Archive for the ‘Board News’ Category

New JAAS Editorial Chair: A few words with Heidi Goenaga-Infante

The new Chair of JAAS has been announced as Heidi Goeanga-Infante, LGC, London, UK. We recently caught up with Heidi to find out a bit more about her.

What are you most looking forward to in your new role as chair?
I am delighted and feel honoured to be the new chair of JAAS. I am definitely looking forward to working more closely with a fantastic team of RSC editors and colleagues from the JAAS Editorial and Advisory boards.

What are you most looking forward to in your new role as Chair? What are your aims?
Taking up the role of JAAS Chair is a great opportunity to ensure that the journal further builds on its long-standing tradition of publishing innovative research at the forefront of atomic spectrometry. I will have big shoes to fill as the previous Chairs have done a fantastic job but I am willing to learn from their experience and do my very best to take the journal to exciting new areas.

What direction do you see this research field moving in and what do you imagine will be the next big breakthrough?
I envisage that key developments will be driven by needs in life sciences applications with regards to diagnostics and advanced therapeutics. The establishment of multidisciplinary platforms for multiple biomarker quantification and imaging of tissue down to single cells will be invaluable in supporting medical research into the diagnosis and treatment of chronic diseases like cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, and Wilson’s disease. Also multi-modal approaches developed so far for nanomaterials will be extended to anisotropic materials in more challenging environments and towards applications in nanomedicine.

How do we encourage the next generation of analytical chemists?
I would encourage them to get themselves out there, be proactive in pursuing their dream career, seize new opportunities and last but not least enjoy the journey. Passion and dedication are keys to success.

Whose work do you think is really exciting at the moment?
To mention a group or a few groups in particular will be unfair as I am amazed by the breadth of high quality work in our community. Having said that, I find the advances made in improving sample introduction and instrument calibration for challenging applications of single particle and single cell multi-tag analyses very exciting. This, of course, is nowadays supported by instrumentation developments towards higher sample transport efficiencies, better spatial resolution and speed and, micro-second, quasi-simultaneous multi-element and multi-isotope detection. Also, the increasing use of atomic spectrometry in parallel with techniques such as molecular mass spectrometry and microscopy in the areas of imaging, nanomaterial characterisation and speciation analysis keeps my full attention.

Once again, we’d like to warmly welcome Heidi. We’re looking forward to her term as Chair of the JAAS Editorial Board.

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JAAS Chair Heidi Goenaga-Infante wins Lester W. Strock Award

JAAS would like to congratulate our new Chair, Heidi Goenaga-Infante, on being awarded the 2020 Lester W. Strock Award.

The Lester W. Strock Award is given by the New England Section of the Society of Applied Spectroscopy in recognition of a selected publication of substantive research in/or application of analytical atomic spectrochemistry in the fields of earth science, life sciences, or stellar and cosmic sciences.

Heidi will recieve the award at the 2020 SciX conference, and will be giving a plenary talk on the Role of Reference Methods and Reference Materials to Support Use of Regulated Nanomaterials in the Manufacturing Industry, on Tuesday Oct 13th, 9:45am (Eastern Daylight Time).

Congratulations Heidi!

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Introducing our newest JAAS Advisory Board members

 

 

JAAS is delighted to announce the newest additions to our Advisory Board: Vincent Motto-Ros (Claude Bernard University Lyon 1, France), Matthieu Baudelet (University of Central Florida, USA) and Marta Costas-Rodríguez (Ghent University, Belgium).

 

Vincent Motto-Ros graduated with a Physics degree in December 2005 from the University Claude Bernard Lyon 1 (Lyon, France). After two postdoctoral positions at the Canadian Space Agency (Montréal, Quebec) and in the Liphy Laboratory (Grenoble, France), he obtained an Associate Professor position at the University Claude Bernard Lyon 1 in 2008. He has since worked on the development of the LIBS technique in the Light and Matter Institute (ILM). He has excellent international visibility for his expertise in LIBS instrumental development, quantification, experimental training, and elemental imaging of biological tissues. He is the author of more than 60 papers in reviewed journals, 2 patents, about 50 presentations at national and international conferences, and 15 invited talks/lectures at international conferences.

Matthieu Baudelet graduated with a B.S in Physics from the University of Lille (France), in 2003. In 2005, he graduated with a M.S. in “Laser and Spectroscopy” in the University of Lyon (France) and continued to complete his Ph.D. in the ‘Laboratoire de Spectrométrie Ionique et Moléculaire’ (Lasim, Lyon) working on “Laser-induced plasma and spectroscopic analysis.” He continued his research on laser spectroscopy and sensing as a Senior Research Scientist for the Townes Laser Institute at the University of Central Florida. Now Assistant Professor of Chemistry in the National Center for Forensic Science, Dr. Baudelet’s research focuses on the application of laser-based spectroscopy for forensic analysis: atomic spectroscopy with laser ablation techniques (LIBS and LA-ICP-MS) as well as molecular with Raman spectroscopy. A large part of this research focuses also on the quantification of interferences in spectroscopic signals.

