Catalysis Science & Technology and RSC Advances joint 10th Anniversary collections: Asymmetric catalysis

This year, we are celebrating 10 years of both Catalysis Science & Technology and RSC Advances and we have taken this opportunity to celebrate together. Looking back over the last decade, we would like to showcase some of the very best articles that have been published in our journals. Many of these papers are highly cited, providing valuable advances for further research, and some continue to be among the journals’ most downloaded articles as of today.

We hope you enjoy our 10th Anniversary collections!

RSC Advances and Catalysis Science & Technology Editorial teams

 

Highlighted articles

Engineering an alcohol dehydrogenase with enhanced activity and stereoselectivity toward diaryl ketones: reduction of steric hindrance and change of the stereocontrol element
Kai Wu, Zhijun Yang, Xiangguo Meng, Rong Chen, Jiankun Huang and Lei Shao
Catalysis Science & Technology, Article, 2020

 

 

The role of biocatalysis in the asymmetric synthesis of alkaloids – an update
Emmanuel Cigan, Bettina Eggbauer, Joerg H. Schrittwieser and Wolfgang Kroutil
RSC Advances, Review, 2021

 

Prediction on the origin of selectivities of NHC-catalyzed asymmetric dearomatization (CADA) reactions
Yang Wang, Qiu-Yu Wu, Tian-Hua Lai, Kai-Jun Zheng, Ling-Bo Qu and Donghui Wei
Catalysis Science & Technology, Article, 2018

 

Asymmetric catalysis in direct nitromethane-free Henry reactions
Lin Dong and Fen-Er Chen
RSC Advances, Article, 2020

 

Read the full collection

 

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Catalysis Science & Technology and RSC Advances joint 10th Anniversary collections: Catalysis for sustainable development

This year, we are celebrating 10 years of both Catalysis Science & Technology and RSC Advances and we have taken this opportunity to celebrate together. Looking back over the last decade, we would like to showcase some of the very best articles that have been published in our journals. Many of these papers are highly cited, providing valuable advances for further research, and some continue to be among the journals’ most downloaded articles as of today.

We hope you enjoy our 10th Anniversary collections!

Catalysis Science & Technology and RSC Advances Editorial teams

 

Highlighted articles

Recent progress with electrocatalysts for urea electrolysis in alkaline media for energy-saving hydrogen production
Xiujuan Sun and Rui Ding
Catalysis Science & Technology, Minireview, 2020

 

 

A short review of recent advances in CO2 hydrogenation to hydrocarbons over heterogeneous catalysts
Wenhui Li, Haozhi Wang, Xiao Jiang, Jie Zhu, Zhongmin Liu, Xinwen Guo and Chunshan Song
RSC Advances, Review, 2018

 

A plasmonic AuPd bimetallic nanoalloy decorated over a GO/LDH hybrid nanocomposite via a green synthesis route for robust Suzuki coupling reactions: a paradigm shift towards a sustainable future
Mitarani Sahoo, Sriram Mansingh, Satyabrata Subudhi, Priyabrat Mohapatra and Kulamani Parida
Catalysis Science & Technology, Article, 2019

 

Fabrication of CS/GA/RGO/Pd composite hydrogels for highly efficient catalytic reduction of organic pollutants
Lei Ge, Meng Zhang, Ran Wang, Na Li, Lexin Zhang, Shufeng Liu and Tifeng Jiao
RSC Advances, Article, 2020

 

Read the full collection

 

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Emerging Investigator Series – Rafael Gramage-Doria

 

Rafael Gramage-Doria received his PhD (2012) from the University of Strasbourg (France) with Prof. Dominique Armspach and Dr Dominique Matt. After a postdoctoral NWO-Rubicon fellowship with Prof. Joost N. H. Reek at the University of Amsterdam (Netherlands) and later with Prof. Takashi Ooi at Nagoya University (Japan), he joined the Institute of Chemical Sciences of the University of Rennes (France) as a CNRS senior researcher in 2015, where he obtained his Habilitation diploma (2019).

His research activities include transition metal catalysis for fine chemicals and green chemistry applications, C–H bond functionalization, supramolecular and coordination chemistry, and supramolecular and bio-inspired catalysis. He is author of >40 publications and he has delivered >30 (inter)national lectures.

Read his Emerging Investigator article “Ruthenium-catalysed oxidative coupling of vinyl derivatives and application in tandem hydrogenation” and read more about his in the interview below:

How do you feel about Catalysis Science & Technology as a place to publish?

