New YouTube Videos

A field-deployable mobile molecular diagnostic system for malaria at the point of need

Flow-induced phase inversion of emulsions in tapered microchannels

Magnetophoretic transistors in a tri-axial magnetic field

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SLAS2017 International Conference & Exhibition


SLAS2017
is the annual International Conference and Exhibition from the Society of Laboratory Automation and Screening (SLAS). The event will take place at the Walter E Washington Convention Center in  Washington DC, USA  on 4-8 February 2017. Through a unique combination of education, access to innovative technologies and intelligent peer networking, SLAS2017 delivers unmatched value for professionals and students looking to leverage the potential of life sciences discovery and technology. The keynote speakers at this event are Jennifer Lippincott-Schwartz (Group Leader, Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Janelia Research Campus) and Rachel Swaby (Author of “Headstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science—and the World”). Visit the conference website for further details on the themes and speakers, as well as the preliminary scientific program.

Important date: 

23 January 2017 Poster abstract submission deadline

 

Register now to attend and present your work!

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New YouTube Videos

Robust scalable high throughput production of monodisperse drops


Spontaneous transfer of droplets across microfluidic laminar interfaces


Electrocoalescence of paired droplets encapsulated in double-emulsion drops

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New YouTube Videos

A novel viscoelastic-based ferrofluid for continuous sheathless microfluidic separation of nonmagnetic microparticles

 

Dynamics of bacterial streamers induced clogging in microfluidic devices

 

Heterotypic 3D tumor culture in a reusable platform using pneumatic microfluidics

 

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New Lab on a Chip Associate Editor: Joel Voldman

We are very pleased to announce our newest Associate Editor – Joel Voldman!

Joel is a Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, MA. His research is at the intersection of biology and microtechnology, applying microfabrication technology to illuminate biological systems, especially at the cellular level. His group develops technologies that enhance or enable the acquisition of information from cells. Joel’s work builds upon various disciplines: electrical engineering, microfabrication, bioengineering, surface science, fluid mechanics and mass transport. He takes a quantitative approach to designing  technology, using both analytical and numerical modelling to gain fundamental understanding of the technologies.  You can find out more about Joel’s research on his homepageJoel adds “Having been a reader of and contributor to Lab on a Chip since its inception, I am looking forward to helping the journal and the microfluidics community to publish the best microfluidics research here.

Joel will be handling papers from 1 January 2017, so submit your best work to him!

Read Joel’s recent Lab on a Chip paper which was also featured in Chemistry World:

Monitoring sepsis using electrical cell profiling
Javier Prieto, Hao-Wei Su, Han Wei Hou, Miguel Pinilla Vera, Bruce Levy, Rebecca Baron, Jongyoon Han and Joel Voldman
Lab Chip, 2016, 16, 4333-4340
DOI: 10.1039/C6LC00940A

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Abraham (Abe) Lee – Our new Editor-in-Chief

Lab on a Chip is delighted to announce Professor Abe Lee as its new Editor-in-Chief.

Abraham (Abe) Lee is the William J. Link Professor and Chair of the Biomedical Engineering (BME) Department with an appointment also in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE) at the University of California, Irvine in the USA.  He also serves as the Director of the “Center for Advanced Design & Manufacturing of Integrated Microfluidics” (CADMIM), an NSF I/UCRC currently with more than 10 industrial members.  Over his career, Abe has developed a series of lab-on-a-chip devices for biomedical and biotechnological applications.  His current research focuses on the development of active integrated microfluidics and droplet microfluidic platforms for the following applications:  point-of-care and molecular diagnostics, “smart” theranostic microparticles for early detection and treatment, sample preparation for cell sorting and enrichment, single cell processing and analysis, and organ-on-chip devices for drug screening.  His research has also contributed to the founding of several start-up companies.

