Join us to discuss this HOT research

Faraday Discussions, Royal Society of Chemistry. Journal cover image.Check out these HOT articles which have recently been published as Accepted Manuscripts in Faraday Discussions:


Effects of Structural Disorder and Surface Chemistry on Electric Conductivity and Capacitance of Porous Carbon Electrodes

Boris Dyatkin and Yury Gogotsi
DOI: 10.1039/C4FD00048J

Redox-active electrolyte for supercapacitor application
Elzbieta Frackowiak, Mikolaj Meller, Jakub Menzel, Dominika Gastol and Krzysztof Fic
DOI: 10.1039/C4FD00052H

Nanodiamond surface redox chemistry: influence of physicochemical properties on catalytic processes
Thomas Varley, Katherine B Holt, George Harrison and Meetal Hirani
DOI: 10.1039/C4FD00041B

Organocatalysis for New Chiral Fullerene-based Materials
Rosa M. Girón, Silvia Reboredo, Juan Marco-Martínez, Salvatorre Filippone and Nazario Martin
DOI: 10.1039/C4FD00065J


All four articles will be discussed at upcoming Faraday Discussions meetings on:

Find out more about the unique format of Faraday Discussions and register to attend one or both of these exciting meetings: http://rsc.li/fd-events.

There are even some bursaries to help undergraduates and postgraduates attend!

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Top 10 Faraday Discussions articles January–March 2014

Read on to find out which Faraday Discussions articles your colleagues were downloading most between January and March 2014

Spectroscopy of molecules in very high rotational states using an optical centrifuge
Liwei Yuan, Carlos Toro, Mack Bell and Amy S. Mullin
Faraday Discuss., 2011,150, 101-111
DOI: 10.1039/C0FD00021C, Paper
From themed collection Frontiers in Spectroscopy

Self-assembly of biomolecular soft matter
Samuel I. Stupp, R. Helen Zha, Liam C. Palmer, Honggang Cui and Ronit Bitton
Faraday Discuss., 2013,166, 9-30
DOI: 10.1039/C3FD00120B, Paper
From themed collection Self-Assembly of Biopolymers

Hydrogen evolution on nano-particulate transition metal sulfides
Jacob Bonde, Poul G. Moses, Thomas F. Jaramillo, Jens K. Nørskov and Ib Chorkendorff
Faraday Discuss., 2009,140, 219-231
DOI: 10.1039/B803857K, Paper
From themed collection Electrocatalysis

The liquid–liquid transition in supercooled ST2 water: a comparison between umbrella sampling and well-tempered metadynamics
Jeremy C. Palmer, Roberto Car and Pablo G. Debenedetti
Faraday Discuss., 2013,167, 77-94
DOI: 10.1039/C3FD00074E, Paper
From themed collection Mesostructure and Dynamics in Liquids and Solutions

Importance of many-body orientational correlations in the physical description of liquids
Hajime Tanaka
Faraday Discuss., 2013,167, 9-76
DOI: 10.1039/C3FD00110E, Paper
From themed collection Mesostructure and Dynamics in Liquids and Solutions

Introductory Lecture: Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy: new materials, concepts, characterization tools, and applications

Jon A. Dieringer, Adam D. McFarland, Nilam C. Shah, Douglas A. Stuart, Alyson V. Whitney, Chanda R. Yonzon, Matthew A. Young, Xiaoyu Zhang and Richard P. Van Duyne
Faraday Discuss., 2006,132, 9-26
DOI: 10.1039/B513431P, Paper
From themed collection Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

Spontaneous tubulation of membranes and vesicles reveals membrane tension generated by spontaneous curvature
Reinhard Lipowsky
Faraday Discuss., 2013,161, 305-331
DOI: 10.1039/C2FD20105D, Paper
From themed collection Lipids & Membrane Biophysics

Simultaneous frequency and dissipation factor QCM measurements of biomolecular adsorption and cell adhesion
Michael Rodahl, Fredrik Höök, Claes Fredriksson, Craig A. Keller, Anatol Krozer, Peter Brzezinski, Marina Voinova and Bengt Kasemo
Faraday Discuss., 1997,107, 229-246
DOI: 10.1039/A703137H, Paper
From themed collection Interactions of Acoustic Waves With Thin Films and Interfaces

A first principles comparison of the mechanism and site requirements for the electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol and formic acid over Pt
Matthew Neurock, Michael Janik and Andrzej Wieckowski
Faraday Discuss., 2009,140, 363-378
DOI: 10.1039/B804591G, Paper
From themed collection Electrocatalysis

Viscoelastic phase separation in soft matter and foods
Hajime Tanaka
Faraday Discuss., 2012,158, 371-406
DOI: 10.1039/C2FD20028G, Paper
From themed collection Soft Matter Approaches to Structured Foods

Join us for a meeting this year – find out more!

