Archive for the ‘Editor’s choice’ Category

Computer Aided Solid Form Design

CrystEngComm

Following the Editor’s collection on Computer Aided Solid Form Design published in 2020, we are delighted to share with you a further, recently commissioned collection of articles also focusing on Computer Aided Solid Form Design, again guest edited by Editorial Board Member Susan Reutzel-Edens, The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre, UK.

These articles are free to access until February 28th 2022 and we hope you enjoy reading them.

Selected articles:

Crystal structure prediction of energetic materials and a twisted arene with Genarris and GAtor
Imanuel Bier, Dana O’Connor, Yun-Ting Hsieh, Wen Wen, Anna M. Hiszpanski, T. Yong-Jin Han and Noa Marom
CrystEngComm, 2021, 23, 6023-6038. DOI: 10.1039/ D1CE00745A

First global analysis of the GSK database of small molecule crystal structures
Leen N. Kalash, Jason C. Cole, Royston C. B. Copley, Colin M. Edge, Alexandru A. Moldovan, Ghazala Sadiq and Cheryl L. Doherty
CrystEngComm, 2021, 23, 5430-5442. DOI: 10.1039/ D1CE00665G

The trimorphism of 3-hydroxybenzoic acid: an experimental and computational study
Doris E. Braun
CrystEngComm, 2021, 23, 2513-2519. DOI: 10.1039/ D1CE00159K

Read the full collection here

Meet the Editor

Susan Reutzel-Edens. Royal Society of Chemistry, CrystEngComm Editorial Board MemberSusan Reutzel-Edens was a senior research advisor in Small Molecule Design & Development at Eli Lilly and Company and adjunct professor at Purdue University. She earned her PhD at the University of Minnesota (1991) under the direction of the late Professor Margaret C. Etter. After, she joined Eli Lilly where she founded the solid form design programme. In 2021, she joined the CCDC as Head of Science.
For two decades she led a team of cross-functional scientists charged with finding commercially-viable crystalline forms for small-molecule drug products. She has contributed to the development of more than 150 compounds, is a named inventor on 12 US patents, and has published over 50 papers and book chapters on key aspects of solid form development.
Susan’s research interests include crystal polymorphism, materials design and engineering, crystal nucleation and growth, structure-property relationships, crystal structure prediction and digital design of drug products. She was elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry in 2018 and currently serves on the CrystEngComm Editorial Board. She is a member of the Editorial Advisory Board of Crystal Growth & Design and Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences.

 

About CrystEngComm

Published by the Royal Society of Chemistry and with a truly international Editorial Board, CrystEngComm is the forum for the design and understanding of crystalline materials. We welcome studies on the investigation of molecular behaviour within crystals, control of nucleation and crystal growth, engineering of crystal structures, and construction of crystalline materials with tuneable properties and functions.

We invite you to submit your research to CrystEngComm and give your work the global visibility it deserves.

Submit your research now

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Editor’s Collection: Rare Earth Materials

CrystEngComm

We are delighted to share with you our latest collection of recently published articles focusing on Rare Earth Materials handpicked by Associate Editor, Dongfeng Xue, Multiscale Crystal Materials Research Center, Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology, CAS, China

Rare earth materials play a key role in many practical applications such as catalysts, lasers, luminescence, magnetism, and sensors, which are of great interest to the community. Crystallisation involves two continuous stages (including nucleation and crystal growth) when preparing rare earth materials, therefore, crystal engineering strategies may stimulate much more innovative ideas when using rare earth elements as powerful functional sources or modifiers in the scale of the whole system. Rare earth elements have f-orbitals and f-electrons that possess specific coordination abilities with a wide range of coordination numbers from 2 to 16, which provide many opportunities to create novel structures and functions.

These articles are all free to access until January 31st, 2022 and we hope you enjoy reading them.

We also invite you to submit your research to CrystEngComm to give your work the global visibility it deserves.

