Archive for the ‘Hot Article’ Category

Point-of-Care Paper Based Rapid Allergy Diagnostics

Recent surveys from Allergy UK have shown that the rates of allergy are increasing throughout the world, affecting up to 30-35 % of people at some point during their lives, in some cases with fatal consequences. In vitro testing of specific Immunoglobin E (IgE) reactivities is thought to be able to significantly improve diagnostic accuracy and management in primary care. IgE plays a significant role in allergic conditions. Current methods for the sensitive and accurate detection of specific IgE reactivities are expensive; require significant sample preparation and investment in equipment. There is a need to provide a cheap, rapid, sensitive and specific test for IgE reactivities.

In a recent HOT article, a group of Swedish and Dutch Scientists describe a paper based lateral flow microarray for rapid allergy diagnostics. One of the authors, Jesper Gantelius of the Science for Life Laboratory, highlights “There is a rapid worldwide increase in atopic disorders and asthma without a clear understanding of the underlying cause. We have developed a paper-based microarray assay that could be used to rapidly and cost-efficiently evaluate a large number of specific IgE sensitisation’s in a primary care setting. The device may come to aid doctors in the personalised management of individual patients, as well as allow public health bodies to gain a better insight into the rapid increase of allergy-related conditions.”

The group, led by Prof. Helene Andersson Svahn, describe exciting research that was able to detect the responses of 15 specific IgE responses from 35 clinical serum samples with an inter-assay variability of 12 % revealing good general agreement with a current multiplexed array-based methodology. Interestingly this process is fully scalable and all that is required for data feedback is a consumer-grade flatbed scanner or smartphone camera enabling point-of-care diagnostics.

A lateral flow paper microarray for rapid allergy point of care diagnostics

Thiruppathiraja ChinnasamyLoes I. Segerink, Mats Nystrand, Jesper Gantelius and Helene Andersson Svahn

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HOT articles in Analyst

Take a look at our new HOT articles just published in Analyst and free for you for the next couple of weeks: Graphical abstract: Electrochemiluminescence resonance energy transfer between graphene quantum dots and gold nanoparticles for DNA damage detection

Electrochemiluminescence resonance energy transfer between graphene quantum dots and gold nanoparticles for DNA damage detection
Qian Lu, Wei Wei, Zhenxian Zhou, Zhixin Zhou, Yuanjian Zhang and Songqin Liu
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00020J, Paper

A lateral flow paper microarray for rapid allergy point of care diagnostics
Thiruppathiraja Chinnasamy, Loes I. Segerink, Mats Nystrand, Jesper Gantelius and Helene Andersson Svahn
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN01806G, Paper

Nanoparticles in sensing applications: on what timescale do analyte species adsorb on the particle surface?
Enno Kätelhön and Richard G. Compton
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00363B, Paper

The use of EEM fluorescence data and OPLS/UPLS-DA algorithm to discriminate between normal and cancer cell lines: a feasibility study
Ana Carolina de Oliveira Neves, Raimundo Fernandes de Araújo Júnior, Ana Luiza Cabral de Sá Leitão Oliveira, Aurigena Antunes de Araújo and Kássio Michell Gomes de Lima Graphical abstract: A lateral flow paper microarray for rapid allergy point of care diagnostics
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00296B, Paper

Enhancing permanganate chemiluminescence detection for the determination of glutathione and glutathione disulfide in biological matrices
Zoe M. Smith, Jessica M. Terry, Neil W. Barnett, Laura J. Gray, Dean J. Wright and Paul S. Francis
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00255E, Paper

Mass spectrometric investigation of the role of the linking polypeptide chain in DNA polymerase I
Taeho Yeom, Jungyoon Lee, Seonghyun Lee, Sunah Kang, Kyung Rok Kim, Byungwoo Han, Hyun Soo Lee and Kyubong Jo
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00107A, Paper

Optimizing detection of RDX vapors using designed experiments for remote sensing
Robert G. Ewing, Alejandro Heredia-Langner and Marvin G. WarnerGraphical abstract: Nanoparticles in sensing applications: on what timescale do analyte species adsorb on the particle surface?
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00125G, Paper

Mixed hydrogel bead-based tumor spheroid formation and anticancer drug testing
Yaolei Wang and Jinyi Wang
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00015C, Paper

Carbon nanobelts as a novel sensing platform for fluorescence-enhanced DNA detection
Xuping Sun, Zhicai Xing, Rui Ning, Abdullah M. Asiri and Abdullah Y. Obaid
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN02364H, Communication

To view these article for free, please register for a free RSC account here

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Analytical tools made from ordinary office paper

Commonplace equipment can turn office paper into cheap, portable and disposable electrochemical devices that are ideal for using in remote locations.