Catal. Sci. Technol. is regarded as one of the most important journals in the area of catalysis not only because of the excellent impact factor but also because it ensures worldwide visibility of our research contributions. The broad readership is ensured by the different topics related to catalysis from fundamental/specific questions to practical applications. Our humble experience with editors and reviewers has been excellent due to the high standards and professionalism they have.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment and what do you find most challenging about your research?

We are chemists performing research on homogeneous catalysis using organometallic complexes in the broad sense. Developing new chemical reactions as well as controlling the selectivity when multiple products can form is highly attractive for us. To meet this challenge, we rationally design appropriate organometallic catalysts as well as to carefully fine-tune the reaction conditions.

In your opinion, what are the most important questions to be asked/answered in this field of research?

In my opinion, the most interesting scientific questions to be addressed in the future is how to design more powerful, more selective and less energetically demanding catalytic systems. In other words, how can we get more efficient man made catalysts? And the answer to this question might be to look at nature’s catalysts, enzymes, which display unparalleled activity and selectivity in biological transformations. The idea to mimic (some of) their features for implementation in abiological catalysts is a promising pathway.

Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?

I do not feel to be in a position to give any advice at all publicly, but I could share a couple of really good advices I received when I was younger: (1) when preparing a manuscript (or an oral presentation), keep in mind the reader (or the audience) in order to make clear what you wish to communicate (the not-so-hidden message is to provide nice scheme/figures and attractive text); (2) always ask yourself and colleagues what is the fundamental scientific question you are addressing in that project or in that experiment; and (3) be supportive and helpful towards students, we all have been there, so do not forget that.

Keep up to date with Rafael and his research by following his Twitter @Rafa_gramage, and visit his group website here.

 

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Emerging Investigator Series – David Nelson

Dr David Nelson studied chemistry at the Universities of Edinburgh (MChem, 2008) and Strathclyde (PhD, 2012 with Prof. J. M. Percy). He was then a Research Fellow at the University of St. Andrews (2012-14 with Prof. S. P. Nolan) before taking up a Chancellor’s Fellowship at the University of Strathclyde (2014), where he was promoted to Senior Lecturer in 2018. He received a Bürgenstock Junior Scientists Programme Fellowship in 2019 and a Thieme Chemistry Journals Award in 2020. David joined the editorial board of Communications Chemistry in 2020.

David and his team use tools and techniques from physical (in)organic, organometallic, organic and computational chemistry to understand reaction mechanisms and structure/reactivity relationships in homogeneous catalysis mediated by transition metal complexes. Current areas of focus include nickel-catalysed cross-coupling reactions and iridium-catalysed C-H activation reactions.

 

Read his Emerging Investigator article “Are rate and selectivity correlated in iridium-catalysed hydrogen isotope exchange reactions?” and read more about his in the interview below:

How do you feel about Catalysis Science & Technology as a place to publish?

I’ve always found publishing with the journal to be quite painless. The review process is smooth, the tracker is excellent (and provides more/more up-to-date information than other publishers do), and we’ve always had constructive comments from reviewers and editors that have allowed us to improve our manuscripts.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment and what do you find most challenging about your research?

We are really interested in understanding reaction mechanisms and how this understanding can be used to optimise reaction conversion and selectivity, and to make reactions more efficient. I really enjoy working with reactions where there is a lot to discover, and where there are still some big questions to be answered. It’s often quite challenging to move beyond empirical observations of “this reaction gives X% yield” or “this is the order of reactivity” to truly understand why this is observed.

In your opinion, what are the most important questions to be asked/answered in this field of research?

For C-H activation I think, depending on the specific reaction, there still remain some challenges around decreasing catalyst loadings and around understanding and predicting selectivity. When I teach C-H activation to our undergraduates I like to point towards iridium-catalysed C-H borylation as an excellent reaction that’s widely used across academia and industry, exactly because we can often work at reasonably low catalyst loadings and predict selectivity quite reliably.

Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?

Advice is always tricky to give out, because everyone has a different experience of life and a different career path, but I would encourage early career scientists to consider empathy as an important attribute. It’s always worth considering things from multiple perspectives, when you interact with people directly or indirectly: your students, senior colleagues, technical staff, reviewers, the authors of the papers and grants you review, and so on. What would you want from that interaction, if you were in their shoes? What else might they be dealing with?

Keep up to date with David and his research by following his Twitter @TheNelsonGroup

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Emerging Investigator Series – Sophie Carenco

Sophie Carenco graduated from Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, in 2008. She obtained her PhD in 2011 from University Pierre & Marie Curie, Paris, for her work on the synthesis and applications of metal phosphide nanoparticles. From 2012 to 2013, she was a post-doctoral fellow at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, California, in the group of Prof. Miquel Salmeron, where she used synchrotron-based in situ spectroscopies to monitor the surface state of metallic nanoparticles during catalytic reactions.