Submit your research now

Selected articles:

Trends in rare earth thiophosphate syntheses: Rb3Ln(PS4)2 (Ln = La, Ce, Pr), Rb3−xNaxLn(PS4)2 (Ln = Ce, Pr; x = 0.50, 0.55), and RbEuPS4 obtained by molten flux crystal growth

Logan S. Breton, Mark D. Smith and Hans-Conrad zur Loye

CrystEngComm
, 2021, 23, 5241-5248

From [B6O13]8− to [GaB5O13]8− to [Ga{B5O9(OH)}{BO(OH)2}]2−: synthesis, structure and nonlinear optical properties of new metal borates

Qi-Ming Qiu and Guo-Yu Yang

CrystEngComm
, 2021, 23, 5200-5207

Bridgman growth and characterization of a HoCa4O(BO3)3 crystal

Xinchao He, Zhigang Sun, Xiaoniu Tu, Sheng Wang, Kainan Xiong, Hongbing Chen, Xiaoyan Zhang, Liming Shen and Yanqing Zheng

CrystEngComm, 2021, 23, 4833-4839

Read the full collection here

Meet the Editor

Dongfeng Xue is a Professor at the Multiscale Crystal Materials Research Center, Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China. He received his PhD in inorganic chemistry at Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, CAS, in 1998. Following postdoctoral studies at the Universität Osnabrück, University of Ottawa and the National Institute for Materials Science in Tsukuba, he was promoted to full professor in 2001 at Dalian University of Technology, China. In 2011, he returned to Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry to assume his professorship in materials chemistry, as the director of State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization during 2015-2019. In 2020, he moved to Shandong University as the director of State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials. In 2021, he created Multiscale Crystal Materials Research Center at Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology. His research interests focus on multiscale crystallization of inorganic matter for energy and optical applications. He has published more than 500 papers and book chapters, and holds around 20 patents. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry, a Corresponding Member of the European Academy of Arts, Sciences and Humanities (EAASH, Paris).

About CrystEngComm

Published by the Royal Society of Chemistry and with a truly international Editorial Board, CrystEngComm is the forum for the design and understanding of crystalline materials. We welcome studies on the investigation of molecular behaviour within crystals, control of nucleation and crystal growth, engineering of crystal structures, and construction of crystalline materials with tuneable properties and functions.

To keep up to date with the latest articles and other journal news, sign up to the e-alerts.

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Read our Editors’ Collection: Bioapplications of MOFs

We are delighted to share with you our latest collection of recently published articles focusing on Bioapplications of MOFs, handpicked by Associate Editor, Professor Christian Doonan, The University of Adelaide, Australia.

All of these articles are free to access until March 31st, 2021 and we hope you enjoy reading them.

We are pleased to invite you to submit your research to CrystEngComm and give your work the global visibility it deserves.

Submit your research now

Selected articles:

Mechanochemical approaches towards the in situ confinement of 5-FU anti-cancer drug within MIL-100 (Fe) metal–organic framework
Barbara E. Souza and Jin-Chong Tan
CrystEngComm, 2020,22, 4526-4530

Fabrication of a dual-emitting RhB@Zn-1 composite as a recyclable luminescent sensor for sensitive detection of nitrofuran antibiotics
Qian-Qian Tu, Ling-Ling Ren, Ai-Ling Cheng and  En-Qing Gao
CrystEngComm, 2021,23, 629-637

Synthesis of fluorescent MOFs: live-cell imaging and sensing of a herbicide
Aurobinda Mohanty, Udai P. Singh, R. J. Butcher, Neeladrisingha Das and  Partha Roy
CrystEngComm, 2020,22, 4468-4477

Read the full collection here

Meet the Editor

Christian Doonan is Professor of chemistry at the University of Adelaide. He received his PhD at the University of Melbourne and carried out post-doctoral work with Professor Omar Yaghi at the University of California, Los Angeles. His research group focuses on the design and synthesis of Metal-organic Framework materials for application to biotechnology and catalysis.

Christian is a member of the international MOF commission and his research has been recognised through several awards including, an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship, a distinguished lectureship award from the Chemical Society of Japan and a Double Hundred Talent Professorship at Qingdao University.