The simple sensors from William de Araujo and Thiago da Paixão at the University of São Paulo, Brazil combine silver ink with ordinary office paper. Office paper is 97% cheaper than the chromatography paper commonly used in cutting-edge paper-based sensors.

To read the full article by Hazel Neighbour, please go to Chemistry World.

Fabrication of disposable electrochemical devices using silver ink and office paper
William Araujo and Thiago Regis Longo Cesar Paixão
Analyst, 2014, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00097H, Paper

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HOT articles in Analyst

Take a look at our new HOT articles just published in Analyst and free for you for the next couple of weeks: Graphical abstract: Improving the fluorescence detection limit with positively charged carbon nanostructures as a low background signal platform

Recent advances in sample preparation techniques to overcome difficulties encountered during quantitative analysis of small molecules from biofluids using LC-MS/MS
Caroline Bylda, Roland Thiele, Uwe Kobold and Dietrich A. Volmer
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00094C, Minireview

Convenient detection of the thiol functional group using H/D isotope sensitive Raman spectroscopy
Sabyasachi Bandyopadhyay and Abhishek Dey
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN02166A, Communication

Improving the fluorescence detection limit with positively charged carbon nanostructures as a low background signal platform
Xiulan He, Li Zhang, Hetong Qi, Ping Yu, Junjie Fei and Lanqun Mao
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00124A, Communication

Femtoliter-scale separation and sensitive detection of nonfluorescent samples in an extended-nano fluidic device
Hisashi Shimizu, Kazuma Mawatari and Takehiko Kitamori
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN02353B, Paper

To view these article for free, please register for a free RSC account here

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HOT articles in Analyst

Take a look at our new HOT articles just published in Analyst and free for you for the next couple of weeks: Graphical abstract: Viral plaque analysis on a wide field-of-view, time-lapse, on-chip imaging platform

Viral plaque analysis on a wide field-of-view, time-lapse, on-chip imaging platform
Chao Han and Changhuei Yang
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN02323K, Paper

IR action spectroscopy shows competitive oxazolone and diketopiperazine formation in peptides depends on peptide length and identity of terminal residue in the departing fragment
L. J. Morrison, J. Chamot-Rooke and V. H. Wysocki
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00064A, Paper

Energy-resolved collision-induced dissociation pathways of model N-linked glycopeptides: implications for capturing glycan connectivity and peptide sequence in a single experiment
Venkata Kolli and Eric D. Dodds
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN02342G, Paper

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HOT articles in Analyst

Take a look at our new HOT articles just published in Analyst and free for you for the next couple of weeks: Graphical abstract: Live-cell vibrational imaging of choline metabolites by stimulated Raman scattering coupled with isotope-based metabolic labeling

Live-cell vibrational imaging of choline metabolites by stimulated Raman scattering coupled with isotope-based metabolic labeling
Fanghao Hu, Lu Wei, Chaogu Zheng, Yihui Shen and Wei Min
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN02281A, Communication

Chip based single cell analysis for nanotoxicity assessment
Pratikkumar Shah, Ajeet Kaushik, Xuena Zhu, Chengxiao Zhang and Chen-Zhong Li
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN02280C, Minireview

Chemical imaging of artificial fingerprints by desorption electro-flow focusing ionization mass spectrometry
Thomas P. Forbes and Edward Sisco
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00172A, Communication

Binding assay for low molecular weight analytes based on reflectometry of absorbing molecules in porous substrates
Milena Stephan, Corinna Kramer, Claudia Steinem and Andreas Janshoff
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00009A, Paper

Quantized double layer charging of Au130(SR)50 nanomoleculesGraphical abstract: Chemical imaging of artificial fingerprints by desorption electro-flow focusing ionization mass spectrometry
Vijay Reddy Jupally, Jacob G. Thrasher and Amala Dass
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN02204H, Communication