Abe takes on the he role from Professor George Whitesides, our previous Editor-in-Chief to whom we are extremely grateful for his vision and leadership throughout a period of continued success for the journal. Abe was the first Lab on a Chip Associate Editor who started handling papers in 2011 and now we look forward to working with him as the Editor-in-Chief of the journal towards an even more dynamic and exciting future for Lab on a Chip! Abe adds “I am humbled and honoured to take on the role of Editor-in-Chief for Lab on a Chip.  Now in its 16th year, Lab on a Chip is built on the pioneering visions of “giants of miniaturization”, most notably the founding Managing Editor Harp Minhas and Editor-in-Chief Andreas Manz, followed by George Whitesides’ leadership the last 5 years. The journal has soundly established itself as the leading journal for micro- and nano-scale science and technologies towards the ultimate goal of miniaturizing, accelerating and automating chemical and biological laboratory processes on a “chip-scale” platform. As I assume my new position and announce our new scope, I would like to take this opportunity to wish you a most fulfilling New Year in 2017. ” More details on the revised scope of Lab on a Chip are on the journal webpage.

 

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Symposium Latsis EPFL 2016: Multicellular organisms in microfluidic systems

The Symposium Latsis EPFL 2016 “Multicellular organisms in microfluidic systems” was held from 14 November 2016 to 16 November 2016 at the EPFL campus in Lausanne (Switzerland). The event was co-organised by Prof. Johan Auwerx and Lab on a Chip Advisory Board member Prof. Martin Gijs.

PhD student Li Dong was presented the Poster Award

Studies of living organisms like nematodes and invertebrate embryos in controlled spatio-temporal chemical environments on microfluidic chips are gaining momentum, as these animals offer genetic amenability, low-cost, and culture conditions that are compatible with large-scale screens, while not raising ethical issues. The Latsis Symposium wanted to bridge the gap between microfluidic systems and biological model organism research, by providing an interdisciplinary forum on the technology and applications of microfluidic systems for studies of multicellular organisms in medicine and biology.

Topics covered in each of the sessions were:

  • Phenotyping
  • Imaging Techniques
  • High-throughput techniques
  • Neurobiology
  • Physiology and Development Studies


Among the speakers presenting at the symposium was Prof. Hang Lu (School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia, USA), Lab on a Chip Advisory Board member, who spoke on “Deep Phenotyping Enabled by Microfluidics and High-Throughput Quantitative Microscopy”.

Li Dong's winning poster on "On-chip biocommunication through exchange of compounds secreted by male C. elegans nematodes"

A distinction for the best contributed poster of the Symposium was given to Ph.D. student Li Dong of the Laboratory of Microsystems of EPFL. He received an electronic subscription to the RSC journals Lab on a Chip and Integrative Biology.

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Lab on a Chip will not be accepting new Technical Innovations from 1st December 2016

We would like to inform our authors and readers that as a result of the recent change in the journal scope, the Editorial Board has decided that the journal will not accept Technical Innovations for submission from the 1st December 2016 onwards. All Technical Innovations currently under review for the journal will not be affected.

Technical Innovations currently published in the journal cover new and innovative technologies of immediate value to the Lab-on-a-Chip, micro/nanofluidics or miniaturisation communities or offer novel technical insights to new and/or existing problems.

The revised scope highlights that the journal aims to publish work at the interface between physical technological advancements and high impact applications that are of direct interest to a broad audience. The most important criterion used to assess manuscripts that are submitted to Lab on a Chip is novelty. Papers should demonstrate novelty in both: (i) the device physics, engineering, and materials; and (ii) applications in biology, chemistry, medicine. Submissions that describe novelty in both device and application are most likely to be published.

Outstanding articles featuring novelty in either the device or the application may also be published and therefore articles with outstanding innovation in the device technology may still be submitted to the journal, either as Full Papers or Communications.

For presubmission enquries, please contact the Editorial Office.

Submit your latest research here.

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Major society chemistry publishers jointly commit to integration with ORCID

ORCID provides an identifier for individuals to use with their name as they engage in research, scholarship and innovation activities, ensuring authors gain full credit for their work.

Today, we signed their open letter, along with ACS Publications, committing to unambiguous identification of all authors that publish in our journals.

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The Royal Society of Chemistry and the Publications Division of the American Chemical Society (ACS) today each became signatories to the ORCID Open Letter, reasserting the commitment of both organizations to enhancing the scholarly publishing experience for researchers worldwide who are involved in chemistry and allied fields.

