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Materials Horizons welcomes Professor Guoping Chen to the Editorial Board

Materials Horizons are delighted to welcome Professor Guoping Chen from the National Institute for Materials Science in Japan to the Editorial Board as a Scientific Editor.

 

 

Guoping Chen is a Group Leader at the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) and a Professor at the University of Tsukuba. He received his Ph.D. from Kyoto University in 1997 majoring in polymer biomaterials and did postdoctoral research until 2000. He joined the Tissue Engineering Research Center, National Institute for Advanced Industrial Science and Technology as a Researcher in 2000 and a Senior Researcher in 2003. He moved to the Biomaterials Center, NIMS as a Senior Researcher in 2004 and was promoted to Group Leader in 2007. He served as a Principal Investigator and Unit Director of the International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), NIMS from 2011 to 2017. He concurrently joined the Joint Doctoral Program in Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tsukuba as an Associate Professor in 2004 and a Professor in 2013. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry (FRSC, 2015), the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE, 2017) and the International Union of Societies for Biomaterials Science and Engineering (FBSE, 2020). His research focuses on biomaterials, scaffolds, biomimetic matrices, micro-patterning, surface modification, tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and nanomedicine.

Check out Guoping Chen’s lab webpage here to find out more about his research.

 

 

 

Guoping Chen joins the Materials Horizons Editorial Board after previously having an Associate Editor role on Journal of Materials Chemistry B and Materials Advances. To mark this transition, he has selected some outstanding recent articles and reviews on the topic of tissue engineering across Materials Horizons, Journal of Materials Chemistry B and Materials Advances. We welcome you to read this Editor’s Choice collection on tissue engineering and check out the Editorial written by Guoping Chen to introduce the collection.

 

Read our interview below to find out more about Guoping:

 

1. What attracted you to pursue a career in materials science and how did you get to where you are now?

I have been interested in almost anything since I was a kid. I could imagine something that I did not know or had never seen. Such curiosity had driven me to show more interest on materials science after entering high school. During college study, I spent a lot of time doing experiments. By doing experiments, I found materials science more and more interesting. So, I decided to enter materials science field when I entered graduate school in 1986. Since then, I have been involved in this field for more than 36 years. Now, doing scientific experiments to synthesize new materials and to discover new phenomena has become one of my interests. My curiosity and persistence have brough many benefits to my research career.

 

2. Why did you choose to specialize in your specific research field?

From 1994 to 1997, I did my Ph.D. study at Department of Materials Chemistry of Kyoto University majoring in biomaterials. After graduation, I got two offers. One was tissue engineering research and the other was synthesis of stimuli-responsive polymers and actuators. I chose the first one because I thought I could challenge more new things in the interdisciplinary field of materials science and biological science. So, I joined the tissue engineering research group of a national research institute. Since then, I have been enjoying working in the field.

 

3. What do you see as the biggest challenges facing researchers who work in your field?

Many advanced approaches have been developed for regeneration of functional tissues and organs through materials science, biomimetics, synthetic chemistry, biomechanics and cell biology. In some cases, very complicated approaches have been proposed and used. Sometimes I think the system of our body may not be as complex as we think. There may be some switches to reveal the simple way that our body uses to assemble all cells and components together into functional tissues and organs. Finding the switches and learning from the natural assembly clues to create multi-functional biomaterials and scaffolds may be the biggest challenges in my research field.

 

4. What do you see as the most important scientific achievement of the last decade?

I think it is CRISPR gene editing. It provides a cheap and easy way to precisely edit DNA. It is attractive for the treatment of refractory diseases such as cancer, HIV and genetic diseases.

 

5. What excites you most about your area of research and what has been the most exciting moment of your career so far?

Multi-functional scaffolds are amusing because they are similar to the housing where cells live. They can provide a variety of physicochemical, biological, biomechanical and therapeutic signal and factors to guide functional tissue regeneration, to maintain cellular homeostasis and to treat diseased cells. The most exciting moment for me was in 2000 when I succeeded in preparing hybrid scaffolds of biodegradable synthetic polymers and naturally derived polymers. The hybrid scaffolds have high mechanical strength and good biocompatibility and can be used for regeneration of large tissues such as large cartilage for treatment of osteoarthritic cartilage defects. The research had been introduced twice by Nature BioNews.