Robotic plasma probe ionization mass spectrometry (RoPPI-MS) of non-planar surfaces
Rachel V. Bennett, Ezequiel M. Morzan, Jacob O. Huckaby, María Eugenia Monge, Henrick I. Christensen and Facundo M. Fernández
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4AN00277F, Communication

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Femtoliter-Scale Separation and Sensitive Detection Using Nanofluidics

An image of liquid chromatography using nanofluidic chip and DIC-TLM

Liquid chromatography using nanofluidic chip and DIC-TLM

The field of separation science has been continually evolving to enable the separation of smaller volumes. This interdisciplinary field has required developments in capillary electrophoresis, microfluidics and new detection technologies such as plasmonic sensing and thermal lensing. 

Researchers from the Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Tokyo lead by Prof. Kitamori have shown the ability to perform femtolitre (1 x 10-15) separation and detection of nonfluorescent samples in a nanofluidic device. Using an extended nanofluidic device the researchers were able to separate and detect nonfluorescent molecules for the first time. Previous detection methodologies relied mainly on laser-induced fluorescence. 

The researchers showed the ability of nanofluidic separation science combined with differential interference contrast thermal lens microscopy (DIC-TLM) to enable detection of 370 molecules in a 2.3 μm wide by 350 nm deep nanochannel with a separation efficiency of 150,000 plates/m. DIC-TLM is thermal lens microscopy with an increased detection limit by realising background-free photodetection using differential interference contrast. 

Amazingly the injection volume and number of molecules were estimate to be 21 fL (1 x 10-15) and 250 zmol at the limit of detection. This limit of detection provides separation of a sample 8 orders of magnitude smaller that that possible with high-performance liquid chromatography. This injection volume is much smaller than a single cell and detection limit is similar to the number of typical protein molecules in a single cells. Providing a promising tool for single cell research. 

To read more about this research download the HOT article which is free to access until April 5th 

Femtoliter-Scale Separation and Sensitive Detection of Nonfluorescent Samples in an Extended-Nano Fluidic Device
Hisashi Shimizu, Kazuma Mawatari and Takehiko Kitamori 
Analyst, 2014, Accepted Manuscript

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Novel analytical technique for profiling enteric coated drugs

An image of enteric coated drug delivery spheres dissolving while being profiled by Broadband Acoustic Resonance Dissolution Spectroscopy (BARDS)

The authors work features on the front cover of Issue 5

This blog has been written by Adam Davis, a Guest Web-Writer for Analyst and Analytical Methods.

Enteric coatings are used to protect acid labile active pharmaceutical ingredients upon entry into the stomach, allowing for controlled and sustained release of active ingredients to the small intestine later. Enteric coated formulations typically consist of a sugar core, a layer of active ingredient followed by the enteric coating. Using current analysis methods determining the thickness of these layers can take up to 24hrs.

In this article, which appears in Issue 5 of Analyst, researchers from University College Cork, Ireland and Kinetox, Netherlands, have demonstrated how Broadband Acoustic Resonance Dissolution Spectroscopy (BARDS) can be used for rapid profiling of enteric coated spheres. The BARDS technique is a novel approach which utilises the acoustic signature of cores spheres and enteric coating as they dissolve, which arise as result of the changes in compressibility of the solvent as a compound dissolves in it. This alters the speed of sound through the solvent, which in turn changes the frequency in solution. The use of BARDS has important implications for manufacturing, quality assurance and stability testing for pharmaceuticals.

Rapid profiling of enteric coated drug delivery spheres via Broadband Acoustic Resonance Dissolution Spectroscopy (BARDS)
D. Fitzpatrick, R. Evans-Hurson, Y. Fu, T. Burke, J. Krüse, B. Vos, S. G. McSweeney, P. Casaubieilh and J. J. Keating
Analyst, 2014, 139, 1000-1006
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN01809A

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HOT articles in Analyst

Take a look at our new HOT articles just published in Analyst and free for you for the next couple of weeks: Graphical abstract: An antibody-free microfluidic paper-based analytical device for the determination of tear fluid lactoferrin by fluorescence sensitization of Tb3+

