Archive for the ‘Conferences’ Category

MOF2014: Poster abstract deadline 30 June

MOF2014
28 September – 1 October 2014, Kobe, Japan

Deadline of poster abstract submission: 30 June

Our forthcoming Chem Soc Rev themed issue on Metal Organic Frameworks will be promoted at the forthcoming MOF2014 Conference, with all delegates receiving a free USB flash drive with a copy of the whole MOFs themed issue. The guest editors are Susumu Kitagawa (Kyoto University), Chair of MOF2014, and (Joe Zhou, Texas A&M University).

Keynote Speakers:
Xiao-Ming Chen, Sun-Yat-Sen University/PRC
Andrew Cooper, University of Liverpool/UK
Roland Fischer, Ruhr-University Bochum/Ger
Jeffrey Long, University of California, Berkeley/USA
George Shimizu, University of Calgary/Can
Myunghyun Paik Suh, Seoul National University/RoK
Qiang Xu, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST)/Jpn
Omar Yaghi, University of California, Berkeley/USA

Submit your poster abstract for MOF2014

Preview Chem Soc Rev themed issue on Metal Organic Frameworks

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Nanoplasmonics

Our current Chem Soc Rev issue is a themed issue on nanoplasmonics, guest edited by Luis Liz-Marzan, Catherine Murphy and Jianfang Wang.

Nanoplasmonics concerns light-matter interactions with nanoscale materials.  Advances in fabrication, computation, and applications ranging from biomedicine to energy have burgeoned in the last 5 years. This themed issue gathers together a variety of reviews and tutorial reviews covering all chemical aspects of the field, from synthesis and fabrication to plasmon-enhanced effects in physical and biological systems.

To read the full editorial for free, click the link below:

Nanoplasmonics
Luis M. Liz-Marzán, Catherine J. Murphy and Jianfang Wang
DOI: 10.1039/C4CS90026J

If you are interested in Nanoplasmonics, why not register for the Faraday Discussion in London, February 2015.

This meeting aims to highlight the most recent breakthroughs in the multidisciplinary field of nanoplasmonics. The following themes will be covered:

  • Plasmonic nanoparticles and metamaterials with designed optical properties
  • Surface plasmon enhanced spectroscopies
  • Quantum plasmonics, gain and spasers
  • Biosensing and biomedical applications of plasmonics

Faraday Discussions have a special format where research papers written by the speakers are distributed to all participants before the meeting, and most of the meeting is devoted to discussing the papers. Click the link to find out more about the Nanoplasmonics Faraday Discussion.

The oral abstract deadline is Monday 19th May 2014 – so don’t delay submit your oral abstract today! You can view details of the other submission deadlines on the Abstract Submission homepage.

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Nucleation & Crystallography Themed Issue

This year is the international year of crystallography so guest editors David Amabilino and Xavier Obradors from the Institute of Material Science of Barcelona, introduce the ‘Nucleation and Crystallisation’ themed issue of Chemical Society Reviews.

It is over a hundred years since the thermodynamic principles of nucleation were established. The formation of crystals can be spectacular, but the mechanisms of their nucleation and growth are not fully understood. Control over crystallisation can be achieved, but there are still a number of outstanding fundamental questions that remain unanswered.

With different backgrounds, yet a common passion for nucleation and crystallisation, our guest editors put together a collection of view-points of crystallisation from across different areas of chemistry. From crystal crops in Mexico to pulsed lasers and crystallisation techniques involving light, this stimulating collection fuses together the great advances made over the years in the different disciplines of chemistry.


The Nucleation and Crystallisation themed issue is now available online. To access the full editorial for free, click the link below:
Nucleation & crystallisation
David B. Amabilino and Xavier Obradors
DOI: 10.1039/C4CS90015D

If this fascinating area of chemistry inspires you, why not attend the upcoming discussion in Leeds?
Nucleation – A Transition State to the Directed Assembly of Materials

Faraday Discussion
30 March – 1 April 2015, Leeds MET, UK
http://rsc.li/nucleation-fd2015

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A Celebration of Organic Chemistry

On Friday 15 June, Professor Keith Smith will host a symposium showcasing the very best in Organic Chemistry.

The symposium features lectures by two Nobel Laureates and an RSC Prize Winner, as well as marking Keith’s retirement from Cardiff University, and celebrating his work within the Organic Chemistry Community.

This event is free to attend but places are limited, and attendance is only guaranteed by pre-registration – so act now!

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Directing Biosynthesis – oral abstract deadline 11 May!

DBIII header

Please don’t miss this last opportunity to submit an oral abstract now to be part of a high profile conference featuring contributions from the most active groups in the UK, Europe, the USA and Japan working in this rapidly developing area.

