HOT articles for April

Novel surfactant-free route to delaminated all-silica and titanosilicate zeolites derived from a layered borosilicate MWW precursor
Xiaoying Ouyang, Ying-Jen Wanglee, Son-Jong Hwang, Dan Xie, Thomas Rea, Stacey I. Zones and Alexander Katz
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT00383G

Graphical Abstract

Free to access until 8th May 2014


Influence of reduction temperature on composition, particle size, and magnetic properties of CoFe alloy nanomaterials derived from layered double hydroxide precursors
Shuangxia Yang, Lianying Wang, Shuang Yue, Yanluo Lu, Jing He and Dongye Zhao
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT00137K

Graphical Abstract

Free to access until 8th May 2014


Borohydrides: from sheet to framework topologies
P. Schouwink, M. B. Ley, T. R. Jensen, L’. Smrčokc and R. Černý
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT00160E

Graphical Abstract

Free to access until 8th May 2014

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On the Hunt for HOCl

Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is a weak acid, formed from the reaction of chlorine with water. In addition to its use as a reagent in organic chemistry, it has significant biological relevance. HOCl is generated in biological systems in a reaction between chloride ions and hydrogen peroxide, catalysed by the enzyme myeloperoxidase.

This enzyme is secreted by phagocytes (cells which help protect the body by ‘ingesting’ bacteria) when they are activated during an immune response. Hypochlorite (ClO-), the conjugate base of HOCl, is extremely toxic to bacteria and plays a vital role in assisting the activated phagocytes with killing a wide range of pathogens.1

Excess production of HOCl in a living system can have a detrimental effect, as HOCl can react with many different biological molecules, including DNA, cholesterol and proteins, leading to changes in their biological properties. An example of this is the reaction of hypochlorous acid with unsaturated bonds in lipids, which produces a species called a chlorohydrin. This disrupts the formation of the essential lipid by-layers which form around cells.

Excess hypochlorous acid has been implicated in conditions such as inflammatory diseases, neurodegeneration and cancers.2 In order to fully understand the role of HOCl in these biological processes, accurate detection methods must be developed to monitor the molecule in living cells.

  Luminescent ruthenium complexes 

Several ‘HOCl-recognising’ molecules have been found to be effective sensors of hypochlorous acid. When conjugated with a fluorophore, these probes can successfully ‘recognise’ HOCl by reacting with it, however their application in vivo is still limited due to their excitation wavelengths being in the ultraviolet region of light.3 Sensors with adsorption (or emission) in the visible light range are more desirable for clinical diagnostic applications. 

In one recent paper in Dalton Transactions, Yuan and co-workers combine an excellent HOCl-recognising moiety: 4-amino-3-nitrol phenol) and a ruthenium(II)-2,2-bipyridyl complex, which is well known to exhibit visible light adsorption and emission, into one compound to create a luminescent probe for HOCl.

The resulting complex [Ru(bpy)2(AN-bpy)][PF6]2 is very weakly luminescent but, upon reaction with HOCl in aqueous media, converts to [Ru(bpy)2(HM-bpy)][PF6]2, which has a luminescence signal which is 110-fold stronger.

Impressively, the authors show that when HeLa cells are incubated with [Ru(bpy)2(AN-bpy)][PF6]2 for two hours they remain non-luminescent; when the same cells are subsequently treated with HOCl for thirty minutes, a bright red luminescence is observed, clearly demonstrating the potential for using this ruthenium complex as an in vivo, luminescent detector of hypochlorous acid. 

To find out more, read the article using the link below:

Development of a functional ruthenium(II) complex for probing hypochlorous acid in living cells
Dalton Trans. 2014, DOI:10.1039/C4DT00179F



Liana
Dr C. Liana Allen is currently a post-doctoral research associate in the group of Professor Scott Miller at Yale University, where she works on controlling the enantio- or regioselectivity of reactions using small peptide catalysts. Liana received her Ph.D. in organic chemistry at Bath University with Professor Jonathan Williams, where she worked on developing novel, efficient syntheses of amide bonds.


