Archive for the ‘Web theme issues’ Category

OBC Call for Papers – Peptide Materials

Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry is delighted to announce a call for papers for its latest themed issue on:

Peptide Materials

Guest Editors: John D. Tovar (Johns Hopkins University, USA), Dave Adams (University of Glasgow, UK) and Honggang Cui (Johns Hopkins University, USA)

Deadline for Submission: 15 April 2017

OBC offers fast decisions and publication (average time from receipt to first decision for peer reviewed articles is 12 days for communications and 19 days for papers). Colour publication is free and all articles are indexed in MEDLINE. You can choose for your article to be handled by the Cambridge office or one of our Associate Editors: Christian Hackenberger, Lei Liu, Margaret Brimble or Jin-Quan Yu.

Scope

Proteins are privileged macromolecules that play critical roles in catalysis, extracellular matrix structure, cargo transport, and cell signalling. Over the past two decades, the role of peptides as functional components of materials systems has been elucidated. These systems have found use in a variety of emerging technologies spanning optoelectronics, energy conversion, regenerative medicine and drug delivery.

In this special issue, we will focus on peptides and peptide mimics not as isolated molecules of therapeutic value but as components of larger collective systems. Among these collections will be examples of polymers with a variety of natural and unnatural amino acid monomer feed compositions, smaller oligopeptides designed to self-associate into complex hierarchical structures, and complex macromolecules with unusual properties. We will showcase examples whereby specific functions are built into molecular units that can be augmented or even amplified within higher-order structures.



















Research in OBC is published as communications (for urgent work – up to 5 pages in length) or full papers. There is also the opportunity to write a Perspective or Review article for the issue, and if you would be interested in this please let us know beforehand. All submissions will be subject to rigorous peer review to meet the usual high standards of OBC. Guidelines are available at rsc.li/1K0EgYx and rsc.li/1OoQWQh.

If you are interested in taking part in this issue, please email OBC: obc-rsc@rsc.org

Manuscripts can be submitted using the Royal Society of Chemistry’s online article submission service. Please clearly state that the manuscript is submitted for the themed issue on Peptide Materials.

To view recent articles or find out more about OBC, please visit the journal’s homepage:

Organic & Biomolecular ChemistryRapid publication of high quality organic chemistry research



Please note that articles will be published online as soon as ready to ensure no delay in dissemination of your work. Articles for the web theme will be published in regular issues of the journal. The themed issue will then be published online once all articles have been published. Click here for an example of a previous web theme issue in OBC.

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OBC Call for Papers – Macrocycles with bio-related applications

Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry is delighted to announce a call for papers for a themed issue on:

Macrocycles with bio-related applications

Guest Editors: Spiros Liras (Pfizer, USA), Andrei Yudin and Conor Scully (University of Toronto, Canada)

Deadline for Submission: 15 January 2017

OBC offers fast decisions and publication (average time from receipt to first decision for peer reviewed articles is 12 days for communications and 19 days for papers). Colour publication is free and all articles are indexed in MEDLINE. You can choose for your article to be handled by the Cambridge office or one of our Associate Editors: Christian Hackenberger, Lei Liu, Margaret Brimble or Jin-Quan Yu.

Scope

The special issue will serve as a forum to disseminate the latest findings in the burgeoning field of macrocycles. This will include studies aimed at new ways of constructing macrocycles, efforts to understand their biological activity, and new approaches to deciphering conformational profiles using state of the art spectroscopic methods. The issue is aimed at a broad audience comprising synthetic, medicinal, and biological chemists

Research in OBC is published as communications (for urgent work – up to 5 pages in length) or full papers. There is also the opportunity to write a Perspective or Review article for the issue, and if you would be interested in this please let us know beforehand. All submissions will be subject to rigorous peer review to meet the usual high standards of OBC. Guidelines are available at rsc.li/1K0EgYx and rsc.li/1OoQWQh.

