Archive for the ‘Themed Issue’ Category

PCCP 2020 Emerging Investigators themed collection now online!

We are delighted to announce that the inaugural Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics Emerging Investigators 2020 collection is now online and free to access until the end of February 2021!

The collection brings together excellent research carried out around the world by early career scientists in physical chemistry, chemical physics and biophysical chemistry. As outstanding researchers in the early stages of their independent careers, each contributor was nominated for the PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship and invited to contribute to this themed collection by the Editorial Board.

We congratulate those whose work is featured and hope you enjoy reading their contributions.

Read the full collection online for FREE

It includes:

Profile
Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics profiles: contributors to the Emerging Investigators 2020 issue
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020, 22, 24835-24841. DOI: 10.1039/D0CP90238A

Perspective
Cold and controlled chemical reaction dynamics
Jutta Toscano, H. J. Lewandowski and Brianna R. Heazlewood
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020, 22, 9180-9194. DOI: 10.1039/D0CP00931H

Communication
A rotational study of the AlaAla dipeptide
I. León, E. R. Alonso, S. Mata and  J. L. Alonso
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020, 22, 13867-13871. DOI: 10.1039/D0CP01043J

Paper
A molecular perspective on Tully models for nonadiabatic dynamics
Lea M. Ibele and Basile F. E. Curchod
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020, 22, 15183-15196. DOI: 10.1039/D0CP01353F

Paper
Full triples contribution in coupled-cluster and equation-of-motion coupled-cluster methods for atoms and molecules in strong magnetic fields
Florian Hampe, Niklas Gross and Stella Stopkowicz
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020, 22, 23522-23529. DOI: 10.1039/D0CP04169F

Paper
The one-electron self-interaction error in 74 density functional approximations: a case study on hydrogenic mono- and dinuclear systems
Dale R. Lonsdale and Lars Goerigk
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020, 22, 15805-15830. DOI: 10.1039/D0CP01275K

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Synchrotron Radiation Techniques in Catalytic Science PCCP themed issue now online and free to access

We are delighted to announce that the Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics (PCCP) themed issue Synchrotron Radiation Techniques in Catalytic Science is now online and free to access until the end of November 2020.

Techniques employing Synchrotron Radiation (SR) have had a transformative effect on catalytic science. The unique properties of SR have led to entirely new opportunities in diffraction, spectroscopy, small angle scattering and tomographical studies of catalytic materials. Moreover, SR has been crucial in enabling the growth of in situ experimental studies of catalytic processes under realistic operating conditions. The field impacts on all areas of catalytic science, including heterogeneous, homogeneous, biocatalysis and chemical engineering aspects.

Guest Edited by Professor Richard Catlow, Dr Diego Gianolio and Professor Peter Wells, this themed issue presents a survey of the present state-of-the-art in the field with papers from leading scientists in catalytic science worldwide.

Read the full issue online
It includes:

Editorial
Synchrotron radiation techniques in catalytic science
C. Richard A. Catlow, Peter Wells and Diego Gianolio
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020, 22, 18745-18746. DOI: 10.1039/D0CP90186E

Perspective
Soft XAS as an in situ technique for the study of heterogeneous catalysts
Simon K. Beaumont
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020, 22, 18747-18756. DOI: 10.1039/D0CP00657B

Perspective
Enantiospecificity in achiral zeolites for asymmetric catalysis
Tianxiang Chen, Ching Kit Tommy Wun, Sarah J. Day, Chiu C. Tang and Tsz Woon Benedict Lo
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020, 22, 18757-18764. DOI: 10.1039/D0CP00262C

Communication
Site-dependent selectivity in oxidation reactions on single Pt nanoparticles
Shahar Dery, Suhong Kim, Daniel Feferman, Hillel Mehlman, F. Dean Toste and Elad Gross
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020, 22, 18765-18769. DOI: 10.1039/D0CP00642D

Communication
In situ XAFS of acid-resilient iridate pyrochlore oxygen evolution electrocatalysts under operating conditions
David L. Burnett, Enrico Petrucco, Andrea E. Russell, Reza J. Kashtiban, Jonathan D. B Sharman and Richard I. Walton
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020, 22, 18770-18773. DOI: 10.1039/D0CP01378A

