Call for papers: Themed issues

Dalton Transactions coverWe are delighted to announce four new Dalton Transactions themed issues:

Metallodrugs: Activation, Targeting and Delivery
Deadline: 12th April 2016
Guest Editors: Professor Dr Nils Metzler-Nolte (Ruhr-Universität Bochum), Professor Dr Zijian Guo (Nanjing University)

In 1965, a seminal paper by Barnett Rosenberg appeared in Nature, describing the anti-proliferative properties of a very simple inorganic compound, now known to all of us as Cisplatin. This discovery, and the subsequent clinical approval of Cisplatin, has led to thousands of papers, and it has arguably initiated the field of medicinal inorganic chemistry. Now, 50 years after Rosenberg’s discovery, the field has matured and, beyond Cisplatin, many other compounds have been explored for their anti-proliferative activity. Moreover, chemical creativity has shifted from the mere discovery of new active agents, and elucidation of their mode of action (as difficult as that may be at times) to issues such as delivery of anti-proliferative agents to cancer cells, activation of inorganic prodrugs, and very creative approaches to targeting malignant cells exclusively.

A Themed Issue of Dalton Transactions now seeks to explore these frontiers in the art of medicinal inorganic chemistry. Crucially, the Issue will aim to provide an overview of current progress in three focal points of inorganic drug development: activation (for example, by light, enzymes or external stimuli), targeting (that is, bioconjugates, using the EPR effect, and so on) or selective delivery (to cancer cells or intra-cellularly, by nanoparticles or other carrier systems, and so on).

Although certainly important, the discovery of new compounds or elucidation of a mode of action are not topics for this issue — but Dalton Transactions is of course an excellent place for dissemination of such results in a regular Paper.

Small molecule activation
Deadline: 30th April 2016
Guest Editors: Professor Martin Albrecht (University of Bern), Professor Eric Clot (University of Montpellier), Professor Giulia Licini (University of Padova), Professor Barbara Milani (University of Trieste)

Small molecule activation constitutes one of the main frontiers of inorganic and organometallic chemistry, with much effort directed towards the development of new processes for the selective and sustainable transformation of abundant small molecules such as H2O, NH3, N2, O2, CO, or CO2 into high-value chemical feedstocks and energy resources.

This themed issue will focus on homogenously catalysed activation of small molecules, as well as stoichiometric reactions that further our understanding towards such ends. We invite submissions covering any relevant aspect of small molecule activation including: organometallic chemistry, (electro)catalysis, photochemistry, mechanistic studies, spectroscopy, synthesis, and developments in materials science.

Reactions Facilitated by Ligand Design
Deadline: 10th May 2016
Guest Editor: Professor Jason Love (The University of Edinburgh)

This issue will focus on transformations involving inorganic complexes where a ligand design approach has been used to produce a demonstrable change in reactivity. Papers can be submitted from any area of inorganic or organometallic chemistry, including catalysis, small molecule activation, C–X bond activation, bioinorganic chemistry and supramolecular chemistry. Ligand classes could include pincers, carbenes, macrocyclic ligands, phosphines or metallocenes, with approaches for goal-oriented ligand design involving aspects such as redox non-innocence, steric hindrance, secondary coordination sphere effects and manipulation of Lewis pairs.

Molecular Spintronics: The role of Coordination Chemistry
Deadline: 17th May 2016
Guest Editors: Professor Eugenio Coronado (University of Valencia), Professor Masahiro Yamashita (Tohoku University)

This issue intends to show the impact of coordination chemistry in the emerging field of Molecular Spintronics.

Coordination chemistry provides many examples of molecules that can be useful in this field: from metal complexes that can be incorporated into spintronic devices, as spin collectors or spin filters, to magnetic molecules that can behave as bits of memory or even as spin qubits.

This issue will cover the three different facets of the field, namely: 1) the use of molecules in the development of a new generation of spintronic devices; 2) the miniaturization of the device to reach the single-molecule limit (molecular nanospintronics); and 3) The search for molecular spin qubits of interest in quantum computing.