References  

 1 J. M. Albrich, C. A. McCarthy, J. K. Hurst, Prot. Nat. Acad. Sci., 1981, 78, 210.
2  T. I. Kim, S. Park, Y. Choi, Y. Kim, Chem.-Asian J., 2011, 6, 1358
3 Y. Xiao, R. Zhang, Z. Ye, Z. Dai, H. An, J. Yuan, Anal. Chem., 2012, 84, 10785.

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HOT articles for March

These articles are HOT as recommended by the referees. And we’ve made them free to access for the next 4 weeks!

Sensitisation of Eu(III)- and Tb(III)-based luminescence by Ir(III) units in Ir/lanthanide dyads: evidence for parallel energy-transfer and electron-transfer based mechanisms
Daniel Sykes, Ahmet J. Cankut, Noorshida Mohd Ali, Andrew Stephenson, Steven J. P. Spall, Simon C. Parker, Julia A. Weinstein and Michael D. Ward  
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT00292J

Graphical abstract

Free to access until 16th April 2014


Structure and thermal expansion of the tungsten bronze Pb2KNb5O15
Kun Lin, Hui Wu, Fangfang Wang, Yangchun Rong, Jun Chen, Jinxia Deng, Ranbo Yu, Liang Fang, Qingzhen Huang and Xianran Xing  
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT53340A

Graphical abstract

Free to access until 16th April 2014


Is the phosphaethynolate anion, (OCP)−, an ambident nucleophile? A spectroscopic and computational study
Dominikus Heift, Zoltán Benkő and Hansjörg Grützmacher  
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT53569J

Graphical abstract

Free to access until 11th April 2014


Effect of f–f interactions on quantum tunnelling of the magnetization: mono- and dinuclear Dy(III) phthalocyaninato triple-decker single-molecule magnets with the same octacoordination environment
Keiichi Katoh, Rina Asano, Akira Miura, Yoji Horii, Takaumi Morita, Brian K. Breedlove and Masahiro Yamashita
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT00042K

Graphical abstract

Free to access until 11th April 2014


Zinc(II) and cadmium(II) metal–organic frameworks with 4-imidazole containing tripodal ligand: sorption and anion exchange properties
Shui-Sheng Chen, Peng Wang, Satoshi Takamizawa, Taka-aki Okamura, Min Chen and Wei-Yin Sun  
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT53388C 

Graphical abstract 

Free to access until 4th April 2014 


 

Interactions of Pb and Te atoms with graphene
Chuncheng Gong, Alex W. Robertson, Kuang He, Camden Ford, Andrew A. R. Watt and Jamie H. Warner  
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT00143E 

Graphical abstract 

Free to access until 4th April 2014 


 

Reactivity of [K3(phen)8][Cu(NPh2)2]3—a possible intermediate in the copper(I)-catalyzed N-arylation of N-phenylaniline
Chia-Kai Tseng, Chi-Rung Lee, Mei-Chun Tseng, Chien-Chung Han and Shin-Guang Shyu  
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT00051J 

Graphical abstract 

Free to access until 4th April 2014 


 

Temperature-dependent upconversion luminescence and dynamics of NaYF4:Yb3+/Er3+ nanocrystals: influence of particle size and crystalline phase
Wei Yu, Wen Xu, Hongwei Song and Shuang Zhang  
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT53562B 

 Graphical abstract

Free to access until 4th April 2014


 

Band gap expansion, shear inversion phase change behaviour and low-voltage induced crystal oscillation in low-dimensional tin selenide crystals
Robin Carter, Mikhail Suyetin, Samantha Lister, M. Adam Dyson, Harrison Trewhitt, Sanam Goel, Zheng Liu, Kazu Suenaga, Cristina Giusca, Reza J. Kashtiban, John L. Hutchison, John C. Dore, Gavin R. Bell, Elena Bichoutskaia and Jeremy Sloan
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT00185K

GA

Free to access until 25th April


 

Versatile reactivity of a rhodium(I) boryl complex towards ketones and imines
Sabrina I. Kalläne, Thomas Braun, Beatrice Braun and Stefan Mebs
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4DT00080C

GA

Free to access until 25th April

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Top Ten most accessed Dalton Transactions articles from October to December 2013