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Read our Editors’ Collection: MOF based catalysts for water splitting and CO2 reduction

We are delighted to share with you our latest collection of recently published articles focusing on Metal Organic Framework based catalysts for water splitting and CO2 reduction, handpicked by Editorial Board Member Professor Tong-Bu Lu, Tianjin University of Technology, China.

All of these articles are free to access until December 31st, 2020 and we hope you enjoy reading them.

We are pleased to invite you to submit your research to CrystEngComm and give your work the global visibility it deserves.

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Selected articles:

Covalently anchoring cobalt phthalocyanine on zeolitic imidazolate frameworks for efficient carbon dioxide electroreduction
Zhongjie Yang, Xiaofei Zhang, Chang Long, Shuhao Yan, Yanan Shi, Jianyu Han, Jing Zhang, Pengfei An, Lin Chang and Zhiyong Tang
CrystEngComm, 2020, 22, 1619-1624.

Polymorphs of a copper coordination compound: interlinking active sites enhance the electrocatalytic activity of the coordination polymer compared to the coordination complex
Pandi Muthukumar, Mehboobali Pannipara, Abdullah G. Al-Sehemi, Dohyun Moon and Savarimuthu Philip Anthony
CrystEngComm, 2020, 22, 425-429.

Understanding metal–organic frameworks for photocatalytic solar fuel production
J. G. Santaclara, F. Kapteijn, J. Gascon and M. A. van der Veen
CrystEngComm, 2017, 19, 4118-4125.

Read the full collection here

Meet the Editor

Tong-Bu Lu was born in 1964. He graduated in Chemistry from Lanzhou University in 1993, and then moved to Sun Yat-Sen University as a Postdoc. joining the Faculty and then becoming Professor of Chemistry in 2000. He moved to Tianjing University of Technology in 2016. He worked as a postdoc. in F. Albert Cotton’s group at Texas A&M University in 1998 and 2002. His research interests focus on crystal engineering, including macrocyclic chemistry, MOFs and pharmaceutical polymorphs and co-crystals. He currently focuses on the study on homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts for water splitting and CO2 reduction. He obtained the National Natural Science Foundation for Distinguished Youth Scholar award in 2006. He has over 200 scientific publications and an h-index of 43. He is currently a fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry (FRSC), is on the Editorial Board of CrystEngComm, the Editorial Advisory Board of Current Green Chemistry and Current Pharmaceutical Design and is a co-editor of Acta Crystallographica Section C.

 

 

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Read Our Editor’s Collection: Zirconium based MOFs for catalysis

We are delighted to share with you our latest collection of recently published articles focusing on Zirconium based MOFs for catalysis, handpicked by Editorial Board Member Omar K. Farha, Northwestern University, USA.

These articles are free to access until September 30th, 2020 and we hope you enjoy reading them.

We are very pleased to invite you to submit your research to CrystEngComm and give your work the global visibility it deserves.

Submit your research now

Selected articles:

Single crystal structure and photocatalytic behavior of grafted uranyl on the Zr-node of a pyrene-based metal–organic framework
Julia G. Knapp, Xuan Zhang, Tatyana Elkin, Laura E. Wolfsberg, Sylvia L. Hanna, Florencia A. Son, Brian L. Scott and Omar K. Farha
CrystEngComm, 2020, 22, 2097-2102

Ferrocenecarboxylic acid: a functional modulator for UiO-66 synthesis and incorporation of Pd nanoparticles
Zheng Deng, Xinsheng Peng and Yu-Jia Zeng
CrystEngComm, 2019, 21, 1772-1779

Synthesis, characterization, and post-synthetic modification of a micro/mesoporous zirconium–tricarboxylate metal–organic framework: towards the addition of acid active sites
Carolina Ardila-Suárez, Ana M. Díaz-Lasprilla, Laura A. Díaz-Vaca, Perla B. Balbuena, Víctor G. Baldovino-Medrano and Gustavo E. Ramírez-Caballero
CrystEngComm, 2019, 21, 3014-3030