 

6. What is your favourite reaction or material, and why?

Biomimetic materials are very attractive to me. If we can mimic the compositions, structures and processes of tissue and organ development, we can more easily control cell functions and tissue regeneration.

 

7. The Journal of Materials Chemistry B and Materials Advances Editorial Boards are sad to see you leave but are excited for your new role. What will you miss most about being an Associate Editor on Journal of Materials Chemistry B and Materials Advances?

I’m really proud to have joined the editorial team to work for Journal of Materials Chemistry B for nine years shortly after the JMC split and to work for Materials Advances since its launch. I appreciate the strong support and help from the great team. I am very happy to have worked with all colleagues. I had a lot of happy times and good memories during the daily editorial work, the editorial board meetings in Cambridge and RSC Editors’ Symposium in London. I have had many opportunities to communicate with our authors and reviewers. I will miss them very much. I hope they will continue to support the journals by publishing their excellent research achievements in the journals and providing excellent reviewing services for the journals.

 

8. What attracted you to join the Editorial Board of Materials Horizons?

I often read the articles published in Materials Horizons. The high quality of the articles has given me an impression that the editorial team is always doing a great job to edit the best articles for the readers. Now I am very happy to join the team to make some contributions.

 

9. The Materials Horizons team are delighted to welcome you to the Editorial Board. What are you most looking forward to when acting as a Scientific Editor for the journal?

I will fully use my previous editorial experience to provide the best service to satisfy our authors and readers.

 

10. What is your biggest passion outside of science?

I like jogging and cooking. After my daily work, I go jogging in a park at night. It is my happiest moment because I can relax more and think of some new research ideas while enjoying the natural night view. If time permits, I also cook because cooking is like doing chemical experiments. There are raw materials, processes and final products. There are a lot of fun.

 

11. Why should young people study chemistry or related subjects?

Chemistry can help us to understand the essence of nature and to synthesize novel and functional compounds and materials for innovation. Chemistry is the fundamental and central science for many fields including materials science and biological science.

 

12. What impact do you feel that your area of research can make over the next 10 years?

Many new techniques such as biomimetics, bioprinting and hybridization have been developed for scaffold preparation and functionalization. Advanced scaffolds with more biomimetic structures and functions will be achieved for the regeneration of not only simple tissues, but also complex organs. Multi-functional scaffolds will provide synergistic effects of different therapeutic treatments and regenerative approaches.

 

 

Please join us in welcoming Professor Guoping Chen to the Materials Horizons Editorial Board. We encourage you to submit your best work to Guoping and our team of Scientific Editors now! Check out the Materials Horizons author guidelines for more information on our article types.

 

 

 

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Outstanding Paper Award 2021

Celebrating the exceptional work published in Materials Horizons

Our annual Outstanding Paper Award celebrates some of the exceptional work published in Materials Horizons and Nanoscale Horizons, and the authors behind those articles. The winners were chosen by the Editorial and Advisory Boards based on the science presented and the work’s potential future impact, from papers published in 2021.

Please join us in congratulating the winners of the 2021 Outstanding Paper Award and we hope that you enjoy reading their outstanding articles as much as we did.

Materials Horizons Outstanding Article 2021

Biohybrid plants with electronic roots via in-vivo polymerization of conjugated oligomers

Daniela Parker, Yohann Daguerre, Gwennaël Dufil, Daniele Mantione, Eduardo Solano, Eric Cloutet, Georges Hadziioannou, Torgny Näsholm, Magnus Berggren, Eleni Pavlopoulou and Eleni Stavrinidou
Mater. Horiz., 2021, 8, 3295-3305

Materials Horizons Outstanding Article Runner-up 2021

Van der Waals solid solution crystals for highly efficient in-air photon upconversion under subsolar irradiance

