Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Introducing our new Associate Editor: Professor Takashi Uemura

We are delighted to welcome Professor Takashi Uemura to the Dalton Transactions Editorial Board. Takashi joins us as an Associate Editor today!

Takashi Uemura, Dalton Transactions Associate Editor, Royal Society of Chemistry

 

Takashi Uemura obtained his PhD at the Department of Polymer Chemistry, Kyoto University in 2002. He began his academic career as an Assistant Professor and Associate Professor at Department of Synthetic Chemistry and Biological Chemistry in Kyoto University. In 2018, he moved to the University of Tokyo where he now holds the position of Professor. He was also a researcher of PRESTO program (2006–2010) and has been a research director for a CREST program (2013-2020) of the Japan Science and Technology Agency. He has received a number of awards, including the Chemical Society of Japan (CSJ) Award for Young Chemists, the Commendation for Science and Technology by the Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology, Kao Research Initiative Award, and JSPS Prize.

His research interest focuses on the preparation of synergistic nanohybrids between porous coordination compounds and polymeric materials, in particular, polymer chemistry in confined nanospaces.

 

 

 

Read a selection of Takashi’s work published by the Royal Society of Chemistry:

Fluorinated porous molecular crystals: vapor-triggered on–off switching of luminescence and porosity
Hiroshi Sasaki, Hiroaki Imoto, Takashi Kitao, Takashi Uemura, Takashi Yumura and Kensuke Naka
Chem. Commun., 2019, 55, 6487-6490
DOI: 10.1039/C9CC02309G, Communication

Impact of the position of the imine linker on the optoelectronic performance of π-conjugated organic frameworks
Samrat Ghosh, Yusuke Tsutsui, Katsuaki Suzuki, Hironori Kaji, Kayako Honjo, Takashi Uemura and Shu Seki
Mol. Syst. Des. Eng., 2019, 4, 325-331
DOI: 10.1039/C8ME00079D, Paper

Controlled polymerizations using metal–organic frameworks
Shuto Mochizuki, Takashi Kitao and Takashi Uemura
Chem. Commun., 2018, 54, 11843-11856
DOI: 10.1039/C8CC06415F, Feature Article

Hybridization of MOFs and polymers
Takashi Kitao, Yuanyuan Zhang, Susumu Kitagawa, Bo Wang and Takashi Uemura
Chem. Soc. Rev., 2017, 46, 3108-3133
DOI: 10.1039/C7CS00041C, Review Article

Inclusion and dielectric properties of a vinylidene fluoride oligomer in coordination nanochannels
Nobuhiro Yanai, Takashi Uemura, Wataru Kosaka, Ryotaro Matsuda, Tetsuhiro Kodani, Meiten Koh, Takashi Kanemura and Susumu Kitagawa
Dalton Trans., 2012, 41, 4195-4198
DOI: 10.1039/C2DT11891B, Paper
Dalton Transactions, Royal Society of Chemistry

 

Submit your research or reviews to Takashi now, he will be delighted to receive them! – see our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

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Welcome to our new Associate Editor: Vadapalli Chandrasekhar

We would like to offer a very warm welcome to our new Dalton Transactions Associate Editor Professor Vadapalli Chandrasekhar!

 

Vadapalli Chandrasekhar Royal Society of Chemistry Dalton Transactions Associate EditorMoving from an Editorial Board member position to an Associate Editor, Professor Chandrasekhar brings a wealth of experience to his new role. He obtained his Ph.D. from the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, in 1982. After a post-doctoral stint at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, he joined the Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur in 1987 and he is currently at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research Hyderabad as a Distinguished Professor and Centre Director.

His research interests include organometallic chemistry of main-group compounds and molecular materials. His research work is documented in 360+ publications and he is a Fellow of the Indian National Science Academy in New Delhi and also the World Academy of Sciences, Trieste, Italy. He is the recipient of several awards including the Shanthi Swarup Bhatnagar Award (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, India) and the Friedrich Wilhelm-Bessel Award (AvH Foundation, Germany).

 

 

Browse a selection of work published by Professor Chandrasekhar below:

 

 

Modulation of the nuclearity of molecular Mg(II)-phosphates: solid-state structural change involving coordinating solvents
Biswajit Santra, Ramakirushnan Suriya Narayanan, Pankaj Kalita, Vierandra Kumar, Debdeep Mandal, Vivek Gupta, Michael Zimmer, Volker Huch, Vadapalli Chandrasekhar, David Scheschkewitz,* Carola Schulzke and Anukul Jana
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 8853-8860
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT00687G, Paper

Phosphonate-assisted tetranuclear lanthanide assemblies: observation of the toroidic ground state in the TbIII analogue
Sourav Biswas, Pawan Kumar, Abinash Swain, Tulika Gupta, Pankaj Kalita, Subrata Kundu, Gopalan Rajaraman and Vadapalli Chandrasekhar
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 6421-6434
DOI:
10.1039/C9DT00592G, Paper