In 2014, she joined CNRS as a researcher in Laboratoire de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Paris (LCMCP), associated with Sorbonne Université, CNRS and Collège de France. She works on novel synthetic routes of exotic nanomaterials for energy-relevant challenges such as CO2 valorization. In 2017, she was awarded an ERC Starting Grant to work on small molecules activation at the surface of nanoparticles.

She was awarded the European Young Chemist Award from EuCheMS in 2010 and the C’Nano National Award in 2012 for her PhD work. More recently, she was awarded the Bronze Medal of CNRS, the Jean Rist Medal of SF2M. In relation with the interdisciplinary character of her research, she received the Young Researcher Award of Physical Chemistry division of SCF-SFP (2018) and the Young Researcher Award of the Catalysis Division of the French Chemical Society (2021). In 2020, she was the recipient of the Clara Immerwahr Award, from the German consortium UniSysCat. In 2021, she received the Researcher Award from the Solid State Chemistry division of the French Chemical Society. She is also involved in science outreach: she published in 2012 a short book about nanomaterials and chemistry.

Read her Emerging Investigator article “Influence of the copper precursor on the catalytic transformation of oleylamine during Cu nanoparticle synthesis” and read more about her in the interview below:

How do you feel about Catalysis Science & Technology as a place to publish?

As my work deals with reactivity and catalysis at the frontier of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, this journal is a nice venue to publish our latest results. I enjoy the fact that mechanistic works, focused on deciphering the underlying processes rather than on the catalysts performance, are welcome in CatSciTech.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment and what do you find most challenging about your research?

I am excited about our research line on colloidal catalysis, which is neither traditional homogeneous catalysis nor typical of heterogeneous catalysis studies. In the ERC project “NanoFLP”, we focus on the interface of metal-containing nanoparticles with solutions containing strong ligands. Nowadays, a range of tools are available to monitor this interface, which provides us with new insights on the dynamics of the interface, and an opportunity to enhance the reactivity toward small molecules.

In your opinion, what are the most important questions to be asked/answered in this field of research?

I believe we should pursue a fundamental approach that properly characterizes the amount and nature of surface ligands, while also considering the exchanges with the surrounding solution and the metal core restructuring. Both phenomena are intertwined. We should expand the variety of examples, beyond the typical CdSe or gold nanoparticles, reaching to multimetallic nanoparticles but also less common phases such as metal carbides or metal oxysulfides.

Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?

I would mention two things: First, don’t work in a bubble, seek feedback from your advisors but also from your peers, which you can do at your university or through younger chemists networks such as IYCN or YEuCAT. Second, target the core question in your research topic sooner than later: you will be able to optimize yields or performance only if you get an in-depth understanding of the catalyst you work with.

 

Follow @SophieCARENCO on Twitter to keep updated with her and her research!

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Emerging Investigator Series – Takashi Toyao

Takashi Toyao obtained his PhD from Osaka Prefecture University under the supervision of Prof. Masaya Matsuoka for the development of photocatalysts based on metal–organic frameworks and porous coordination polymers. Since 2015, He has served as Assistant Professor at Hokkaido University, where he enjoys catalysis research in an international research group with fantastic collaborators. His research interests include CO2 utilization, automotive emission control, and lower alkanes upgrading using spectroscopic, theoretical and data science approaches.

Read his Emerging Investigator article “Reverse water-gas shift reaction over Pt/MoOx/TiO2: reverse Mars–van Krevelen mechanism via redox of supported MoOx” and read more about him in the interview below:

How do you feel about Catalysis Science & Technology as a place to publish?

I am very excited because Catalysis Science & Technology is a leading journal in the field of catalysis. I am also grateful to the co-authors who not only made this possible but made it an extremely pleasant and joyful journey.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment and what do you find most challenging about your research?

I am looking forward to continuing my work on the low-temperature reverse water-gas shift (RWGS) reaction we explored in this most recent publication as well as on reactions that would help to solve energy and environmental issues. We try to seamlessly integrate experiment, theory and data science to realize catalysts development and to gain a better understanding of on structure-performance relationship. I hope these activities would lead to establishing a new methodology that accelerate paradigm shift away from the use of traditional catalysis research where trial-and-error methods are already reaching the limit

In your opinion, what are the most important questions to be asked/answered in this field of research?

I think that rational catalyst design would be the most important. The discovery of truly novel catalysts and catalytic reactions is a formidable task, and as a result, many of the advances in this field of catalysis have arisen from trial-and-error investigations which are often too resource intensive and intellectually frustrating. Establishing effective and accurate catalyst design guides through the fundamental understanding of catalytic processes could accelerate the development of novel catalysts.

