Call for papers: 2015 themed issues

Dalton Transactions coverWe are delighted to announce three new Dalton Transactions themed issues to be published in 2015:

Luminescent Complexes and Materials for Light-Emitting Devices
Guest Editor: Dr Eli Zysman-Colman (University of St. Andrews)
Deadline: 6th October 2014

Perovskites
Guest Editors: Professors Russell Morris, Philip Lightfoot (both University of St. Andrews) and J. Paul Attfield (The University of Edinburgh)
Deadline: 16th December 2014

Earth Abundant Element Compounds in Homogeneous Catalysis
Guest Editors: Professors Philip Mountford (University of Oxford), Laurel L. Schafer (University of British Columbia) and Warren E. Piers (University of Calgary) 
Deadline: 14th January 2015

Does your research fit into any of these subject areas? If so, we would welcome your contribution. For further details on issue scopes and on how to submit, see below:

How to submit

All types of manuscript – communications, full papers and Perspectives, will be considered for publication. The manuscript should be prepared according to our article guidelines and submitted via our online system.

All manuscripts will be subject to normal peer review and inclusion in the themed issue will be at the discretion of the Guest Editors. Please indicate in your submission which themed issue you would like to be considered for.

Issue scopes

Luminescent Complexes and Materials for Light-Emitting Devices
This themed issue will highlight the latest research in the field of luminescent complexes and materials for light-emitting devices. Suitable topics include the synthesis and fundamental photophysical studies of luminescent complexes as well as the fabrication and testing of devices which incorporate these materials. Contributions covering computational studies on relevant materials will also be appropriate.

Perovskites
This issue will focus on functional perovskites from the inorganic chemist’s perspective. It will include, but is not limited to: experimental studies on the synthesis, structure and physical/chemical properties of perovskites; chemistry-structure-property relationships; and the design and understanding of perovskite structure and functionality from a theoretical/computational perspective. Contributions are not limited to ‘classical’ inorganic perovskites but can also include hybrid perovskites, ‘MOF’ perovskites, layered perovskite families and related phases (eg. tungsten bronze types).

Earth Abundant Element Compounds in Homogeneous Catalysis
The aim of this themed issue is to showcase the latest research in the development of highly active and selective homogeneous catalysts utilizing earth abundant elements from across the Periodic Table. We believe this will reflect a recent trend in catalysis that seeks to find alternatives to catalysts based on precious metals like Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, or Au and toxic elements like Hg, Bi, In and Pb. We are inviting contributions from researchers utilizing catalysts based on elements from both the s and p block, the more abundant first row transition metals and the lanthanides as catalysts for commodity chemical, fine chemical and polymer synthesis, to emphasise the broad range of activity in this area

Are you interested in contributing? If so, submit your manuscript before the themed issue deadline(s)

 

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Dalton Transactions in Japan

Members of our Editorial Board recently awarded Dalton Transactions certificates to two attendees at conferences in Japan.

The XXVI International Conference on Organometallic Chemistry (ICOMC 2014) was held in Sapporo on 13th – 18th July with over 1100 participants in attendance.

Professors Fryzuk & Mountford

Professor Michael Fryzuk recieving his certificate from Professor Philip Mountford

Professor Philip Mountford (University of Oxford), Chair of the Dalton Transactions Editorial Board, was on hand to present Professor Michael Fryzuk (University of British Columbia) with a certificate commemorating his Dalton Transactions Lectureship.

Professor Fryzuk gave an excellent talk on nitrogen fixation using organometallic species which was well attended by conference delegates.

After the conference, a number of speakers attended a post-ICOMC symposium at Osaka University on 19th July 2014. The meeting was attended by 150 students and local professors and featured talks from Professors Jun Okuda and Matthias Tam (both members of the Dalton Transactions Advisory Board), Professor John Arnold (Dalton Transactions Associate Editor) and Professor Mountford.

John Arnold, Philip Mountford and Kento Kawakita

Mr Kento Kawakita (right) recieving his certificate from Professors John Arnold (left) and Philip Mountford (centre).

50 posters were presented during the conference, with Mr Kento Kawakita, from the group of Professor Kazushi Mashima (Osaka University and Dalton Transactions Advisory Board), being awarded a Dalton Transactions prize for best poster by Professors Mountford and Arnold.

Congratulations to both Professor Fryzuk and Mr Kawakita!

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Breaking zirconacycles is hard to do

In their recent paper in Dalton Transactions, Erker and co-workers describe B(C6F5)3 as an unorthodox probe for the detection of σ ligand character and allenoid-type bonding in substituted zirconocenes.