Mononuclear lanthanide complexes assembled from a tridentate NNO donor ligand: design of a DyIII single-ion magnet
Pankaj Kalita, Amit Malakar, Joydeb Goura, Subhashree Nayak, Juan Manuel Herrera, Enrique Colacio and Vadapalli Chandrasekhar
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 4857-4866
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT00504H, Paper

Heterometallic 3d–4f single molecule magnets containing diamagnetic metal ions
Amit Chakraborty, Joydeb Goura, Pankaj Kalita, Abinash Swain, Gopalan Rajaramand and Vadapalli Chandrasekhar
Dalton Trans., 2018, 47, 8841-8864
DOI: 10.1039/C8DT01883A, Perspective

Professor Chandrasakhar also recently served as a Guest Editor for our New Talent Asia-Pacific themed issue along with Professor Guo-Xin Jin and Professor Paul Low.

Submit your research or reviews to Vadapalli now, he will be delighted to receive them! – see our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

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Outstanding Reviewers for Dalton Transactions in 2018

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Dalton Transactions in 2018, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Professor Catherine Constable-Housecroft, University of Basel ORCiD: 0000-0002-8074-0089

Professor Marilena Ferbinteanu, University of Bucharest ORCiD: 0000-0002-7019-4635

Dr Diana Iovan, UC Berkeley ORCiD: 0000-0001-9889-7183

Professor Yahong Li, Soochow University ORCiD: 0000-0002-6467-0607

Dr Wei Li, West Virginia University ORCiD: 0000-0003-2802-7443

Dr Shaikh Mobin, Indian Institute of Technology, Indore ORCiD: 0000-0003-1940-3822 

Professor Keith Murray, Monash University ORCiD: 0000-0003-4098-9389

Dr Takuya Shiga, University of Tsukuba ORCiD: 0000-0002-6834-6011

Professor Mike Ward, University of Warwick ORCiD: 0000-0001-8175-8822

Professor Zhiguo Xia, University of Science and Technology, Beijing ORCiD: 0000-0002-9670-3223

We would also like to thank the Dalton Transactions board and the inorganic chemistry community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé. You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

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Brandi M. Cossairt – 2018 Dalton Transactions UC Berkeley Lecture

Brandi Cossairt

 

The 2018 Dalton Transactions University of California, Berkeley Lecture is Professor Brandi Cossairt, at the University of Washington. The Lecture recognizes independent early career researchers who have made a significant contribution to the field of inorganic chemistry.

 

The academic selected to give the lecture receives the opportunity to present at UC Berkeley, a plaque, a $500 honorarium, a dinner and an invitation to publish in Dalton Transactions.

Brandi Cossairt and John Arnold Dalton Transactions

Brandi Cossairt (right) receiving her award plaque from Dalton Transactions Editorial Board Chair John Arnold (left)

Professor Cossairt’s lecture was entitled The Chemistry of Nanoscale Phosphides: Building Complex Inorganic “Molecules” with Atom-Level Precision:

 

Abstract: Research in the Cossairt lab is focused on the solution-phase synthesis of chemical systems capable of sunlight absorption, color-pure emission, charge transfer, and fuels generation. Towards this end we seek to address fundamental challenges in the field of inorganic chemistry, specifically controlling the composition, structure and function of nanoscale light absorbers and catalysts, and controlling the interactions between them. This talk will focus primarily on our efforts to understand the precursor conversion reactions, nucleation and growth mechanisms, and approaches to the post-synthetic transformation of indium phosphide quantum dots for use in solid-state lighting and displays. This research has catalyzed a number of other areas of investigation including the synthesis of other pnictide-based nanomaterials for use in light harvesting and catalysis that will also be discussed.

 

Brandi Cossairt was born and raised in Miami, Florida. She is a first-generation college graduate, having obtained her B. S. in Chemistry from the California Institute of Technology in 2006. Brandi went on to pursue graduate studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under the guidance of Professor Christopher C. Cummins and was awarded her Ph.D. in 2010. She then continued her academic career as an NIH NRSA Postdoctoral Fellow at Columbia University between 2010 and 2012 working with Professor Jonathan Owen. Brandi joined the Department of Chemistry at the University of Washington as an Assistant Professor in 2012 and was promoted to Associate Professor with Tenure in 2018. She has received a number of awards for her research including a Sloan Research Fellowship, a Packard Fellowship, an NSF CAREER Award, a Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, and the National Fresenius Award from the American Chemical Society. Outside of the lab Brandi is an Associate Editor at the ACS journal Inorganic Chemistry and is the co-founder of the Chemistry Women Mentorship Network (ChemWMN).