Read the full collection here

Meet the Editor

Omar K. Farha is an associate professor of chemistry at Northwestern University, Distinguished Adjunct Professor at King Abdulaziz University, president of NuMat Technologies, and Associate Editor for ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces. His research accomplishments have been recognized by several awards and honours including the Royal Society of Chemistry “Environment, Sustainability and Energy Division Early Career” Award; the American Chemical society “The Satinder Ahuja Award for Young Investigators in Separation Science; and an award established by the Department of Chemistry at Northwestern University in his honour: the Omar Farha Award for Research Leadership “awarded for stewardship, cooperation and leadership in the finest pursuit of research in chemistry” and given annually to an outstanding research scientist working in the department. His current research spans diverse areas of chemistry and materials science ranging from energy to defence related challenges. Specifically, his research focuses on the rational design of metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) and porous-organic polymers for sensing, catalysis, storage, separations and light harvesting. Professor Farha has more than 300 peer-reviewed publications, holds 13 patents, and has been named a “Highly Cited Researcher” by Thomson Reuters in 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017.

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Read our Editors’ Collection: Computer Aided Solid Form Design

We are delighted to share with you our latest collection of recently published articles focusing on Computer Aided Solid Form Design, handpicked by Editorial Board Member Susan Reutzel-Edens, Eli Lilly and Company.

These articles are free to access until July 31st 2020 and we hope you enjoy reading them.

We invite you to submit your research to CrystEngComm and give your work the global visibility it deserves.

Submit your research now

Selected articles:

Naphthalene crystal shape prediction from molecular dynamics simulations
Zoran Bjelobrk, Pablo M. Piaggi, Thilo Weber, Tarak Karmakar, Marco Mazzotti and Michele Parrinello
CrystEngComm, 2019, 21, 3280-3288.
DOI: 10.1039/C9CE00380K

Crystal-energy landscapes of active pharmaceutical ingredients using composite approaches
Luc M. LeBlanc and Erin R. Johnson
CrystEngComm, 2019, 21, 5995-6009.
DOI: 10.1039/C9CE00895K

Cocrystal design by network-based link prediction
Jan-Joris Devogelaer, Sander J. T. Brugman, Hugo Meekes, Paul Tinnemans, Elias Vlieg and René de Gelder
CrystEngComm, 2019, 21, 6875-6885.
DOI: 10.1039/C9CE01110B

Read the full collection here

Meet the Editor

Susan Reutzel-Edens. Royal Society of Chemistry, CrystEngComm Editorial Board Member

Susan Reutzel-Edens is a senior research advisor in Small Molecule Design & Development at Eli Lilly and Company and adjunct professor at Purdue University. After earning her PhD at the University of Minnesota (1991) under the direction of the late Professor Margaret C. Etter, she joined Eli Lilly, where she founded the solid form design programme and for two decades led a team of cross-functional scientists charged with finding commercially-viable crystalline forms for small-molecule drug products. She has contributed to the development of more than 150 compounds, is a named inventor on 12 US patents, and has published over 50 papers and book chapters on key aspects of solid form development. Her research interests include crystal polymorphism, materials design and engineering, crystal nucleation and growth, structure-property relationships, crystal structure prediction and digital design of drug products. She was elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry in 2018, and currently serves on the CrystEngComm Editorial Board, as a topic editor for Crystal Growth and Design, and is a member of the Editorial Advisory Board of Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences and the Scientific Advisory Board of the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre.

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Read our Editor’s Collection on Mechanochemistry by Elena Boldyreva

We are delighted to share with you our latest collection of recently published articles focusing on Mechanochemistry, handpicked by Editorial Board Member Elena Boldyreva.

These articles are free to access until April 13th 2020 and we hope you enjoy reading them.

We invite you to submit your research to CrystEngComm and give your work the global visibility it deserves.