Chemists have studied the strong Lewis acid, B(C6F5)3 for the past decade, particularly for its uses in frustrated Lewis pairs (FLPs). This small molecule has, however, gained popularity in other areas of chemistry. In catalysis, B(C6F5)3 is commonly employed to generate cationic metal centres by alkyl group abstraction (σ-ligand abstraction) to activate molecular pre-catalysts for use in polymerisation.

Zirconocene cleavage

Expanding the scope beyond alkyl groups, Erker and co-workers showed that B(C6F5)3 can mediate cleavage of Zr-C(sp3) bonds in zirconacycles, creating unique allene coordination complexes. In one instance, they used an unsubstituted zirconacycloallenoid (Zr-CH2-) to synthesise a zwitterionic (η2-allenyl)zirconocene with an allene bond angle close to linearity.

In a second case, they reacted a 4-phenyl substituted zirconacycloallenoid (Zr-CHPh-) to produce a zwitterionic allene-coordinated zirconocene.

In demonstrating such reactivity, the authors lead the way for B(C6F5)3 to act as a standard probe for detecting latent σ ligand character in other molecules.

Interested in finding out more? Read the full article:

Reaction of Five-membered Zirconacycloallenoids with the Strong Lewis Acid B(C6F5)3
Gerald Kehr, Gerhard Erker, Constantin Gabriel Daniliuc, Birgit Wibbeling and Georg Bender
Dalton Trans. 2014, DOI: 10.1039/C4DT01137F


Marcus Drover Marcus Drover is a Ph.D. student, co-supervised by Professors Laurel Schafer and Jennifer Love at the University of British Columbia. His research is focused on the preparation of low-coordinate RhI and IrI complexes for use in small-molecule reactivity. He grew up in St. John’s, Newfoundland and graduated from Memorial University (MUN) before beginning graduate school in 2012.
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HOT articles for July

July brings us a new batch of HOT articles – free to access for 4 weeks only!

Mechanism of water oxidation by non-heme iron catalysts when driven with sodium periodate
Alexander R. Parent, Takashi Nakazono, Shu Lin, Satoshi Utsunomiya and Ken Sakai
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT01188K

Graphical Abstract

Free to access until 13th August 2014


Hybrid photocatalysts using graphitic carbon nitride/cadmium sulfide/reduced graphene oxide (g-C3N4/CdS/RGO) for superior photodegradation of organic pollutants under UV and visible light
Rajendra C. Pawar, Varsha Khare and Caroline Sunyong Lee
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT01278J

Graphical Abstract

Free to access until 13th August 2014


NAMI-A is highly cytotoxic toward leukaemia cell lines: evidence of inhibition of KCa 3.1 channels
Serena Pillozzi, Luca Gasparoli, Matteo Stefanini, Mirco Ristori, Massimo D’Amico, Enzo Alessio, Federica Scaletti, Andrea Becchetti, Annarosa Arcangeli and Luigi Messori
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT01356E

Graphical Abstract

Free to access until 7th August 2014


Shape evolution of Au nanoring@Ag core–shell nanostructures: diversity from a sole seed
Jingsong Sun, Jindi Wang, Ying Zhang, Pengbo Wan, Liang Luo, Feng Wang and Xiaoming Sun
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT00992D

Graphical Abstract

Free to access until 4th August 2014


Aqueous stability of alumina and silica perhydrate hydrogels: experiments and computations
Yitzhak Wolanov, Avital Shurki, Petr V. Prikhodchenko, Tatiana A. Tripolskaya, Vladimir M. Novotortsev, Rami Pedahzur and Ovadia Lev
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT01024H 

Graphical Abstract
  

Free to access until 4th August 2014

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Hang on to your carbene

Posted on behalf of Ian Mallov, web writer for Dalton Transactions

What we think of as “organic chemistry” doesn’t often focus on the structure and bonding environments of the carbon atom, unlike inorganic chemistry which often does so with heteroatoms.  So I don’t think I’m going far out on a limb when I say that perhaps the key development in the structure and bonding of carbon over the last quarter century has been the isolation and use of the persistent carbene. 

Arduengo carbene

Arduengo carbene

A carbene is a divalent carbon atom possessing two electrons.  Once thought to be unisolable, its history is recent enough that almost all important figures in its development are not only still living to this day, but still working.  Ron Breslow proposed that carbenes could be isolated in 1957, Guy Bertrand isolated a liquid dicarbene in 1989 and, in 1991, Anthony Arduengo reported the first comprehensive solid-state data of the type of carbene that now bears his name (pictured above).  

So why waste the words of a short post blog on historical perspective?