If you are interested in taking part in this issue, please email OBC: obc-rsc@rsc.org

Manuscripts can be submitted using the Royal Society of Chemistry’s online article submission service. Please clearly state that the manuscript is submitted for the themed issue on Macrocycles with bio-related applications.

To view recent articles or find out more about OBC, please visit the journal’s homepage:

Organic & Biomolecular ChemistryRapid publication of high quality organic chemistry research



Please note that articles will be published online as soon as ready to ensure no delay in dissemination of your work. Articles for the web theme will be published in regular issues of the journal. The themed issue will then be published online once all articles have been published. Click here for an example of a previous web theme issue in OBC.

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OBC Call for Papers – Biocatalysis: Natural and biologically inspired synthetic enzymes

Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry is delighted to announce a call for papers for its latest themed issue on:

Biocatalysis: Natural and biologically inspired synthetic enzymes

Guest Editors: Scott Silverman and Douglas Mitchell (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA)

Deadline for Submission: 15 February 2017

OBC offers fast decisions and publication (average time from receipt to first decision for peer reviewed articles is 12 days for communications and 19 days for papers). Colour publication is free and all articles are indexed in MEDLINE. You can choose for your article to be handled by the Cambridge office or one of our Associate Editors: Christian Hackenberger, Lei Liu, Margaret Brimble or Jin-Quan Yu.

Scope

Biocatalysis includes a range of topics related to catalysis by molecules obtained or derived from biology. This issue will cover the following topics:

1. Study of naturally occurring biological catalysts (protein enzymes and ribozymes)
2. Protein engineering and directed evolution, including computational tools
3. Metabolic engineering for synthetic chemistry
4. Development of synthetic biologically inspired catalysts, including small-molecule catalysts

















Research in OBC is published as communications (for urgent work – up to 5 pages in length) or full papers. There is also the opportunity to write a Perspective or Review article for the issue, and if you would be interested in this please let us know beforehand. All submissions will be subject to rigorous peer review to meet the usual high standards of OBC. Guidelines are available at rsc.li/1K0EgYx and rsc.li/1OoQWQh.

If you are interested in taking part in this issue, please email OBC: obc-rsc@rsc.org

Manuscripts can be submitted using the Royal Society of Chemistry’s online article submission service. Please clearly state that the manuscript is submitted for the themed issue on Biocatalysis: Natural and biologically inspired synthetic enzymes.

To view recent articles or find out more about OBC, please visit the journal’s homepage:

Organic & Biomolecular ChemistryRapid publication of high quality organic chemistry research



Please note that articles will be published online as soon as ready to ensure no delay in dissemination of your work. Articles for the web theme will be published in regular issues of the journal. The themed issue will then be published online once all articles have been published. Click here for an example of a previous web theme issue in OBC.

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OBC Call for Papers – Polycyclizations in Synthesis and Biosynthesis themed issue

Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry is delighted to announce a call for papers for its latest themed issue on:

Polycyclizations in Synthesis and Biosynthesis

Guest Editors: Michel Gagné (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, USA), Rong-Jie Chein (Academia Sinica, Taiwan) and Dean Tantillo (University of California Davis, USA)

Deadline for Submission: 1 February 2017

OBC offers fast decisions and publication (average time from receipt to first decision for peer reviewed articles is 12 days for communications and 19 days for papers). Colour publication is free and all articles are indexed in MEDLINE. You can choose for your article to be handled by the Cambridge office or one of our Associate Editors: Christian Hackenberger, Lei Liu, Margaret Brimble or Jin-Quan Yu.

Scope

This issue will cover research on the development of new polycyclization reactions including new reagents and catalysts, applications to total synthesis and/or diversity-oriented synthesis, and experimental and/or theoretical mechanistic studies on polycyclizations in synthesis or biosynthesis.













Research in OBC is published as communications (for urgent work – up to 5 pages in length) or full papers. There is also the opportunity to write a Perspective or Review article for the issue, and if you would be interested in this please let us know. All submissions will be subject to rigorous peer review to meet the usual high standards of OBC. Guidelines are available at rsc.li/1K0EgYx and rsc.li/1OoQWQh.