In this multidisciplinary field, chemists work in close interaction with solid-state physicists, including theoreticians as well as experimentalists, and materials scientists. Contributions coming from the three scientific communities in which these scientists are integrated – Spintronics, Molecular Electronics and Molecular Magnetism – are expected.

Does your research fit into any of these subject areas? If so, we would welcome your contribution. Please see below for further details on how to submit:

How to submit

All types of manuscript – communications, full papers and Perspectives, will be considered for publication. The manuscript should be prepared according to our article guidelines and submitted via our online system.

All manuscripts will be subject to normal peer review and inclusion in the themed issue will be at the discretion of the Guest Editors. Please indicate in your submission which themed issue you would like to be considered for.

Interested in submitting  paper? Please contact us for more information

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Malcolm Green’s 80th Birthday Symposium

We are delighted to announce the success of Malcolm Green’s 80th Birthday Symposium that was held at the Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory and Balliol College, University of Oxford, UK, on 14th May 2016. Malcolm was presented with a copy of a collection of his articles published by the Royal Society of Chemistry, highlighting his vast contribution to Inorganic Chemistry over the last 50 years. Please join us in wishing Malcolm a very Happy Birthday!

Image credit: Polly Arnold

Image credits: Karl Harrison

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Malcolm Green FRS: In celebration of his 80th Birthday

Posted on behalf of F. Geoffrey N. Cloke, Philip Mountford, Dermot O’Hare, Gerard Parkin and Andrea Sella

This collection of articles is dedicated to Professor Malcolm L. H. Green on the occasion of his 80th birthday.  Malcolm was born in Eastleigh, Hampshire, on the 16th of April, 1936. He received his B. Sc. (Hons) in 1956 from the University of London (Acton Technical College) and his Ph. D. in 1959 from Imperial College of Science and Technology, where he studied under Professor Sir Geoffrey Wilkinson. Following Imperial College, Malcolm moved to Cambridge University in 1960, and finally to Oxford University in 1963, where he was appointed University Lecturer and Septcentenary Fellow in Inorganic Chemistry at Balliol College.  On the 2nd of January 1965, he married Jennifer Green (née Bilham), with whom he has also enjoyed a long time scientific collaboration.  Malcolm became a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1985 and was appointed Statutory Professor and Head of the Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory and Professorial Fellow of St. Catherine’s College in 1989.  He became a research active Emeritus Professor in 2003 and continues to publish to this day.

Professor Malcolm L. H. Green

Malcolm’s contributions to inorganic chemistry are numerous and varied.  His first publication, which bears the title “Bis‑cyclopentadienylrhenium hydride”,  appeared in 1958 and was based on his Ph. D. thesis which was entitled “A study of some transition metal hydrides and olefin complexes.”  To date, he has published more than 600 papers describing synthetic, structural, and mechanistic aspects of the chemistry of virtually every transition element.  In order to give the reader a flavour of the research that Malcolm has performed, the present collection provides a selection of his papers that have been published in journals of the Royal Society of Chemistry over a period of more than fifty years.  For example, these papers show how Malcolm’s research popularized the now ubiquitous molybdenocene and tungstenocene systems which provided evidence for alpha‑ and beta‑hydrogen migratory insertion reactions, and also early examples of C–H bond activation.

Malcolm is well known for his synthetic achievements, an important aspect of which was his development of multigram-scale metal vapour synthesis, in which metals are vapourized and condensed with a reactive ligand.  This technique allowed him to obtain molecules such as dibenzene titanium, zirconium and hafnium, the first zerovalent compounds of these elements.  Likewise, Malcolm also employed metal vapour synthesis to isolate Mo(PMe3)6, a highly reactive electron-rich molecule.

His discovery that the simple molecule (dmpe)TiCl3(CH2CH3) exhibits a direct bonding interaction between the titanium and the β‑C‑H moiety, an interaction which he named agostic, must be regarded as one of the most important discoveries in the field of organometallic chemistry.  Furthermore, in terms of mechanistic studies, Malcolm proposed a mechanism for the stereospecific Ziegler-Natta polymerization of olefins (the so-called Green-Rooney mechanism) and also, together with Mingos and Davies, formulated a series of rules to predict the stereospecificity of nucleophilic addition to p-coordinated ligands attached to a transition metal.

