New Video Competition at microTAS 2014!

Lab on a Chip is proud to announce the first μTAS Video Competition, created in partnership with Dolomite Microfluidics and supported by the CBMS (the Chemical and Biological Microsystems Society).

We invite registered μTAS participants to submit short videos (see full conditions of entry below) that are either scientifically or educationally focused. Videos may be fun, artistic or just surprising and unusual in order to meet these criteria.

Dolomite Microfuidics, innovators in microfluidic solutions, have generously agreed to support this competition with $2500 worth of Dolomite equipment as the prize.

If you think you have the necessary visual science to take home the prize money, have a read of the entry conditions below!

Deadline 10th October 2014

Video Award Submission Process – Easy 3 Step Process

Step 1. Sign-In to the Electronic Form Using Your Registration Number (submissions can be made between July 25 and October 10, 2014. Form available at www.microTAS2014.org from July 25)

Please have your Abstract/Manuscript Number accessible. If you are unable to locate your Abstract/Manuscript Number, please contact info@microTAS2014.org.

Step 2. Fill in Remaining Information on Electronic Submission Form

Please fill in remaining information on the electronic submission form including title of image and your caption.

Step 3. Upload Your Video

All entries are to be submitted in MP4 or MOV format online via this website. Entries will not be accepted by email, fax, or post. Once your entry has been successfully uploaded and submitted, you will be given an entry number and you will be sent a confirmation email with the information you provided, minus the image. The ability to submit an image will close Friday, 10 October 2014 at 23:59 Honolulu, Hawaii, USA time (HST. GMT minus 10 hours).


Conditions of entry:

1. Only registered participants can take part/submit videos

2. Videos must be either scientific (demonstrating interesting aspects) or educational (enhancing understanding) with respect to micro or nanofluidics

3. Videos can be presented in a fun way

4. Videos can be presented in an artistic way

5. Videos can be presented in a surprising or unusual way

6. Videos can be enhanced by audio, animations or annotations, if necessary

7. Videos should be no longer than 2 minutes in length and file sizes must be compressed as much as possible for submission

8. Videos must be viewable on a PC without bespoke software

9. All submissions are submitted on the basis that they may be used by Lab on a Chip and/or CBMS for promotional purposes in any form

10. Judging by an international panel of judges will take place at μTAS 2014. The judge’s decision will be final and no discussion will be entertained.

11. The prize will be awarded at μTAS 2014 and a written voucher  for the equipment will be handed over to the person submitting the winning entry.


Finally, just for a bit of inspiration, here’s a classic Lab on a Chip video from our YouTube Channel…enjoy!


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Sorting by Surfing: particles separate by riding acoustic waves

Collaborators across the University of Augsburg, Harvard University, and the University of Glasgow create a fluorescence-activated cell sorter relying on acoustofluidics to guide particles to their final location.

Traditional fluorescence-activated cell and droplet sorting (FACS, FADS) machines are expensive and require considerable time for analysis as well as maintenance (i.e., rinsing and cleaning of tubing to prepare for RNase-free processing). Cheap and disposable microfluidic devices can alleviate the expense and maintenance required, but still lag in particle sorting speed because they depend on fluidic, dielectric, and magnetic actuation to direct particles after fluorescence interrogation.

Lothar Schmid, David Weitz, and Thomas Franke overcame these issues by using traveling surface acoustic waves (SAWs) to drive particles into select channels based on readout of a fluorescent signal. The group oscillated PDMS structures from below by embedded interdigitated transducers to achieve focused acoustic radiation forces which gently moved droplets and cells via acoustic streaming.

The group was able to achieve sorting independent of cell size and compressibility on the order of 3000 particles/second into multiple outlet channels. This fast separation of particles given fluorescence signal readout enables efficient sorting of populations which vary widely in shape and volume. Further, the particles did not have to be first encapsulated into drops. This simplification avoids biohazard aerosol formation, provides higher signal to noise on the fluorescent signal interrogation, and streamlines the separation process. The group demonstrated gentle sorting of melanoma cells in a single fluid based on metabolic activity and membrane integrity. It will be exciting to see how acoustic streaming can further be used to direct particles to aid rare cell separations and cell isolations from complex samples.

You can download the full article for free* until the 24th October 2014:

Sorting drops and cells with acoustics: acoustic microfluidic fluorescence-activated cell sorter
Lothar Schmid, David A. Weitz, and Thomas Franke. Lab Chip, 2014, 14, 3710-3718.
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00588K

*Access is free through a registered RSC account – click here to register

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A chemical time capsule

Written by Victoria Richards

Inspired by tree rings, scientists have designed a sensing device that records chemical information over time as spatial patterns.