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Opportunities for discussion with prize winning researchers

We are delighted to announce that the Spiers Memorial Award Winners for 2014 are:

Professor Pulickel M. Ajayan Professor Pulickel M. Ajayan, Rice University for his pioneering contributions to the field of carbon based nanomaterials.
Professor Fred Wudl Professor Fred Wudl, University of California, Santa Barbara for his many innovative developments to the field of organic electroactive materials and plastic electronics.

We invite you to join us and hear these award winning researchers delivering their introductory lecture at a Faraday Discussions meeting later in the year.

Faraday Discussions journal cover imageProf. Ajayan will deliver the Introductory lecture at New Advances in Carbon Nanomaterials: Faraday Discussion 173 which takes place in London between 1 – 3 September 2014.

Prof. Wudl will be starting off proceedings with his lecture at Organics, Photonics & Electronics: Faraday Discussion 174 in Strathclyde, Scotland (8-10 September 2014).

As with all Faraday Discussion meetings there is also an opportunity for you to take part:

  • Submit a poster. The deadlines are 23 June 2014 for New Advances in Carbon Nanomaterials, and 16 June 2014 for Organics, Photonics and Electronics.
  • Join the disussion. All the discussion of papers at the meeting are recorded and published as part of the final volume so every delegate has a chance to be fully involved. There is more information on how Faraday Discussions work in our FAQs.
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    2014 Faraday Discussions – Registration open!

    We have a wide range of very diverse discussion topics this year, and registration is now open for each of them – so don’t miss your opportunity to register now at the early bird rates.

    FD169: Molecular Simulations and Visualization
    7-9 May 2014, Nottingham, UK 

    FD170: Mechanochemistry: from functional solids to single molecules
    21-23 May 2014, Montreal, Canada    

    FD171: Emerging Photon Technologies for Chemical Dynamics
    9-11 July 2014, Sheffield, UK    
    Early bird deadline – 17 May

    FD172: Carbon in Electrochemistry
    28-30 July 2014, Sheffield, UK    
    Early bird deadline – 9 June

    FD173: New Advances in Carbon Nanomaterials
    1-3 September 2014, London, UK    
    Early bird deadline – 14 July

    FD174: Organics, Photonics & Electronics
    8-10 September 2014, Glasgow, UK 
    Early bird deadline – 7 July

    FD175: Physical Chemistry of Functionalised Biomedical Nanoparticles
    17-19 September 2014, Bristol, UK   
    Early bird deadline – 21 July

    FD176: Next-Generation Materials for Energy Chemistry
    27-29 October 2014, Xiamen, China   
    Early bird deadline – 1 September

    To help you on your way we offer a number of very attractive bursary options, so please do make the most of your Faraday Division membership.

    If you are new to Faraday Discussions be sure to find out more – discover how every contribution is recorded and published in the corresponding journal volume.

    We look forward to welcoming you to a meeting this year!

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    Faraday Discussion 177: Temporally and Spatially Resolved Molecular Science

    We invite you to join us at Temporally and Spatially Resolved Molecular Science: Faraday Discussion 177, which will be held at the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India from 12-14 January 2015.

    This discussion will bring together crystallographers and spectroscopists from chemistry, physics and biology to promote new interdisciplinary research and to benefit from complementary approaches and techniques in the rapidly emerging areas of ‘time resolved studies’, leading to a greater overall understanding of structural dynamics. Discussion themes include:

    • Dynamics of the Chemical Bond
    • Time and Space Resolved Methods
    • Local and Global Dynamics
    • Future Challenges and Emerging Techniques

    Submit your abstract today via our submission system.