While Malcolm is best known for molecular chemistry, he also developed the field of organometallic solid state chemistry, which included the first example of an organometallic compound with a large second order non-linear optical behaviour, and many examples of organometallic intercalation compounds.

Malcolm’s reasearch has not been restricted to organometallic chemistry.  For example, in his later years, he focused much effort into developing the foundational chemistry of C60 and carbon nanotubes.  His research in heterogenous catalysis, in which he discovered an excellent metal carbide catalyst for the Fischer-Tropsch conversion of synthesis gas to hydrocarbons, also resulted in the creation of the Oxford Catalysts Group (subsequently Velocys), of which he is a co-founder.

Finally, it is important to note that Malcolm has contributed much to the community by his development of a new approach for classifying covalent compounds, namely the Covalent Bond Classification (CBC) method.  This approach, which offers considerable advantages over that employing oxidation states, has now been widely adopted, to the extent that it is also used in describing materials chemistry.

Not surprisingly, his research has been widely recognized by numerous awards, some of which include:  The Royal Society of Chemistry Corday‑Morgan Medal and Prize in Inorganic Chemistry (1974); the Chemistry Society Medal in Transition Metal Chemistry (1978); the Royal Society of Chemistry Tilden Lectureship and Prize (1982); The J. C. Bailar Lecture and Medal, University of Illinois (1983); the American Chemical Society Award in Inorganic Chemistry (1984); the Royal Society of Chemistry Medal in Organometallic Chemistry (1986); the Royal Society of Chemistry Sir Edward Frankland Prize (1989); The Karl‑Ziegler Prize of the Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker (1992); the Davy medal of the Royal Society (1995) ; American Chemical Society award in Organometallic Chemistry (1997) and The Royal Society of Chemistry Sir Geoffrey Wilkinson Medal and Prize (2000).  Other recognitions of his work include:  University of Western Ontario, Visiting Professor (1971); Ecole de Chimie and Institute des Substances Naturalles, Paris, Visiting Professor (1972); Harvard University, A. P. Sloan Visiting Professor (1973); Pacific West Coast Lecturer in Inorganic Chemistry (1977); Sherman Fairchild Visiting Scholar at the California Institute of Technology (1981); Karl Ziegler Gastprofessor, Max Plank Institute, Mulheim (1983); Hutchinson Lectureship, University of Rochester (1983); The University Lecturer in Chemistry, University of Western Ontario (1984); Debye Lecturer, Cornell University (1985); Wuhan University, PRC, Visiting Professor (1985); Julius Stieglitz Lecturer, University of Chicago (1986); Frontiers of Science Lecturer, Texas A & M University (1987); The DuPont Lecturer, Indiana University (1989/90); The Ida Beam Lecturer, University of Iowa (1990); The Glenn T. Seaborg Lecturer in Inorganic Chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley (1991); The South‑East Lecturer in Inorganic Chemistry, USA (1991); The Walter Heiber Gastprofessor, University of Munich (1991); The Pacific Coast Lecturer (1994); The Rayson Huang Visiting Lecturer, Hong Kong (1995); The A. D. Little Lecturer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1995); The Stauffer Lecturer, University of Southern California (1996); the Dow Lecturer at the University of Ottowa (1996); and the James Walker Memorial Lecture, University of Edinburgh (1996); Doutor Honoris Causa, University of Lisbon, Portugal (1997); The Frank Dyer Medal, University of New South Wales (1997); The Fred Basolo Medal and Lecture., Northwestern University (1998); Ernest H. Swift Lectureship, California Institute of Technology (1998); Lewis Lecture, Cambridge UK (2001); FMC Lecturer, Princeton (2001); Distinguished Visiting Professor, Hong Kong University (2002);  Eastman Company Distinguished Lecturer in Inorganic Chemistry, University of North Carolina (2002); 34th Camille and Henry Dreyfus Lecturer, Dartmouth College (2002); Raymond Siedle Lecturer, Indiana University (2004); Bert Vallee Visiting Professor at Harvard University (2004); Falk-Plaut Lecturer, Columbia University, New York (2006); Prix Franco-Briitannique, Societé,  Francaise de Chemie (2007); and, most recently, the European Prize for Organometallic Chemistry (2015).