If you are interested in taking part in this issue, please email OBC: obc-rsc@rsc.org

Manuscripts can be submitted using the Royal Society of Chemistry’s online article submission service. Please clearly state that the manuscript is submitted for the themed issue on Polycyclizations in Synthesis and Biosynthesis.

To view recent articles or find out more about OBC, please visit the journal’s homepage:

Organic & Biomolecular ChemistryRapid publication of high quality organic chemistry research

 


Please note that articles will be published online as soon as ready to ensure no delay in dissemination of your work. Articles for the web theme will be published in regular issues of the journal. The themed issue will then be published online once all articles have been published. Click here for an example of a previous web theme issue in OBC.

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Past and present methodologies for the synthesis and functionalization of heterocycles and their impact on drug discovery

Heterocycles play a central role in modern drug design and this is reflected in the fact that they are present within the majority of marketed drugs. Their prevalence in medicine is not unexpected as heterocycles are the core elements of natural bioactive molecules and medicinal chemistry is centred around simulating the biological effects elicited by these privileged scaffolds.

Advances in organic synthesis are critical to the drug discovery process. The breadth of available synthetic methodologies related to heterocycle functionalization represents an almost endless source of innovation for the medicinal chemist. What is interesting however is the bias within the pharmaceutical industry toward relatively few reaction types. But why are certain methodologies favoured and what has been the long term impact?

Numerous reviews and analyses have been published wherein the types of chemical reactions used by the pharmaceutical industry over the past 30-50 years have been assessed and it has been established that of the current, most frequently used synthetic reactions—for example, amide bond formation, Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling, SNAr—none were discovered within the past 20 years.1 Increase in available commercial reagents, robustness and chemoselectivity has only amplified medicinal chemists’ preference for these reaction types.

The integration of new, ground-breaking methodologies in heterocycle synthesis such as ring-closing metathesis, C–H activation, multi-component reactions, photoredox catalysis etc. has been slow and this reliance on a select few reaction types has resulted in an overpopulation of a small amount of chemical space. Granted, underlying reasons for selected routes in a medicinal chemistry program are complex and the constant pressure to produce, maintain timelines, follow regulations and remain competitive is valid. However, this approach has not necessarily translated into an increase in FDA approved drugs. It’s fair to question whether or not such a practise is fully exploiting the vast toolbox of synthetic methodology available to medicinal chemists which could lead to new, diverse chemical space and new opportunities to tackle issues presently facing the pharmaceutical industry.

In a recently published OBC review as part of the themed collection on Contemporary Synthesis in Drug Discovery, scientists from Pfizer outline recent developments from both industry and academia in heterocycle synthesis and functionalization within the context of drug discovery. The purpose of this and other reviews is to help raise awareness and even popularize novel synthetic methodologies within the pharmaceutical industry. This is likely to be of greater impact in drug discover if more industrial-academic partnerships were to collaborate in the development of novel synthetic approaches toward medicinally relevant heterocycles. Regardless, advancements in synthetic chemistry are intertwined with the development of interesting molecular designs and transformative medicines.

1. Alexandria P. Taylor, Ralph P. Robinson, Yvette M. Fobian, David C. Blakemore, Lyn H. Jones and Olugbeminiyi Fadeyi, Org. Biomol. Chem.2016, 14, 6611–6637


To find out more see:

Contemporary Synthetic Chemistry in Drug Discovery OBC Themed Collection

Modern advances in heterocyclic chemistry in drug discovery
Alexandria P. Taylor, Ralph P. Robinson, Yvette M. Fobian, David C. Blakemore, Lyn H. Jones and Olugbeminiyi Fadeyi
DOI: 10.1039/C6OB00936K


Victoria Corless is currently completing her Ph.D. in organic chemistry with Prof. Andrei Yudin at The University of Toronto. Her research is centred on the synthesis of kinetically amphoteric molecules, which offer a versatile platform for the development of chemoselective transformations with particular emphasis on creating novel biologically active molecules.

