Archive for the ‘Cover articles’ Category

HOT review: Forming the wiring of the nervous system – discovering the mechanisms of axon guidance through new technologies

Today’s HOT article is a review article that was featured on the front cover of our Neuroengineering themed issue.

In this review, Santiago Costantino et al. at the University of Montreal and McGill University, Canada, critically discuss the most recent insights into axon guidance that have been enabled by developments in methods and technologies for engineered cell substrates.

This review includes:

  1. Extracellular cues and growth cones
  2. Historical background
  3. The stripe assay in discovery of guidance cues and signalling mechanisms
  4. Microcontact printing – development from the stripe assay
  5. Insights via microfluidics
  6. Studies using laser-assisted printing and patterning 3D hydrogels

The focus is on the biological insights into how axons recognise and interpret external signals in order to reach their synaptic target that have come out of using these technologies, rather than the development of the technology itself. This cover article is still free to access for another couple of weeks*, read it now by clicking the link below:

Engineered cell culture substrates for axon guidance studies: moving beyond proof of concept
Joannie Roy, Timothy E. Kennedy and Santiago Costantino
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC41002H

*Free access to individuals is provided through an RSC Publishing personal account. Registration is quick, free and simple

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Welcome to Lab on a Chip Issue 6! A microrobot, adaptive coatings, protein detection, flow cytometry, a critical review and the final Acoustofluidics paper

On the outside front cover is a Technical Innovation from Oliver Hayden, Michael Helou and co-workers in Germany describing a magnetic time-of-flight flow cytometry workflow for point-of-care tests, integrating sample preparation with the use of superparamagnetic labels:

Time-of-flight magnetic flow cytometry in whole blood with integrated sample preparation
Michael Helou, Mathias Reisbeck, Sandro F. Tedde, Lukas Richter, Ludwig Bär, Jacobus J. Bosch, Roland H. Stauber, Eckhard Quandt and Oliver Hayden
DOI: 10.1039/C3LC41310A


 

The inside front cover highlights work by Martin Gijs’s team at EPFL, Switzerland, on a microfluidic method for ultra-sensitive protein detection in serum using magnetic beads:

Attomolar protein detection using a magnetic bead surface coverage assay
H. Cumhur Tekin, Matteo Cornaglia and Martin A. M. Gijs
DOI: 10.1039/C3LC41285G


Mengsu Yang and co-workers at the City University of Hong Kong are advertised on the back cover, which illustrates their research on monitoring of intracellular calcium signals after mechanical stimulation using a single integrated microfluidic device:

Microfluidics study of intracellular calcium response to mechanical stimulation on single suspension cells
Tao Xu, Wanqing Yue, Cheuk-Wing Li, Xinsheng Yao and Mengsu Yang
DOI: 10.1039/C3LC40880A

 

Remember, all of our cover articles are free to access for 6 weeks!*

*Free access to individuals is provided through an RSC Publishing personal account. Registration is quick, free and simple
 


The final paper in our highly interesting Acoustofluidics series of tutorial articles is published in Issue 6. It points out the ability to combine acoustic forces with others for microfluidic applications:

Acoustofluidics 23: acoustic manipulation combined with other force fields
Peter Glynne-Jones and Martyn Hill
DOI: 10.1039/C3LC41369A

Issue 6 also includes a Critical Review on sample preparation for cell analysis technology from Dino Di Carlo et al. at the University of California, USA:

Microfluidic sample preparation for diagnostic cytopathology
Albert J. Mach, Oladunni B. Adeyiga and Dino Di Carlo
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC41104K

HOT articles in Issue 6 include:

On-chip microrobot for investigating the response of aquatic microorganisms to mechanical stimulation
Tomohiro Kawahara, Masakuni Sugita, Masaya Hagiwara, Fumihito Arai, Hiroyuki Kawano, Ikuko Shihira-Ishikawa and Atsushi Miyawaki
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC41190C

Dynamic pH mapping in microfluidic devices by integrating adaptive coatings based on polyaniline with colorimetric imaging techniques
Larisa Florea, Cormac Fay, Emer Lahiff, Thomas Phelan, Noel E. O’Connor, Brian Corcoran, Dermot Diamond and Fernando Benito-Lopez
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC41065F

For more fascinating Lab on a Chip content, read the full issue here

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Constant stretching of DNA in a microfluidic device for higher throughput Genome Sequence Scanning

This HOT article by Robert Meltzer et al. at Pathogenetix Inc., USA, describes new geometries for the stretching funnel in Genome Sequence Scanning that increase DNA throughput by 30 times.