Paper
The electronic structure, surface properties, and in situ N2O decomposition of mechanochemically synthesised LaMnO3
Rachel H. Blackmore, Maria Elena Rivas, George F. Tierney, Khaled M. H. Mohammed, Donato Decarolis, Shusaku Hayama, Federica Venturini, Georg Held, Rosa Arrigo, Monica Amboage, Pip Hellier, Evan Lynch, Mahrez Amri, Marianna Casavola, Tugce Eralp Erden, Paul Collier and Peter P. Wells
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020, 22, 18774-18787. DOI: 10.1039/D0CP00793E

Paper
Elucidating the mechanism of the CO2 methanation reaction over Ni–Fe hydrotalcite-derived catalysts via surface-sensitive in situ XPS and NEXAFS
Gianfranco Giorgianni, Chalachew Mebrahtu, Manfred Erwin Schuster, Alexander Ian Large, Georg Held, Pilar Ferrer, Federica Venturini, David Grinter, Regina Palkovits, Siglinda Perathoner, Gabriele Centi, Salvatore Abate and Rosa Arrigo
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020, 22, 18788-18797. DOI: 10.1039/D0CP00622J

Paper
CuO/La0.5Sr0.5CoO3: precursor of efficient NO reduction catalyst studied by operando high energy X-ray diffraction under three-way catalytic conditions
Ivo Alxneit, Alberto Garbujo, Giovanni Carollo, Davide Ferri and Antonella Glisenti
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020, 22, 18798-18805. DOI: 10.1039/D0CP01064B

Paper
Identifying the catalyst chemical state and adsorbed species during methanol conversion on copper using ambient pressure X-ray spectroscopies
Baran Eren, Christopher G. Sole, Jesús S. Lacasa, David Grinter, Federica Venturini, Georg Held, Cruz S. Esconjauregui and Robert S. Weatherup
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020, 22, 18806-18814. DOI: 10.1039/D0CP00347F

Paper
Model building analysis – a novel method for statistical evaluation of Pt L3-edge EXAFS data to unravel the structure of Pt-alloy nanoparticles for the oxygen reduction reaction on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite
Felix E. Feiten, Shuntaro Takahashi, Oki Sekizawa, Yuki Wakisaka, Tomohiro Sakata, Naoto Todoroki, Tomoya Uruga, Toshimasa Wadayama, Yasuhiro Iwasawa and Kiyotaka Asakura
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020, 22, 18815-18823. DOI: 10.1039/C9CP06891K

We hope you enjoy reading the articles. Please get in touch if you have any questions about this themed collection or PCCP.

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ANNOUNCEMENT: Deadline extension for the Quantum Computing and Quantum Information Storage themed collection

Due to the significant challenges being caused by the COVID-19 pandemic we would like to inform you that we are extending the submission deadline for the themed collection – the new deadline for submissions is 31 August 2020.

When you are ready to do so you can submit your article through our online system and indicate where requested that your manuscript is for the Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics (PCCP) themed collection on Quantum Computing and Quantum Information Storage, with Guest Editors:

John Doyle
Harvard University, USA
Anna Krylov (Associate Editor, PCCP)
University of Southern California, USA
Kang-Kuen Ni
Harvard University, USA

 

Quantum computing and information storage promise to revolutionize our information technology. Some basic theory of quantum computing has been established over the past two decades and researchers are on the cusp of quantum supremacy for truly useful systems. Yet, for quantum computing to become a reality we need to find a practical physical platform for realizing qubits with enough fidelity and depth to solve important problems. At present it is not clear what platform will succeed at this.

Molecules are a relative newcomer to the field (apart from the initial molecular NMR qubits that energized the field), but the power of such systems is easy to recognize with a myriad of internal quantum states and dipole coupling for quantum processing. The key goals are the ability to prepare, control, manipulate, and interrogate specific quantum states of interacting qubits, control their interactions and thus program an array of qubits. The current status quo in this field is reminiscent of the dawn of the first quantum revolution (which brought us GPS, MRI, and other amazing technologies): fundamental physics tells us that there are grounds for a powerful and transformative technology and informs us of what needs to be done to realize it, but the actual work and, consequently, the success of the entire endeavour is in the hands of scientists, who must find the right platform for qubits and the right physical tools to control them.