During October, November and December, the following articles were the Top Ten most accessed:

Characterization of a versatile organometallic pro-drug (CORM) for experimental CO based therapeutics
João D. Seixas, Abhik Mukhopadhyay, Teresa Santos-Silva, Leo E. Otterbein, David J. Gallo, Sandra S. Rodrigues, Bruno H. Guerreiro, Ana M. L. Gonçalves, Nuno Penacho, Ana R. Marques, Ana C. Coelho, Patrícia M. Reis, Maria J. Romão and Carlos C. Romão  
Dalton Trans., 2013, 42, 5985-5998
DOI: 10.1039/c2dt32174b

Recent progress in the synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles
C. N. R. Rao, H. S. S. Ramakrishna Matte, Rakesh Voggu and A. Govindaraj  
Dalton Trans., 2012, 41, 5089-5120
DOI: 10.1039/c2dt12266a

The phase behaviour of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborates; ionic liquids and ionic liquid crystals
John D. Holbrey and Kenneth R. Seddon  
J. Chem. Soc., Dalton Trans., 1999, 2133-2140
DOI: 10.1039/a902818h

Facile synthesis and excellent recyclable photocatalytic activity of pine cone-like Fe3O4@Cu2O/Cu porous nanocomposites
Haisheng Wang, Yongan Hu, Yang Jiang, Lingguang Qiu, Haibin Wu, Ben Guo, Yuhua Shen, Yang Wang, Ling Zhu and Anjian Xie  
Dalton Trans., 2013, 42, 4915-4921
DOI: 10.1039/c2dt32290k

Synthesis, structural, photophysical and electrochemical studies of various d-metal complexes of btp [2,6-bis(1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)pyridine] ligands that give rise to the formation of metallo-supramolecular gels
Joseph P. Byrne, Jonathan A. Kitchen, Oxana Kotova, Vivienne Leigh, Alan P. Bell, John J. Boland, Martin Albrecht and Thorfinnur Gunnlaugsson  
Dalton Trans., 2014, 43, 196-209
DOI: 10.1039/c3dt52309h

Templating and structural engineering in organic–inorganic perovskites
David B. Mitzi  
J. Chem. Soc., Dalton Trans., 2001, 1-12
DOI: 10.1039/b007070j

Nitrogen defects from NH3 in rare-earth sesquioxides and ZrO2
Jonathan M. Polfus, Truls Norby and Reidar Haugsrud  
Dalton Trans., 2011, 40, 132-135
DOI: 10.1039/c0dt01068e

Recent progress in the development of bimetallic photocatalysts for hydrogen generation
Yvonne Halpin, Mary T. Pryce, Sven Rau, Danilo Dini and Johannes G. Vos  
Dalton Trans., 2013, 42, 16243-16254
DOI: 10.1039/c3dt52319e

Facile synthesis of mononuclear early transition-metal complexes of κ3cyclo-tetrametaphosphate ([P4O12]4−) and cyclo-trimetaphosphate ([P3O9]3−)
Haisheng Wang, Yongan Hu, Yang Jiang, Lingguang Qiu, Haibin Wu, Ben Guo, Yuhua Shen, Yang Wang, Ling Zhu and Anjian Xie  
Dalton Trans., 2013, 43, 1509-1518
DOI: 10.1039/c2dt52526k

Novel platinum(ii) compounds with O,S bidentate ligands: synthesis, characterization, antiproliferative properties and biomolecular interactions
Carolin Mügge, Ruiqi Liu, Helmar Görls, Chiara Gabbiani, Elena Michelucci, Nadine Rüdiger, Joachim H. Clement, Luigi Messori and Wolfgang Weigand  
Dalton Trans., 2014, 43, 3072-3086
DOI: 10.1039/c3dt52284a

Please leave your comments or thoughts on any of these articles in the comment box below.

Do you have an article that you would like to submit to Dalton Transactions? Why not submit to us here today?

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New MOFs Show Selective Carbon Dioxide Capture Capabilities

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is released into the Earth’s atmosphere in large quantities by fossil fuel and biomass-driven power generation and by natural gas processing plants. While the production of energy via these means is essential, the gaseous CO2 by-product they release into the atmosphere has been implicated in global warming and ocean acidification.1 The capture of waste gaseous CO2 and its subsequent long-term storage is one strategy being used to try to mitigate these geological problems.