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Continuous Flow Processes as an Enabling Technology in Synthesis

Recent advancements in reaction control and method development strategies have significantly impacted the way in which synthetic chemistry is performed. Arguably, one of the most widely amenable and enabling technologies is continuous flow chemistry, which can offer advantages over batch in terms of cost, reaction efficiency and safety. Its implementation is changing the way in which we think about and conduct chemistry and in some areas has expanded our synthetic capabilities.

As a result, numerous syntheses of commercially and pharmaceutically relevant compounds are being redesigned around flow processes in order to improve efficiency and reproducibility. In addition, the flow reactor configuration can be readily customized to meet specific reaction demands.

These changes are most evident within the pharmaceutical industry where increasing pressure to continually identify and optimize lead compounds has renewed interest in the development of sustainable and cost effective processes for both research and production purposes.1

A direct example of this comes from Prof. Ian Baxendale’s laboratory at Durham University.2 Heterocyclic motifs are prevalent in pharmaceuticals and have constituted one of the largest areas of research in organic chemistry. Through a convenient telescope continuous flow process, ethyl isocyanoacetate—a highly sensitive and reactive compound frequently used as a key building block in heterocycle synthesis—was generated in situ and used to synthesize diverse heterocyclic structures in a convergent manner.

General reaction scheme for the muti-step flow synthesis of 1,2,4-triazole and pyrrole[1,2-c]pyrimidine-based heterocycles.

Continuous flow limits issues related to hazardous exothermic processes, reaction scale-up and handling of highly reactive or toxic intermediates, overcoming numerous safety concerns inherent in batch chemistry. Furthermore, flow chemistries have also been combined with additional features such as microwave irradiation, solid-supported reagents or catalysts, photochemistry, inductive heating and electrochemistry, which greatly increase its application in synthetic organic chemistry.3,4

Significant developments within the last decade indicate that the full potential of flow chemistry has yet to be realized. As with any new up-and-coming technology, there exist limitations that more and more researchers are willing to tackle. This is evident in the prevalence of flow systems now being utilized not only within academic laboratories but also in industrial institutions.

Interesting and innovative examples of synthetic reactions translated to flow systems have recently been published in Organic and Biomolecular Chemistry and can also be found in the joint OBC/ChemComm collection ‘Recent Advances in Flow Synthesis and Continuous Processing’. Select examples are discussed below.


Establishing a multistep continuous flow process is a logical step forward in the development of flow technology. However, genuine applications remain limited due to inherent challenges such as solvent incompatibility, intermediate work-up and dilution effects. Prof. Floris Rutjes and his coworkers at Radboud University have provided a solution to this problem.5 They effectively integrated a two-step chemoenzymatic flow synthesis of incompatible reaction steps through the use of an inline liquid-liquid separation module.

Two step synthesis of cyanohydrins and schematic representation of the flow set up with integrated liquid-liquid phase separation module.

Homogenous metal catalysis has seen limited use in industrial processes due to difficult separation from product material and troublesome recovery of precious metals. To remedy this, an immobilised iridium hydrogen transfer catalyst was developed by Prof. Ian Baxendale and coworkers for use in flow based systems by incorporation of a ligand to a porous polymeric monolithic flow reactor, which limits metal leaching and catalyst deactivation.6

A monolith reactor testing configuration using immobilized iridium hydrogen transfer catalyst.

Finally, Prof. Bradely Pentelute and his group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology very recently reported an efficient continuous-flow system for the challenging synthesis of peptides containing perfluoroaromatic molecules in place of labile disulfide bonds.7 Application of a rapid flow-based solid-phase peptide synthesis allowed the researchers to circumvent previously encountered problems associated with this chemistry and has resulted in an overall improvement in quality and isolated yield of the peptides.