The breadth and originality of Malcolm’s work collected here underscores his fearless and often iconoclastic approach to chemistry. Armed with his pipe and cigarette lighter (essential for checking  new products in the lab) Malcolm infected new students with his enthusiastic approach by asking them to prepare starting materials on big scales, whether it was 3 moles of trimethylphosphine, a kilogram of molybdenum pentachloride, or more than 100 grams of  tungstenocene dihydride.  Many students encountered some of his more ambitious ideas in the King’s Arms, where original experiments and apparatus were dreamed up on the back of a beer mat.  Malcolm’s seminars became legendary for the anthropomorphism of his chemical intuition, where both mechanism and apparatus were often described in mime.  Every student of Malcolm went away not only with a broad training in inorganic chemistry, from organometallic to solid state, but also with a wealth of often hilarious stories from their time in the group.

In closing, Malcolm has been at the forefront of organometallic chemistry for more than a half-century and we hope that this collection serves as a simple means to highlight some of his significant achievements.

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All-metal sandwich inspires a theoretical following

Written by Alex Pashley for Chemistry World

In the wake of the first experimentally isolated all-metal sandwich complex last year,1 two independent groups from China have put forward their theoretical take on this inorganic rarity.2,3

Researchers analysed the molecular orbitals holding the unusual all-metal sandwich complex together

Researchers analysed the molecular orbitals holding the unusual all-metal sandwich complex together

Sandwich complexes are a class of inorganic compounds, typified by ferrocene. They feature a metal ion sandwiched between two aromatic ligands, which are bound to the central metal through haptic covalent bonds. Structurally similar species to ferrocene, with different metals or coordinating ligands, are generally termed metallocenes.

Interested in reading further? The full article can be read in Chemistry World.

The original articles can be read below and are free to access until 21st June 2016

On the nature of chemical bonding in the all-metal aromatic [Sb3Au3Sb3]3− sandwich complex
Xue-Rui You, Wen-Juan Tian, Da-Zhi Li,* Ying-Jin Wang, Rui Li, Lin-Yan Feng and Hua-Jin Zhai*
Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2016, 18, 13423-13431
DOI: 10.1039/C6CP00101G

Theoretical studies on the bonding and electron structures of a [Au3Sb6]3− complex and its oligomers
Wan-Lu Li, Cong-Qiao Xu, Shu-Xian Hu and Jun Li*
Dalton Trans., 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6DT00602G

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RSC Nyholm Prize for Inorganic Chemistry goes to Advisory Board member George Christou

Each year the Royal Society of Chemistry presents prizes and awards to chemical scientists who have made a considerable contribution in their area of research, in industry and academia. This year, we are delighted to announce that Dalton Transactions Advisory Board member, Professor George Christou, of the University of Florida, USA, has been awarded the 2016 RSC Nyholm Prize for Inorganic Chemistry, for his pioneering work in magnetic metal-oxo clusters and the discovery of numerous single-molecule magnets.

In celebration of the 2016 RSC Prizes and Awards, we have collected together some of the research recently published by the winners. This collection showcases articles authored by the winners from across the Royal Society of Chemistry’s journals portfolio, which are free to access for a limited period. A full list of 2016 winners and more information about RSC Prizes and Awards can be found here.

Please join us in congratulating George on this achievement!
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Nitrogen Reduction By Homogeneous Fe Complexes Revisited

Geographer Vaclav Smil described the Haber-Bosch process as the “detonator of the human population explosion” in the twentieth century, in his Nature Millennium Essay.1 Today, nearly 80% of nitrogen atoms in human tissue have been through the Haber-Bosch process;2 where nitrogen gas is converted to ammonia converted into industrial fertilizers.

