Materials Horizons welcomes Professor Guoping Chen to the Editorial Board

Materials Horizons are delighted to welcome Professor Guoping Chen from the National Institute for Materials Science in Japan to the Editorial Board as a Scientific Editor.

 

 

Guoping Chen is a Group Leader at the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) and a Professor at the University of Tsukuba. He received his Ph.D. from Kyoto University in 1997 majoring in polymer biomaterials and did postdoctoral research until 2000. He joined the Tissue Engineering Research Center, National Institute for Advanced Industrial Science and Technology as a Researcher in 2000 and a Senior Researcher in 2003. He moved to the Biomaterials Center, NIMS as a Senior Researcher in 2004 and was promoted to Group Leader in 2007. He served as a Principal Investigator and Unit Director of the International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), NIMS from 2011 to 2017. He concurrently joined the Joint Doctoral Program in Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tsukuba as an Associate Professor in 2004 and a Professor in 2013. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry (FRSC, 2015), the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE, 2017) and the International Union of Societies for Biomaterials Science and Engineering (FBSE, 2020). His research focuses on biomaterials, scaffolds, biomimetic matrices, micro-patterning, surface modification, tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and nanomedicine.

Check out Guoping Chen’s lab webpage here to find out more about his research.

 

 

 

Guoping Chen joins the Materials Horizons Editorial Board after previously having an Associate Editor role on Journal of Materials Chemistry B and Materials Advances. To mark this transition, he has selected some outstanding recent articles and reviews on the topic of tissue engineering across Materials Horizons, Journal of Materials Chemistry B and Materials Advances. We welcome you to read this Editor’s Choice collection on tissue engineering and check out the Editorial written by Guoping Chen to introduce the collection.

 

Read our interview below to find out more about Guoping:

 

1. What attracted you to pursue a career in materials science and how did you get to where you are now?

I have been interested in almost anything since I was a kid. I could imagine something that I did not know or had never seen. Such curiosity had driven me to show more interest on materials science after entering high school. During college study, I spent a lot of time doing experiments. By doing experiments, I found materials science more and more interesting. So, I decided to enter materials science field when I entered graduate school in 1986. Since then, I have been involved in this field for more than 36 years. Now, doing scientific experiments to synthesize new materials and to discover new phenomena has become one of my interests. My curiosity and persistence have brough many benefits to my research career.

 

2. Why did you choose to specialize in your specific research field?

From 1994 to 1997, I did my Ph.D. study at Department of Materials Chemistry of Kyoto University majoring in biomaterials. After graduation, I got two offers. One was tissue engineering research and the other was synthesis of stimuli-responsive polymers and actuators. I chose the first one because I thought I could challenge more new things in the interdisciplinary field of materials science and biological science. So, I joined the tissue engineering research group of a national research institute. Since then, I have been enjoying working in the field.

 

3. What do you see as the biggest challenges facing researchers who work in your field?

Many advanced approaches have been developed for regeneration of functional tissues and organs through materials science, biomimetics, synthetic chemistry, biomechanics and cell biology. In some cases, very complicated approaches have been proposed and used. Sometimes I think the system of our body may not be as complex as we think. There may be some switches to reveal the simple way that our body uses to assemble all cells and components together into functional tissues and organs. Finding the switches and learning from the natural assembly clues to create multi-functional biomaterials and scaffolds may be the biggest challenges in my research field.

 

4. What do you see as the most important scientific achievement of the last decade?

I think it is CRISPR gene editing. It provides a cheap and easy way to precisely edit DNA. It is attractive for the treatment of refractory diseases such as cancer, HIV and genetic diseases.

 

5. What excites you most about your area of research and what has been the most exciting moment of your career so far?

Multi-functional scaffolds are amusing because they are similar to the housing where cells live. They can provide a variety of physicochemical, biological, biomechanical and therapeutic signal and factors to guide functional tissue regeneration, to maintain cellular homeostasis and to treat diseased cells. The most exciting moment for me was in 2000 when I succeeded in preparing hybrid scaffolds of biodegradable synthetic polymers and naturally derived polymers. The hybrid scaffolds have high mechanical strength and good biocompatibility and can be used for regeneration of large tissues such as large cartilage for treatment of osteoarthritic cartilage defects. The research had been introduced twice by Nature BioNews.