The transformation of time-varying signals into spatially-varying signals is fundamental for recording temporal information. For trees, growth rings that form throughout their lifetime provide a historical record of their growth conditions. Now, a team led by Sindy Tang at Stanford University, US, have designed a time capsule to record information about the occurrence of chemical events.

To read the fill article please visit Chemistry World.

Time capsule: an autonomous sensor and recorder based on diffusion–reaction
Lukas C. Gerber, Liat Rosenfeld, Yunhan Chen and Sindy K. Y. Tang  
Lab Chip, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00640B, Communication

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New You Tube Videos

Time Capsule: An autonomous sensor and recorder based on diffusion-reaction 
 
 
  
Wide bandwidth power amplifier for frequency-selective insulator-based dielectrophoresis 
 
 
   
Microfluidic Mixing of Nonpolar Liquids by Contact Charge Electrophoresis 
 
  
 
Controlled stimulation-burst targeted release by smart decentered core-shell microcapsules in gravity and magnetic field 
 
   
On-demand control of microfluidic flow via capillary-tuned solenoid microvalve suction 
 
 
  
Catalytic oxygen production mediated by smart capsules to modulate elastic turbulence under laminar flow regime 
 
 
  
Electrowetting on Dielectrics for Manipulating Oil Drops and Gas Bubbles in Aqueous-Shell Compound Drops 
 
  
 
ElectroTaxis-on-a-Chip (ETC): an Integrated Quantitative High-throughput Screening Platform for Electrical Field-Directed Cell Migration 
 
 
  
A reliable, programmable acoustofluidic pump powered by oscillating sharp-edge structures 
 
  
 
DLD Pillar Shape Design for Efficient Separation of Spherical and Non-spherical Bioparticles 

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Top ten most accessed LOC articles in Q2 2014

This month sees the following articles in Lab on a Chip that are in the top ten most accessed April – June:-

Deformability-based cell classification and enrichment using inertial microfluidics 
Soojung Claire Hur, Nicole K. Henderson-MacLennan, Edward R. B. McCabe and Dino Di Carlo 
Lab Chip, 2011,11, 912-920 
DOI: 10.1039/C0LC00595A 

Microfluidic approaches for cancer cell detection, characterization, and separation 
Jian Chen, Jason Li and Yu Sun    
Lab Chip, 2012,12, 1753-1767 
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC21273K 
 
Recent advances in microfluidic techniques for single-cell biophysical characterization 
Yi Zheng, John Nguyen, Yuan Wei and Yu Sun    
Lab Chip, 2013,13, 2464-2483 
DOI: 10.1039/C3LC50355K 
 
Cell patterning with a heptagon acoustic tweezer – application in neurite guidance 
F. Gesellchen, A. L. Bernassau, T. Déjardin, D. R. S. Cumming and M. O. Riehle    
Lab Chip, 2014,14, 2266-2275 
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00436A 
 
Simple modular systems for generation of droplets on demand 
Krzysztof Churski, Michal Nowacki, Piotr M. Korczyk and Piotr Garstecki    
Lab Chip, 2013,13, 3689-3697 
DOI: 10.1039/C3LC50340B 

Paper-based microfluidic point-of-care diagnostic devices 
Ali Kemal Yetisen, Muhammad Safwan Akram and Christopher R. Lowe    
Lab Chip, 2013,13, 2210-2251 
DOI: 10.1039/C3LC50169H 

Hydrogel bioprinted microchannel networks for vascularization of tissue engineering constructs 
Luiz E. Bertassoni, Martina Cecconi, Vijayan Manoharan, Mehdi Nikkhah, Jesper Hjortnaes, Ana Luiza Cristino, Giada Barabaschi, Danilo Demarchi, Mehmet R. Dokmeci, Yunzhi Yang and Ali Khademhosseini   
Lab Chip, 2014,14, 2202-2211 
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00030G 

A robust diffusion-based gradient generator for dynamic cell assays 
Javier Atencia, Gregory A. Cooksey and Laurie E. Locascio   
Lab Chip, 2012,12, 309-316 
DOI: 10.1039/C1LC20829B 
 
Pneumatic valves in folded 2D and 3D fluidic devices made from plastic films and tapes 
Gregory A. Cooksey and Javier Atencia  
Lab Chip, 2014,14, 1665-1668 
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00173G 

A microfluidic tubing method and its application for controlled synthesis of polymeric nanoparticles 
Jidong Wang, Wenwen Chen, Jiashu Sun, Chao Liu, Qifang Yin, Lu Zhang, Yunlei Xianyu, Xinghua Shi, Guoqing Hu and Xingyu Jiang   
Lab Chip, 2014,14, 1673-1677 
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00080C 
 
Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting an article to Lab on a Chip? Then why not submit to us today or alternatively email us your suggestions