 

We spoke to Professor Cossairt about what attracted her to a career in research and what excites her the most about her own research areas:

 

Insatiable curiosity and a love of mentorship. I never tire of asking new questions and trying to develop strategies to answer them. Getting to share the beauty and excitement of science with the next generation is also extremely fulfilling.

It seems that every year we (the collective we) are able to make new strides in understanding phenomena that were complete black boxes. The level of mechanistic and structural understanding that is emerging in the field of colloidal inorganic nanoscience continues to boggle my mind. I am delighted to be a part of the cohort of scientists that are leading the way in developing predictive design principles for the synthesis of complex inorganic nanostructures.”

 

And when asked what advice she would pass on, she had this advice:

 

“Pursue the science you love. Your excitement will be contagious and will bring others on board.”

 

Previous recipients include Jillian Dempsey, Kit Cummins, John Hartwig, Geoff Coates, Paul Chirik, Dan Mindiola, Teri Odom, Daniel Gamelin, Trevor Hayton, Christine Thomas, Mircea Dinca, and Alison Fout.

An online collection of recent Dalton Transactions papers by recipients of the lecture can be found here.

A doubly deprotonated diimine dioximate metalloligand as a synthon for multimetallic complex assembly

Graphical abstract of Brandi Cossairt’s recent publication in Dalton Transactions.
DOI: 10.1039/C5DT03650J

 

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Meet our new Associate Editor!

We are delighted to be able to introduce Professor Paola Ceroni as the latest member of our Editorial Board and are very happy to be able to welcome Paola to the team, and look forward to working closely with her on shaping the future of Dalton Transactions!
Paola Ceroni is full professor at the University of Bologna. In 1998, she obtained her PhD in the Chemical Sciences at the University of Bologna, after a period in the United States working in Professor Allen J. Bard’s laboratory. Paola was awarded the Semerano prize for her PhD thesis by the Italian Chemical Society. In 2015, she spent three months as a visiting scientist in Professor Vinogradov’s laboratory at the University of Pennsylvania, USA. Her current research is focussed on the photochemistry and electrochemistry of supramolecular systems with particular emphasis towards luminescent nanocrystals.

Her research on luminescent silicon nanocrystals was funded by an ERC Starting Grant PhotoSi (2012-2017) and an ERC Proof of Concept SiNBiosys (2017-2019).

Paola is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry. She is co-author of 190 scientific papers in international peer reviewed journals and of a book entitled: Photochemistry and Photophysics: Concepts, Research, Applications (2014, Wiley-VCH).

As a Dalton Transactions Associate Editor, Paola will be handling submissions in the areas of coordination chemistry, nanoparticles and photoscience.

Paola was also one of the guest editors for the recent Metal complexes and nanoparticles for energy upconversion themed issue published in Dalton Transactions.

Browse a selection of work published by Paola below:

Mechanistic insights into two-photon-driven photocatalysis in organic synthesis
Marianna Marchini, Andrea Gualandi, Luca Mengozzi, Paola Franchi, Marco Lucarini, Pier Giorgio Cozzi, Vincenzo Balzani and Paola Ceroni
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2018, 20, 8071-8076

Rigidification or interaction-induced phosphorescence of organic molecules
Massimo Baroncini, Giacomo Bergamini and Paola Ceroni
Chem. Commun., 2017, 53, 2081-2093

Long-lived luminescence of silicon nanocrystals: from principles to applications
Raffaello Mazzaro, Francesco Romano and Paola Ceroni
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2017, 19, 26507-26526

Photocatalytic ATRA reaction promoted by iodo-Bodipy and sodium ascorbate
G. Magagnano, A. Gualandi, M. Marchini, L. Mengozzi, P. Ceroni and P. G. Cozzi
Chem. Commun., 2017, 53, 1591-1594

NIR-emissive iridium(III) corrole complexes as efficient singlet oxygen sensitizers
Woormileela Sinha, Luca Ravotto, Paola Ceroni and Sanjib Kar
Dalton Trans., 2015, 44, 17767-17773

*Access to these articles is free until 31/08/2018 through a registered RSC account.