 

6. What is your favourite reaction or material, and why?

Biomimetic materials are very attractive to me. If we can mimic the compositions, structures and processes of tissue and organ development, we can more easily control cell functions and tissue regeneration.

 

7. The Journal of Materials Chemistry B and Materials Advances Editorial Boards are sad to see you leave but are excited for your new role. What will you miss most about being an Associate Editor on Journal of Materials Chemistry B and Materials Advances?

I’m really proud to have joined the editorial team to work for Journal of Materials Chemistry B for nine years shortly after the JMC split and to work for Materials Advances since its launch. I appreciate the strong support and help from the great team. I am very happy to have worked with all colleagues. I had a lot of happy times and good memories during the daily editorial work, the editorial board meetings in Cambridge and RSC Editors’ Symposium in London. I have had many opportunities to communicate with our authors and reviewers. I will miss them very much. I hope they will continue to support the journals by publishing their excellent research achievements in the journals and providing excellent reviewing services for the journals.

 

8. What attracted you to join the Editorial Board of Materials Horizons?

I often read the articles published in Materials Horizons. The high quality of the articles has given me an impression that the editorial team is always doing a great job to edit the best articles for the readers. Now I am very happy to join the team to make some contributions.

 

9. The Materials Horizons team are delighted to welcome you to the Editorial Board. What are you most looking forward to when acting as a Scientific Editor for the journal?

I will fully use my previous editorial experience to provide the best service to satisfy our authors and readers.

 

10. What is your biggest passion outside of science?

I like jogging and cooking. After my daily work, I go jogging in a park at night. It is my happiest moment because I can relax more and think of some new research ideas while enjoying the natural night view. If time permits, I also cook because cooking is like doing chemical experiments. There are raw materials, processes and final products. There are a lot of fun.

 

11. Why should young people study chemistry or related subjects?

Chemistry can help us to understand the essence of nature and to synthesize novel and functional compounds and materials for innovation. Chemistry is the fundamental and central science for many fields including materials science and biological science.

 

12. What impact do you feel that your area of research can make over the next 10 years?

Many new techniques such as biomimetics, bioprinting and hybridization have been developed for scaffold preparation and functionalization. Advanced scaffolds with more biomimetic structures and functions will be achieved for the regeneration of not only simple tissues, but also complex organs. Multi-functional scaffolds will provide synergistic effects of different therapeutic treatments and regenerative approaches.

 

 

Please join us in welcoming Professor Guoping Chen to the Materials Horizons Editorial Board. We encourage you to submit your best work to Guoping and our team of Scientific Editors now! Check out the Materials Horizons author guidelines for more information on our article types.

 

 

 

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Introducing Jean-Luc Brédas as a new Scientific Editor on Materials Horizons

Materials Horizons are delighted to welcome Professor Jean-Luc Brédas from the University of Arizona, USA as a Scientific Editor.

 

Professor Jean-Luc Bredas received his B.Sc. (1976) and Ph.D. (1979) degrees from the University of Namur, Belgium. In 1988, he was appointed Professor at the University of Mons, Belgium, where he established the Laboratory for Chemistry of Novel Materials. While keeping an “Extraordinary Professorship” appointment in Mons, he joined the University of Arizona in 1999. In 2003, he moved to the Georgia Institute of Technology where he became Regents’ Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry and held the Vasser-Woolley and Georgia Research Alliance Chair in Molecular Design. Between 2014 and 2016, he joined King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) as a Distinguished Professor and served as Director of the KAUST Solar & Photovoltaics Engineering Research Center. He returned to Georgia Tech in 2017 before moving back to the University of Arizona in 2020 where he is currently Regents Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Jean-Luc Brédas is an elected Member of the International Academy of Quantum Molecular Science, the Royal Academy of Belgium, and the European Academy of Sciences. Recent honors include the 2013 American Physical Society David Adler Lectureship Award in the Field of Materials Physics, the 2016 American Chemical Society Award in the Chemistry of Materials, the 2019 Alexander von Humboldt Research Award, the 2020 Materials Research Society Materials Theory Award, and the 2021 Centenary Prize of the RSC. He is an Honorary Professor of the Institute of Chemistry of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and holds an Adjunct Professorship at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His Focus Article “Mind the Gap” is the first article that appeared in the very first issue of Materials Horizons.

 

Read our interview with Jean-Luc below.