The commitment by these two global chemistry publishers to undertake new workflow integration with technology infrastructure provided by ORCID, a not-for-profit organization that provides unique identifiers for researchers and scholars, will enable both societies to provide unambiguous designation of author names within chemistry and across the broader sciences. This partnership with ORCID will resolve ambiguity in researcher identification caused by name changes, cultural differences in name presentation, and the inconsistent use of name abbreviations that is too often a source of confusion for those who must rely on the published scientific record.

By becoming signatories to the ORCID Open Letter, these two major chemical societies are voicing their intent to collect ORCID iDs for all submitting authors through use of the ORCID API, and to display such identifiers in the articles published in their respective society journals. The integration of such activities within the publishers’ workflows means authors will benefit from automated linkages between their ORCID record and unique identifiers embedded within their published research articles, ensuring their contributions are appropriately recognized and credited.

During the publishing process, ACS and the Royal Society of Chemistry will automatically deposit publications to Crossref, which in turn will coordinate with ORCID to link and update the publishing activity populated to authors’ respective ORCID profiles, thus attributing each published work to the correct researcher. Existing holders of an ORCID iD will encounter a one-time prompt to grant permission for the linkage. If authors do not have an ORCID iD, they can easily enroll without navigating away from the publishers’ manuscript submission site. If users wish to revoke integrated ORCID profile access at any time, they can elect to do so through their ACS, Royal Society of Chemistry or ORCID accounts.

Both ACS Publications and the Royal Society of Chemistry understand the importance of attributing accurately the scholarly contributions of research scientists in the context of their other professional activities. “ACS has supported ORCID since the outset of the initiative,” says Sarah Tegen, Ph.D., Vice President of Global Editorial & Author Services at ACS Publications. “We are pleased now to align with the Royal Society of Chemistry in this endeavor, as both societies underscore our willingness not only to encourage and assist our respective authors in establishing their unique ORCID profiles, but also to help tackle the broader challenge of researcher name disambiguation in the scholarly literature. With the integration of author ORCID iDs in our publishing workflows, we will ensure that researchers receive proper credit for their accomplishments.”

Emma Wilson, Ph.D., Director of Publishing at the Royal Society of Chemistry adds, “We have been a supporter of ORCID since 2013, recognizing the benefits it brings to researchers; ORCID can and will make a huge difference to our authors’ ability to gain full credit for their work. ORCID will also help researchers meet the requirements of their research funders — for example, a number of funders have already announced that all grant applicants must now include a researcher’s ORCID iD. A unified system that integrates and links research-related information with accurate and timely linkage to the publishing output of authors has the potential to simplify and speed up their grant applications — something we know is important to researchers.”

“The ACS and the Royal Society of Chemistry have been long-standing supporters of ORCID,” says Laurel Haak, Ph.D., Executive Director, ORCID. “We are pleased to see ORCID integration into ACS and Royal Society of Chemistry Publications systems. This will be a substantial benefit to researchers in the chemistry community, both in improving search and discovery of research articles, and for attribution and recognition of researchers’ contributions to the discipline.”

About the American Chemical Society and ACS Publications

The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With nearly 157,000 members, ACS is the world’s largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

ACS Publications, a division of the American Chemical Society, is a nonprofit scholarly publisher of 50 peer-reviewed journals and a range of eBooks at the interface of chemistry and allied sciences, including physics and biology. ACS Publications journals are among the most-cited, most-trusted and most-read within the scientific literature. Respected for their editorial rigor, ACS journals offer high-quality service to authors and readers, including rapid time to publication, a range of channels for researchers to access ACS Publications’ award-winning web and mobile delivery platforms, and a comprehensive program of open access publishing options for authors and their funders. ACS Publications also publishes Chemical & Engineering News — the Society’s newsmagazine covering science and technology, business and industry, government and policy, education and employment aspects of the chemistry field.