The Haber-Bosch process has now entered its second century. High temperatures and pressures and a catalyst composed of magnetite (Fe3O4), wüstite (FeO) and iron(0) metal,  push the equilibrium of a mixture of pure hydrogen, nitrogen and ammonia gas towards the formation of ammonia.  Today, one of the greatest challenges of industrial chemistry is to find an alternative catalyst and process.

In 1991 Leigh et. al. reported the nitrogen of nitrogen by a homogeneous Fe complex with two chelating phosphine ligands.3 They were able to reduce N2 to ammonia (isolated as NH4+) under strongly acidic conditions. However, following this discovery, verification and mechanistic questions remained.

The previously unreported dimer

In a recent article, ‘Teaching old compounds new tricks: efficient N2 fixation by simple Fe(N2)(diphosphine)2 complexes‘ published in Dalton Transactions, , Ashley and co-workers report their investigation of the Leigh compound. They have persued a peak that was previously unaccounted for in the 31P NMR spectrum which has led them to isolate a unique dimer of this complex, bridged by molecular N2.  Comparing the reactivities of this dimer with the two monomers that feature different simple chelating phosphine ligands, they unambiguously report yields of NH3 and N2H4 after reaction with triflic acid, and discern dependences based on ligand, temperature, and solvent.

This hitherto unreported dimeric compound, and the impressive NH3/N2H4 yields achieved with the monomers tested, add a significant piece to the puzzle of how iron-mediated N2 activation occurs.

Read the full article here:

Teaching old compounds new tricks: efficient N2 fixation by simple Fe(N2)(diphosphine)2 complexes
Laurence R. Doyle, Peter J. Hill, Gregory G. Wildgoose and Andrew E. Ashley
Dalton Trans., 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6DT00884D

1V. Smil Nature 1999, 400, 415.

2R. W. Howarth Harmful Algae 2008, 8, 14.

3J. G. Leigh and M. Jimenez-Tenorio, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 1991, 113, 5862.

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Scientists explore arsoles’ off-colour behaviour

Written by Christopher Barnard for Chemistry World

Various 2,5-diarylarsoles showed unexpected mechanochromic properties

Various 2,5-diarylarsoles showed unexpected mechanochromic properties

Alongside inspiring puns for infantile chemistry journalists, scientists in Japan have experimentally demonstrated that a class of heteroles known as arsoles can change colour under pressure.

Theorists predicted that these arsenic-containing compounds could form interesting optical and electronic materials, based on their low aromaticity and the high barrier to structural inversion. However, the bottom line in arsole synthesis is that volatile toxic arsenic intermediates have always limited their investigation…

The full story can be read in Chemistry World.

The original article can be read below and is free to access until the 13th June 2016.:

An experimental study on arsoles: structural variation, optical and electronic properties, and emission behavior
Makoto Ishidoshiro, Hiroaki Imoto, Susumu Tanaka and Kensuke Naka*
Dalton Trans., 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6DT01010E

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Goodbye borazine, hello hydrogen

Written by Alice Jensen for Chemistry World

The ruthenium catalyst produces 2.7 equivalents of hydrogen from ammonia borane

The ruthenium catalyst produces 2.7 equivalents of hydrogen from ammonia borane

Scientists are a step closer to ammonia borane-powered fuel cells thanks to a ruthenium catalyst that yields an unprecedented amount of hydrogen.

In theory, each molecule of ammonia borane, H3NBH3, can release three hydrogen molecules. This high hydrogen density makes ammonia borane an ideal fuel cell material.

Interested? The full story can be read in Chemistry World.

The original article can be read below and is free to access until 8th June 2016:

Dehydrogenation of ammonia borane through the third equivalent of hydrogen
Xingyue Zhang, Lisa Kam and Travis J. Williams*
Dalton Trans., 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6DT00604C

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British Zeolite Association meeting 2016 prize winner

The 39th annual British Zeolite Association meeting was held on 21-23 March, 2016, at the University of Bath, UK. During the event, keynote lectures were given by Professor Richard Catlow, UCL, UK, Professor Diego Gatta, University of Milan, Italy, Professor Svetlana Mintova, CNRS & University of Caen, France and Dr Matthias Thommes, Quantachrome Instruments.