Submit your research now

Selected articles:

Dynamic behaviour in nonporous hybrid metal–organic materials via mechanochemical and gas–solid reactions
Fang Guo, Hao-Cheng Wang, Antonino Famulari, Hai-Dong Lu and Javier Martí-Rujas
CrystEngComm, 2018, 20, 6721-6726. DOI: 10.1039/C8CE01287C

On the kinetics of solvate formation through mechanochemistry
Dritan Hasa, Mariana Pastore, Mihails Arhangelskis, Benjamin Gabriele, Aurora J. Cruz-Cabeza, Gabriela Schneider Rauber, Andrew D. Bond and William Jones
CrystEngComm, 2019, 21, 2097-2104. DOI: 10.1039/C8CE00871J

Cocrystal formation by ionic liquid-assisted grinding: case study with cocrystals of caffeine
Arijit Mukherjee, Robin D. Rogers and A. S. Myerson
CrystEngComm, 2018, 20, 3817-3821. DOI: 10.1039/C8CE00859K

Read the full collection here

Meet the Editor

Professor Elena Boldyreva, CrystEngComm Editorial Board MemberEditorial Board Member Professor Dr Elena Boldyreva is currently employed by Boreskov Institute of Catalysis Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences and is the Head of the Chair of Solid State Chemistry of the Novosibirsk State University. Elena Boldyreva is an Honorary Doctor of Sciences of the University of Edinburgh, a Corresponding Member of the Academy of Sciences and Arts of Slovenia and a Member of the Academia Europea. She was a Humboldt Fellow and has spent many research terms in Germany, UK, Italy, France. She served as a member of the Executive Committee of the IUCr in 2008–2014.

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Read our Editor’s Collection on Chromism in Frameworks by Susan Bourne

We are delighted to share with you our latest collection of recently published articles focusing on Chromism in Frameworks handpicked by Associate Editor Susan Bourne.

These articles are free to access until December 31st 2019 and we hope you enjoy reading them.

We invite you to submit your research to CrystEngComm and give your work the global visibility it deserves.

 

Submit your research now

 

Featured articles:

Two novel multichromic coordination polymers based on a new flexible viologen ligand exhibiting photocontrolled luminescence properties and sensitive detection for ammonia
Hai Yu Wang, Shuang Liu, Chen Fu and Hong Zhang
CrystEngComm, 2019, 21, 1635-1641 DOI: 10.1039/C8CE01948G

Solvatomorphism of Reichardt’s dye
Sarah J. Pike, Andrew D. Bond and Christopher A. Hunter
CrystEngComm, 2018, 20, 2912-2915 DOI: 10.1039/C8CE00480C

The thermo-responsive behavior in molecular crystals of naphthalene diimides and their 3D printed thermochromic composites
Madushani Dharmarwardana, Bhargav S. Arimilli, Michael A. Luzuriaga, Sunah Kwon, Hamilton Lee, Gayan A. Appuhamillage, Gregory T. McCandless, Ronald A. Smaldone and Jeremiah J. Gassensmith
CrystEngComm, 2018, 20, 6054-6060 DOI: 10.1039/C8CE00798E

 

Read the full collection here

CrystEngComm Associate Editor Susan Bourne Royal Society of Chemistry

 

 

 

Meet the Editor

Associate Editor Susan Bourne is the Professor of Physical Chemistry at the University of Cape Town. Her PhD, obtained at the University of Cape Town, was a study of organic inclusion compounds undertaken under the supervision of Professor Luigi Nassimbeni. Her research interests include the application of physicochemical methods to inclusion compounds and crystal engineering of metal-organic materials, all with the aim of correlating solid-state structure with physical properties and reactivity. She has published over 120 papers and has supervised 20 postgraduate students. She is the chair of the Structural Chemistry Commission of the International Union of Crystallography, and is a Fellow of the University of Cape Town.

