board members of Materials Horizons and Nanoscale Horizons.

Each 90 to 120-min webinar will feature scientific talks as well as dedicated time for questions & answers. The schedule for the series will be as follows:

Wednesday, 25 November 2020 (7am GMT; 15:00 CST; 16:00 JST)

Find out more & register

“Machine learning accelerated design of new functional material” – Professor Jinlan Wang (Southeast University, China)

Thursday, 3 December 2020 (08:00 GMT; 13:30 IST; 19:00 AEDT)

Find out more & register

“Soft Gold Elastronics for Connected Healthcare” – Professor Wenlong Cheng (Monash University, Australia)

“Smart Sensors for Environmental Monitoring and Healthcare” – Professor Ritu Gupta (IIT Jodhpur, India)

Thursday, 10 December 2020 (07:00 GMT; 15:00 CST; 17:00 AEST; 18:00 AEDT)

Find out more & register

“The interaction between micelles and cells: Small changes in the nanoparticle shells have big impacts” – Professor Martina Stenzel (University of New South Wales, Australia)

“Emerging trends in oral drug delivery using stimuli responsive nanomedicine” – Dr Amirali Popat (The University of Queensland, Australia)

Thursday, 17 December 2020 (08:00 GMT; 16:00 CST; 17:00 JST)

Find out more & register

“Sub-1nm Ultrathin Nanocrystals” – Professor Xun Wang (Tsinghua University, China)

“Metal-Organic Frameworks for Polymer Recognition and Separation” – Dr Nobuhiko Hosono (University of Tokyo, Japan)

“Stability of Photocatalysts” – Dr Mengye Wang (Sun Yat-Sen University, China)

 

We hope you will be able to join us for some of the events in this Desktop Seminar Series.

Best wishes,

 

Dr Michaela Mühlberg
Executive Editor, Materials Horizons
Dr Charlotte Marshall
Managing Editor, Nanoscale Horizons

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