Marta Costas-Rodríguez obtained her PhD in Analytical Chemistry from the University of Vigo (Spain) in 2011, where she was awarded with the Extraordinary Doctorate Award (Sciences scope). Her work focused on the development of analytical methods for elemental analysis by spectrometric techniques. Since 2012, she is a postdoctoral researcher (currently with a postdoctoral fellowship from the Flemish Research Foundation FWO – Flanders) in the ‘Atomic & Mass Spectrometry – A&MS’ research group of Prof. Frank Vanhaecke at Ghent University (Belgium). Her research at UGent is mainly dealing with high-precision isotopic analysis in biomedicine. She has supervised 3 Master and 2 PhD students and is currently guiding another 2 PhD students in this field. She is (co)author of 50 peer-reviewed international papers and 4 book chapters and has given some 50 presentations on conferences. Her current research interests are elemental and isotopic analysis by single- and multi-collector ICP-MS and bioimaging with LA-ICP-MS. Additionally, she is the current JAAS Emerging Investigator Lectureship winner.

JAAS is guided by an international Editorial Board and Advisory Board – more information on our board members can be found on our website. We welcome the knowledge and expertise Vincent, Matthieu and Marta will bring to the journal and we very much look forward to working with them. Welcome to the JAAS team!

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In memory of Gary Horlick

Professor Gary Horlick

We are sad to report that Professor Emeritus Gary Horlick of the University of Alberta passed away on Thursday, November 1. For over 50 years, Gary Horlick was a leader in the field of atomic spectrometry, contributing to this field with many elegant experiments and a sharp interpretive insight. He will be remembered as a great teacher, mentor, colleague, and friend. – Steve Ray

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In memory of Bernhard Welz

Bernhard Welz (photo by Jorg Feldmann)

I am very saddened to report that last Saturday (June 2), Dr. Bernhard Welz passed away, after severe complications, as consequence of a car accident. Bernhard was cremated last Sunday in Florianópolis (Brazil), the city in which he chose to live for the last 20 years.

Born in Augsburg (Germany), Bernhard was without any doubt one of the driving figures in the development of atomic absorption. As a young doctor, he started doing research in what was then a very new field, when he joined Perkin Elmer in 1967. After more than 30 years working for such company, Bernhard, instead of opting for a peaceful retirement, decided to adventure overseas and became Visiting Professor at the Federal University of Santa Catarina, in Florianópolis. And so Bernhard became Bernardo, and started a new life, meeting his wife and co-worker, Maria. His presence and example invigorated atomic spectrometry in Brazil, to the point that it is one of the leading countries in the field now.

Bernhard was tireless and very active until the very end, traveling to conferences all over the world, and presenting his unique work. It is hard to resume his contribution to the field or overestimate his enormous impact. His work for the last 20 years focused on the development of high-resolution continuum source AAS/MAS, but that is only one of his many achievements. His “Bible” on Atomic Absorption Spectrometry, wrote together with M. Sperling in the last edition, still is the reference book in the field. And let’s not forget that he started organizing several successful conferences, such as the Rio Symposium on Atomic Spectrometry, or the German CANAS.

I remember reading his papers (his series on the use of palladium and magnesium nitrate as a universal modifier is certainly noteworthy) as a young Ph.D. student, meeting him as a young post-doc, and becoming his colleague and friend later on, as a not so young scientist. Bernhard was a true giant, and it was a privilege to share time with him, both personally and scientifically. He will be sorely missed, but his legacy certainly remains. A life well-lived, Bernardo. Rest in peace and many thanks!

Martín Resano
Chair of the JAAS Editorial Board

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Introducing the newest members of the JAAS Advisory Board

We are delighted to announce the appointment of four new members to the JAAS Advisory Board. All four of our new members have been recipients of JAAS Emerging Investigator Lectureships in recent years. The Lectureship aims to recognise and support an emerging scientist working in the area of atomic spectrometry in the early stages of their independent career.

Lara Lobo, Oviedo University, Spain
Lara Lobo was one of two winners of the 2015 JAAS Emerging Investigator Lectureship, launched to celebrate the 30th Anniversary of the journal. Read Lara’s recent critical review article on depth profile analysis with glow discharge spectrometry here.