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Emerging Investigator Series – Chunfei Wu

 

Dr Chunfei Wu is a Reader at the School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering and the Chemical Engineering Programme Lead at Queen’s University Belfast. He has worked in the areas of converting renewable and waste resources to energy, fuel, and chemicals through catalytic thermo-chemical routes for more than 15 years. Dr Wu has also been involved in several EPSRC, Innovate UK, Royal Society and EU projects. He has published more than 150 peer reviewed journal papers with >6000 citations (H index of 45, Google Scholar) in the areas of catalytic thermo-chemical conversion of wastes and carbon capture and utilisation. He is the founding Editor-in-Chief of Carbon Capture Science & Technology, the Managing Editor of Biomass and Bioenerg. He is a Charted Scientist and a Member of Royal Society of Chemistry.

Read his Emerging Investigator article “Coked Ni/Al2O3 from the catalytic reforming of volatiles from co-pyrolysis of lignin and polyethylene: preparation, identification and application as a potential adsorbent” and read more about him in the interview below:

How do you feel about Catalysis Science & Technology as a place to publish?

Catalysis Science & Technology is a high profile journal in the research area of catalysis. Its fast processing of manuscripts is attracting me to publish papers. I definitely recommend the journal to my colleagues.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment and what do you find most challenging about your research?

I am excited about developing novel and applicable technologies to upcycle waste plastics. However, the key challenge is to demonstrate its commercial potential and deploy the technologies.

In your opinion, what are the most important questions to be asked/answered in this field of research?

In the area of waste plastic recycling, the key question is whether the recycling technology is robust, economically feasible and environmentally friendly.

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Celebrating Catalysis Science & Technology’s 10th Anniversary

The inaugural journal cover from early 2011

 

This year, we are delighted to celebrate 10 years of Catalysis Science & Technology. Our inaugural issue was published in early 2011, and since then we have continued to publish a variety of content from across the wide-ranging research areas of our diverse community.

We are pleased to introduce a number of new initiatives in celebration of the journal’s 10th anniversary. This includes broadening our journal’s scope to be inclusive of the wide-ranging interests of the catalysis science community; relaunching themed collections including a new ongoing Emerging Investigators series highlighting up-and-coming scientists in the early stages of their independent careers and a 2-day virtual symposium on 16-17 November. Sign up to the journal’s e-alerts for upcoming updates on these initiatives and further information about our activities can be found below.

 

Emerging Investigators Series

Catalysis Science & Technology is pleased to present its inaugural Emerging Investigator Series, showcasing the work being conducted by Emerging Investigators in all areas of catalysis science across the globe. It highlights up-and-coming scientists in the early stages of their independent careers, who have been identified as having the potential to influence future directions in the field.

More details about the Emerging Investigator Series can be found on the blog, including information on eligibility and how to apply for consideration as well as more information about the corresponding authors featured in this collection. Check out the collection here: rsc.li/cst-emerging

Refreshed journal scope

We are pleased to launch our refreshed journal scope, which aims to be inclusive of all types of research work carried out by the catalysis community at large.

Themed Collection: operando & in-situ spectroscopy

This themed collection Guest Edited by Professor Angelika Brueckner (Leibniz-Institut für Katalyse, Germany), Professor Jian-Feng Li (Xiamen University, China) and Catalysis Science & Technology Associate Editor Professor Bin Liu (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore) will showcase cutting-edge advances in the areas of in situ and operando spectroscopy. The research works featured in this collection will cover the broad spectrum of catalytic science research as well as a variety of spectroscopic techniques and methodologies.

Contact the Editorial Office at catalysis-rsc@rsc.org with an abstract if you are interested in submitting a paper for consideration as part of this collection, which will be available online in early 2022.

Catalysis Science & Technology 10th year anniversary Symposium

Join us for this exciting 2-day virtual symposium, sponsored by Catalysis Science & Technology, to celebrate the journal’s 10-year anniversary. The event will showcase cutting edge research across all areas of catalysis and provides an opportunity for the broad catalysis community to come together in honour of the journal’s important milestone.

The programme will feature invited speakers from a wide variety of research areas, including some fantastic emerging investigators, a panel discussion as well as a poster session. We hope the event will give you lots of opportunities to network and engage with other attendees. Join us for some exciting discussions and to share your ideas with key members of the catalysis science community.

Submit your abstract and save the date here: rsc.li/CST10

Please join us in celebrating the journal’s important milestone and we hope you enjoy our upcoming initiatives and activities. We hope to see you at the Symposium later this year!