About the Royal Society of Chemistry

The Royal Society of Chemistry is the world’s leading chemistry community, advancing excellence in the chemical sciences. With over 50,000 members and a knowledge business that spans the globe, we are the U.K.’s professional body for chemical scientists; a not-for-profit organisation with 175 years of history and an international vision for the future. We promote, support and celebrate chemistry. We work to shape the future of the chemical sciences — for the benefit of science and humanity.

About ORCID

ORCID’s vision is a world where all who participate in research, scholarship and innovation are uniquely identified and connected to their contributions across disciplines, borders and time. ORCID provides an identifier for individuals to use with their name as they engage in research, scholarship and innovation activities. It provides open tools that enable transparent and trustworthy connections between researchers, their contributions and affiliations. The organization provides this service to help people find information and to simplify reporting and analysis. ORCID is a not-for-profit organization, sustained by fees from member organizations. Its work is open, transparent and non-proprietary. The organization strives to be a trusted component of research infrastructure with the goal of providing clarity in the breadth of research contributions and the people who make them.

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What can a magnet do?

The magic of magnetism can be shown through a simple classroom demonstration of bringing two magnetic pieces together and then trying to pull them apart. The attraction between the opposite poles of the magnets becomes very apparent as you struggle to tear them apart. This simple concept can be applied to lab-on-a-chip devices to eliminate the need for off-device hardware with power requirements, and therefore, enable the use of lab-on-a-chip technology in low-resource settings.

The majority of existing lab-on-a-chip systems use manual pipettes, syringe pumps, or pressure pump systems to manipulate the fluid flow. The dependence on off-chip hardware, however, makes the integration of these systems into low-cost environments rather challenging. Researchers in both, academia and industry think that this challenge can be addressed by “manually operated self-contained microfluidic devices”, which has gained significant attention over the past couple of years. In line with this objective, magnetically-adhesive based valves have for the first time shown to control fluid flow in a microfluidic device in a recent collaboration work by Sandia National Labs and Qorvo Inc. Here, the “magnetic-adhesive based valve” simply consists of a disk magnet seated on a thin ring of adhesive material.

In this study, a microfluidic device is designed to perform bioassays and contains a port connecting two chambers in different planes. The port is closed by an internal magnet located on a pressure-sensitive adhesive tape, and is opened by the help of an external magnet which displaces the internal magnet (figure 1). When the port is open, the reagents can flow in the microchannels, as shown in figure 2. The adhesive tape prevents any leakage within the microchip, while the magnet serves as an actuatable gate for reagents. The microfluidic device, therefore, allows for storage and on-demand transport of different types of reagents (both liquid, solid, and gas) to perform bioassays.

Magnetic-adhesive based valves are fabricated at the millimeter-scale, however, it is possible to manufacture micron-sized valves depending on the resolution of the laser ablation system used to cut the valve layout. Design considerations and characterization of magnetic-adhesive based valves are further addressed in the paper. Apart from this, the self-contained device is made of low-cost materials (such as PMMA and magnetic alloys), resulting in a fabrication cost as low as 0.2 dollars per chip. As portable and low-cost devices start to draw increasing attention in lab-on-a-chip technology, this work might be an important milestone for next generation micro total analysis systems.

Magnetic valves for lab on a chip sytems

Figure 1. Schematic and photos of magnetic-adhesive based valve working mechanism.

Magnetic valves for lab on a chip devices

Figure 2. Controlled transport and reaction of the stored components in a simple, power- and instrument-free manner in a three chambered microfluidic device.

This is a recently published Hot article and you can download it for free* by clicking the link below:

Magnetic-adhesive based valves for microfluidic devices used in low-resource settings

Jason C. Harper, Jenna M. Andrews, Candice Ben, Andrew C. Hunt, Jaclyn K. Murton, Bryan D. Carson, George D. Bachand, Julie A. Lovchik, William D. Arndt, Melissa R. Finley and Thayne L. Edwards

Lab Chip, 2016, Recent HOT Articles

DOI: 10.1039/C6LC00858E


About the Webwriter

Burcu Gumuscu is a postdoctoral fellow in BIOS Lab on a Chip Group at University of Twente in The Netherlands.

Her research interests include development of microfluidic devices for next generation sequencing, compartmentalized organ-on-chip studies, and desalination of water on the microscale .

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