 

 

 

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Read our Editor’s Collection on Polymorphism in Molecular Crystals by Aurora Cruz-Cabeza

We are delighted to share with you our latest collection of recently published articles focusing on Polymorphism in Molecular Crystals, handpicked by Editorial Board Member Aurora Cruz-Cabeza. This collection is dedicated to the late Professor Joel Bernstein who endeavoured much of his work to the study of polymorphism and inspired many of us.

These articles are free to access until October 31st 2019 and we hope you enjoy reading them.

We invite you to submit your research to CrystEngComm and give your work the global visibility it deserves.

 

Submit your research now

Featured articles:

L-Malic acid crystallization: polymorphism, semi-spherulites, twisting, and polarity
Jingxiang Yang, Chunhua T. Hu, Alexander G. Shtukenberg, Qiuxiang Yin and Bart Kahr
CrystEngComm, 2018, 20, 1383-1389. DOI: 10.1039/C7CE02107K

Serendipitous isolation of a disappearing conformational polymorph of succinic acid challenges computational polymorph prediction
Paolo Lucaioli, Elisa Nauha, Ilaria Gimondi, Louise S. Price, Rui Guo, Luca Iuzzolino, Ishwar Singh, Matteo Salvalaglio, Sarah L. Price and Nicholas Blagden
CrystEngComm, 2018, 20, 3971-3977. DOI: 10.1039/C8CE00625C

Polymorphism of chlorpropamide on liquid-assisted mechanical treatment: choice of liquid and type of mechanical treatment matter
Nadia Bouvart, Roland-Marie Palix, Sergey G. Arkhipov, Ivan A. Tumanov, Adam A. L. Michalchuk and Elena V. Boldyreva
CrystEngComm, 2018, 20, 1797-1803, DOI: 10.1039/C7CE02221B

 

Read the full collection here

Dr Aurora Cruz-Cabeza, CrystEngComm Editorial Board Member, University of Manchester

 

Meet the Editor

 

Editorial Board Member Dr Aurora Cruz-Cabeza is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Manchester, School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Sciences. She has established her own research group in solid state chemistry and crystallisation. Aurora has authored over 50 research articles and has given over 60 research talks around the world. Some of her best well-known work lies in the area of polymorphism in molecular crystals.

 

 

 

CrystEngComm

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CrystEngComm Editor’s choice

In this Editor’s choice post, Professor Nicola Pinna, a member of  the CrystEngComm Editorial Board, talks about his favourite articles published in the journal in recent months. Nicola has chosen the most interesting articles in the area of controlled growth of nanostructured materials.  

Faegheh Hoshyargar, Enrico Mugnaioli, Robert Branscheid, Ute Kolb, Martin Penthofer and Wolfgang Tremel 
CrystEngComm, 2014, DOI:  10.1039/C4CE00326H    

Mechanistic analyses of nanoscale transformations are not easily accessible, however this case reported by Hoshyargar and co-workers is an exception as the authors managed to follow the transformation of tungsten oxide nanostructures to WS2 hollow particles. The starting material was synthesized by my favourite approach: a simple, solvothermal treatment of a tungsten alkoxide in benzyl alcohol, with the well-defined tungsten oxide nanoplatelets being subsequently converted to WS2 by sulfidization at higher temperature. The growth mechanism was investigated by applying advanced electron microscopy techniques at different stages of the solid state reaction. The final product, the “hollow rectangular WS2 nanoboxes”, was shown to be formed by “a cascade” of topotactic and epitactic processes. What I found the most astonishing was the last step of the mechanism, involving the fusion of the layered WS2 sheets forming almost perfect rectangular boxes with 90° kinks (see figure below).

layered tungsten sulfide sheets


Unconventional upright layer orientation and considerable enhancement of proton–electron conductivity in Dion–Jacobson perovskite thin films
Tomohiko Nakajima, Kiyoshi Kobayashi, Kentaro Shinodaa and Tetsuo Tsuchiyaa
CrystEngComm, 2014, 16, 4113-4119