Because the uses of the carbene have fallen almost entirely in one direction.  Primarily, the carbene has been used as a strong s 2-electron donor – attached to many transition metal atoms it forms very stable complexes, and it is relatively easy to vary its size. 

Only recently have the uses of the carbene diverged. 

In a recent Dalton Transactions paper, Arnold, Love and co-workers present work on labile carbenes tethered to rare earth metals by an alkoxy arm.  On rare earth metals – which are much harder Lewis acids than late transition metals – the soft carbene donor and hard metal acceptor are poorer matches.  Thus the carbon-metal bond may break, freeing the carbene for reactivity, while the hard alkoxy arm keeps the ligand tethered to the metal.

carbene reactivity

Reactivity of tethered alkoxycarbene complexes 

The authors present some examples of reactivity, including co-operative activation of pyrroles and alkynes by the carbene and metal centres, as well as outer-sphere interactions in the form of hydrogen bonding between pyrroles and the metal-bound O atom in solution.   Despite these being small steps, they are nonetheless important if the carbene is to find new roles outside stabilising late transition metal centres.

Interested in finding out more? Read the full paper:

Homo- and heteroleptic alkoxycarbene f-element complexes and their reactivity towards acidic N–H and C–H bonds
Polly L. Arnold, Thomas Cadenbach, Isobel H. Marr, Andrew A. Fyfe, Nicola L. Bell, Ronan Bellabarba, Robert P. Tooze and Jason B. Love
Dalton Trans., 2014, DOI10.1039/C4DT01442A


Ian Mallov Ian Mallov is currently a Ph.D. student in Professor Doug Stephan’s group at the University of Toronto. His research is focused on synthesizing new Lewis-acidic compounds active in Frustrated Lewis Pair chemistry. He grew up in Truro, Nova Scotia and graduated from Dalhousie University and the University of Ottawa, and worked in chemical analysis in industry for three years before returning to grad school.
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Enzyme-Inspiration for a New Nanoswitch

Enzymes function as biological catalysts in a wide array of reactions which are essential for sustaining life. They are almost always large protein molecules which adopt complex three dimensional structures, yet are able to remain structurally dynamic in order to allow the function of the enzyme to be switched on and off.

This feature allows an enzyme’s catalytic activity to be active only when required in the metabolic pathway in which it is involved. For this reason, enzymes have long been a source of inspiration to researchers involved in the design and synthesis of artificial molecular switches and machines.

SARS-CoV 3CLpro is a protease enzyme which is involved in the replication and transcription process of the human coronavirus, the virus which causes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). This enzyme is catalytically inactive as a monomer and only functions as a catalyst when it is bound with another monomer in a complex called a homodimer.

Both crystallographic and mutation studies have implicated several amino acid residues in the dimerization process, however the exact mechanism of dimer formation and how this activates the enzyme’s catalytic activity is still unconfirmed.

 Nanoswitch mechanism 

 Scheme 1. Switching between open and close conformations of nanoswitch 1 in response to metal ion addition

Drawing inspiration from this monomer-dimer on-off mechanism, Schmittel and co-workers have devised a molecular switch capable of toggling between monomeric and dimeric forms in response to the addition of different metal ions. With no metal ions present, the triangular framework adopts the ‘OPEN-I’ conformation (Scheme 1). Upon the addition of copper(I) ions, the two pyridine-based ligands come into proximity to mutually coordinate the metal.

This changes the conformation of the framework to the ‘CLOSE’ state. Addition of iron(II) ions to the ‘CLOSE’ state again changes the molecular conformation, as the iron(II) ions occupy the terpyridine moiety and the copper(I) ions move to occupy only the shielded phenanthroline ligand.

This both forms a homoleptic dimer, as the iron(II) ions can coordinate two terpyridine moieties simultaneously from two different molecules, and creates a coordinatively unsaturated copper species which acts as a catalyst for a cyclopropanation reaction. The authors impressively demonstrate the reversibility of each step, with the removal of metal ions changing the framework back to its uncoordinated conformation.

In this way, they have successfully made a molecular switch which responds to a metal ion signal (Fe2+) and turns a catalytic complex on and off. Like SARS-CoV 3CLpro enzyme, the catalytically active state is the homodimer, with the monomeric form being catalytically inactive.