Genome Sequence Scanning (GSS) detects sequence-specific fluorescent tags on DNA fragments. It is used to identify bacteria by first lysing open the bacteria cell to release the DNA, then using a restriction endonuclease enzyme to digest the DNA into smaller fragments. Fluorescent tags are added that recognise specific repeated elements present in all bacterial genomes. GSS characterises the bacterial genome by the spatial distribution of the tags.

genome sequence scanning, GSSThe detection is done in a continuous flow microfluidic device with confocal microscopy. In order to carry out the spatial recognition of the fluorescent tags along the length of the DNA fragment, it needs to be stretched out into a linear form using a funnel. High molecule throughput is important as the detection confidence of this technology relies on observing as many tags as possible in the specified experimental period.

The team looks at the relationship between the funnel taper shape and related parameters, such as fluid velocity and fragment length, to improve the current designs and increase throughput. Their new geometries are able to keep the tension applied to the DNA constant during the detection process. Because DNA fragments come in various lengths, a very important goal is to maximise the range of lengths that can be stretched effectively with the funnel. The influence of channel etch depth on fluid flow, and therefore throughput, is also considered.

You can learn more about the work of Pathogenetix on Genome Sequence Scanning by visiting their website. This HOT article, which was featured on the cover of Issue 2, is free to access for the next 4 weeks* and you can read it by clicking the link below:

High-throughput genome scanning in constant tension fluidic funnels
Joshua W. Griffis, Ekaterina Protozanova, Douglas B. Cameron and Robert H. Meltzer
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40943G#

*Free access to individuals is provided through an RSC Publishing personal account. Registration is quick, free and simple

 

Keep up to date with the latest Lab on a Chip news and blogs by following us on Twitter! @LabonaChip

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Lab on a Chip Issue 5 is online! Towards point-of-care biosensors, an RNAi screening method and a review of microfluidics for liposome production

The front cover of Issue 5 illustrates work from Peter Ertl and colleagues at AIT, Austria, in which they combine organic photodiodes and electrode structures in a lab on a chip to develop the ability to quickly determine cell number to standardise microfluidic cell culture and simultaneously measure cell adhesion and interactions.

Standardization of microfluidic cell cultures using integrated organic photodiodes and electrode arrays
Verena Charwat, Michaela Purtscher, Sandro F. Tedde, Oliver Hayden and Peter Ertl
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40965H


Research by scientists at the National Research Council and McGill University, Canada, features on the striking inside front cover. Teodor Veres and co-workers take a step towards the development of point-of-care nanoplasmonic biosensors with their all-polymeric transmission surface plasmon resonance sensor. It uses a simple and widely available technique and they demonstrate its application in sensing glycoprotein sCD44 at picomolar to nanomolar concentrations.

All-thermoplastic nanoplasmonic microfluidic device for transmission SPR biosensing
Lidija Malic, Keith Morton, Liviu Clime and Teodor Veres
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC41123G


The back cover advert highlights research from the groups of Anup Singh and Oscar Negrete at Sandia National Laboratories, USA, on their advantageous microfluidic RNA interference screening method, which they validate using vesicular stomatitis virus and Rift Valley fever virus.

Microfluidic platforms for RNA interference screening of virus–host interactions
Benjamin R. Schudel, Brooke Harmon, Vinay V. Abhyankar, Benjamin W. Pruitt, Oscar A. Negrete and Anup K. Singh
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC41165B


This issue also features Research highlights from Ali Khademhosseini on biomimetic honeycombs, microfluidic vessel chips and BioMEMS, and a critical review written by Andrew deMello and Dirk van Swaay at ETH Zurich on the microfluidic technologies available for producing liposomes:

Research highlights
Gulden Camci-Unal, Šeila Selimović, Mehmet R. Dokmeci and Ali Khademhosseini
DOI: 10.1039/C3LC90002A

Microfluidic methods for forming liposomes
Dirk van Swaay and Andrew deMello
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC41121K

 

Find the issue in full here

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LOC issue 4 – the Neuroengineering 2013 themed issue is online now!