Direct capture of CO2 from the air presents significant challenges, one of which is the separation of CO2 from other gases. Currently, a lot of waste carbon dioxide is captured at the emission source – fossil fuel-powered energy plants – by a ‘filter’ that traps the CO2 as it travels up a chimney. This method can prevent up to 90% of a power plant’s carbon emissions from entering the atmosphere, however the process requires a lot of energy and the captured gas still needs to be transported to a suitable storage area. New technologies for selective capture of carbon dioxide from the air are still in their infancy, but could offer more efficient ways to trap CO2 anywhere on the planet, not just at the sources of emission. 
MOF

Figure 1: Double chain MOF

Metal organic frameworks (MOFs), also known as coordination polymers, are compounds containing metal ions which are coordinated to organic molecules to form extensive two- or three-dimensional structures. The uniform and controllable porosity of these materials has already been exploited as potential devices for gas capture and storage.2 In one recent paper in Dalton Transactions, Kim and co-workers synthesise novel MOFs using cobalt and zinc metal ions coordinated to porphyrin-based molecules. The resulting MOFs display an interesting 1D ‘double chain’ arrangement of molecules (Figure 1). These ‘double chains’ pack together tightly, forming hydrogen bonds between the ‘chains’, resulting in a stable solid state structure with defined pores. Gas sorption experiments revealed that these new MOFs both show high uptake of CO2 gas compared with nitrogen (N2), hydrogen (H2) and methane (CH4), (Figure 2), making these types of materials excellent candidates for selective CO2 capture from the air. 

Gas uptake by double chain MOF

Figure 2: Gas uptake by double-chain MOF

Find out more and download the article now:
CO2 selective 1D double chain dipyridyl-porphyrin based porous coordination polymers 
Dalton Trans. 2014, DOI:10.1039/C3DT53287A 

References 

1 IPCC Special Report, ‘Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage’, IPCC Working Group III, 2005
2 S. L. James, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2003, 32, 276.


Liana Allen Dr C. Liana Allen is currently a post-doctoral research associate in the group of Professor Scott Miller at Yale University, where she works on controlling the enantio- or regioselectivity of reactions using small peptide catalysts. Liana received her Ph.D. in organic chemistry at Bath University with Professor Jonathan Williams, where she worked on developing novel, efficient syntheses of amide bonds.
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HOT articles for February

These articles are HOT as recommended by the referees. And we’ve made them free to access for the next 4 weeks!

Growth mechanism and photocatalytic activity of self-organized N-doped (BiO)2CO3 hierarchical nanosheet microspheres from bismuth citrate and urea
Fan Dong, Ting Xiong, Rui Wang, Yanjuan Sun and Yanke Jiang  
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT53383B

Graphical abstract

Free to access until 20th March 2014


A novel and high brightness AlN:Mn2+ red phosphor for field emission displays
Xiao-Jun Wang, Rong-Jun Xie, Benjamin Dierre, Takashi Takeda, Takayuki Suehiro, Naoto Hirosaki, Takashi Sekiguchi, Huili Li and Zhuo Sun  
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT53532K

Graphical abstract

Free to access until 20th March 2014


Assembly and core transformation properties of two tetrahedral clusters: [FeIII13P8W60O227(OH)15(H2O)2]30− and [FeIII13P8W60O224(OH)12(PO4)4]33−
Pedro I. Molina, Haralampos N. Miras, De-Liang Long and Leroy Cronin  
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT53382D

Graphical abstract

Free to access until 20th March 2014

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Tag-Team Luminescence Enlightens Biomolecular Analysis

How do you combine rare-earth metals, extremely specific energy transfers, and luminescent properties to investigate changes in enzymes? New methods often arise from unique confluences of existing knowledge. In their recent paper, the Natrajan group from the University of Manchester exploit known properties of easily-obtained chemical products to present a clever new biosensory technique .