Riku Enomoto, Megumi Hoshi, Hironaga Oyama, Hideki Agata, Shinichi Kurokawa, Hitoshi Kuma, Hidehiro Uekusa and Yoichi Murakami
Mater. Horiz., 2021, 8, 3449-3456

Materials Horizons Outstanding Review 2021

Catalytic Methods for Chemical Recycling or Upcycling of Commercial Polymers

Sophia C. Kosloski-Oh, Zachary A. Wood, Yvonne Manjarrez, Juan Pablo de los Rios and Megan E. Fieser
Mater. Horiz., 2021, 8, 1084-1129

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Materials Horizons Outstanding Paper Award 2020

Celebrating the exceptional work published in Materials Horizons

Our annual Outstanding Paper Award celebrates some of the exceptional work published in Materials Horizons and Nanoscale Horizons, and the authors behind those articles. The winners were chosen by the Editorial and Advisory Boards based on the science presented and the work’s potential future impact, from papers published in 2020.

Read the Editorial about our winning papers and authors

Please join us in congratulating the winners of the 2020 Outstanding Paper Award and we hope that you enjoy reading their outstanding articles as much as we did.

Materials Horizons Outstanding Article 2020

An ambient-stable and stretchable ionic skin with multimodal sensation

Binbin Ying, Qiyang Wu, Jianyu Li and Xinyu Liu

Mater. Horiz., 2020, 7, 477–488

Materials Horizons Outstanding Article runner-up 2020

Stretchable, self-healing and tissue-adhesive zwitterionic hydrogels as strain sensors for wireless monitoring of organ motions

Xinjie Pei, Hua Zhang, Yang Zhou, Linjie Zhou and Jun Fu

Mater. Horiz., 2020, 7, 1872–1882

Materials Horizons Outstanding Review 2020

Evolution of self-healing elastomers, from extrinsic to combined intrinsic mechanisms: a review

Saul Utrera-Barrios, Raquel Verdejo, Miguel A. López-Manchado and Marianella Hernández Santana

Mater. Horiz., 2020, 7, 2882–2902

Read more about the prize winners and their research in our Editorial. Our sister journal Nanoscale Horizons has also announced its Outstanding Paper Award winners.  You can read all of the Materials Horizons and Nanoscale Horizons 2020 Outstanding Papers in our joint themed online collection:

Read the collection

With kind regards,

Dr Michaela Mühlberg
Executive Editor, Materials Horizons

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RSC Desktop Seminar series – Hosted by Materials Horizons and Nanoscale Horizons

Materials Horizons and Nanoscale Horizons are pleased to announce a free Webinar series featuring scientific talks from Editorial and Community Board Members on a range of topics.

RSC Desktop Seminars are an ongoing initiative from the Royal Society of Chemistry to bring cutting-edge research directly to you! Now, more than ever, there is a crucial need for sharing research, and each seminar in this series will feature presentations from Editorial and Community Board members of Materials Horizons and Nanoscale Horizons.

Each 90 to 120-min webinar will feature scientific talks as well as dedicated time for questions & answers. The schedule for the series will be as follows:

Wednesday, 25 November 2020 (7am GMT; 15:00 CST; 16:00 JST)

Find out more & register

“Machine learning accelerated design of new functional material” – Professor Jinlan Wang (Southeast University, China)

Thursday, 3 December 2020 (08:00 GMT; 13:30 IST; 19:00 AEDT)

Find out more & register

“Soft Gold Elastronics for Connected Healthcare” – Professor Wenlong Cheng (Monash University, Australia)

“Smart Sensors for Environmental Monitoring and Healthcare” – Professor Ritu Gupta (IIT Jodhpur, India)

Thursday, 10 December 2020 (07:00 GMT; 15:00 CST; 17:00 AEST; 18:00 AEDT)

Find out more & register

“The interaction between micelles and cells: Small changes in the nanoparticle shells have big impacts” – Professor Martina Stenzel (University of New South Wales, Australia)

“Emerging trends in oral drug delivery using stimuli responsive nanomedicine” – Dr Amirali Popat (The University of Queensland, Australia)

Thursday, 17 December 2020 (08:00 GMT; 16:00 CST; 17:00 JST)

Find out more & register

“Sub-1nm Ultrathin Nanocrystals” – Professor Xun Wang (Tsinghua University, China)

“Metal-Organic Frameworks for Polymer Recognition and Separation” – Dr Nobuhiko Hosono (University of Tokyo, Japan)

“Stability of Photocatalysts” – Dr Mengye Wang (Sun Yat-Sen University, China)

 

We hope you will be able to join us for some of the events in this Desktop Seminar Series.

