CrystEngComm Impact Factor – 3.849

Continuing to excel as the home for innovative research in all fields of crystal engineering!

The 2015 Journal Citation Reports® have just been released and we are pleased to announce that CrystEngComm received an Impact Factor* of 3.849, whilst being the biggest publisher of innovative research covering all aspects of crystal engineering. What’s more is that researchers around the world cited CrystEngComm articles 25,875 times last year, making us the second most cited journal in the crystallography ISI category!

We are truly grateful to all of our authors, referees and readers for contributing to the journal’s continued success, as well as our Editorial and Advisory Boards for their hard work and dedication to the journal. Thanks to you,Graphical abstract: Front coverCrystEngComm has continued to grow from strength to strength and become the journal of choice for many authors and readers!

We invite you to submit your best work to CrystEngComm!

Also of interest: Find out how other RSC journals are ranked in the latest Impact Factor release.

Take a look at a selection of our most highly cited articles listed below:

Highlights

Metal–organic frameworks as heterogeneous photocatalysts: advantages and challenges
M. A. Nasalevich, M. van der Veen, F. Kapteijn and J. Gascon
CrystEngComm, 2014, 16, 4919-4926
DOI: 10.1039/C4CE00032C

Polymorphism in cocrystals: a review and assessment of its significance
Srinivasulu Aitipamula, Pui Shan Chow and  Reginald  B. H. Tan
CrystEngComm, 2014, 16, 3451-3465
DOI: 10.1039/C3CE42008F

Communications

Facile synthesis of single-crystalline NiO nanosheet arrays on Ni foam for high-performance supercapacitors
Ming Huang, Fei Li, Jun Yi Ji, Yu Xin Zhang, Xiao Li Zhao and Xing Gao
CrystEngComm, 2014, 16, 2878-2884
DOI: 10.1039/C3CE42335B

Full papers

Temperature and pH driven self-assembly of Zn(II) coordination polymers: crystal structures, supramolecular isomerism, and photoluminescence
Min-Le Han, Xin-Hong Chang, Xun Feng, Lu-Fang Ma and Li-Ya Wang
CrystEngComm, 2014, 16, 1687-1695
DOI: 10.1039/C3CE41968A

Chemical bonding theory of single crystal growth and its application to ϕ 3′′ YAG bulk crystal
Congting Sun and Dongfeng Xue
CrystEngComm, 2014, 16, 2129-2135
DOI: 10.1039/C3CE42292E

*The Impact Factor provides an indication of the average number of citations per paper. Produced annually, Impact Factors are calculated by dividing the number of citations in a year, by the number of citeable articles published in the preceding two years. Data based on the 2015 Journal Citation Reports®, (Thomson Reuters, 2016).

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Novel photocatalytic heterojunctions

A recent paper published in CrystEngComm details the successful development of BiOBr/WO3 p–n heterojunctions. These novel photocatalysts display higher activity than the individual components across a range of organic molecule pollutants and remain stable for further cycles.

Semiconducting photocatalysts offer a potentially green way of removing organic pollutants from water. Initial development of these photocatalysts focused on TiO2, which shows excellent performance for the decomposition of many organic compounds. However, TiO2 only exhibits this performance under UV light and the development of visible light driven (VLD) photocatalysts is highly desirable. WO3, an n-type semiconductor, possesses many properties needed for a good VLD, but encounters problems related to the recombination of charge carriers.

It is known that the creation of p-n heterojunctions can enhance performance. Enter bismuth oxyhalides, p-type semiconductors which exhibit excellent performance under both UV and visible light. BiOBr in particular, has good chemical stability, acts against a wide range of pollutants, and has never been combined with WO3 before.

Flower-like structures of BiOBr/WO3
Flower-like structures of BiOBr/WO3
The heterojunctions were prepared by solvothermally treating a solution of WO3, Bi(NO3)3 and CTAB. Three different molar ratios were prepared (1/0.5, 1/1 and 1/2) creating flower-like structures. The individual components were also prepared for comparative measurements. Photocatalytic activity was measured by the decomposition of three organic compounds, rhodamine B, methyl orange and para-chlorophenol. The 1/1 compound showed the greatest removal efficiency across all the mock pollutants with all heterojunction ratios performing better than the individual components and a mixture of the two with the same weight of components. The authors explain the excellent performance of BiOBr/WO3 is due to two reasons; firstly the flower-like superstructures of the material with their many pores and channels increase the absorption of small molecules and secondly the nature of the p-n heterojunction allows for efficient charge collection and separation.

The authors conclude the 1/1 compound is the best potential visible light driven photocatalyst with efficient performance and good stability for water environmental purification.