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Catalysis Science & Technology: Editors’ Choice August 2021

Associate Editor Kenichi Shimizu has selected some outstanding recent research from Catalysis Science & Technology to share with you. Read now for free until 6th November 2021.

Ken-ichi ShimizuKen-ichi Shimizu has been a full Professor at Institute for Catalysis, Hokkaido University, since 2015. He received his Ph.D. degree at Nagoya University in 2000. He began his career as a Research Associate at Niigata University in 2000, moved to Nagoya University in 2004 as an Assistant Professor, and then moved to Hokkaido University in 2010 as an Associate Professor.

His main interest is in heterogeneous catalysis for sustainable chemical transformations and automotive emission control. He also works for in situ spectroscopies and catalysis informatics for molecular level design of heterogeneous catalysis.

Submit to Kenichi now

 

Paper

Fabrication of AEI-type aluminosilicate with sheet-like morphology for direct conversion of propene to butenes

Ryota Osuga, Takashi Takeuchi, Masato Sawada, Yusuke Kunitake, Takeshi Matsumoto, Shuhei Yasuda, Hiroaki Onozuka, Susumu Tsutsuminai, Junko Nomura Kondo, Hermann Gies and Toshiyuki Yokoi

Catal. Sci. Technol., 2021, Accepted. DOI: 10.1039/D1CY00854D

 

Paper

Selective oxidation of methane to methanol on dispersed copper on alumina from readily available copper(ii) formate

Jordan Meyet, Alexander P. van Bavel, Andrew D. Horton, Jeroen A. van Bokhoven and Christophe Copéret

Catal. Sci. Technol., 2021, Advance Article. DOI: 10.1039/D1CY00789K

 

Paper

Selective synthesis of para-xylene and light olefins from CO2/H2 in the presence of toluene

Dengyun Miao, Xiulian Pan, Feng Jiao, Yi Ji, Guangjin Hou, Lei Xub and Xinhe Bao

Catal. Sci. Technol., 2021, 11, 4521-4528. DOI: 10.1039/D1CY00602A

 

Paper

The dynamic behavior of dilute metallic alloy PdxAu1−x/SiO2 raspberry colloid templated catalysts under CO oxidation

Amanda Filie, Tanya Shirman, Michael Aizenberg, Joanna Aizenberg, Cynthia M. Friend and Robert J. Madix

Catal. Sci. Technol., 2021, 11, 4072-4082. DOI: 10.1039/D1CY00469G

 

We hope you enjoy reading these articles!

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Catalysis Science & Technology: Editor’s Choice January 2021

Associate Editor Bin Liu has selected some outstanding recent research from Catalysis Science & Technology to share with you. Read now for free until 26th April 2021.

Bin LiuBin received his B.Eng. (1st Class Honours) and M.Eng. degrees in Chemical Engineering from the National University of Singapore in 2002 and 2004, respectively, and obtained his Ph.D. degree in Chemical Engineering from University of Minnesota in 2011. Thereafter, he moved to University of California, Berkeley and worked as a postdoctoral researcher in Department of Chemistry during 2011 – 2012 before joining School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering at Nanyang Technological University as an Assistant Professor in 2012. He is now an Associate Professor at Nanyang Technological University. His main research interests are electrocatalysis, photovoltaics and photoelectrochemistry.

Submit to Bin now

Paper

Bimetallic PtIr nanoalloy on TiO2-based solid solution oxide with enhanced oxygen reduction and ethanol electro-oxidation performance in direct ethanol fuel cells

Tai Thien Huynh, Nam Nguyen Dang &  Hau Quoc Pham

Catal. Sci. Technol., 2021, Advance Article. DOI: 10.1039/D0CY02056G

 

Mini Review

Selective CO2 reduction towards a single upgraded product: a minireview on multi-elemental copper-free electrocatalysts

Madeleine K. Wilsey, Connor P. Cox, Ryland C. Forsythe, Luke R. McCarney & Astrid M. Müller

Catal. Sci. Technol., 2021, Advance Article. DOI: 10.1039/D0CY02010A

 

Paper

Silicon microfabricated reactor for operando XAS/DRIFTS studies of heterogeneous catalytic reactions

Venezia, E. Cao, S. K. Matam, C. Waldron, G. Cibin, E. K. Gibson, S. Golunski, P. P. Wells, I. Silverwood, C. R. A. Catlow, G. Sankarh & A. Gavriilidis

Catal. Sci. Technol., 2020, 10, 7842-7856. DOI: 10.1039/D0CY01608J

 

We hope you enjoy reading these articles!

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