UCP emission spectra

The unique aspect is the use of upconverting phosphors (UCPs) in combination with enzymes. UCPs are luminescent particles, often based on rare-earth metals, which can be excited by multiple photons absorbed in the near-infra-red region (750-1400 nm wavelengths). Post excitation, they emit a photon of light in the higher-energy visible spectrum, thus the energetic process is known as up-conversion. While enzymes have high specificities and sensitivities to substrates, UCP’s have the advantage of excitation in the near-infra-red region without autofluorescence. In combination, enzymes and UCPs provide several direct advantages over simple biosensory fluorescence measurements.

In the current paper, NaYF4:Yb:Tm was the UCP used to probe the redox properties of the enzyme pentaerythritol tetranitrate reductase (PETNR) and Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), involving energy transfer between two chromophores, was used to excite the UCP. In this case, transfer of energy from the absorbance band of the flavin mononucleotide core of the PETNR enzyme and the emission band of the UCP, which are very close in wavelength, allow FRET to occur. Since a second emission band in the near-IR region originates from this UCP, this was normalized so that the other band, varying with the enzyme concentration, could be measured against it. When the PETNR underwent a two-electron reduction, it negated its ability to undergo FRET, resulting in the loss of the emission band at 460 nm, rendering the solution colourless. The researchers demonstrated that this new technique can be used with either the full PETNR enzyme or the mononucleotide flavin core alone, indicating that this can be applied to a wider range of systems.

Find out more and download the article now:
Ratiometric detection of enzyme turnover and flavin reduction using rare-earth upconverting phosphors
Dalton Trans., 2014, DOI: 10.1039/C4DT00356J


Ian_Mallow Ian Mallov is currently a Ph.D. student in Professor Doug Stephan’s group at the University of Toronto. His research is focused on synthesizing new Lewis-acidic compounds active in Frustrated Lewis Pair chemistry. He grew up in Truro, Nova Scotia and graduated from Dalhousie University and the University of Ottawa, and worked in chemical analysis in industry for three years before returning to grad school.
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Dalton Transactions Lectures at the University of California, Berkeley 2014

The 2013 Dalton Transactions Lecture awardees delivered their presentations at UC Berkeley last month. Each awardee is provided with an honorarium and a commemorative plaque. 

Trevor Hayton Professor Trevor Hayton (UCSB) gave the annual Dalton Transactions Lecture, which is awarded to an exceptional young inorganic chemist in the Americas each year. Previous recipients are:

2012   Teri Odom (Northwestern University)
2011    Daniel Gamelin (U Washington)
2010    Paul Chirik (Princeton University)
2009    Francois Gabbai (Texas A & M University)
2008    Dan Mindiola (Indiana University)
2007    Geoff Coates (Cornell University)
2006    John Hartwig (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
2005    Kit Cummins (MIT)

Professor Hayton has rapidly established himself as a leader in synthetic inorganic chemistry, focusing on actinides and bioinorganic systems. His lecture focused on the synthesis and reactivity of actinide complexes with chalcogenide ligands. 

Professor Hayton received his B.Sc. in Chemistry from the University of British Columbia, whereupon he began his Ph.D. research, also at UBC, under the direction of Peter Legzdins. After graduating in 2003, he began a postdoctoral fellowship at Los Alamos National Laboratory before joining the faculty at University of California, Santa Barbara in 2003.

   
Phillip Power The inaugural Dalton Transactions Distinguished Lecture was given on February 7 by Professor Phil Power of UC Davis. Professor Power is a world-renowned expert in main group chemistry. His Dalton Transactions Lecture focused on the preparation and structure of low-coordinate main group compounds and their reactivity towards small molecules such as dihydrogen and ethene. 

Professor Power received his bachelor’s degree in chemistry from the University of Dublin, Ireland, and his doctorate from the University of Sussex; the latter under the supervision of Mike Lappert. He carried out postdoctoral research at Stanford University before joining the faculty at UC Davis in 1980. He was award the Royal Society of Chemistry Mond Medal in 2005 and elected Fellow of the Royal Society in the same year. 

 Congratulations to Professors Hayton and Power for their awards!