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New YouTube Videos

 A Microfabricated Optofluidic Ring Resonator for Sensitive, High-Speed Detection of Volatile Organic Compounds 
 
Single molecule DNA intercalation in continuous homogenous elongational flow 
 
 
Flow-Scanning Optical Tomography 
 
 
Flow-induced immobilization of glucose oxidase in nonionic micellar nanogels for glucose sensing 
 
 
Continuous Flow C. elegans sorting system with integrated optical fiber detection and laminar flow switching 
 

A soft microchannel decreases polydispersity of droplet generation 
 

Magnetic Steering Control of Multi-Cellular Bio-Hybrid Microswimmers 
 
  
An integrated CMOS quantitative-polymerase-chain-reaction lab-on-chip for point-of-care diagnostics 
 
 
A Smartphone Controlled Handheld Microfluidic Liquid Handling System 
 

Phaseguides as Tunable Passive Microvalves for Liquid Routing in Complex Microfluidic Networks 

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Another three articles make it into the Top 10%

The Top 10% represents our highest impact papers, which demonstrate a breakthrough in device technology or methodology, or demonstrate important new results. The papers included are chosen by our Editor from among the Lab on a Chip HOT articles, which score highly in peer review.

We’ve added four new papers to the Top 10%. Download your copies by clicking the links below…

Research Paper: Human airway musculature on a chip: an in vitro model of allergic asthmatic bronchoconstriction and bronchodilation
Alexander Peyton Nesmith, Ashutosh Agarwal, Megan Laura McCain and Kevin Kit Parker
Lab Chip, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00688G, Paper

Graphical abstract: Human airway musculature on a chip: an in vitro model of allergic asthmatic bronchoconstriction and bronchodilation

Research Paper: On-demand weighing of single dry biological particles over a 5-order-of-magnitude dynamic range
Bin-Da Chan, Kutay Icoz, Wanfeng Huang, Chun-Li Chang and Cagri A. Savran
Lab Chip, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00765D, Paper

Graphical abstract: On-demand weighing of single dry biological particles over a 5-order-of-magnitude dynamic range

Communication: Time Capsule: An autonomous sensor and recorder based on diffusion-reaction

Lukas C Gerber, Liat Rosenfeld, Yunhan Chen and Sindy K Y Tang
Lab Chip, 2014, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C4LC00640B, Communication

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Lab on a Chip’s Top 2013 Cited Papers

Here are our papers, published in 2011-2012, that received the highest number of citations in 2013 – free* to access for a limited time only!

In order to celebrate our new Impact Factor of 5.75, the following highly cited articles are free to access until 30th September 2014. Click on the links to download!

Graphical abstract: Commercialization of microfluidic point-of-care diagnostic devicesCommercialization of microfluidic point-of-care diagnostic devices
Curtis D. Chin, Vincent Linder and Samuel K. Sia
Lab Chip, 2012,12, 2118-2134
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC21204H, Critical Review
From themed collection Focus on USA

Microengineered physiological biomimicry: Organs-on-Chips
Dongeun Huh, Yu-suke Torisawa, Geraldine A. Hamilton, Hyun Jung Kim and Donald E. Ingber
Lab Chip, 2012,12, 2156-2164
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40089H, Frontier

Droplet microfluidics for high-throughput biological assays
Mira T. Guo, Assaf Rotem, John A. Heyman and David A. Weitz
Lab Chip, 2012,12, 2146-2155
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC21147E, Critical Review

Human gut-on-a-chip inhabited by microbial flora that experiences intestinal peristalsis-like motions and flow
Hyun Jung Kim, Dongeun Huh, Geraldine Hamilton and Donald E. Ingber
Lab Chip, 2012,12, 2165-2174
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40074J, Paper

Ensembles of engineered cardiac tissues for physiological and pharmacological study: Heart on a chip
Anna Grosberg, Patrick W. Alford, Megan L. McCain and Kevin Kit Parker
Lab Chip, 2011,11, 4165-4173
DOI: 10.1039/C1LC20557A, Paper

Pinched flow coupled shear-modulated inertial microfluidics for high-throughput rare blood cell separation
Ali Asgar S. Bhagat, Han Wei Hou, Leon D. Li, Chwee Teck Lim and Jongyoon Han
Lab Chip2011,11, 1870-1878
DOI: 10.1039/C0LC00633E, Paper

Deformability-based cell classification and enrichment using inertial microfluidics
Soojung Claire Hur, Nicole K. Henderson-MacLennan, Edward R. B. McCabe and Dino Di Carlo
Lab Chip, 2011,11, 912-920
DOI: 10.1039/C0LC00595A, Paper