 

1. What attracted you to pursue a career in materials science and how did you get to where you are now?

 It was initially a love for chemistry, which grew into a passion for computational chemistry and organic chemistry. With organic materials becoming increasingly appealing because of their opto-electronic properties and broad range of applications, I gradually evolved into a computational materials scientist.

 

2. Why did you choose to specialize in your specific research field?

Because of a major scientific event that took place as I was starting my Ph.D.: The then-surprising discovery by Alan Heeger, Alan McDiarmid, and Hideki Shirakawa in late 1976 that organic polymers can be made highly electrically conducting, which led to the 2000 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. That discovery is what decided where I wanted to do my post-doc and everything else followed from there.

 

3. What do you see as the most important scientific achievement of the last decade?

Given the pandemic context, the development of m-RNA based vaccines springs to mind. In my field, the emergence of bio-organic electronics is very exciting as well as that of organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites.

 

4. What excites you most about your area of research and what has been the most exciting moment of your career so far?

The fact that the area of organic electronics and photonics combines the need for understanding of fundamental scientific processes with real-world applications: OLED displays are so cool!

 

5. Which of your Materials Horizons publications are you most proud of and why?

It turns out that I signed the very first article published by the journal in early 2014: “Mind the Gap”. It was a Focus Article, which many told me has been very useful to get clear ideas of the distinctions among band gap, optical gap, transport gap, etc.

 

6. Why do you feel that researchers should choose to publish their work in Materials Horizons?

 Because of the journal’s high standards; because their work is initially assessed by scientific editors who are fellow active researchers; and because the journal highlights the new conceptual advances that the authors’ quality work brings forward.

 

7. What attracted you to join the Editorial Board of Materials Horizons?

I was a member of the original Editorial Advisory Board of the journal. I was seduced by the vision that the then Chair of the Editorial Board, Seth Marder, brought to what has become the flagship materials journal of the RSC. I am happy now to be in a position to contribute more directly.

 

8. The Materials Horizons team is delighted to welcome you to the Editorial Board. What are you most looking forward to when acting as a Scientific Editor for the journal?

What I hope to contribute is to a healthy growth of the journal where we strive to keep increasing its high standards, to make sure all members of the materials community are actively involved in its evolution, and to promote respect, diversity, and inclusion in everything we do for the journal.

 

9. What impact do you feel that your area of research can make over the next 10 years?

The application of organic optoelectronics on the bio side and its contributions to personalized medicine as well as to healthcare in developing countries. The appearance of organic solar cells out in the real world. The discovery of exotic quantum phases in purely organic π-conjugated materials.

 

10. What is your favourite reaction or material, and why?

I’ll have to say trans-polyacetylene, even though it is not a polymer that will have big-time applications given its instability. However, this is the material that arguably started the interest in the optoelectronic properties of organics. Also, the wealth of physics behind its deceivingly simple chemical structure is amazing!

 

 11. Why should young people study chemistry or related subjects?

The events of the past two years as well as the dark issues facing our planet, make it more important than ever that the young generations embark on scientific studies, combined with the right political activism.

 

12. What is your biggest passion outside of science?

My family and soccer. It is a blast that both our daughters now live in Tucson and we can see them very often. Soccer-wise, it is nice to realize that the US are increasingly embracing the “beautiful game”; it’s comforting as well that “I’ll never walk alone”.

 

Submit to Materials Horizons now! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest articles, reviews, collections & more by following us on TwitterFacebook or by signing up to our E-Alerts.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Introducing Yi Long as a new Scientific Editor on Materials Horizons

Materials Horizons are delighted to welcome Dr Yi Long from Nanyang Technological University in Singapore as a Scientific Editor.

 

Image of Dr Yi Long

Yi Long received her PhD in Materials Science (2005) at Cambridge University with the full scholarship of Overseas Research Scholarship (ORS), United Kingdom Cambridge Trust and Graduate Scholarship of Selwyn College. She started as a Teaching Fellow in Nanyang Technology University Singapore in 2005 with focus on Lab-to-Fab technology transfer for industries. She successfully delivered three technologies include one coating process to Seagate Technology, the leading hard-disk company in the world. From 2011, she changed her title as lecturer and started her academic research center on smart materials and devices.

Her group currently focuses on two main topics; the integration of organic and inorganic smart materials with (1) energy saving applications, and (2) novel advanced functional devices. She has received several awards including the TechConnect Innovation Washington (2016), National Research Foundation Proof of Concept grant (2015), Minister of Education Tier 2 (2021), GreenAwards Top 3 London (2022). She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry.