An antibody-free microfluidic paper-based analytical device for the determination of tear fluid lactoferrin by fluorescence sensitization of Tb3+
Kentaro Yamada, Shunsuke Takaki, Nobutoshi Komuro, Koji Suzuki and Daniel Citterio
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN01926H, Paper

Protein binding for detection of small changes on a nanoparticle surface
Shang Zeng, Yu-ming M. Huang, Chia-en A. Chang and Wenwan Zhong
Analyst, 2014,139, 1364-1371
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN02155F, Paper

Proteomic evaluation of citrate-coated silver nanoparticles toxicity in Daphnia magna
Louis-Charles Rainville, Darragh Carolan, Ana Coelho Varela, Hugh Doyle and David Sheehan
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN02160B, Paper

Oxidized polyethylene films for orienting polar molecules for linear dichroism spectroscopy
Kasra Razmkhah, Nikola Paul Chmel, Matthew I. Gibson and Alison Rodger
Analyst, 2014,139, 1372-1382
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN02322B, Paper Graphical abstract: Making a big thing of a small cell – recent advances in single cell analysis

Solid-phase extraction and purification of membrane proteins using a UV-modified PMMA microfluidic bioaffinity μSPE device
Katrina N. Battle, Joshua M. Jackson, Małgorzata A. Witek, Mateusz L. Hupert, Sally A. Hunsucker, Paul M. Armistead and Steven A. Soper
Analyst, 2014,139, 1355-1363
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN02400H, Paper

Non-invasive mouthguard biosensor for continuous salivary monitoring of metabolites
Jayoung Kim, Gabriela Valdés-Ramírez, Amay J. Bandodkar, Wenzhao Jia, Alexandra G. Martinez, Julian Ramírez, Patrick Mercier and Joseph Wang
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN02359A, Paper

Making a big thing of a small cell – recent advances in single cell analysis
Kerstin Galler, Katharina Bräutigam, Christina Große, Jürgen Popp and Ute Neugebauer
Analyst, 2014,139, 1237-1273
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN01939J, Critical Review

Advances in nanowire transistors for biological analysis and cellular investigation
Bor-Ran Li, Chiao-Chen Chen, U. Rajesh Kumar and Yit-Tsong Chen
Analyst, 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN01861J, Critical Review

High resolution magic angle spinning NMR as a tool for unveiling the molecular enantiorecognition of omeprazole by amylose-based chiral phase
Juliana Cristina Barreiro, Tiago de Campos Lourenço, Lorena Mara A. Silva, Tiago Venâncio and Quezia Bezerra Cass
Analyst, 2014,139, 1350-1354
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN02029K, Paper Graphical abstract: Intra-molecular reactions as a new approach to investigate bio-radical reactivity: a case study of cysteine sulfinyl radicals

Intra-molecular reactions as a new approach to investigate bio-radical reactivity: a case study of cysteine sulfinyl radicals
Kirt L. Durand, Xiaoxiao Ma and Yu Xia
Analyst, 2014,139, 1327-1330
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN02307A, Communication

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The Ongoing Hunt for Deadly Microbes – A New Lateral Flow Assay for Pathogen Detection

Early and accurate monitoring of pathogens such as Escherichia coli is critical for food and water safety, clinical diagnosis, and biosecurity. However there are a number of limitations to current detection methods such as cell culturing, and immunoassays. These drawbacks include non-specificity, insensitivity, as well as the requirement of long analysis time, intensive labor, and extensive sample purification. To address some of these limitations, Christopher Pöhlmann and his colleagues from the University of Bayreuth in Germany have developed a lateral flow device based on a sandwich assay design using gold nanoparticle-oligonucleotides to detect ribosomal RNA of E. coli. The new device is able to provide specific detection of E. coli within 25 minutes and requires no signal amplification step.

A Lateral Flow Assay for Detection of E. coli Ribosomal RNA

A Lateral Flow Assay for Detection of E. coli Ribosomal RNA

Find out more about this discovery by reading the full paper below, which is free to download until March 7th:

A lateral flow assay for identification of Escherichia coli by ribosomal RNA hybridization
Christopher Pöhlmann, Irina Dieser and Mathias Sprinzl
Analyst, 2014, 139, 1063-1071
DOI: 10.1039/C3AN02059B

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