                                                         

Lab on a Chip’s 2013 Neuroengineering themed issue is introduced by guest editors David T. Eddington and Justin Williams, who also contributed the outside front cover design. This is followed by profiles of all of the contributors to the Neuroengineering themed issue.

Neuroengineering
David T. Eddington and Justin Williams
DOI: 10.1039/C3LC90003G

 

As well as plenty of cutting-edge primary research into lab on a chip technology for neuroengineering, Issue 4 includes two Critical Reviews.

A critical review of the development of engineered cell culture substrates and techniques for investigating axon development guidance by Santiago Costantino et al. at University of Montreal and McGill University, Canada, is highlighted on the inside front cover. They look at the opportunities that are now opening up due to these new technological developments, the biological insights that can now be gained and the breakthroughs waiting to happen in the near future.

Engineered cell culture substrates for axon guidance studies: moving beyond proof of concept
Joannie Roy, Timothy E. Kennedy and Santiago Costantino
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC41002H

 

The second critical review from Noo Li Jeon et al. at Seoul National University, Korea, and The Salk Institute, USA, summarises the most recent technological developments of BioMEMs devices and their application to neuroscience research. They look at platforms for disease culture, modelling disease in vitro, neuron electrophysiology and stem cell biology.

Advances in microfluidics-based experimental methods for neuroscience research
Jae Woo Park, Hyung Joon Kim, Myeong Woo Kang and Noo Li Jeon
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC41081H

 

The HOT articles in this issue include:

Integration of pre-aligned liquid metal electrodes for neural stimulation within a user-friendly microfluidic platform
Nicholas Hallfors, Asif Khan, Michael D. Dickey and Anne Marion Taylor
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40954B

Inherent amplitude demodulation of an AC-EWOD (electrowetting on dielectric) droplet
Myung Gon Yoon, Sang Hyun Byun and Sung Kwon Cho
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC41043E

One-step polymer surface modification for minimizing drug, protein, and DNA adsorption in microanalytical systems
Esben Kjær Unmack Larsen and Niels B. Larsen
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40750G

 

To learn all about the exciting advances happening in applying microtechnology to neuroengineering, read the full issue here

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Microdevices in cell biology: not one, but three HOT articles!

microfluidic x-ray cellsBritta Weinhausen and Sarah Köster study hydrated eukaryotic cells device using X-rays in a new microfluidic device in their Technical Innovation, free to access for 4 weeks*.

The team at Georg-August-Universität Göttinghen, Germany, overcome some of the limitations of previous work to create a new type of device suitable for studying hydrated cells, with the possibility of applying it to living cells.

They use UV-curable glue (NOA 81) allowing sophisticated channel structures to be defined, two thin Kapton foils, with advantageous properties for X-ray studies, and a Si3N4 membrane window, upon which cells can be grown and fixed before the device is closed with a second membrane. Despite the small difference in electron density between the cellular material and water, they successfully produce X-ray dark-field images:

Microfluidic devices for X-ray studies on hydrated cells
Britta Weinhausen and Sarah Köster
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC41014A

 

cytometryAs mentioned in the LOC issue 2 blog, Luke Lee et al. at the University of California, Berkeley and Stanford University, featured on the front cover with their work on sorting stem cells using a cell cytometer based on the electrophysiological response to stimulus. As a HOT article that was featured on the cover, this article has been free to access* for 6 weeks from mid-December so get your skates on to read it in full in the next week:

Label-free electrophysiological cytometry for stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte clusters
Frank B. Myers, Christopher K. Zarins, Oscar J. Abilez and Luke P. Lee
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40905D

 

electroporationIn this Technical Innovation, Rashid Bashir led a team of researchers from the USA, Sweden and Singapore in using silicon nanowires for rapid lysis of single cells by ultra-localized electroporation to release cell components for analysis. They integrate label-free magnetic manipulation to correctly position cells with the use of field effect transistors to apply an electric field for cell lysis.