Submit your research or reviews to Paola now, she will be delighted to receive them! – see our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

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Outstanding Reviewers for Dalton Transactions in 2017

We are delighted to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Dalton Transactions in 2017, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the quantity, quality and timeliness of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

A big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Dr Ilich Ibarra, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, ORCID: 0000-0002-8573-8033
Dr Ryuta Ishikawa, Fukuoka University, ORCID: 0000-0002-1279-6283
Dr Jason Lynam, University of York
Dr Tatjana Parac-Vogt, KU Leuven, ORCID: 0000-0002-6188-3957
Dr Spyros Perlepes, University of Patras, ORCID: 0000-0002-3378-6228
Dr Dawid Pinkowicz, Jagiellonian University, ORCID: 0000-0002-9958-3116
Dr Fabrice Pointillart, University of Rennes 1, ORCID: 0000-0001-7601-1927
Dr Wei Shi, Nankai University, ORCID: 0000-0001-6130-1227
Dr Stefano Stagni, University of Bologna, ORCID: 0000-0002-7260-4845
Dr Wei-Yin Sun, Nanjing University, ORCID: 0000-0001-8966-9728      

Thank you to the Dalton Transactions board and the Inorganic community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

 

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

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20th North German Doctoral Colloquium 2017

Dalton Transactions awarded Daniel Delony (University Göttingen) and Malte Fischer (University Oldenburg) poster prizes for their work at the 20th North German Doctoral Colloquium 2017 (Norddeutsches Doktoranden kolloquium 2017) which took place in Kiel, Germany from the 21st – 22nd September 2017.

The event aims to promote a productive exchange of ideas through lectures and poster presentations among the doctoral students from the Inorganic Chemistry working groups. Current research such as bioinorganic chemistry, organometallic and inorganic synthesis and catalysis are discussed as well as the fields of inorganic solid-state chemistry and materials science.

Further information about the conference can be found by visiting the webpage.

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A golden future for hydrogen bonding

Two-dimensional contour plot of [Me2Au]− adduct with HCN.

Source: © Royal Society of Chemistry Two-dimensional contour plot of [Me2Au]− adduct with HCN. Red areas identify the stabilising interactions and blue destabilising interactions

Gold has surprised chemists by showing that a formally positively charged Au(I) ion can be a hydrogen bond acceptor.1 This discovery challenges the traditional view that hydrogen bond acceptors are negatively charged.

Catharine Esterhuysen and her colleagues at the University of Stellenbosch, South Africa, used theoretical calculations to study how dimethylaurate interacted with six hydrogen bond donors including HF, HCN and NH3.This study expands their previous work showing that Au(I) can be a hydrogen bond acceptor for water.2 Strong or moderate hydrogen bonds were found for five of the pairs. As expected, the Au(I)···H–X bonds were weaker than those formed with the negative auride ion, but surprisingly the bonds with HF and HCN were more stabilising than their analogues with [(CO)4Co], which contains a negatively charged Co centre.

Interested? The full article can be read in Chemistry World.

The original article can be read below and is free to access until 27th April 2017.

Gold setting the “gold standard” among transition metals as a hydrogen bond acceptor – a theoretical investigation
Ferdinand Groenewald, Helgard G. Raubenheimer, Jan Dillen and Catharine Esterhuysen*
Dalton Trans., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C7DT00329C

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Outstanding Reviewers for Dalton Transactions in 2016

Following the success of Peer Review Week in September 2016 (dedicated to reviewer recognition) during which we published a list of our top reviewers, we are delighted to announce that we will continue to recognise the contribution that our reviewers make to the journal by announcing our Outstanding Reviewers each year.

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Dalton Transactions in 2016, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Marius Andruh, University of Bucharest
Peter Budzelaar, University of Manitoba
Malcolm Halcrow, University of Leeds
Atsushi Kobayashi, Hokkaido University
George Kostakis, University of Sussex
Dong-Sheng Li, China Three Gorges University
Chengyu Mao, University of California at Riverside
Dawid Pinkowicz, Jagiellonian University
Di Sun, Shandong University

We would also like to thank the Dalton Transactions board and the Inorganic community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

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First uranium–rhodium bond shows that shorter is not stronger

Researchers in the UK have made the first two uranium–rhodium complexes and found their uranium–rhodium bonds to be among the shortest heterometallic uranium bonds ever reported.1

Source: © Royal Society of Chemistry The uranium–rhodium distances in these two complexes are among the shortest between f-elements and transition metals reported to date

Building on their recent success forming uranium complexes with nickel, palladium and platinum,2 Polly Arnold’s group at the University of Edinburgh used a carefully designed bidentate phosphinoaryloxide ligand (ArPO) to create two distinct uranium–rhodium complexes: a tetrametallic dimer, [I2U(OArP)2RhI]2, and a monomeric complex with three phosphinoaryloxide ligands and a bridging iodide. Although the two uranium–rhodium bonds are of similar length (2.760Å in the dimeric complex and 2.763Å in the monomeric one), electrochemical studies show that the bond stabilities are very different.

Interested? The full story can be read in Chemistry World.

The original article can be read below and is free to access until 30th March 2017:

Uranium rhodium bonding in heterometallic complexes
J. A. Hlina, J. A. L. Wells, J. R. Pankhurst, Jason B. Love and P. L. Arnold
Dalton Trans., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6DT04570G

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