Best wishes,

 

Dr Michaela Mühlberg
Executive Editor, Materials Horizons
Dr Charlotte Marshall
Managing Editor, Nanoscale Horizons

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Outstanding Reviewers for Materials Horizons in 2019

Outstanding Reviewers for Materials Horizons in 2019

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Materials Horizons in 2019, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

 

Name Institution Orcid ID
Dr Ben Almquist Imperial College London 0000-0001-9718-777X
Dr Chun Chao Chen Shanghai Jiao Tong University
Prof. Jonas Croissant University of New Mexico 0000-0003-0489-9829
Dr Albertus Handoko Agency for Science Technology and Research 0000-0002-5157-8633
Dr Gregor Kieslich Technische Universitat Munchen
Dr Xiao-Ke Liu Linkopings universitet 0000-0001-5661-8174
Dr Maheswaran Shanmugam Indian Institute of Technology Bombay
Dr Linqi Shi Nankai University 0000-0002-9534-795X
Dr Wei Tao Harvard Medical School 0000-0002-4277-3728
Dr Kai Yu University of Colorado Denver – Anschutz Medical Campus 0000-0001-9067-1673

 

We would also like to thank the Materials Horizons board and the materials chemistry community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé. You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

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11th CIRP Conference on Photonic Technologies [LANE 2020] calls for papers

You have gained interesting research results in the field of laser material processing and want to discuss them with experts from all over the world? If so, submit an abstract for the 11th CIRP Conference on Photonic Technologies [LANE 2020] until January 24, 2020.

 

Especially recent developments in the field of

 

Laser Material Processing

  • Beam sources & components
  • Laser beam welding, brazing & soldering
  • Laser beam cutting & drilling
  • Surface treatment & forming
  • Laser assisted processes

including

  • Experimental results
  • Simulation & modeling
  • Sensing & control
  • Laser safety

 

and the Emerging Technologies

  • Additive Manufacturing
  • Precision processing with ultrashort laser pulses
  • Fast laser beam manipulation
  • Laser material processing in the visible wavelength range
  • E-Mobility/Batteries

 

are of interest.

 

In order to give a detailed overview, LANE aims not only at scientific contributions, but integrates the industrial perspective and their relevance for application, as well. It takes place from September 06-10, 2020 in Fürth, Germany. Visit the conference website for more information: https://www.lane-conference.org

 

Materials Horizons is delighted to support the conference with two prizes for the best talks.

 

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Outstanding Reviewers for Materials Horizons in 2018

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Materials Horizons in 2018, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Professor Antonio di Bartolomeo, Universita degli Studi di Salerno, ORCID: 0000-0002-3629-726X
Professor Dr Stefan Bon, University of Warwick, ORCID: 0000-0001-5156-3901
Professor Jonas Croissant, University of New Mexico, ORCID: 0000-0003-0489-9829
Professor Lorenzo Di Bari, Universita degli Studi di Pisa, ORCID: 0000-0003-2347-2150
Dr Shaolong Gong, Wuhan University, ORCID: 0000-0002-1166-9047
Professor Weida Hu, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, ORCID: 0000-0001-5278-8969
Dr Ville Jokinen, Aalto-yliopisto, ORCID: 0000-0001-6347-7461
Dr Dominik Konkolewicz, Miami University, ORCID: 0000-0002-3828-5481
Dr Igor Perepichka, Bangor University, ORCID: 0000-0001-6672-3103
Dr Michal Piasecki, Uniwersytet Humanistyczno-Przyrodniczy im Jana Dlugosza w Czestochowie, ORCID: 0000-0003-1040-8811

We would also like to thank the Materials Horizons board and the materials community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé. You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

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Lanthanide macrocycle complexes endow graphene electronics with unprecedented stability

Scientists in India have made graphene field-effect transistors that work for over 10 months with some help from discrete inorganic structures. The approach has led them to produce a graphene logic inverter that is stable in ambient conditions.