Their method eliminates the use of microfluidic trapping techniques, transparent substrates for optical tweezing and high voltages, amongst other requirements for previous devices.

This work is featured on the inside front cover of Issue 3, so it’s currently free to access for 6 weeks*. Do have a read of the article here:

Ultra-localized single cell electroporation using silicon nanowires
Nima Jokilaakso, Eric Salm, Aaron Chen, Larry Millet, Carlos Duarte Guevara, Brian Dorvel, Bobby Reddy, Amelie Eriksson Karlstrom, Yu Chen, Hongmiao Ji, Yu Chen, Ratnasingham Sooryakumar and Rashid Bashir
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40837F

*Free access to individuals is provided through an RSC Publishing personal account. Registration is quick, free and simple

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LOC issue 2 – sorting stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte clusters, cross talk between cancer and immune cells and Genome Sequence Scanning

Welcome to Issue 2 of Lab on a Chip! This issue features the winner of the Lab on a Chip Pioneers of Miniaturisation Lectureship, Andrew deMello, on the back cover. Read more about this award and others given at MicroTAS here.

On the front cover of issue 2 is featured work from the group of Luke Lee at the University of California, Berkeley, in conjunction with colleagues at Stanford University.

In the paper, the authors use a ‘non-genetic, label-free cell cytometry method based on electrophysiological response to stimulus’ to sort undifferentiated stem cells from heterogeneous stem cell progeny.

The cell cytometer can identify human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte clusters from their extracellular field potential signals – these stem cells can then be used for various stem cell therapies.

Label-free electrophysiological cytometry for stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte clusters
Frank B. Myers, Christopher K. Zarins, Oscar J. Abilez and Luke P. Lee
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40905D

Work from the Italian National Research Council – Institute for Photonics and Nanotechnologies and the Istituto Superiore di Sanità is featured on the inside front cover.

The groups, led by Fabrizio Mattei and Luca Businaro, have used an on-chip co-culture system to investigate interactions between cancer cells and a host’s immune system.

Cross talk between cancer and immune cells: exploring complex dynamics in a microfluidic environment
Luca Businaro, Adele De Ninno, Giovanna Schiavoni, Valeria Lucarini, Gabriele Ciasca, Annamaria Gerardino, Filippo Belardelli, Lucia Gabriele and Fabrizio Mattei
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40887B

On the inside back cover, work from Robert Meltzer and co-workers at Pathogenetix, Inc. is featured.

In their paper, they present a novel compound funnel design for use with Genome Sequence Scanning (GSS) technology, which improves molecule throughput.

High-throughput genome scanning in constant tension fluidic funnels
Joshua W. Griffis, Ekaterina Protozanova, Douglas B. Cameron and Robert H. Meltzer
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40943G

As with all our cover articles these are free to access for 6 weeks (following a simple registration for an RSC Publishing account).

Other HOT articles featured in the issue include:

Benchtop fabrication of microfluidic systems based on curable polymers with improved solvent compatibility
Michinao Hashimoto, Robert Langer and Daniel S. Kohane
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40888K

Microfluidic assisted self-assembly of chitosan based nanoparticles as drug delivery agents
Fatemeh Sadat Majedi, Mohammad Mahdi Hasani-Sadrabadi, Shahriar Hojjati Emami, Mohammad Ali Shokrgozar, Jules John VanDersarl, Erfan Dashtimoghadam, Arnaud Bertsch and Philippe Renaud
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC41045A

Microfluidic devices for X-ray studies on hydrated cells
Britta Weinhausen and Sarah Köster
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC41014A

For even more exciting microfluidics research, read the full issue here.

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Issue 22 – Focus on Scandinavia

Issue 22 of Lab on a Chip features work from Scandinavia – read the editorial from the Guest Editors Professors Thomas Laurell and Jörg Kutter here. The issue features 8 articles from Scandinavian authors, and profiles of the athours included can be found here.

The front cover features work from Jörg Kutter and co-workers at the Technical University of Denmark, reporting on the optical properties of gold nanoparticle probes, used as sensors for environmental contaminants.