Read the full article here:

Synthesis of BiOBr/WO3 p–n heterojunctions with enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity
Junlei Zhang, Lisha Zhang, Xiaofeng Shen, Pengfei Xu and Jianshe Liu
CrystEngComm, 2016,18, 3856-3865, DOI: 10.1039/C6CE00824K

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

Josh Campbell is a PhD student, currently at the University of Southampton, UK studying crystal structure prediction of organic semiconductors. He received his BSc from the University of Bradford.
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2016 CrystEngComm HOT articles

Take a look at our 2016 HOT articles which have been carefully selected by our referees. These are free to access for 4 weeks and will be updated regularly so keep checking! These have also been compiled into a collection for viewing on our website.

Qiong Wu, Yu Si, Ying-Ying Wu, Shan-Wen Wang, Guang-Sheng Wang and Lei Wang
CrystEngComm, 2016, Advance Article

DOI: 10.1039/C5CE02498F, Paper

Graphical Abstract


Belén Fernández, Garikoitz Beobide, Ignacio Sánchez, Francisco Carrasco-Marín, José M. Seco, Antonio J. Calahorro, Javier Cepeda and Antonio Rodríguez-Diéguez
CrystEngComm, 2016, 18, 1282-1294
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE02036K, Paper

<p style="text-align: center;"Graphical Abstract


Congting Sun and Dongfeng Xue
CrystEngComm, 2016, 18, 1262-1272
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE02328A, Highlight

Graphical Abstract


Photoswitchable metal organic frameworks: turn on the lights and close the windows
S. Castellanos, F. Kapteijn and J. Gascon
CrystEngComm, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE02543E, Highlight

Graphical Abstract


Decrease of the required dopant concentration for δ-Bi2O3 crystal stabilization through thermal quenching during single-step flame spray pyrolysis
Jochen A. H. Dreyer, Suman Pokhrel, Johannes Birkenstock, Miguel G. Hevia, Marco Schowalter, Andreas Rosenauer, Atsushi Urakawa, Wey Yang Teoh and Lutz Mädler
CrystEngComm, 2016, 18, 2046-2056
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE02430G, Paper

Graphical Abstract


Smart, stretchable and wearable supercapacitors: prospects and challenges
Yu Zheng, Yanbing Yang, Shasha Chen and Quan Yuan
CrystEngComm, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE02510A, Highlight

Graphical Abstract


A new nanocrystalline binary phase: synthesis and properties of cubic tin monoselenide
Ran E. Abutbul, Elad Segev, Shmuel Samuha, Leila Zeiri, Vladimir Ezersky, Guy Makov and Yuval Golan
CrystEngComm, 2016, 18, 1918-1923
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE02437D, Paper

Graphical Abstract


Continuous polycrystalline silicon layers on glass grown from tin solutions
R. Bansen, C. Ehlers, Th. Teubner, T. Markurt, J. Schmidtbauer and T. Boeck
CrystEngComm, 2016, 18, 1911-1917
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE02530C, Paper

Graphical Abstract


Visible-light driven oxygen evolution over CoTiO3 perovskites via a modified Pechini method: impact of humidity on their phase composition
Shivatharsiny Rasalingam and Ranjit T. Koodali
CrystEngComm, 2016, 18, 868-871
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE02452H, Communication

Graphical Abstract


Highly elongated vertical GaN nanorod arrays on Si substrates with an AlN seed layer by pulsed-mode metal–organic vapor deposition
Si-Young Bae, Byung Oh Jung, Kaddour Lekhal, Sang Yun Kim, Jeong Yong Lee, Dong-Seon Lee, Manato Deki, Yoshio Honda and Hiroshi Amano
CrystEngComm, 2016, 18, 1505-1514
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE02056E, Paper


Direct observation of a fast single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation from a CuII-framework to a CuI-chain mediated by ascorbic acid
Yang Song, Rui-Qing Fan, Xin-Ming Wang, Song Gao, Xi Du, Ping Wang and Yu-Lin Yang
CrystEngComm, 2016, 18, 1878-1882
DOI: 10.1039/C6CE00132G, Communication

Graphical Abstract


Coordination networks incorporating halogen-bond donor sites and azobenzene groups
Francisco Fernandez-Palacio, Marco Saccone, Arri Priimagi, Giancarlo Terraneo, Tullio Pilati, Pierangelo Metrangolo and Giuseppe Resnati
CrystEngComm, 2016, 18, 2251-2257
DOI: 10.1039/C6CE00059B, Paper

Graphical Abstract

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BCA spring meeting prize winners

We are delighted to announce that three CrystEngComm poster prizes were awarded at the British Crystallographic Spring Meeting held at the University of Nottingham, UK on 4-7th April, 2016.