To find out more, read the full article:

A monomer-dimer nanoswitch that mimics the working principle of the SARS-CoV 3CLpro enzyme controls copper-catalysed cyclopropanation
Soumen De, Susnata Pramanik and Michael Schmittle
Dalton Trans. 2014, DOI:10.1039/c4dt01508h


   Dr C. Liana Allen is currently a post-doctoral research associate in the group of Professor Scott Miller at Yale University, where she works on controlling the enantio- or regioselectivity of reactions using small peptide catalysts. Liana received her Ph.D. in organic chemistry at Bath University with Professor Jonathan Williams, where she worked on developing novel, efficient syntheses of amide bonds.
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HOT articles in June

Take a look at our new HOT articles for the month of June and let us know your thoughts below. Remember, these are ALL free to access for four weeks!

Lithium heterocuprates: the influence of the amido group on organoamidocuprate structures
Roberta Bomparola, Robert P. Davies, Stefan Hornaeur and Andrew J. P. White
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT00965G

Graphical Abstract

Free to access until 30th July 2014


Bent and planar structures of μ–η2:η2-N2 dinuclear early transition metal complexes
Xuelu Ma, Yanhui Tang and Ming Lei
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT00646A

Graphical Abstract

Free to access until 30th July 2014


Ligand-based photooxidations of dithiomaltolato complexes of Ru(II) and Zn(II): photolytic CH activation and evidence of singlet oxygen generation and quenching
Britain Bruner, Malin Backlund Walker, Mukunda M. Ghimire, Dong Zhang, Matthias Selke, Kevin K. Klausmeyer, Mohammad A. Omary and Patrick J. Farmer
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT00961D

Graphical Abstract

Free to access until 15th July 2014


Homo- and heteroleptic alkoxycarbene f-element complexes and their reactivity towards acidic N–H and C–H bonds
Polly L. Arnold, Thomas Cadenbach, Isobel H. Marr, Andrew A. Fyfe, Nicola L. Bell, Ronan Bellabarba, Robert P. Tooze and Jason B. Love
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT01442A

Graphical Abstract

Free to access until 15th July 2014


Syntheses, structures and flexible coordination of sterically demanding di- and “tri”-lithiated methandiides
Christian P. Sindlinger and Andreas Stasch
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT01185F

Graphical Abstract

Free to access until 15th July 2014


An unusual chiral 3D inorganic connectivity featuring a {Pb18} wheel: rapid and highly selective and sensitive sensing of Co(II)
Yun-Hu Han, Chong-Bin Tian and Shao-Wu Du
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT00905C

Graphical Abstract

Free to access until 15th July 2014


Versatile redox reactivity of triaryl-meso-substituted Ni(II) porphyrin
Abdou K. D. Dimé, Charles H. Devillers, Hélène Cattey and Dominique Lucas
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT00221K

Graphical Abstract

Free to access until 8th July 2014


Predicting the spin state of paramagnetic iron complexes by DFT calculation of proton NMR spectra
Andrea Borgogno, Federico Rastrelli and Alessandro Bagno
Dalton Trans., 2014, 43, 9486-9496
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT00671B

Graphical Abstract

Free to access until 8th July 2014


Photoreduction and light-induced triplet-state formation in a single-site fluoroalkylated zinc phthalocyanine
Hans Moons, Andrei Loas, Sergiu M. Gorun and Sabine Van Doorslaer
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT00621F

Graphical Abstract

Free to access until 8th July 2014


Reversible cargo shipping between orthogonal stations of a nanoscaffold upon redox input
Soumen K. Samanta, Anup Rana and Michael Schmittel
Dalton Trans., 2014, 43, 9438-9447
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT00849A

Graphical Abstract

Free to access until 8th July 2014


Benzo annulated cycloheptatriene PCP pincer iridium complexes
Wolfgang Leis, Sophie Wernitz, Benedikt Reichart, David Ruckerbauer, Johannes Wolfram Wielandt and Hermann A. Mayer
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT00885E

Graphical Abstract

Free to access until 8th July 2014


Induced circular dichroism of polyoxometalates via electrostatic encapsulation with chiral organic cations
Yizhan Wang, Lei Shi, Yang Yang, Bao Li and Lixin Wu
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT00866A

Graphical Abstract

 Free to access until 8th July 2014


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Porous Inorganic Materials Symposium

Dalton Transactions and Journal of Materials Chemistry A, B & C will be jointly presenting a Porous Inorganic Materials Symposium in China this June, comprising of three events at: 

  • University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 26 June, hosted by Professor Shu-Hong Yu (Materials Horizons Advisory Board member)
  • Fudan University, Shanghai, 28 June, hosted by Professor Gengfeng Zheng (Journals of Materials Chemistry A Advisory Board Member) 
  • Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Changchun, 30 June, hosted by Professor Hongjie Zhang (CrystEngComm Associate Editor)  

All three meetings will feature talks from Dr Andy Burrows (University of Bath, UK), Professor Jing Li (Rutgers University, USA) and Professor Christoph Janiak (University of Dusseldorf, Germany) with additional speakers that will be unique to each event.