This topical collection will highlight physical chemistry/chemical physics aspects of quantum computing and quantum information storage and will welcome contributions from experimental and theoretical communities working on atomic, molecular, and optical aspects of emerging quantum information technology. Contributions focusing on application of quantum computing to physical problems are also welcome.

We welcome contributions of articles for this the collection including Communications, Full Papers and Perspectives. Please see our Author Guidelines for further information.

If you are interested in submitting a manuscript but are facing issues with the deadline or other aspects of the publishing process due to COVID-19, please get in touch to discuss options with the Editorial Office.

Deadline for submissions: 31 August 2020

Articles can be submitted via our website: mc.manuscriptcentral.com/pccp. Please mention on submission that your manuscript is intended for this themed collection.

All articles will be subject to our fair and impartial peer-review process in the normal way. Accepted articles will be published online in a citeable form as soon as they are ready.

Please contact the Editorial Office with any questions you may have.

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Open for Nominations: 2021 PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship and Themed Issue

PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship

Lectureship and Themed Issue details

Recognising and supporting the significant contribution of early career researchers in physical chemistry, chemical physics and biophysical chemistry, the lectureship is a platform for early career physical chemists to showcase their research to the wider scientific community.

The lectureship recipient will receive £1000 to cover travel and accommodation costs to attend and present at a leading international meeting in 2021. The recipient will also be invited to contribute a Perspective article to PCCP. In addition, selected nominees will be invited to submit to the PCCP Emerging Investigator Themed Issue. You can read the inaugural 2020 Emerging Investigator Themed Issue here.

Eligibility
To be eligible for the lectureship and themed issue, candidates must:
•    Have completed their PhD 
•    Be actively pursuing an independent research career within physical chemistry, chemical physics or biophysical chemistry.
•    Be at an early stage of their independent career (typically this will be within 10 years of completing their PhD, but appropriate consideration will be given to those who have taken a career break or followed a different study path).

Selection criteria, nomination and judging process
•    Nominations must be made via email to pccp-rsc@rsc.org using the PCCP Emerging Investigator nomination form and a letter of recommendation.
•    Nominators may only nominate one candidate for consideration per year.
•    Individuals cannot nominate themselves for consideration.
•    Selection will be made by the PCCP Editorial Board. The Lectureship winner will be selected in quarter four of 2020 and announced before the end of the year.
•    The Lectureship winner will be selected based on their nomination, with due consideration given to the letter of recommendation, candidate biography, research achievements, previous PCCP publications and overall publication history.
•    Selected shortlisted nominees, as chosen by the PCCP Editorial Board, will be invited to submit to the 2021 PCCP Emerging Investigator Themed Issue following the Lectureship winner selection.

Submit a nomination
To be considered for the 2021 Lectureship and Themed Issue, the following must be sent to the Editorial Office
•    A letter of recommendation
•    A complete nomination form 

Submission deadline: 14 September 2020

 

Download nomination form 

Submit nomination with letter of recommendation

 

Find out more about our previous winner’s: 

Dr Federico Calle-Vallejo, University of Barcelona (2019 winner)
Professor Debashree Ghosh, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science (2018 winner)
Professor Ryan P. Steele, University of Utah (2017 winner) 
Dr David Glowacki, University of Bristol (2016 winner)
Read a selection of their work in the PCCP Emerging Investigator Lectureship Winners Collection.

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Submissions still welcome to the Quantum Computing and Quantum Information Storage themed collection

The submission deadline is fast approaching for the Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics (PCCP) Themed Collection on Quantum Computing and Quantum Information Storage, with Guest Editors:

John Doyle
Harvard University, USA
Anna Krylov (Associate Editor, PCCP)
University of Southern California, USA
Kang-Kuen Ni
Harvard University, USA

Quantum computing and information storage promise to revolutionize our information technology. Some basic theory of quantum computing has been established over the past two decades and researchers are on the cusp of quantum supremacy for truly useful systems. Yet, for quantum computing to become a reality we need to find a practical physical platform for realizing qubits with enough fidelity and depth to solve important problems. At present it is not clear what platform will succeed at this.

