RSC Chemical Biology Advisory Board

New additions to the RSC Chemical Biology Advisory Board!

We are delighted to welcome the recent additions to the RSC Chemical Biology Advisory Board!  They join 11 other prominent researchers in the chemical biology field.

Explore the current Advisory Board line-up below.  For more information on the Editorial Board, visit rsc.li/rsc-chembio.

Professor Luc Brunsveld, TU Eindhoven, Netherlands

Professor Brunsveld’s research interests are focused on chemical biology approaches studying protein-protein interactions, particularly drug discovery and supramolecular signalling systems.

Professor Peng Chen, Cornell University, USA

Professor Chen’s Group develops and applies single-molecule approaches to interrogate and understand the function and dynamics of nanomaterials and biomacromolecules.

Professor Donald Hilvert, ETH Zurich, Switzerland

The group of Professor Hilvert are using chemical biology tools to understand and engineer proteins for various applications.

Professor May Khanna, University of Arizona, USA

The work of Professor Khanna’s lab looks to combine biochemical and biophysical techniques to target key protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions in neurodegenerative disease.

Professor Hermen Overkleeft, Leiden University, Netherlands

The research of the Overkleeft lab is characterized by the design, synthesis and application of chemical probes in glycobiology and immunology.

Professor Giulio Superti-Furga, CeMM, Austria

The Superti-Furga laboratory addresses the mechanisms by which cells respond to challenges that perturb homeostasis, and how homeostasis can subsequently be restored.

Professor Xiu-Jie Wang, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China

Professor Wang’s research interests include developing computational methods to analyze biological data, identifying new non-coding regulatory RNA genes and studying the functions of non-coding RNAs.

Professor Christopher Chang, University of California Berkeley, USA

Professor Chang’s research interests include transition metal signaling, activity-based sensing and artificial photosynthesis.

Professor Russell Cox, Leibniz University Hannover, Germany

The Cox group is interested in understanding and engineering the biosynthesis of natural products by fungi.

Professor Dorothea Fiedler, FMP Berlin, Germany

The goal of the Fiedler lab is to develop new chemical and biochemical tools that will provide a mechanistic picture of inositol phosphate signaling.

Professor Christian Hackenberger, FMP Berlin, Germany

The research projects of Professor Hackenberger’s group focus on understanding how nature generates specific biological function in complex cellular environments.

Professor Maja Köhn, University of Freiburg, Germany

Professor Köhn’s group explores integrative signaling research on phosphatase chemistry and biology.

Professor Yamuna Krishnan, University of Chicago, USA

Work in Professor Krishnan’s lab aims to build quantitative chemical maps of organelle lumens using the tools of bionanotechnology.

Professor Elizabeth Nolan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA

Professor Nolan and her team investigate the chemistry and biology of small molecules, peptides, and proteins that participate in the human innate immune response and host/pathogen interaction.

Professor Jennifer Prescher, University of California Irvine, USA

The research in Professor Prescher’s lab has the aim of crafting novel chemical probes and noninvasive imaging technologies to interrogate cells in their native habitats.

Professor Christopher Schofield, University of Oxford, UK

Professor Schofield aims to define functions for all human ‘2OG oxygenases’ at biochemical, cellular, and physiological level.

Professor Pamela Silver, Harvard Medical School, USA

Professor Silver’s research interests include cell programming, therapeutic design, and environment & pathogen sensing.

Professor Kira Weissman, University of Lorraine, France

Professor Weissman is expert in multiple aspects of the biosynthesis of polyketides and related secondary metabolites.

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