 

Read our interview with Yi below.

 

1. What attracted you to pursue a career in materials science and how did you get to where you are now?

My first degree is mechanical design with some courses covering materials fabrication, property, and utilization. When I was offered a scholarship in Singapore, I specialized in electronic materials. I enjoyed the process of making a new piece of material as it felt like creation. After my masters training, I worked as a lithography engineer in a top semiconductor company with good job potential, but a full overseas research scholarship by Cambridge University attracted me. Without much hesitation, I quitted my industrial job and my long journey of research embarked. My PhD training was using self-made ultra-high vacuum system to fabricate superlattice structure and studying its strengthening mechanism. It was tough. I remembered my daily lab work, spending two days carrying 10 KG flange to deposit one single sample and many hours in the dark TEM room to fathom why. My supervisor Dr. Bill Clegg was passionate about research. He sat next door and greeted us every morning cheerfully “Anything new?”. The PhD training did lay a solid foundation. What made it more unforgettable was pubbing, garden party and formal halls.

 

2. Why did you choose to specialize in your specific research field?

I have a unique career. Different from many researchers, after I graduated from Cambridge, I did not attend postdoc training. I was offered a job in Singapore as a teaching fellow to reunion with my husband-to-be. For the first six years of my career in Singapore, I focused on transferring technologies to local industries. I am happy that I have succeeded a few including one solution coating process to Seagate Technologies, the leading hard disk company in the world. After four years of hard work, a production line was set up. Although such work gave zero publications, it was rewarding. Industry and academic speak different languages. I am lucky that I am bilingual.

In 2011, I changed my title to Lecturer and was awarded one research program by National Research Foundation Singapore to specialize in thermochromic smart window. It was a humble beginning, with only one part time PhD student funded for the first three years.  Like all the other colleagues in the world, the beginning is always most gruelling.

 

3. What do you see as the most important scientific achievement of the last decade?

 This is a big question. I could only say, in my own research field, radiative cooling could be considered as one of the important as it spontaneously radiate long-wave infrared to the cold outer space. This could be one of the important solutions to global warming. There are many pioneer workers there, Profs. Fan Shangkui, Yin Xiaobo, Hu Liang Bing, Yang Ronggui and many more. The research community never stops exploration. “Don’t be afraid of boundless truth, there always exists joy in any step taken.” (Dr Hu Shih, Public Intellectual)

 

4. What excites you most about your area of research and what has been the most exciting moment of your career so far?

Buildings consume about 40% of global energy and window, one of the least energy-efficient parts, accounts for as high as 60% of energy loss in the buildings. In the United States, the window-associated energy consumption in buildings was estimated at 4% of nation’s total primary energy usage. The potential that I may contribute to this grand challenge excites me.

We started our research with radiative cooling regulated window in 2019. At the initial proof of concept stage, we designed outdoor experiment to convince that we were in the right track. Singapore is a tropical country. The data for summer season were readily accessible and predictably good. We need find a place to simulate the winter scenario. Singapore has a Snow City with the indoor temperature below -5 oC. We asked the special permission to do the experiment before the opening hour. My students Dr. Wang ShanCheng and Zhou Yang had to finish everything within 3 hours. When we saw the “room temperature” was higher than the commercial product, the three of us were thrilled. The day after we finished the experiment, the Snow City was sadly closed due to Covid lockdown.  

 

5. What is your favourite reaction or material, and why?

Vanadium dioxide and hydrogel. Both have profound science behind and great potential to be commercialized. I have spent one decade, trying hard to understand them more. Both materials are smart as they could give fascinating response with external stimulus automatically. I worked with heat stimulus most of the time. Such passive response of these two materials simply the device design and cut down the cost.  Less is more.

 

6. Which of your Materials Horizons publications are you most proud of and why?

Materials Horizons 8 (6), 1700-1710, 2021.  Vanadium dioxide (VO2) is a unique active plasmonic material due to its intrinsic metal–insulator transition, Dr Ke Yujie, my PhD student, experimented a new method to tailor the VO2 surface plasmon by manipulating its atomic defects. With the excellent collaboration with Prof. Sun Zhimei, this paper developed a quantitative understanding based on different representative defective VO2 systems. We further demonstrated the unconventional plasmonic applications including energy-saving smart windows, wearable camouflage devices, and encryption inks.