Gold nanoparticle-based optical microfluidic sensors for analysis of environmental pollutants
Josiane P. Lafleur, Silja Senkbeil, Thomas G. Jensen and Jörg P. Kutter
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40543A

Artwork linked to research from Vincent Aimez and colleagues from the Université de Sherbrooke can be seen on the inside front cover of the issue – they have developed a microfluidic device to monitor the radioactivity concentration in the blood of rats and mice in real time.

Blood compatible microfluidic system for pharmacokinetic studies in small animals
Laurence Convert, Frédérique Girard Baril, Vincent Boisselle, Jean-François Pratte, Réjean Fontaine, Roger Lecomte, Paul G. Charette and Vincent Aimez
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40550D

The back cover of the issue features work from Samir Iqbal and co-workers at the University of Texas and Lehigh University. The team designed a Hele-Shaw device with aptamer functionalized glass beads to isolate cancer cells from a cellular mixture.

Capture, isolation and release of cancer cells with aptamer-functionalized glass bead array
Yuan Wan, Yaling Liu, Peter B. Allen, Waseem Asghar, M. Arif Iftakher Mahmood, Jifu Tan, Holli Duhon, Young-tae Kim, Andrew D. Ellington and Samir M. Iqbal
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC21251J

Other HOT papers in the issue include:

Two-hundredfold volume concentration of dilute cell and particle suspensions using chip integrated multistage acoustophoresis
Maria Nordin and Thomas Laurell
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40629B

Inertial microfluidics in parallel channels for high-throughput applications
Jonas Hansson, J. Mikael Karlsson, Tommy Haraldsson, Hjalmar Brismar, W. van der Wijngaart and Aman Russom
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40241F

Low cost integration of 3D-electrode structures into microfluidic devices by replica molding
Benjamin Mustin and Boris Stoeber
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40728K

A microfluidic device with removable packaging for the real time visualisation of intracellular effects of nanosecond electrical pulses on adherent cells
C. Dalmay, M. A. De Menorval, O. Français, L. M. Mir and B. Le Pioufle
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40857K

Programmable microfluidic synthesis of spectrally encoded microspheres
R. E. Gerver, R. Gómez-Sjöberg, B. C. Baxter, K. S. Thorn, P. M. Fordyce, C. A. Diaz-Botia, B. A. Helms and J. L. DeRisi
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40699C

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Hot articles in optofluidics

You might have already seen our themed issue on optofluidics but in case you haven’t, here are the HOT articles from this issue:


Yi-Chung Tung et al. review the recent advances in optofluidic technologies that will open up new possibilities for on-chip phenotyping

Optofluidic detection for cellular phenotyping
Yi-Chung Tung, Nien-Tsu Huang, Bo-Ram Oh, Bishnubrata Patra, Chi-Chun Pan, Teng Qiu, Paul K. Chu, Wenjun Zhang and Katsuo Kurabayashi
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40509A


Optofluidic nose
Kevin Raymond et al. have developed an ‘optofluidic nose’ for sensing organic liquids based on wetting in photonic-crystal arrays.

Combinatorial wetting in colour: an optofluidic nose
Kevin P. Raymond, Ian B. Burgess, Mackenzie H. Kinney, Marko Lončar and Joanna Aizenberg
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40489C


An electrokinetically tunable optofluidic bi-concave lens
Haiwang Li and colleagues demonstrate the design of a bi-concave lens to perform both light focusing and diverging in-plane.

An electrokinetically tunable optofluidic bi-concave lens
Haiwang Li, Chaolong Song, Trung Dung Luong, Nam-Trung Nguyen and Teck Neng Wong
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40406K


Highly sensitive optofluidic chips for biochemical liquid assay
Yasutaka Hanada and coworkers show how to create a highly sensitive optofluidic chip for biochemical liquid assays by coating microfluidic channels with a low refractive index polymer and use of an optical waveguide.

Highly sensitive optofluidic chips for biochemical liquid assay fabricated by 3D femtosecond laser micromachining followed by polymer coating
Yasutaka Hanada, Koji Sugioka and Katsumi Midorikawa
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40377C


Optical imaging techniques in microfluidics

Jigang Wu,  Guoan Zheng and Lap Man Lee focus on compact systems in their review of optical imaging techniques that can be integrated with microfluidics.