Molecules are a relative newcomer to the field (apart from the initial molecular NMR qubits that energized the field), but the power of such systems is easy to recognize with a myriad of internal quantum states and dipole coupling for quantum processing. The key goals are the ability to prepare, control, manipulate, and interrogate specific quantum states of interacting qubits, control their interactions and thus program an array of qubits. The current status quo in this field is reminiscent of the dawn of the first quantum revolution (which brought us GPS, MRI, and other amazing technologies): fundamental physics tells us that there are grounds for a powerful and transformative technology and informs us of what needs to be done to realize it, but the actual work and, consequently, the success of the entire endeavour is in the hands of scientists, who must find the right platform for qubits and the right physical tools to control them.

This topical collection will highlight physical chemistry/chemical physics aspects of quantum computing and quantum information storage and will welcome contributions from experimental and theoretical communities working on atomic, molecular, and optical aspects of emerging quantum information technology. Contributions focusing on application of quantum computing to physical problems are also welcome.

We welcome contributions of articles for this the collection including Communications, Full Papers and Perspectives. Please see our Author Guidelines for further information.

If you are interested in submitting a manuscript but are facing issues with the deadline or other aspects of the publishing process due to COVID-19, please get in touch to discuss options with the Editorial Office.

Deadline for submissions: 30 July 2020

Articles can be submitted via our website: mc.manuscriptcentral.com/pccp. Please mention on submission that your manuscript is intended for this themed collection.

All articles will be subject to our fair and impartial peer-review process in the normal way. Accepted articles will be published online in a citeable form as soon as they are ready.

Please contact the Editorial Office with any questions you may have.

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Frontiers in molecular simulation of solvated ions, molecules and interfaces PCCP themed issue now online and free to access

We are delighted to announce that the Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics (PCCP) themed issue Frontiers in molecular simulation of solvated ions, molecules and interfaces is now online and articles in the collection are free to access until the end of August 2020.

Predictive molecular simulation of condensed matter at finite temperature has come a long way from the first practical implementations of ab-initio or Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics thirty years ago.

Guest Edited by Professor Jochen Blumberger, Professor Marie-Pierre Gaigeot, Professor Marialore Sulpizi and Professor Rodolphe Vuilleumier, this themed issue provides a representative snapshot of latest and upcoming techniques and their applications at the forefront of this research area with a specific focus on the simulation of solvated ions, molecules and interfaces.

Read the collection online
It includes:

Editorial
Frontiers in molecular simulation of solvated ions, molecules and interfaces
Jochen Blumberger, Marie-Pierre Gaigeot, Marialore Sulpizi and Rodolphe Vuilleumier
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020, 22, 10393-10396. DOI: 10.1039/D0CP90091E

Perspective
Tumbling with a limp: local asymmetry in water’s hydrogen bond network and its consequences
Hossam Elgabarty and Thomas D. Kühne
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020, 22, 10397-10411. DOI: 10.1039/C9CP06960G

Perspective
DFT modelling of explicit solid–solid interfaces in batteries: methods and challenges
Kevin Leung
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020, 22, 10412-10425. DOI: 10.1039/C9CP06485K

Communication
Temperature effects on the ionic conductivity in concentrated alkaline electrolyte solutions
Yunqi Shao, Matti Hellström, Are Yllö, Jonas Mindemark, Kersti Hermansson, Jörg Behler and Chao Zhang
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020, 22, 10426-10430. DOI: 10.1039/C9CP06479F

Paper
Benchmark and performance of long-range corrected time-dependent density functional tight binding (LC-TD-DFTB) on rhodopsins and light-harvesting complexes
Beatrix M. Bold, Monja Sokolov, Sayan Maity, Marius Wanko, Philipp M. Dohmen, Julian J. Kranz, Ulrich Kleinekathöfer, Sebastian Höfener and Marcus Elstner
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020, 22, 10500-10518. DOI: 10.1039/C9CP05753F

Paper
Raman spectrum and polarizability of liquid water from deep neural networks
Grace M. Sommers, Marcos F. Calegari Andrade, Linfeng Zhang, Han Wang and Roberto Car
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020, 22, 10592-10602. DOI: 10.1039/D0CP01893G

We hope you enjoy reading the articles. Please get in touch if you have any questions about this themed issue of PCCP.