To register for any of the events and to view the full list of speakers, see the symposium’s webpage.

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Top 10 Dalton Transactions most downloaded articles

During the 1st quarter of the year (the months of January, February & March) the top 10 most downloaded Dalton Transactions articles were:

Chloride ion impact on materials for light-emitting electrochemical cells
Gabriel E. Schneider, Henk J. Bolink, Edwin C. Constable, Cathrin D. Ertl, Catherine E. Housecroft, Antonio Pertegàs, Jennifer A. Zampese, Andreas Kanitz, Florian Kessler and Sebastian B. Meier
Dalton Trans., 2014, 43, 1961-1964
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT53229A

Syntheses, topological analyses, and NLO-active properties of new Cd(II)/M(II) (M = Ca, Sr) metal–organic frameworks based on R-isophthalic acids (R = H, OH, and t-Bu)  
Jian-Di Lin, Shu-Ting Wu, Zhi-Hua Li and Shao-Wu Du 
Dalton Trans., 2010, 39, 10719-10728 
DOI: 10.1039/C0DT00390E 

Nitrogen defects from NH3 in rare-earth sesquioxides and ZrO2  
Jonathan M. Polfus, Truls Norby and Reidar Haugsrud 
Dalton Trans., 2011, 40, 132-135 
DOI: 10.1039/C0DT01068E  

Recent progress in the synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles  
C. N. R. Rao, H. S. S. Ramakrishna Matte, Rakesh Voggu and A. Govindaraj 
Dalton Trans., 2012, 41, 5089-5120 
DOI: 10.1039/C2DT12266A     
  
Shape-controlled synthesis and catalytic application of ceria nanomaterials  
Dengsong Zhang, Xianjun Du, Liyi Shia and Ruihua Gao 
Dalton Trans., 2012, 41, 14455-14475 
DOI: 10.1039/C2DT31759A     

Organometal halide perovskites as useful materials in sensitized solar cells  
Surya Prakash Singh and P. Nagarjuna 
Dalton Trans., 2014, 43, 5247-5251 
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT53503G  

Synthesis, crystal structure and EPR spectroscopic analysis of novel copper complexes formed from N-pyridyl-4-nitro-1,8-naphthalimide ligands  
Jonathan A. Kitchen, Paulo N. Martinho, Grace G. Morgan and Thorfinnur Gunnlaugsson 
Dalton Trans., 2014, 43, 6468-6479 
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT53323A  

Metal–organic frameworks in mixed-matrix membranes for gas separation  
Harold B. Tanh Jeazet, Claudia Staudt and Christoph Janiak 
Dalton Trans., 2012, 41, 14003-14027 
DOI: 10.1039/C2DT31550E  

A colorimetric organic chemo-sensor for Co2+ in a fully aqueous environment  
Gyeong Jin Park, Yu Jeong Na, Hyun Yong Jo, Seul Ah Lee and  Cheal Kim 
Dalton Trans., 2014, 43, 6618-6622 
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT00423J  

Zinc and cobalt complexes based on tripodal ligands: synthesis, structure and reactivity toward lactide  
Mathieu J.-L. Tschan, Jia Guo, Sumesh K. Raman, Emilie Brulé, Thierry Roisnel, Marie-Noelle Rager, Rémi Legay, Guillaume Durieux, Baptiste Rigaud and Christophe M. Thomas 
Dalton Trans., 2014, 43, 4550-4564 
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT52629A

Like what you read? If so, please comment below.

If you’d like to submit your work to Dalton Transactions, you can do so by using this direct link: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/dalton.

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Salt lakes worth their lithium

Written by Helen Bache for Chemistry World

Researchers in Japan have demonstrated the exceptional potential of a hydrated titanium oxide to extract lithium from salt lake brine collected from Salar de Uyuni in Bolivia, the world’s largest salt flat.  

The high levels of magnesium and sulfate in Uyuni brine would create difficulties if it was processed by conventional techniques © Shutterstock

The high levels of magnesium and sulfate in Uyuni brine would create difficulties if it was processed by conventional techniques © Shutterstock

Demand for lithium is growing alongside the development of lithium ion batteries. This strain on scarce supplies puts the cost and effectiveness of current methods for harvesting lithium into question.

Interested? Read the full article at Chemistry World.

The original article can be read below:

Lithium recovery from salt lake brine by H2TiO3
Ramesh Chitrakar, Yoji Makita, Kenta Ooi and Akinari Sonoda
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT00467A

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