Microfluidic fabrication of microengineered hydrogels and their application in tissue engineering
Bong Geun Chung, Kwang-Ho Lee, Ali Khademhosseini and Sang-Hoon Lee
Lab Chip, 2012,12, 45-59
DOI: 10.1039/C1LC20859D, Critical Review

Automated cellular sample preparation using a Centrifuge-on-a-Chip
Albert J. Mach, Jae Hyun Kim, Armin Arshi, Soojung Claire Hur and Dino Di Carlo
Lab Chip, 2011,11, 2827-2834
DOI: 10.1039/C1LC20330D, Paper

Tumour cell identification by means of Raman spectroscopy in combination with optical traps and microfluidic environments
Sebastian Dochow, Christoph Krafft, Ute Neugebauer, Thomas Bocklitz, Thomas Henkel, Günter Mayer, Jens Albert and Jürgen Popp
Lab Chip, 2011,11, 1484-1490
DOI: 10.1039/C0LC00612B, Paper

*Access is free through a registered RSC account – click here to register

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New YouTube Videos

Single-Neuron Axonal Pathfinding under Geometric Guidance: Low-Dose-Methylmercury Developmental Neurotoxicity Test 

  

Finger-Powered Microfluidic Systems Using Multilayer Soft Lithography and Injection Molding Processes 

 

Integrated Immunoisolation and Protein Analysis of Circulating Exosomes Using Microfluidic Technology 

 

A microfluidic approach for investigating multicomponent systems thermodynamics at high pressures and temperatures 

On the flow topology inside droplets moving in rectangular microchannels 

 
 
A Microfluidic Linear Node Array for the Study of Protein-Ligand Interaction 

 

Cavity-Induced Microstreaming for Simultaneous On-Chip Pumping and Size-Based Separation of Cells and Particles 

 

Three-dimensional Flash Flow Microreactor for Scale-up Production of Monodisperse PEG-PLGA Nanoparticles 

Visualizing oil displacement with foam in a microfluidic device with permeability contrasts 

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Whole-in-One: one chamber to amplify DNA from single cells

Researchers at Virginia Tech create an elegant device to perform DNA amplification starting from whole cells by taking advantage of diffusivity differences in PCR components.

Diffusion can be friend or foe in the microscale regime, depending on the application. For active mixing, relying on diffusion can lengthen reaction time and thereby decrease reaction efficiency. But for separating reaction products, low ratios of convection to diffusion (Péclet number) enable control over elements based on their diffusivity[1]. Professors Luke Achenie and Chang Lu from the chemical engineering department at Virginia Tech took advantage of this diffusion-enabled control to combine cell lysis and PCR reactions in ‘one pot’ with temporal separation of how components add to the chamber due to diffusivity differences. Separation of cell lysis and DNA amplification steps in PCR is important as many traditional chemical reagents for cell lysis inhibit polymerases used in PCR and Phusion polymerases tolerant to surfactant lysis reagents are incompatible with downstream SYBR green dyes.

The device consists of a single reaction chamber connected on both sides to two separate loading chambers. A hydration line ensures minimal evaporation during the PCR cycle in the main chamber. The loading chambers are opened in sequence to let molecules into the reaction chamber via two-layer control valves. The substantial difference in reagent diffusivity in the lysis and amplification processes allow diffusion gradients to drive molecules from new solutions contacting the reaction chamber and replace reagents from previous steps without disturbing the DNA of interest. Taq polymerase and proteins are two orders of magnitude larger in diffusivity than typical (50 kb) DNA fragments, while primers, dNTPs, and lysis buffers are three orders smaller. Relying solely on diffusion to deliver reagents to the main chamber increases the time of the reaction, but this can be addressed by elevating the temperature or increasing concentration of starting reagents in the loading chambers.

The authors showed the functionality of their device with purified human genomic DNA as well as single cells. This work opens up new capabilities to perform multi-step preparation and amplification assays for DNA in a single chamber starting directly from few cells to a single cell.

Download the full article today – for free*

Diffusion-based microfluidic PCR for “one-pot” analysis of cells

Sai Ma, Despina Nelie Loufakis, Zhenning Cao, Yiwen Chang, Luke E Achenie and Chang Lu
DOI:10.1039/C4LC00498A

References: [1] T. M. Squires and S. R. Quake, Reviews of Modern Physics, 2005, 77, 977.

*Access is free through a registered RSC account until 19th September 2014 – click here to register

About the Webwriter


Sasha is a PhD student in bioengineering working with Professor Beth Pruitt’s Microsystems lab at Stanford University. Her research focuses on evaluating relationships between cell geometry, intracellular structure, and force generation (contractility) in heart muscle cells. Outside the lab, Sasha enjoys hiking, kickboxing, and interactive science outreach.

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