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Announcing Quantum Computing and Quantum Information Storage themed collection

We are excited to announce an upcoming themed collection in Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics (PCCP) on Quantum Computing and Quantum Information Storage with Guest Editors

John Doyle
Harvard University, USA
Anna Krylov (Associate Editor, PCCP)
University of Southern California, USA
Kang-Kuen Ni
Harvard University, USA

Quantum computing and information storage promise to revolutionize our information technology. Some basic theory of quantum computing has been established over the past two decades and researchers are on the cusp of quantum supremacy for truly useful systems. Yet, for quantum computing to become a reality we need to find a practical physical platform for realizing qubits with enough fidelity and depth to solve important problems. At present it is not clear what platform will succeed at this.

Molecules are a relative newcomer to the field (apart from the initial molecular NMR qubits that energized the field), but the power of such systems is easy to recognize with a myriad of internal quantum states and dipole coupling for quantum processing. The key goals are the ability to prepare, control, manipulate, and interrogate specific quantum states of interacting qubits, control their interactions and thus program an array of qubits. The current status quo in this field is reminiscent of the dawn of the first quantum revolution (which brought us GPS, MRI, and other amazing technologies): fundamental physics tells us that there are grounds for a powerful and transformative technology and informs us of what needs to be done to realize it, but the actual work and, consequently, the success of the entire endeavour is in the hands of scientists, who must find the right platform for qubits and the right physical tools to control them.

This topical collection will highlight physical chemistry/chemical physics aspects of quantum computing and quantum information storage and will welcome contributions from experimental and theoretical communities working on atomic, molecular, and optical aspects of emerging quantum information technology. Contributions focusing on application of quantum computing to physical problems are also welcome.

We welcome contributions of articles for this the collection including Communications, Full Papers and Perspectives. Please see our Author Guidelines for further information.

Deadline for submissions: 30 July 2020

Articles can be submitted via our website: mc.manuscriptcentral.com/pccp. Please mention on submission that your manuscript is intended for this themed collection.

All articles will be subject to our fair and impartial peer-review process in the normal way. Accepted articles will be published online in a citeable form as soon as they are ready.

Please contact the Editorial Office with any questions you may have.

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XFELs: cutting edge X-ray light for chemical and material sciences PCCP themed issue now online and free to access

We are delighted to announce that the Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics (PCCP) themed issue XFELs: cutting edge X-ray light for chemical and material sciences is now online and free to access until the end of May 2020.

XFELs (X-ray free electron lasers) provide a coherent, monochromatic and ultra-short pulse X-ray light. This enables experiments into the ultrafast dynamics of electron excitation and chemical reactions, and coherent imaging of materials.

Guest Edited by Professor Kiyotaka Asakura, Professor Kelly Gaffney,Dr Chris Milne and Dr Makina Yabashi, this collection reviews the very recent achievements of XFELs in chemical and material sciences.

Read the full issue online
It includes:

Editorial
XFELs: cutting edge X-ray light for chemical and material sciences
Kiyotaka Asakura, Kelly J. Gaffney, Christopher Milne and Makina Yabashi
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020, 22, 2612-2614. DOI: 10.1039/C9CP90304F

Paper
Direct observation of the electronic states of photoexcited hematite with ultrafast 2p3d X-ray absorption spectroscopy and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering
Ahmed S. M. Ismail, Yohei Uemura, Sang Han Park, Soonnam Kwon, Minseok Kim, Hebatalla Elnaggar, Federica Frati, Yasuhiro Niwa, Hiroki Wadati, Yasuyuki Hirata, Yujun Zhang, Kohei Yamagami, Susumu Yamamoto, Iwao Matsuda, Ufuk Halisdemir, Gertjan Koster, Bert M. Weckhuysen and Frank M. F. de Groot
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020, 22, 2685-2692. DOI: 10.1039/C9CP03374B

Paper
Resolving structures of transition metal complex reaction intermediates with femtosecond EXAFS
Alexander Britz, Baxter Abraham, Elisa Biasin, Tim Brandt van Driel, Alessandro Gallo, Angel T. Garcia-Esparza, James Glownia, Anton Loukianov, Silke Nelson, Marco Reinhard, Dimosthenis Sokaras and Roberto Alonso-Mori
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020, 22, 2685-2692. DOI: 10.1039/C9CP03374B