The Dalton Transactions poster prize was awarded to Huan V. Doan, a PhD student at the Unitversity of Bath’s Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies, for his poster entitled: “Synthesis of hierarchical metal-organic frameworks in CO2 expanded solvent systems.” Huan’s research shows that CO2-expanded synthesis modifies the porosity and crystallite size of the material and could lead to promising control of MOF formation for a variety of applications with reduced environmental impact.

Please join us in congratulating Huan!

Huan V. Doan next to his poster

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Poster prize at the first University of California Symposium for Chemical Sciences

We are delighted to announce that the University of California Symposium for Chemical Sciences Dalton Transactions poster prize was awarded to Allie Yingyao Chen, during the event held from 21-23 March 2016, at the, UCLA Lake Arrowhead conference centre, USA. This was the first symposium of its kind and brought graduate students and postdoctoral researchers from across the University of California together, to network and start up new collaborations.

Poster prize winner, Allie, is a second year graduate student working on the synthesis of small molecule inhibitors for metalloproteins. This work is carried out under the guidance of Professor Seth Cohen at the University of California, San Diego, USA. Please join us in congratulating Allie on this achievement!

A selection of photos from the symposium – Beverly Chou
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Top 10 most accessed

The most downloaded articles from October, November and December 2015 were:

Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in nanoparticle synthesis
Kallum M. Koczkur, Stefanos Mourdikoudis, Lakshminarayana Polavarapu and Sara E. Skrabalak
Dalton Trans., 2015, 44, 17883-17905
DOI: 10.1039/c5dt02964c

Polyoxometalate – conductive polymer composites for energy conversion, energy storage and nanostructured sensors
Sven Herrmann, Chris Ritchie and Carsten Streb*
Dalton Trans., 2015, 44, 7092-7104
DOI: 10.1039/c4dt03763d

Anti-Markovnikov oxidation and hydration of terminal olefins
Jiayi Guo and Peili Teo*
Dalton Trans., 2014, 43, 6952-6964
DOI: 10.1039/c3dt53600a

Beyond iron: non-classical biological functions of bacterial siderophores
Timothy C. Johnstone and Elizabeth M. Nolan*
Dalton Trans., 2015, 44, 6320-6339
DOI: 10.1039/c4dt03559c

A cartography of the van der Waals territories
Santiago Alvarez
Dalton Trans., 2013, 42, 8617-8636
DOI: 10.1039/c3dt50599e

p-Type mesoscopic NiO as an active interfacial layer for carbon counter electrode based perovskite solar cells
Zonghao Liu, Meng Zhang, Xiaobao Xu, Lingling Bu, Wenjun Zhang, Wenhui Li, Zhixin Zhao,* Mingkui Wang,* Yi-Bing Cheng and Hongshan He*
Dalton Trans., 2015, 44, 3967-3973
DOI: 10.1039/c4dt02904f

A detailed kinetic analysis of rhodium-catalyzed alkyne hydrogenation
Jingwei Luo, Allen G. Oliver and J. Scott McIndoe*
Dalton Trans., 2013, 42, 11312-11318
DOI: 10.1039/c3dt51212f

Iridium-based complexes for water oxidation
Julianne M. Thomsen, Daria L. Huang, Robert H. Crabtree* and Gary W. Brudvig*
Dalton Trans., 2015, 44, 12452-12472
DOI: 10.1039/c5dt00863h

Morphology control of the perovskite films for efficient solar cells
Lingling Zheng, Danfei Zhang, Yingzhuang Ma, Zelin Lu, Zhijian Chen, Shufeng Wang, Lixin Xiao* and Qihuang Gong
Dalton Trans., 2015, 44, 10582-10593
DOI: 10.1039/c4dt03869j

De facto methodologies toward the synthesis and scale-up production of UiO-66-type metal–organic frameworks and membrane materials

Zhigang Hu and Dan Zhao*
Dalton Trans., 2015, 44, 19018-19040
DOI: 10.1039/c5dt03359d

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