Single crystal substrates are generally needed for growth of single-crystalline and highly-oriented oxide thin films. However, such an approach cannot be used in industrial applications for which the growth of highly-oriented oxide thin films should take place on common substrates. In this article, Nakajima et al. show that by pulsed laser-assisted annealing of an oxide precursor thin film that is spin coated from a molecular precursor solution, single crystalline RbCa2Nb3O10 layered perovskite thin films can be obtained. The peculiarity of these films is that they show upright layer orientations (see figure below) which may allow for them to be used as membranes for fuel cells due to the potential for high proton conductivity in the interlayer sites. The unusual orientation of the films is possibly connected to oxygen deficiencies near the surface which as caused by the high laser power needed to obtain the upright layer orientation.

layered perovskite thin films


Layered titanosilicates for size- and pattern-controlled overgrowth of MFI zeolite
Stanislav Ferdov
CrystEngComm, 2014, DOI10.1039/C3CE42644K

There is a need for controlling the growth of zeolites on different substrates which can only be achieved by understanding of the heterostructural interconnections between the support and the zeolite material.  This is particularly relevant for industrial applications such as catalysis. In this work, Stanislav Ferdov reports that plate-like crystals of two titanium silicates can act as interesting substrates for the controlled growth of an MFI-type zeolite. The different arrangement of the SiO4 tetrahedra and TiO6 octahedra in the two chosen titanosilicates govern the overgrowth behaviour. In one case, the plate-like crystals of the titanosilicate (20–40 μm) are covered with a monolayer of regularly packed-zeolite crystals (see figure below left). In the second case, the support acts as a single-nucleation site and only isolated and larger crystals of MFI zeolite are observed (see figure below right). Although the possibility for controlling the overgrowth of zeolites has clearly been demonstrated, the opportunity for improvement is huge. It can only be successful, however, if combined with a molecular-scale understanding of the heterostructural interconnections between substrate and zeolite.

MFI zeolites on layered titanosilicates


Ligand dynamic effect on phase and morphology control of hexagonal NaYF4
Suli Wu, Ye Liu, Jie Changa and Shufen Zhang 
CrystEngComm, 2014, DOI10.1039/C4CE00109E

It is well accepted that the adsorption of stabilizing ligands at the surface of nuclei dramatically influences the growth habit of inorganic nanocrystals. The organic–inorganic interface present in these systems is the key to the synthesis of morphology controlled nanocrystals. Ligands can selectively adsorb onto particular facets hindering the growth in the direction perpendicular to that facet. However, the adhesion energy of the ligands should be adjusted to allow dynamic adsorption-desorption during nanoparticle growth, as demonstrated in the past for the synthesis of quantum dots. More importantly, it has also been demonstrated that, for the same functional group, the dynamic effect on the surface of quantum dot nanocrystals is significantly influenced by the ligand chain length. In this article, the authors investigate the effect of the alkyl chain length of carboxylic acid ligands on the growth of NaYF4 nanocrystals. The much more mobile hexanoic acid (HA) does not effectively passivate the {001} facets leading to rod-shape nanoparticles. With longer alkyl chains ligands, the growth along the c-axis is decreased (see figure below) and the morphology can be almost continuously tuned from rods to very thin disk-shaped crystals. The authors attribute such precise morphology control to the different ligand dynamic as, for longer alkyl chain ligands, the tendency of leaving the (001) crystal surfaces decreases leading to a lower growth on the [001] direction.

hexagonal NaYF4


Nicola PinnaNicola Pinna studied physical chemistry at the Université Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris). He received his Ph.D. in 2001 and in 2002 moved to the Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society (Berlin). In 2003, he joined the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces (Potsdam) before moving to the Martin Luther University, Halle-Wittenberg, as an Assistant Professor of Inorganic Chemistry in 2005. From March 2006 to June 2012 he was researcher at the Department of Chemistry and CICECO of the University of Aveiro and from September 2009 to June 2012 he was also Assistant Professor at the school of chemical and biological engineering Seoul National University. In July 2012 he joined the Department of Chemistry of the Humboldt University in Berlin. His research activity is focused on the development of novel routes to nanostructured materials, their characterization, and the study of their physical properties.

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