Optical imaging techniques in microfluidics and their applications
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40517B


Optofluidics and synthetic biologyChao-Min Cheng and colleagues provide thoughtful insight into the application of optofluidics to synthetic biology in this forward-looking Frontier article.

Frontiers of optofluidics in synthetic biology
Cheemeng Tan, Shih-Jie Lo, Philip R. LeDuc and Chao-Min Cheng
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40828G


Microplasma in dielectrophoresis-driven bubbles
Shih-Kang Fan’s team manipulate 200 nL bubbles with DEP and ignite microplasma within them, with potential for future applications in the biomedical field.

Atmospheric-pressure microplasma in dielectrophoresis-driven bubbles for optical emission spectroscopy
Shih-Kang Fan, Yan-Ting Shen, Ling-Pin Tsai, Cheng-Che Hsu, Fu-Hsiang Ko and Yu-Ting Cheng
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40499K


Optofluidic hydrogel microrobotsWenqi Hu, Kelly S. Ishii, Qihui Fan and Aaron T. Ohta report a hydrogel microrobot which can be manipulated by laser-induced bubbles.  Single or pairs of robots are able to assemble polystyrene beads and yeast cells into patterns.


Hydrogel microrobots actuated by optically generated vapour bubbles

Wenqi Hu, Kelly S. Ishii, Qihui Fan and Aaron T. Ohta
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40483D


Remember, all our cover articles are free to access for 6 weeks, and our HOT articles for 4 weeks.  All you need to access them is an RSC Publishing Personal Account – signing up is quick and easy.

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Submicron particle focussing, 3D capillary networks & monitoring cell signalling in Issue 16

We’ve got some great artwork on the covers of Issue 16,  on topics from particle focusing to creating 3D capillary networks and cell signalling.

Lateral migration and focusing of colloidal particles and DNA molecules under viscoelastic flowOn the outside front cover we have a HOT article from Ju Min Kim et al who have achieved viscoelasticity-driven focusing of particles as small as 200 nm – a technique which had previously only been achieved with micron-sized particles.  The team also showed that DNA focusing is significantly enhanced by medium viscoelasticity and that the focussing of both the colloidal particles and DNA is dependant on length.

Lateral migration and focusing of colloidal particles and DNA molecules under viscoelastic flow
Jae Young Kim, Sung Won Ahn, Sung Sik Lee and Ju Min Kim
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40147A

In vitro formation and characterization of a perfusable three-dimensional tubular capillary network in microfluidic devicesOn the inside front cover is another HOT article from Noo Li Jeon and colleagues at Seoul University who have designed a 3D array of perfusable capillaries from HUVECs.  The the capillary network can be grown on the microfluidic device in 3-4 days and the authors hope will not only be useful for basic angiogenesis research but also drug screening applications.

In vitro formation and characterization of a perfusable three-dimensional tubular capillary network in microfluidic devices
Ju Hun Yeon, Hyun Ryul Ryu, Minhwan Chung, Qing Ping Hu and Noo Li Jeon
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40131B

Microfluidically-unified cell culture, sample preparation, imaging and flow cytometry for measurement of cell signaling pathways with single cell resolutionLast but not least, on the back cover is research from Anup Singh and colleagues at Sandia National Laboratory who have developed a chip that enables dynamic monitoring of an entire cell signalling pathway in a single experiment, by combining cell culture, stimulation, and preparation for analysis by multicolor flow cytometry and fluorescence imaging in one device.

Microfluidically-unified cell culture, sample preparation, imaging and flow cytometry for measurement of cell signaling pathways with single cell resolution
Meiye Wu, Thomas D. Perroud, Nimisha Srivastava, Catherine S. Branda, Kenneth L. Sale, Bryan D. Carson, Kamlesh D. Patel, Steven S. Branda and Anup K. Singh
DOI: 10.1039/C2LC40344G

As with all our cover articles these are free to access for 6 weeks (following a simple registration for an RSC Publishing account).

For more exciting miniaturisation research take a look at the rest of the issue

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