Gerardo Gamez, Texas Tech University, USA
Gerardo Gamez was one of two winners of the 2015 JAAS Emerging Investigator Lectureship, launched to celebrate the 30th Anniversary of the journal. Check out Garardo’s article on compressed sensing spectral imaging for plasma optical emission spectroscopy here.

Sohail Mushtaq, University of Bristol, UK
Sohail Mushtaq was the recipient of the 2016 JAAS Emerging Investigator Lectureship. Read Sohail’s article on “The production of doubly charged sample ions by “charge transfer and ionization” (CTI) in analytical GD-MS” featured in the journal’s fifth Young Analytical Scientists issue.

Márcia Mesko, Federal University of Pelotas, Brazil
Márcia Foster Mesko was the recipient of the 2018 JAAS Emerging Investigator Lectureship. Read her contribution to the recent Young Analytical Scientist Issue of the journal titled “Sample preparation of lipstick for further Cd and Pb determination by ICP-MS: is the use of complexing acids really necessary?

JAAS is guided by an international Editorial Board and Advisory Board – more information on our board members can be found on our website. We welcome the knowledge and expertise our four new Advisory Board members will bring to the journal and we very much look forward to working with them. Welcome to the JAAS team!

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JAAS Chair of the Editorial Board, Professor Martín Resano (Universidad de Zaragoza) selects his Top 5 articles from recent issues of JAAS

Dr. Resano is Professor in the Department of Analytical Chemistry and member of the I3A research institute at the University of Zaragoza, where he leads the group M.A.R.T.E., that investigates the capabilities and limitations of atomic spectrometry techniques for bulk and spatially resolved trace and isotopic analysis. Current focus is in a) the detection and quantification of nanomaterials; b) the development of minimally invasive methods for analysis of biological fluids; c) the potential of high-resolution graphite furnace molecular absorption spectrometry for elemental and isotopic analysis.

Read Professor Resano’s Editor’s Choice selection via the links below – all articles are free to access for the next 4 weeks!


Separation and detection of gold nanoparticles with capillary electrophoresis and ICP-MS in single particle mode (CE-SP-ICP-MS)
Franze et al., J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2017, DOI: 10.1039/c7ja00040e

This article explores for the first time the coupling of CE with ICP-MS operating in single particle mode, such that information on particle number, particle mean size, size distribution, and elemental composition can be visualized in 3-D single-particle electropherograms. A brilliant idea that follows the trend of adding extra dimensions to separation techniques, in order to achieve better resolution and more information.

Evaluation of a compact VUV spectrometer for elemental imaging by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: application to mine core characterization
Trichard et al., J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2017, DOI: 10.1039/c7ja00185a

Imaging is a field in which the use of LIBS can represent a breakthrough because of its simplicity, sample throughput and cost-effectiveness. This work is a clear example of the potential of this technique.

Depth profiling of nanometer thin layers by laser desorption and laser postionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry
Yin et al., J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2017, DOI: 10.1039/c7ja00081b

A very impressive work on the performance of a new technique, laser desorption and laser postionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, for depth profiling of thin layers of Ni and Ta, providing in-depth full isotopic spectra with an average ablation rate as low as 0.026 nm per laser pulse.

Novel non-target analysis of fluorine compounds using ICPMS/MS and HPLC-ICPMS/MS
Jamari et al., J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2017, 32, 942-950, DOI: 10.1039/C7JA00051K

A good example of how elemental information that is nearly impossible to achieve in a conventional way can instead be obtained, in an ingenious way, via the monitoring of molecular species. Plus, a good illustration of the upcoming importance of speciation of non-metals.

Sizing gold nanoparticles using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry
Leopold et al., J. Anal. At. Spectrom., 2017, 32, 723-730, DOI: 10.1039/C7JA00019G

Another brilliant example of innovation, proving how an “old-fashioned” technique can provide new information, in this case enabling the selective detection and quantification of AuNP of different sizes, in the range between 2 and 100 nm.

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In memory of Joe Caruso

Gary Hieftje, Joe Caruso, Maria Montes-Bayon

We are honoured to announce the publication of an online web collection with JAAS and Metallomics dedicated to the memory of Joe Caruso.

Joe was a well-known and highly respected leader in the field of analytical chemistry and plasma spectrochemistry in particular – more recently he made great contributions to the fields of elemental speciation and metallomics. Over the years he had been very active for the Royal Society of Chemistry and as well as serving as Chair for JAAS, he was the founding Chair for Metallomics, and became one of the leaders in this emerging area of exciting research.

This very special compilation highlights analytical research being conducted in these areas. We believe that this collection of papers is a fitting memorial to an inspiring mentor and outstanding chemist.