Paper
Design of a liquid cell toward three-dimensional imaging of unidirectionally-aligned particles in solution using X-ray free-electron lasers
Akihiro Suzuki, Takashi Kimura, Ying Yang, Yoshiya Niida, Akiko Nishioka, Tatsuro Tachibana, Masashi Takei, Kensuke Tono, Makina Yabashi, Tetsuya Ishikawa, Tairo Oshima, Yoshitaka Bessho, Yasumasa Joti and Yoshinori Nishino
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020, 22, 2622-2628. DOI: 10.1039/C9CP03658J

Paper
Core–valence-separated coupled-cluster-singles-and-doubles complex-polarization-propagator approach to X-ray spectroscopies
Rasmus Faber and Sonia Coriani
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2020, 22, 2642-2647. DOI: 10.1039/C9CP03696B

We hope you enjoy reading the articles. Please get in touch if you have any questions about this themed collection or PCCP.

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Photodissociation and reaction dynamics PCCP themed collection now online and free to access

We are delighted to announce that the Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics (PCCP) themed collection Photodissociation and reaction dynamics is now online and free to access until 1 October 2019.

Guest-edited by Andrew Orr-Ewing (University of Bristol), this themed issue highlights the latest research in the fundamental mechanisms of photochemical and chemical reactions in the gas and liquid phases, featuring both experimental and theoretical studies.

Read the full collection online

It includes:

Editorial
Photodissociation and reaction dynamics
Andrew J. Orr-Ewing
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2019, 21, 13878-13879. DOI: 10.1039/C9CP90164G

Perspective
Photoinduced C–H bond fission in prototypical organic molecules and radicals
Michael N. R. Ashfold, Rebecca A. Ingle, Tolga N. V. Karsili and Jingsong Zhang
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2019, 21, 13880-13901. DOI: 10.1039/C8CP07454B

Communication
Probing ultrafast dynamics during and after passing through conical intersections
Shunsuke Adachi, Tom Schatteburg, Alexander Humeniuk, Roland Mitrić and Toshinori Suzuki
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2019, 21, 13902-13905. DOI: 10.1039/C8CP04426K

Paper
Isotope-selective chemistry in the Be+(2S1/2) + HOD → BeOD+/BeOH+ + H/D reaction
Gary K. Chen, Changjian Xie, Tiangang Yang, Anyang Li, Arthur G. Suits, Eric R. Hudson, Wesley C. Campbell and Hua Guo
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2019, 21, 14005-14011. DOI: 10.1039/C8CP06690F

Paper
How reactant polarization can be used to change the effect of interference on reactive collisions
P. G. Jambrina, M. Menéndez, A. Zanchet, E. García and F. J. Aoiz
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2019, 21, 14012-14022. DOI: 10.1039/C8CP06892E

Paper
Competition between folded and extended structures of alanylalanine (Ala-Ala) in a molecular beam
Vasyl Yatsyna, Ranim Mallat, Tim Gorn, Michael Schmitt, Raimund Feifel, Anouk M. Rijs and Vitali Zhaunerchyk
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2019, 21, 14126-14132. DOI: 10.1039/C9CP00140A

We hope you enjoy reading the articles. Please get in touch (pccp-rsc (at) rsc.org) if you have any questions about this themed collection or PCCP.

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Official themed issue of the Bunsentagung 2019 meeting now online and free to access!

The Deutsche Bunsen-Gesellschaft and Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics (PCCP) are delighted to announce that the official themed issue of the Bunsentagung 2019 meeting is now online.

Functional materials form the core of many modern technologies, e.g. in energy conversion and storage, heterogeneous catalysis, drug delivery, implants, biosensors and optical devices. The challenges in the design and characterization of modern materials are diverse and interdisciplinary. They require joint research across scientific boundaries. The most challenging tasks range from the synthesis of materials, the developments of novel experimental characterization tools and theoretical methods for atomistic description of material properties, in silico material screening for tailoring the interaction of materials with their environment and device engineering. Physical chemistry is a key scientific discipline for successful achievement of these tasks.

The issue is guest-edited by Benjamin Dietzek (Jena University), Leticia Gonzalez (University of Vienna), Christina Roth Free (University of Berlin), Sebastian Schlücker (University of Duisburg-Essen), Andrey Turchanin (Jena University), Dr Maria Wächtler (Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Jena).

Read the official full collection online free until 31 August 2019.

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