This meeting builds on the two previous extremely successful conferences in a subject area which remains highly topical. As significant opportunities exist for engineering biosynthetic pathways in bacteria, fungi and plants for the directed biosynthesis of new natural products with new and beneficial properties. We expect the programme this year to generate a high profile event that you will not want to miss. 

Confirmed Invited speakers:

  • Ikuro Abe, University of Tokyo, Japan
  • Mervyn Bibb, John Innes Centre, UK
  • David W. Christianson, University of Pennsylvania, USA
  • Christian Hertweck, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany
  • Ben Liu, The University of Texas at Austin, USA
  • Professor Jim Naismith, University of St Andrews, UK
  • Joern Piel, University of Bonn, Germany
  • Professor Chris Schofield, University of Oxford, UK
  • David H Sherman, University of Michigan, USA
  • Dr David R Spring, University of Cambridge, UK
  • Tom Simpson, FRS, University of Bristol, UK
  • Yi Tang, UCLA, USA

NOW CONFIRMED – Craig Townsend, John Hopkins University, USA

A special symposium will take place within the Directing Biosynthesis III programme, recognising the achievements of three 2011 RSC award winners. Each of the winners will give a keynote lecture within the symposium.

Find out more >

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70th Harden conference – Synthetic Biology

70th Harden Conference
Synthetic biology: design and engineering through understanding
Keele University, UK
22-26 August 2011 

Application is still available!

Synthetic Biology is the design and construction of new biological systems not found in that configuration in nature. The overarching aims of Synthetic Biology are to develop a firm basis for the design and engineering of new biological and biologically inspired molecules and collections of molecules (so-called systems), and to put these to useful purposes.  By applying engineering principles to biology, scientists hope to generate new molecular systems, and perhaps even new basic life forms, that are radically different from those that can be generated by more-traditional chemical synthesis and genetic engineering.

Despite much hype in the scientific and popular press, major obstacles towards these goals remain, however. The potential of Synthetic Biology will not be limited by the imagination of the researcher but rather by the suitability, quality, variability and compatibility of the ‘parts’ (genes, promoters, proteins and other biomolecular components) that they choose to engineer; the complex and often unwieldy circuitry of complex biological systems; the incompatibility of new parts with a new or existing biological contexts (so-called chassis); and the noise, variability and uncertainty, or emergent properties, inherent in biology.  Furthermore, the problems are not only scientific but also sociological, ethical and cultural: just because we can do this type of biological engineering, should we open this particular Pandora’s box?

The 70th Harden Conference will illustrate the potential of this emerging cross-disciplinary area; showcase current successes; and present the underpinning biology, engineering and systems understanding necessary to design synthetic biological systems reliably and predictably.

 

You may also be interested to know that conference organiser Dek Woolfson (The University of Bristol, UK) has guest edited a themed issue (alongisde Rein Ulijn, The University of Strathclyde, UK) on “Peptide- and protein-based materials” for ChemSocRev, in issue 9, 2010. 

 This is a nice themed issue that covers the design, synthesis, engineering, characterisation and functionalisation of materials composed of peptides or protein components. It features some top reviews from researchers including Molly Stevens, Alison Rodger, Jan van Hest, Bing Xu, Anthony Weiss, Joel Collier, Alexander Kros, both guest editors and more…

So, if you’re interested in peptides or proteins take a look at the peptide- and protein-based materials themed issue today!

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Shanghai and Beijing welcome the Editorial Board

The very first Chem Soc Rev Symposium was held at Fudan University on 22nd June, hosted by Professor Guo-Xin Jin. 11 members of Chem Soc Rev’s Editorial Board each gave 30 minute presentation to delegates from local universities. The day also included plenty of time for interaction and discussion.

The Chem Soc Rev Editorial Board at Fudan University with host Professor Guo-Xin Jin

The following day, a group of the Editorial Board members visited the Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry at the invitation of Professor Shuli You. Professors Huw Davies and Helma Wennemers gave presentations to the department about their work then the group attended a formal lunch joined by Professor Tong (Vice Dean),  Professor Dai and RSC Chief Executive Office Richard Pike.

The Editorial Board then jetted off to Beijing for the final part of their visit to China. The Chem Soc Rev Beijing Symposium was held at Beihang University on 24th June, hosted by Professor Lei Jiang. An audience of 200-300 scientists were treated to 18 talks covering the whole spectrum of the chemical sciences, from both Editorial Board members and leading Chinese researchers. Richard Pike closed the symposium, highlighting the success of event, in terms of both scientific dissemination and international collaboration.

Professor Lei Jiang opens the Chem Soc Rev Symposium in Beijing

The Chem Soc Rev Editorial Board and Editorial Offiice would like to thank everyone involved in the organising of these symposia for their help and hospitality.

If you are interested in writing for Chem Soc Rev please contact the Editorial Office  for more information. 

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