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Call for papers: 2014 themed issues

DaltonTransCoverWe are delighted to announce that Dalton Transactions will be publishing a number of themed issues in 2014. We want you to submit your work. If your research fits within the following themed issue topics, read on…

New Expeditions in Polar Organometallic Chemistry – deadline 1st April 2014

Inorganic Chemistry for Renewable Energy Conversion and Storage  – deadline 1st May 2014

Spectroscopy of Inorganic Excited States – deadline 14th May 2014

 Details of the scope of each issue is below.

How to submit?
All types of manuscript—communications, full papers and Perspectives, will be considered for publication. The manuscript should be prepared according to our article guidelines and submitted via our online system.

All manuscripts will be subject to the normal refereeing procedure and inclusion in the themed issue will be at the discretion of the Guest Editors. Please indicate in your submission that you would like the manuscript to be considered for this themed issue.

Issue scopes:

New Expeditions in Polar Organometallic Chemistry
Guest edited by Professor Eva Hevia (University of Strathclyde), this issue will focus on both the synthesis and characterisation of polar organometallic reagents and their application in organic synthesis, catalysis, supramolecular chemistry and materials science.

Inorganic Chemistry for Renewable Energy Conversion and Storage
Guest edited by Professor Lars Kloo (KTH), this issue will focus on all aspects of inorganic/organometallic materials and coordination chemistry of relevance for the conversion and storage of renewable energy. Contributions may include solar cells, solar fuels, fuel cells, batteries, or materials for energy storage; however, this list is by no means exhaustive – all subject areas within the title theme will be welcome!

Spectroscopy of Inorganic Excited States
Guest edited by Dr Julia Weinstein (Universityof Sheffield), this issue will focus on the state-of-the art in spectroscopic interrogation of inorganic excited states which apply the latest advances in detection technology.

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HOT articles for January

Ligand-based molecular recognition and dioxygen splitting: an endo epoxide ending
Peter E. Sues, Matthew W. Forbes, Alan J. Lough and Robert H. Morris
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT53495B    

Graphical abstract

Free to access until 28th February 2014


Pillar[5]arene-based diglycolamides for highly efficient separation of americium(III) and europium(III)
Lei Wu, Yuyu Fang, Yiming Jia, Yuanyou Yang, Jiali Liao, Ning Liu, Xinshi Yang, Wen Feng, Jialin Ming and Lihua Yuan  
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT53336K

Graphical abstract

Free to access until 21st February 2014


Yellow-light sensitization of a ligand photosubstitution reaction in a ruthenium polypyridyl complex covalently bound to a rhodamine dye
Azadeh Bahreman, Jordi-Amat Cuello-Garibo and Sylvestre Bonnet  
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT52643G

 

Graphical abstract

Free to access until 21st February 2014


Synthesis and characterisation of new MO(OH)2 (M = Zr, Hf) oxyhydroxides and related Li2MO3 salts
Yana V. Baklanova, Tatyana A. Denisova, Lidiya G. Maksimova, Alexander P. Tyutyunnik, Inna V. Baklanova, Igor R. Shein, Reinhard B. Neder and Nadezda V. Tarakina  
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT52929K

Graphical abstract

Free to access until 17th February 2014


Structure–property relationships based on Hammett constants in cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes: their application to the design of a fluorine-free FIrPic-like emitter
Julien Frey, Basile F. E. Curchod, Rosario Scopelliti, Ivano Tavernelli, Ursula Rothlisberger, Mohammad K. Nazeeruddin and Etienne Baranoff  
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT52739E

Graphical abstract

Free to access until 17th February 2014


Synthesis, structure and reactivity of Ni site models of [NiFeSe] hydrogenases
Claire Wombwell and Erwin Reisner  
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT52967C

Graphical abstract

Free to access until 17th February 2014


Effective catalytic disproportionation of aqueous H2O2 with di- and mono-nuclear manganese(II) complexes containing pyridine alcohol ligands
M. Zienkiewicz, A. Jabłońska-Wawrzycka, J. Szlachetko, Y. Kayser, K. Stadnicka, W. Sawka-Dobrowolska, J. Jezierska, B. Barszcz and J. Sá  
Dalton Trans., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3DT53288G

Graphical abstract

 

Free to access until 17th February 2014

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