Conventional electronics tend to be silicon based, due to the ease of doping silicon with either electrons or holes. These two forms of silicon, n- and p-type, are the building blocks of electronic devices. However, it isn’t possible to make silicon electronics on the nanoscale, so many researchers are turning to materials like graphene.

An essential component of digital electronics is a logic inverter – a device for switching between fixed voltage levels. Inverters combine n-type field effect transistors and p-type field effect transistors, so require both n-type and p-type graphene.

Source: © Maheswaran Shanmugam/Indian Institute of Technolgy Bombay
The lanthanide-macrocyclic complexes exhibit strong C-H–π interactions with graphene, leading to a sharp and stable negative shift in the Dirac point

To read the full article visit Chemistry World.

Lanthanide complexes as molecular dopants for realizing air-stable n-type graphene logic inverters with symmetric transconductance
Ashwini S. Gajarushi, Mohd Wasim, Rizwan Nabi, Srinivasu Kancharlapalli, V. Ramgopal Rao, Gopalan Rajaraman, Chandramouli Subramaniam and Maheswaran Shanmugam
Mater. Horiz., 2019, Advance Article
http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/C8MH01241E

 

 

 

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Highlights from Materials Horizons so far in 2018

 

 

 

 

We are delighted to see the support from the community as you continue to contribute outstanding articles showcasing new concepts of exceptional significance to the materials science readership.

To celebrate the materials science community’s excellent work, we have picked out some content highlights for 2018 so far, which we would like to share with you. All articles are free to access until the end of June – we hope you enjoy reading them.

 

Reviews

Photocatalytic fixation of nitrogen to ammonia: state-of-the-art advancements and future prospects

Xingzhu Chen, Neng Li, Zhouzhou Kong, Wee-Jun Ong and Xiujian Zhao

Materials Horiz., 2018, 5, 9-27

 

Metal–organic framework-derived one-dimensional porous or hollow carbon-based nanofibers for energy storage and conversion

Chaohai Wang, Yusuf Valentino Kaneti, Yoshio Bando, Jianjian Lin, Chao Liu, Jiansheng Li and Yusuke Yamauchi

Materials Horiz., 2018, 5, 394-407

 

 

Communications

 

Photoelectrochemical response of carbon dots (CDs) derived from chitosan and their use in electrochemical imaging

De-Wen Zhang, Nikolaos Papaioannou, Naomi Michelle David, Hui Luo, Hui Gao, Liviu Cristian Tanase, Thibault Degousée, Paolo Samorì, Andrei Sapelkin, Oliver Fenwick, Maria-Magdalena Titirici and Steffi Krause

Materials Horiz., 2018, 5, 423-428

 

An alternative route to single ion conductivity using multi-ionic salts

Sumanth Chereddy, Parameswara Rao Chinnam, Vijay Chatare, Stephen Patrick diLuzio, Mallory P. Gobet, Steven G. Greenbaum and Stephanie L. Wunder

Materials Horiz., 2018, 5, 461-473

 

Translation of protein charge and hydrophilicity to materials surface properties using thermal treatment in fluorous media

Li-Sheng Wang, Sanjana Gopalakrishnan, Yi-Wei Lee, Jiaxin Zhu, Stephen S. Nonnenmann and Vincent M. Rotello

Materials Horiz., 2018, 5, 268-274

 

Band engineering in Mg3Sb2 by alloying with Mg3Bi2 for enhanced thermoelectric performance

Kazuki Imasato, Stephen Dongmin Kang, Saneyuki Ohno and G. Jeffrey Snyder

Materials Horiz., 2018, 5, 59-64

 

Janus DNA orthogonal adsorption of graphene oxide and metal oxide nanoparticles enabling stable sensing in serum

Biwu Liu, Lingzi Ma, Zhicheng Huang, Hao Hu, Peng Wu and Juewen Liu

Materials Horiz., 2018, 5, 65-69

 

 

At Materials Horizons, our reviewing standards are set extremely high to ensure we only publish first reports of new concepts across the breadth of materials research. Our impact factor of 10.706* is testament to the exceptionally significant work of our community.