Flow system for the synthesis of H2 relaxin fragment analogues using modified solid-phase peptide synthesis

To find out more see:

1 Flash chemistry: flow chemistry that cannot be done in batch. J. Yoshida, Y. Takahashi, A. Nagaki, Chem. Commun., 2013, 49, 9896. DOI: 10.1039/C3CC44709J

2 Flow synthesis of ethyl isocyanoacetate enabling the telescoped synthesis of 1,2,4-triazoles and pyrrolo-[1,2-c]pyrimidines. M. Baumann. A. M. Rodriguez Garcia, I. R. Baxendale, Org. Biomol. Chem., 2015, 13, 4231. DOI: 10.1039/C5OB00245A

3 Liquid phase oxidation chemistry in continuous-flow microreactors. H. P. L. Gemoets, Y. Su, M. Shang, V. Hessel, R. Luque, T. Noël, Chem. Soc. Rev.201645, 83. DOI: 10.1039/C5CS00447K

4 Flow chemistry syntheses of natural products. J. C. Pastre, D. L. Browne, S. V. Ley, Chem. Soc. Rev.201342, 8849. DOI: 10.1039/C3CS60246J

5 Chemoenzymatic flow cascade for the synthesis of protected mandelonitrile derivatives. M.M. Delville, K. Koch, J.C.M. van Hest, F.P.J.T. Ruties, Org. Biomol. Chem., 2015, 13, 1634. DOI: 10.1039/C4OB02128B

6 A monolith immobilised iridium Cp* catalyst for hydrogen transfer reactions under flow conditions. M. V. Rojo, L. Guetzoyan, I. R. Baxendale, Org. Biomol. Chem., 2015, 13, 1768. DOI: 10.1039/C4OB02376E

7 A perfluoroaromatic abiotic analog of H2 relaxin enabled by rapid flow-based peptide synthesis. T. Luhmann, S. K. Mong, M. D. Smino, L. Meinel, B. L. Pentelute, Org. Biomol. Chem., 2016, 14, 3345. DOI: 10.1039/C6OB00208K


Victoria Corless is currently completing her Ph.D. in organic chemistry with Prof. Andrei Yudin at The University of Toronto. Her research is centred on the synthesis of kinetically amphoteric molecules, which offer a versatile platform for the development of chemoselective transformations with particular emphasis on creating novel biologically active molecules.

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OBC Call for Papers – Selective Chemistry with Peptides and Proteins Themed Issue

Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry is delighted to announce a call for paper for its latest themed issue on: Selective Chemistry with Peptides and Proteins

Guest Editor: Philip Dawson (The Scripps Research Institute, San Diego, USA)

Deadline for Submission: 11 April 2016

OBC offers fast decisions and publication (average time from receipt to first decision for peer reviewed articles is 12 days for communications and 19 days for papers). Colour publication is free and all articles are indexed in MEDLINE. You can choose for your article to be handled by the Cambridge office or one of our Associate Editors: Christian Hackenberger, Lei Liu, Margaret Brimble or Jin-Quan Yu.

Scope

This issue will cover topics including native chemical ligation and other chemical reactions to prepare proteins and peptides, and selective protein modification. We would welcome either a primary research article or a review.

Research in OBC is published as communications (for urgent work – up to 5 pages in length) or full papers. There is also the opportunity to write a Perspective or Review article for the issue, and if you would be interested in this please let us know. All submissions will be subject to rigorous peer review to meet the usual high standards of OBC. Guidelines are available at rsc.li/1K0EgYx and rsc.li/1OoQWQh.

If you are interested in taking part in this issue, please email OBC: obc-rsc@rsc.org

Manuscripts can be submitted using the Royal Society of Chemistry’s online article submission service. Please clearly state that the manuscript is submitted for the themed issue on Selective Chemistry with Peptides and Proteins.