    The deadline for oral abstracts is 21st April 2014

    Confirmed invited speakers:

    Elagannan Arunan, Indian Institute of Science, India
    Godfrey Beddard, University of Leeds, UK
    Volker Deckert, Jena University, Germany
    Jonathan Hirst, University of Nottingham, UK
    Wolfgang Junge, University of Osnabruck, Germany
    R. J. Dwayne Miller, Max Planck Unit for Structural Dynamics at the University of Hamburg, Germany
    Shaul Mukamel, University of California, USA
    Paul Raithby, University of Bath ,UK

    In addition there will be a discussion meeting, entitled ‘Advances in Structure and Dynamics’ held directly after the Faraday Discussion in Bangalore on 15 – 16 January 2015. More information will be available on the website in due course.


    You may be interested in these articles in the area of temporally and spatially resolved molecular science, recently published in Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics (PCCP). A sister journal to Faraday Discussions, PCCP brings you content of the highest quality in physical chemistry, chemical physics and biophysical chemistry.

    Probing structural evolution along multidimensional reaction coordinates with femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy
    Renee R. Frontiera, Chong Fang, Jyotishman Dasgupta and Richard A. Mathies
    DOI: 10.1039/C1CP22767J, Perspective

    Ultrafast time resolved studies of the photochemistry of acyl and sulfonyl azides
    Jacek Kubicki, Yunlong Zhang, Jiadan Xue, Hoi Ling Luk and Matthew Platz
    DOI: 10.1039/C2CP40226B, Perspective

    Chemistry in solution: recent techniques and applications using soft X-ray spectroscopy

    Kathrin M. Lange, Alexander Kothe and Emad F. Aziz
    DOI: 10.1039/C2CP24028A, Perspective

    Ultrafast UV spectroscopy: from a local to a global view of dynamical processes in macromolecules
    Andrea Cannizzo
    DOI: 10.1039/C2CP40567A, Perspective


    We hope you can join us for Temporally and Spatially Resolved Molecular Science: Faraday Discussion 177. Professor Siva Umapathy and the rest of the Scientific Committee look forward to welcoming you and your colleagues to Bangalore.

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    FD 169: Molecular Simulations and Visualization-deadline for poster abstracts is 24th February

    There is only one week left  in which to submit your poster abstract for Molecular Simulations and Visualization: Faraday Discussion 169

    Virtual Reality represents a formidable communication and learning tool that could significantly speed up understanding of dynamic behaviour of complex biomolecular systems. This meeting is an excellent opportunity to bring the relevant disciplines closer together and benefit from collaborations across diverse fields.

    Don’t miss your chance to be part of this significant meeting which will illustrate and discuss the potential of Human–Computer Interaction and Virtual Reality for computational molecular sciences.

    Submit your abstract by 24th February 2014!

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    FD 168: Astrochemistry of Dust, Ice and Gas- Early bird registration deadline is 17th February

    Early bird registration for Astrochemistry of Dust, Ice and Gas: Faraday Discussion 168 closes on 17th February 2014, so register now to take advantage of discounted fees.

    Join this meeting to discuss the cyclic role of dust in the chemical evolution of the Universe, focusing on the following themes:

    •  Observations on Dust, Ice and Gas relevant to Astrochemistry
    • Laboratory Astrochemistry of Dust and Ice
    • Astrophysical Modelling
    • New Directions in Solid and Surface Astrochemistry

    Travel bursaries of £150 are available to eligible student and early-career members of the Royal Society of Chemistry.

     So don’t miss out – click here to register

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    Top 10 most-read Faraday Discussions articles – Q4 2013

    This month sees the following articles in Faraday Discussions that are in the top 10 most accessed from October – December:

    Hydrogen evolution on nano-particulate transition metal sulfides
    Jacob Bonde, Poul G. Moses, Thomas F. Jaramillo, Jens K. Nørskov and Ib Chorkendorff
    Faraday Discuss., 2009,140, 219-231
    DOI: 10.1039/B803857K, Paper

    Introductory Lecture
    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy: new materials, concepts, characterization tools, and applications

    Jon A. Dieringer, Adam D. McFarland, Nilam C. Shah, Douglas A. Stuart, Alyson V. Whitney, Chanda R. Yonzon, Matthew A. Young, Xiaoyu Zhang and Richard P. Van Duyne
    Faraday Discuss., 2006,132, 9-26
    DOI: 10.1039/B513431P, Paper