You can access the collection here, or use the link http://rsc.li/2tHpEQl

We thank the guest editors Gary Hieftje and Maria Montes-Bayon, and those who were able to contribute to the collection for their support of this very special memorial.

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Introducing new JAAS Editorial Board member Dr George Havrilla

We are delighted to announce the appointment of Dr George Havrilla as a member of the JAAS Editorial Board.


George Havrilla is a scientist 5, in the Chemistry Division, at Los Alamos National Laboratory since 1993. His research efforts have included elemental analyses using X-ray fluorescence for bulk, mesoscale and microscale characterization. Before LANL he was at BP Research R&D Cleveland, Ohio and spent 2 years as an NAS/NRC postdoc at the National Bureau of Standards. He has a PhD from West Virginia University (1980) and 2 R&D 100 awards. He has developed novel XRF instruments including MXRF, confocal MXRF and hiRX along with many materials characterization methodologies. Current research interests include XRF applications to materials characterization and international safeguards.


We welcome Dr Havrilla and his expertise and experience to the JAAS Editorial Board. This appointment strenghtens the Board and we look forward to working with Dr Havrilla going forward.

You can keep up to date with the latest developments from JAAS by signing up for free table of contents alerts and monthly e-newsletters.

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New JAAS Editorial Chair: A few words with Martín Resano

Martin Resano

The new Chair of the Editorial Board for JAAS has been announced as Martín Resano. We recently had the opportunity to catch up with Martín and find out a bit more about him.

What are you most looking forward to in your new role as chair?

Besides working with very nice people, I think it is learning. Since I joined the Advisory Board and later the Editorial Board of JAAS, I have learnt a lot about how a Journal works and how all my colleagues do things in different ways. I expect the role as Chair will be even more formative. Plus, my wife is very proud of me!

What are your aims?

My aim is to try to further improve JAAS and leave it in a better situation than is now. Obviously, I have big shoes to fill, so it will not be easy. But JAAS community has always been like a family and we want to keep that, we want to keep the human contact in a Web 2.0 world, and we want to make it as easier and swift as possible for authors and reviewers, as well as provide further service (e.g. I like the new citation velocity addition!). I think there is still some room for improvement, for instance regarding proof corrections and MS promotion.

And there is always the inevitable IF. I think the current IF does not completely reflect the quality of the papers that JAAS publishes and I would like to see it going higher. Plus, former Editor and Publisher Niamh O’Connor jokingly (jokingly?) challenged me to beat the IF she achieved with Detlef Gunther as Chair (4.372 in 2010). Let’s see what we can do about that.

What direction do you see this research field moving in and what do you imagine will be the next big breakthrough?

As Bohr said, “Prediction is very difficult, especially if it’s about the future.”

I think atomic spectrometry is a bit dependent on instrumental and technological developments. This happens in all areas, but perhaps it is most obvious in ours, because only a few groups have the knowledge, support and access to resources to build such complex instruments. But we are good at taking advantage of the instruments we have, and even using them for purposes that significantly differ from those for which they were originally designed for, sometimes with very interesting outcomes.

So you can see new papers coming in some areas due to new needs (e.g., characterization of nanomaterials) but also because new instruments make it possible to develop new applications (e.g., new types of lasers, high-resolution continuum source AAS devices, ICP-MS/MS instruments, new XRF imaging applications based on synchrotrons). So it is hard to guess, because I think technologically it is possible to build better instrumentation right now, but the commercial impact has to be taken into account.

From a personal point of view, I would like to see a more powerful high-res continuum source AAS device, I am very curious about the potential of TOF devices for ICP-MS, and I would like to see the prices of fs lasers to finally drop.

And, overall, I think the difference between atomic and molecular spectrometry is becoming very subtle, as former Chair Frank Vanhaecke discussed in a recent JAAS editorial.

How do we encourage the next generation of analytical chemists?

Analytical chemistry is such an interdisciplinary field that enables you to work in any area you really like. Plus, the information we provide is not only useful, but often indispensable.

Whose work do you think is really exciting at the moment?

Everybody in our Editorial and Advisory Board is doing a great job. I feel very comfortable with the team we have, and I think it would be a bit unfair to highlight some group right now.

Instead, I prefer to talk a bit about the past. I grew up as a scientist admiring the work that former JAAS Chairs (such as Barry Sharp, Joe Caruso, Gary Hietfje, Detlef Gunther and Frank Vanhaecke) and other JAAS members (such as Ralph Sturgeon, Jim Holcombe, Bernhard Welz, Scott Tanner) did, and for me it has been a formidable experience and a wonderful journey to be able to not only meet them but to work with most of them. And most of them are still active and doing great Science!

Once again, we’d like to warmly welcome Martín. We’re looking forward to his term as Chair of the JAAS Editorial Board.

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