 

7. What attracted you to join the Editorial Board of Materials Horizons?

My submissions to Materials Horizons were not all smooth. I remembered one of them had one negative comment and the paper was rejected initially. I appealed and the editorial DID listen. The editorial team is professional and open minded. I admire profoundly.

 

8. What is your biggest passion outside of science?

Reading and Movies. When I was young, there were not much entertainment, reading and watching movies were my hobbies. Science is more about logical and rational reasoning. Humanities is about empathic understanding. I need balance my academic life with other horizons. We human can “see” the black holes, navigate the deepest sea, transmit data in light speed and even transform ourselves into immortal cyborg. How about humanity?

 

9. Why should young people study chemistry or related subjects?

Creation.  We synthesis, characterize and analyse. Materials shape the evolution of human civilization from Stone, Bronze, Iron to Silicon. What is next? It’s open to generations of materials scientists.

 

10. What impact do you feel that your area of research can make over the next 10 years?

 Paris treaty aims to hold the increase in the global average temperature to “well below” 2°C above pre-industrial levels. It is our scientist moral obligation and social responsivity to take actions. My research is focused on smart materials and device, but majority work is with smart window. There is not much technological advancement of commercial windows for many years. I do hope more breakthroughs could happen to bring the new window in the household with more functionality and much less carbon footprint.

 

Submit to Materials Horizons now! Check out our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest articles, reviews, collections & more by following us on Twitter, Facebook or by signing up to our E-Alerts.

 

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Horizons Community Board collection: Antimicrobial Materials and Surfaces

Antimicrobial Materials and Surfaces

A new online article collection guest edited by members of the Horizons Community Boards

The Community Boards that support Materials Horizons and Nanoscale Horizons provide a platform for early career researchers to share their experiences and ideas on scientific publishing. Working together and sharing their unique expertise, our Community Board members have recommended several key topics where significant, rapid progress has been made in the last two years. Today we are delighted to share their selected top articles published in the Horizons journals showcasing the most important advances in antimicrobial materials and surfaces.

Ignacio Insua and Nacho Martin-Fabiani

This collection is guest edited by Ignacio Insua (Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Spain) and Nacho Martin-Fabiani (Loughborough University, UK). To get to know our guest editors, check out their Editorial article introducing this collection.

 

Read the collection

Read the introductory editorial

 

We hope you enjoy reading this collection.

With best wishes,

Dr Michaela Muehlberg

Executive Editor, Materials Horizons

Dr Heather Montgomery
Managing Editor, Nanoscale Horizons

 

 

 

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Outstanding Paper Award 2021

Celebrating the exceptional work published in Materials Horizons

Our annual Outstanding Paper Award celebrates some of the exceptional work published in Materials Horizons and Nanoscale Horizons, and the authors behind those articles. The winners were chosen by the Editorial and Advisory Boards based on the science presented and the work’s potential future impact, from papers published in 2021.

Please join us in congratulating the winners of the 2021 Outstanding Paper Award and we hope that you enjoy reading their outstanding articles as much as we did.

Materials Horizons Outstanding Article 2021

Biohybrid plants with electronic roots via in-vivo polymerization of conjugated oligomers

Daniela Parker, Yohann Daguerre, Gwennaël Dufil, Daniele Mantione, Eduardo Solano, Eric Cloutet, Georges Hadziioannou, Torgny Näsholm, Magnus Berggren, Eleni Pavlopoulou and Eleni Stavrinidou
Mater. Horiz., 2021, 8, 3295-3305

Materials Horizons Outstanding Article Runner-up 2021

Van der Waals solid solution crystals for highly efficient in-air photon upconversion under subsolar irradiance

Riku Enomoto, Megumi Hoshi, Hironaga Oyama, Hideki Agata, Shinichi Kurokawa, Hitoshi Kuma, Hidehiro Uekusa and Yoichi Murakami
Mater. Horiz., 2021, 8, 3449-3456

Materials Horizons Outstanding Review 2021

Catalytic Methods for Chemical Recycling or Upcycling of Commercial Polymers

Sophia C. Kosloski-Oh, Zachary A. Wood, Yvonne Manjarrez, Juan Pablo de los Rios and Megan E. Fieser
Mater. Horiz., 2021, 8, 1084-1129

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Materials Horizons indexed in MEDLINE®

All articles published in Materials Horizons from 2021 onwards will be indexed in the MEDLINE® database, significantly increasing their discoverability. This is a key database for biomedical researchers, so we are very pleased that everyone who publishes with us will get this increased exposure.