    Simultaneous frequency and dissipation factor QCM measurements of biomolecular adsorption and cell adhesion
    Michael Rodahl, Fredrik Höök, Claes Fredriksson, Craig A. Keller, Anatol Krozer, Peter Brzezinski, Marina Voinova and Bengt Kasemo
    Faraday Discuss., 1997,107, 229-246
    DOI: 10.1039/A703137H, Paper

    Self-assembling amphipathic alpha-helical peptides induce the formation of active protein aggregates in vivo
    Zhanglin Lin, Bihong Zhou, Wei Wu, Lei Xing and Qing Zhao
    Faraday Discuss., 2013,166, 243-256
    DOI: 10.1039/C3FD00068K, Paper

    Spontaneous tubulation of membranes and vesicles reveals membrane tension generated by spontaneous curvature
    Reinhard Lipowsky
    Faraday Discuss., 2013,161, 305-331
    DOI: 10.1039/C2FD20105D, Paper

    Importance of many-body orientational correlations in the physical description of liquids
    Hajime Tanaka
    Faraday Discuss., 2013,167, 9-76
    DOI: 10.1039/C3FD00110E, Paper

    Realizing artificial photosynthesis
    Devens Gust, Thomas A. Moore and Ana L. Moore
    Faraday Discuss., 2012,155, 9-26
    DOI: 10.1039/C1FD00110H, Paper

    Cell penetrating peptide amphiphile integrated liposomal systems for enhanced delivery of anticancer drugs to tumor cells
    Melis Sardan, Murat Kilinc, Rukan Genc, Ayse B. Tekinay and Mustafa O. Guler
    Faraday Discuss., 2013,166, 269-283
    DOI: 10.1039/C3FD00058C, Paper

    A first principles comparison of the mechanism and site requirements for the electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol and formic acid over Pt
    Matthew Neurock, Michael Janik and Andrzej Wieckowski
    Faraday Discuss., 2009,140, 363-378
    DOI: 10.1039/B804591G, Paper

    Steady state oxygen reduction and cyclic voltammetry
    Jan Rossmeisl, Gustav S. Karlberg, Thomas Jaramillo and Jens K. Nørskov
    Faraday Discuss., 2009,140, 337-346
    DOI: 10.1039/B802129E, Paper

    Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

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    Rewarding Excellence, Gaining recognition

    Up to £5,000 prize money

    The Royal Society of Chemistry’s Prizes and Awards recognise achievements by individuals, teams and organisations in advancing the chemical sciences. There are over 80 Prizes and Awards available covering all areas of the chemical sciences.

    You still have time to make your nomination before the deadline on 15th January 2014

    As well as the cash prize of up to £5,000 and an inscribed medal , all Prize and Award winners are given the opportunity to present their work to the wider community by giving lectures at several universities around the UK.

    Prizes are available in the categories various categories, including Biosciences, Environment, Sustainability and Energy, Materials Chemistry, Physical Chemistry and Industry & Technology.

    Please nominate someone or be nominated by a Royal Society of Chemistry member by visiting

    http://www.rsc.org/ScienceAndTechnology/Awards/2014-RSC-Prizes-Awards.asp

    The publicity associated with my RSC Award resulted in the increased recognition for all my great colleagues who contributed and supported this programme over the years.” Monica Papworth

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    FD164: Electrolysis at the Nanoscale now published

    We are pleased to announce the publication of Faraday Discussion 164: Electrolysis at the Graphical abstract: Front coverNanoscale.

    Take a look at the volume today

    In the volume you can find all the papers and exciting discussion from the conference held in Durham, UK in July 2013.

    Here are just some of the highlights:

    Opening
    Template electrodeposition of catalytic nanomotors
    Joseph Wang
    DOI: 10.1039/C3FD00105A

    Closing
    Closing remarks: looking back and ahead at ‘nano’ electroanalytical chemistry
    David E. Williams
    DOI: 10.1039/C3FD00106G

    Read all the discussion & debate on the presented papers in the dedicated “General Discussion” sections.

    Faraday Discussions are a unique opportunity to discuss your work with leading researchers in developing areas of physical chemistry, biophysical chemistry and chemical physics. The latest Impact Factor is 3.8.

    All delegates have the opportunity to present their views on the Discussion papers and their own new research. All the presented papers and the discussion are published together in the Faraday Discussions volume.

    Don’t miss out – find out more and take a look at future Faraday Discussions.

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