Contact us: materialshorizons-rsc@rsc.org

Follow us: Homepage | Twitter | Facebook | Blog | RSS

 

Click here for 2018 Highlights in our sister-journal Nanoscale Horizons or sign up to our newsletters for more regular journal-specific updates.

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Some of the most popular 2017 articles in Materials Horizons

We are delighted to share with you some of the most popular articles that were published in Materials Horizons in 2017.

Last year our Materials Horizons community published a larger number of articles of exceptional significance than ever before. We hope you enjoy reading this selection of some of the most highly cited* and most frequently downloaded articles from 2017.


Focus

Thermoresponsive polymers with lower critical solution temperature: from fundamental aspects and measuring techniques to recommended turbidimetry conditions
Qilu Zhang, Christine Weber, Ulrich S. Schubert and Richard Hoogenboom

Review

Metal organic framework based catalysts for CO2 conversion
James W. Maina, Cristina Pozo-Gonzalo, Lingxue Kong, Jürg Schütz, Matthew Hill and Ludovic F. Dumée

Heteroatom-doped graphene as electrocatalysts for air cathodes
Huijuan Cui, Zhen Zhou and Dianzeng Jia

Atomic layer deposition for nanomaterial synthesis and functionalization in energy technology
Xiangbo Meng, Xinwei Wang, Dongsheng Geng, Cagla Ozgit-Akgun, Nathanaelle Schneider and Jeffrey W. Elam

Metal-organic frameworks: a novel host platform for enzymatic catalysis and detection
Effrosyni Gkaniatsou, Clémence Sicard, Rémy Ricoux, Jean-Pierre Mahy, Nathalie Steunou and Christian Serre

Communication

Searching for promising new perovskite-based photovoltaic absorbers: the importance of electronic dimensionality
Zewen Xiao, Weiwei Meng, Jianbo Wang, David B. Mitzi and Yanfa Yan

Quaternisation-polymerized N-type polyelectrolytes: synthesis, characterisation and application in high-performance polymer solar cells
Zhicheng Hu, Rongguo Xu, Sheng Dong, Kai Lin, Jinju Liu, Fei Huang and Yong Cao

Functional conductive nanomaterials via polymerisation in nano-channels: PEDOT in a MOF
Tiesheng Wang, Meisam Farajollahi, Sebastian Henke, Tongtong Zhu, Sneha R. Bajpe, Shijing Sun, Jonathan S. Barnard, June Sang Lee, John D. W. Madden, Anthony K. Cheetham and Stoyan K. Smoukov

Efficient triplet–triplet annihilation upconversion in binary crystalline solids fabricated via solution casting and operated in air
Kenji Kamada, Yusuke Sakagami, Toshiko Mizokuro, Yutaka Fujiwara, Kenji Kobayashi, Kaishi Narushima, Shuzo Hirata and Martin Vacha

Programming 2D/3D shape-shifting with hobbyist 3D printers
Teunis van Manen, Shahram Janbaz and Amir A. Zadpoor


 

Check out our most recent articles from 2018…

 

At Materials Horizons, our reviewing standards are set extremely high to ensure we only publish first reports of new concepts across the breadth of materials research. Our impact factor of 10.706** is testament to the exceptionally significant work of our community.

Contact us: materialshorizons-rsc@rsc.org

Follow us: Homepage | Twitter | Facebook | Blog | E-alerts | RSS

 

 

*Web of Science (February 2018) © Clarivate Analytics.
**2016 Journal Citation Reports (June 2017) © Clarivate Analytics.

 

 

 

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