To view recent articles or find out more about OBC, please visit the journal’s homepage:

Organic & Biomolecular ChemistryRapid publication of high quality organic chemistry research


Please note that articles will be published online as soon as ready to ensure no delay in dissemination of your work. Articles for the web theme will be published in regular issues of the journal. The themed issue will then be published online once all articles have been published. Click here for an example of a previous web theme issue in OBC.

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Contemporary Synthetic Chemistry in Drug Discovery Themed Issue Launched

Organic and Biomolecular Chemistry (OBC) is delighted to announce a high-profile web themed issue on Contemporary Synthetic Chemistry in Drug Discovery. The guest editors for this issue are Professor Angela Russell (University of Oxford, UK), Professor Douglas E. Frantz (The University of Texas at San Antonio, USA), Dr Matthew Duncton (Rigel, San Francisco, USA), Dr Graham Wynne (University of Oxford, UK) and Dr Shane Krska (Merck, Boston, USA).

Deadline for Submission: 30 April 2016

If you are interested in taking part in this issue, please email OBC: obc-rsc@rsc.org

Manuscripts can be submitted using the Royal Society of Chemistry’s online article submission service. Please clearly state that the manuscript is submitted for the themed issue on Contemporary Synthetic Chemistry in Drug Discovery.

The level of quality of this issue will be high, and all manuscripts will undergo the journal’s normal peer review process. Guidelines are available at rsc.li/1K0EgYx and rsc.li/1OoQWQh



Scope of the issue

This issue aims to demonstrate the importance of synthetic chemistry in drug discovery. Specifically it will highlight how synthetic methods can be used to address hurdles currently being faced in modern medicinal chemistry. Areas falling within the scope of the issue include:

•    CH-Functionalization, including late-stage CH-functionalization & CH-functionalization via biomimetic catalysis
•    Fluorination chemistry, including late-stage fluorination, CF3, SCF3 & SF5 chemistry
•    Asymmetric chemistry, including use of organocatalytic methods
•    Synthesis of compounds with enhanced 3-dimensional character (including cross-coupling & other metal-catalyzed reactions, particularly in relation to sp3-functionalization)
•    Modern heterocyclic chemistry including synthesis of novel heterocycles, highly-decorated heterocycles & synthesis/use of small heterocyclic groups (e.g. oxetanes, azetidines, etc.)
•    Modern synthetic techniques, including flow chemistry, automated synthesis, high-throughput synthesis, microwave-assisted chemistry, multi-component reactions & sustainable chemistry
•    Synthesis/modification of natural products, or natural-product-like compounds (diversity-orientated synthesis)
•    Synthesis utilizing enzymatic chemistry and its use in drug discovery
•    The use of novel reagents/reactions in drug discovery


All submissions should clearly show/explain what challenge within drug discovery is being addressed by the presented work. Articles covering general organic synthesis without this connection are not suitable for this issue.

Inclusion of biological data is not a requirement for submission but you are welcome to include any such data that you feel supports your article. Please note that the main focus of the manuscript should be on the organic synthesis and not the medicinal chemistry.

To view recent articles or find out more about OBC, please visit the journal’s homepage:

Organic & Biomolecular ChemistryRapid publication of high quality organic chemistry research

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OBC call for papers: Multivalent Biomolecular Recognition themed issue

Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry is delighted to announce a call for paper for its latest themed issue on: Multivalent Biomolecular Recognition

Guest Editors: Prof.  Mihail Barboiu (Institut Européen des Membranes, France),  Prof. Olof Ramström (KTH – Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden) and Prof. Stéphane Vincent (University of Namur, Belgium)

Submission Deadline: 15th July 2015

From the guest-editors:

The understanding and control of multivalent biomolecular interactions has become one of the key frontiers of chemistry and biology. This issue will cover important findings and advances in the field, in order to:
1. Develop functional sugar decorated nanoplatforms (nanoparticles, nanostructured surfaces, vesicles, microarrays, etc.).
2. Understand the biomolecular mechanisms by exploring their synergistic adaptive interactions with biomolecules, in order to accurately control the chemical/biological responses.