In addition to MEDLINE®, Materials Horizons is indexed in the Science Citation Index, EBSCO Essentials and Scopus.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Issue 1 Focus Articles

We were delighted to include several Materials Horizons Focus articles in Issue 1 of Materials Horizons, a special issue in honor of Professor Seth Marder.

Materials Horizons Focus articles are free to access educational articles that address topic areas which are often misunderstood or require greater explanation. You can read the collection of Focus articles below.

Read the below selection of Materials Horizons Focus articles from the special issue in honor of Professor Seth Marder. All Materials Horizons Focus articles are free to access upon publication.

Electronic properties of metal halide perovskites and their interfaces: the basics

Fengshuo Zu, Dongguen Shin and Norbert Koch

Mater. Horiz., 2022, 9, 17-24 DOI: 10.1039/D1MH01106E

Plasmons: untangling the classical, experimental, and quantum mechanical definitions

Rebecca L. M. Gieseking

Mater. Horiz., 2022, 9, 25-42 DOI: 10.1039/D1MH01163D

Scattering techniques for mixed donor–acceptor characterization in organic photovoltaics

Thomas P. Chaney, Andrew J. Levin, Sebastian A. Schneider and Michael F. Toney

Mater. Horiz., 2022, 9, 43-60 DOI: 10.1039/D1MH01219C

Engineering of flat bands and Dirac bands in two-dimensional covalent organic frameworks (COFs): relationships among molecular orbital symmetry, lattice symmetry, and electronic-structure characteristics

Xiaojuan Ni, Hong Li, Feng Liu and Jean-Luc Brédas

Mater. Horiz., 2022, 9, 88-98 DOI: 10.1039/D1MH00935D

Organic building blocks at inorganic nanomaterial interfaces

Yunping Huang, Theodore A. Cohen, Breena M. Sperry, Helen Larson, Hao A. Nguyen, Micaela K. Homer, Florence Y. Dou, Laura M. Jacoby, Brandi M. Cossairt, Daniel R. Gamelin and Christine K. Luscombe

Mater. Horiz., 2022, 9, 61-87 DOI: 10.1039/D1MH01294K

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Materials Horizons Emerging Investigator Series – Zhengyang Bin

A methyl-shield strategy enables efficient blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence hosts for high-performance fluorescent OLEDs

An infographic highlighting a novel methyl-shield strategy to design ideal TADF hosts for the improvement of OLED performance

We are pleased to present an infographic showcasing outstanding work by Zhengyang Bin and Jingsong You et al. on a series of highly efficient TADF host materials via a novel methyl-shield strategy! Learn more in the infographic below or get the full story from their Materials Horizons article.

This Communication was also featured in our Emerging Investigator series, find out more about this series here and check out the full interview with Zhengyang in this Editorial.

A methyl-shield strategy enables efficient blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence hosts for high-performance fluorescent OLEDs
You Ran, Ge Yang, Yang Liu, Weiguo Han, Ge Gao, Rongchuan Su, Zhengyang Bin and Jingsong You
Mater. Horiz., 2021, 8, 2025-2031

Meet the authors

Zhengyang Bin, Sichuan University, China

Zhengyang Bin received his Ph.D. degree at Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University in 2018, supervised by Prof. Yong Qiu. He is now working at College of Chemistry, Sichuan University. He was selected as Materials Horizons Emerging Investigator in 2021. His research interest focuses on developing structurally non-traditional organic materials for high-performance OLEDs.

Don’t forget to check out the Emerging Investigator series interview with Shengyang in this Editorial.

Jingsong You, Sichuan University, China

Jingsong You received his Ph.D. degree from Sichuan University in 1998. He then worked as a post-doctoral fellow or a research scientist at Chung-Hsing University (China), Institute für Organische Katalyseforschung (Germany), Iowa State University (USA), and University of California, Irvine (USA). In 2004, he joined the College of Chemistry of Sichuan University as Professor. His research interest focuses on developing new concepts and strategies to synthesize π-conjugated frameworks, especially via the transition metal catalyzed C−H functionalization of (hetero)arenes, and exploring their applications in the synthesis of organic optoelectronic materials.