The inspiration for this issue comes partly from our membership of the EU-funded Dynamic Interactive Nanosystems ITN Marie Curie DYNANO Network (see http://www.dynano.eu ). We hope that colleagues from the Network will participate but are also very welcoming to contributors who have not (yet) joined our association.

Research in OBC is published as communications (for urgent work – up to 5 pages in length) or full papers. There is also the opportunity to write a Perspective or Review article for the issue, and if you would be interested in this please let us know. All submissions will be subject to rigorous peer review to meet the usual high standards of OBC.

The deadline for submissions to the themed issue is 15th July 2015, although submissions before this date are of course welcomed.

Manuscripts can be submitted using the RSC’s online submissions service. Please clearly mark that the manuscript is submitted for the themed issue on ‘Multivalent Biomolecular Recognition’.

Please would you inform the editorial office by e-mail as soon as possible if you plan to submit to the issue and whether your contribution will be original research or a review-type article. We would like to have a list of authors who intend to contribute as soon as possible.

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In Celebration of Andrew D. Hamilton’s Career in Chemistry

Professor Andrew D. Hamilton FRS

We are delighted to present an on-line collection of articles dedicated to Professor Andrew D. Hamilton FRS, on the occasion of his 60th birthday. 

Students and colleagues past and present have come together to contribute over 40 communications, full papers, feature articles and perspectives of some of their latest work now published in ChemComm, OBC, MedChemComm and RSC Advances.

“An insight into the rise of a star in molecular recognition, ground breaking discoveries, and on a more light-hearted note, some fond reminiscences of research in Cambridge, Princeton, Pittsburgh, Yale and Oxford.”  

Read the introductory Profile article by guest-editors Sam Thompson and Andrew J. Wilson, with the contribution of Sir Alan R. Battersby. 

Access the full collection here

As a taster, the collection of articles includes: 

Chemical approaches for detection and destruction of nerve agents
Dariush Ajami and Julius Rebek
Org. Biomol. Chem., 2013,11, 3936-3942
DOI: 10.1039/C3OB40324F 

Diverse topologies in dynamic combinatorial libraries from tri- and mono-thiols in water: sensitivity to weak supramolecular interactions
Artur R. Stefankiewicz and Jeremy K. M. Sanders
Chem. Commun., 2013,49, 5820-5822
DOI: 10.1039/C3CC41158C 

Peptides: minimal drug surrogates to interrogate and interfere with protein function
A. Cruz-Migoni, N. Fuentes-Fernandez and T. H. Rabbitts
Med. Chem. Commun., 2013,4, 1218-1221
DOI: 10.1039/C3MD00142C 

A rotaxane host system containing integrated triazole C–H hydrogen bond donors for anion recognition
Nicholas G. White and Paul D. Beer
Org. Biomol. Chem., 2013,11, 1326-1333
DOI: 10.1039/C2OB27229F, Paper 

Supramolecular hydrogels based on bola-amphiphilic glycolipids showing color change in response to glycosidases
Rika Ochi, Kazuya Kurotani, Masato Ikeda, Shigeki Kiyonaka and Itaru Hamachi
Chem. Commun., 2013,49, 2115-2117
DOI: 10.1039/C2CC37908B, Communication 

Identification of a potent salicylic acid-based inhibitor of tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B
Sina Haftchenary, Daniel P. Ball, Isabelle Aubry, Melissa Landry, Vijay M. Shahani, Steven Fletcher, Brent D. G. Page, Andriana O. Jouk, Michel L. Tremblay and Patrick T. Gunning
Med. Chem. Commun., 2013,4, 987-992
DOI: 10.1039/C3MD00011G 

and many more!  

Why not have a look at the great cover artworks authors have created to illustrate their articles from the collection – click on the images to access the articles! 

           

Feel free to send the link to the issue to other researchers whom you think will find it interesting and stimulating to read.

We hope you enjoy the collection!

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