You Ran, Sichuan University, China

Dr. You Ran was born in 1992 and received his Ph.D. degree in the Department of Chemistry from Sichuan University in 2021. His research focuses on efficient TADF host materials for TSF-OLEDs.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Welcome to new Community Board member Weilai Yu

We are delighted to welcome a new Community Board member to Materials Horizons – join us in welcoming Weilai Yu to the journal!!

The Materials Horizons Community Board is made up of early career researchers, such as PhD students and postdocs, that are fundamental in the future development of the materials field.

We are pleased to welcome Weilai Yu to this outstanding group of early career researchers. 

Headshot of Weilai Yu

 

 

Weilai Yu, Stanford University, USA

ORCID: 0000-0002-9420-0702

Dr. Weilai Yu is currently a postdoc scholar of Chemical Engineering at Stanford working with Prof. Zhenan Bao. In 2021, he obtained his Ph.D in Chemistry at Caltech working with Prof. Nathan S. Lewis. His research interests include solar fuels, electrochemistry, Li battery and materials interface.

Connect with Weilai on Twitter: @yuweilai93 

 

 

Check out Weilai’s most recent publications in the Royal Society of Chemistry:

Catalytic open-circuit passivation by thin metal oxide films of p-Si anodes in aqueous alkaline electrolytes
Harold J. Fu, Pakpoom Buabthong, Zachary Philip Ifkovits, Weilai Yu, Bruce S. Brunschwig and Nathan S. Lewis
Energy Environ. Sci., 2022,15, 334-345, DOI: 10.1039/D1EE03040J

Investigations of the stability of etched or platinized p-InP(100) photocathodes for solar-driven hydrogen evolution in acidic or alkaline aqueous electrolytes
Weilai Yu,  Matthias H. Richter,  Pakpoom Buabthong, Ivan A. Moreno-Hernandez, Carlos G. Read, Ethan Simonoff, Bruce S. Brunschwig and Nathan S. Lewis
Energy Environ. Sci., 2021,14, 6007-6020, DOI: 10.1039/D1EE02809J

Investigations of the stability of GaAs for photoelectrochemical H2 evolution in acidic or alkaline aqueous electrolytes
Weilai Yu, Matthias H. Richter, Ethan Simonoff, Bruce S. Brunschwig and Nathan S. Lewis
J. Mater. Chem. A, 2021,9, 22958-22972, DOI: 10.1039/D1TA04145B

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Materials Horizons Emerging Investigator Series – Dae Sung Chung

A regioregular donor–acceptor copolymer allowing a high gain–bandwidth product to be obtained in photomultiplication-type organic photodiodes

An infographic highlighting a newly designed donor-acceptor polymer as the active layer of a photomultiplication-type organic photodiode

We are pleased to highlight an infographic showcasing excellent work by Bogyu Lim and Dae Sung Chung et al. on a new donor–acceptor copolymer! Learn more in the infographic below or get the full story from their Materials Horizons article.

This Communication was also featured in our Emerging Investigator series, find out more about this series here and check out the full interview with Dae Sung in this Editorial.

A regioregular donor–acceptor copolymer allowing a high gain–bandwidth product to be obtained in photomultiplication-type organic photodiodes
Juhee Kim, Chan So, Mingyun Kang, Kyu Min Sim, Bogyu Lim and Dae Sung Chung
Mater. Horiz., 2021, 8, 276-283

Meet the authors

Dae Sung Chung, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Republic of Korea

Prof. Dae Sung Chung received his B.S. in 2005 and Ph.D in 2010 at Department of Chemical Engineering in Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Korea. He had been postdoctoral researcher supervised by Prof. Dmitri V. Talapin at University of Chicago for 2 years. He had worked for Chung-Ang University and Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science & Technology (DGIST) for 4 year and 3 years, respectively, as an assistant and associate professor. In 2020, he joined Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH) as an associate professor. His research interests include organic image sensors, printing M3D of organic electronics and molecular switch devices.

Don’t forget to check out the Emerging Investigator series interview with Dae Sung in this Editorial.

Juhee Kim, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Republic of Korea

Juhee Kim received her B.S. in 2018 at Department of Chemical Engineering in Chonnam National University, Korea. She received her M.S. in 2020 at Department of Energy Science & Engineering in Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science & Technology (DGIST) under the guidance of Prof. Dae Sung Chung. Since 2020, she has been her Ph.D. course at Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH) under the same supervisor. Her research interests include organic image sensors.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)