The following prizes were awarded:

  • Target crystals/materials: Merina Corpinot, University College London, UK “How predictable are supramolecular interactions in molecular cocrystals”
  • Structure-property relationships: Daniel Harcombe, University of Oxford, UK “Emergence of one-dimensional magnetic order in the metal-organic framework Tb(HCOO)3
  • Techniques and methods: Yue Wu, University of Oxford, UK “Using in situ x-ray diffraction to observe solvent exchange during MOF synthesis”

Please join us in congratulating the winners! (pictured)

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Luminescent MOF detects explosives

A new metal-organic-framework (MOF) based sensor for the explosive, trinitrophenol (TNP or picric acid), is reported by scientists at the Indian Institute of Technology,  Guwahati, India.

MOFs have been studied for a variety of potential uses, including as sensors.  The size and electronic properties of their pores can make MOFs sensitive to particular compounds and these features can be readily modified.  In their paper,  Mostakim SK and Shyam Biswas describe a MOF formed from Zr(IV) and the ligand 4,4′-(benzoijc]ij1,2,5]thiadiazole-4,7-diyl)dibenzoic acid (H2BTDB).  The as-synthesised material, [Zr6O4(OH)4(BTDB)6]·8H2O·6DMF, is activated by stirring with methanol and heating under vacuum, removing water and DMF from the pores. This activated MOF is strongly luminescent both in the solid state and in organic solvents.

Luminescence is quenched in the presence of TNP, an explosive commonly used in the production of fireworks, landmines and matches.  Other uses include: as an antiseptic and to treat burns, in metallurgy and in the dyeing industry. Shock or friction can cause dry TNP to explode so it is usually stored wet for safety reasons.   TNP is also mutagenic and/or carcinogenic and its presence in the environment as a result of industry is problematic.  Current detection methods for TNP and other related explosive compounds have low selectivity and are not portable.

Schematic representation of the selective sensing of TNP

This new MOF not only allows detection of TNP at levels as low as 1.63 × 10−6 M, but is also selective for TNP in the presence of other similar compounds such as trinitrotoluene (TNT). The MOF is also photostable and reusable and therefore has potential for use as a portable TNP sensor in practical situations. The authors are now investigating other potential sensors based on luminescent MOFs using related ligands.

For more information, see the full paper here:

A thiadiazole-functionalized Zr(IV)-based metal–organic framework as a highly fluorescent probe for the selective detection of picric acid
Mostakim SK and Shyam Biswas
CrystEngComm, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6CE00421K

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

Gwenda KydGwenda Kyd has a PhD in metallocarborane chemistry from the University of Edinburgh. Other research work includes the spectroscopic study of the structure of glasses and organometallic electron-transfer reactions and the preparation of new inorganic phosphors. She has recently published a book on chemicals from plants.

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Top 10 most accessed articles

The most downloaded articles for the months of October, November and December 2015 were:

Nanocrystal engineering of noble metals and metal chalcogenides: controlling the morphology, composition and crystallinity
Lakshminarayana Polavarapu, Stefanos Mourdikoudis, Isabel Pastoriza-Santos and  Jorge Pérez-Juste
CrystEngComm, 2015, 17, 3727-3762
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE00112A

Fundamental growth principles of colloidal metal nanoparticles – a new perspective

Jörg Polte
CrystEngComm, 2015, 17, 6809-6830
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE01014D

Layered organic–inorganic hybrid perovskites: structure, optical properties, film preparation, patterning and templating engineering
Ziyong Cheng and Jun Lin*
CrystEngComm, 2010, 12, 2646-2662
DOI: 10.1039/C001929A

A comprehensive review on synthesis methods for transition-metal oxide nanostructures
Ting Guo, Ming-Shui Yao, Yuan-Hua Lin* and Ce-Wen Nan
CrystEngComm, 2015, 17, 3551-3585
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE00034C

Bulk crystal growth of hybrid perovskite material CH3NH3PbI
3
Yangyang Dang, Yang Liu, Youxuan Sun, Dongsheng Yuan, Xiaolong Liu, Weiqun Lu, Guangfeng Liu, Haibing Xia* and Xutang Tao*
CrystEngComm, 2015, 17, 665-670
DOI: 10.1039/C4CE02106A

How to print a crystal structure model in 3D
Teng-Hao Chen,* Semin Lee, Amar H. Flood and Ognjen Š. Miljanić
CrystEngComm, 2014, 16, 5488-5493
DOI: 10.1039/C4CE00371C

Rational design of metal–organic frameworks with anticipated porosities and functionalities
Muwei Zhang, Mathieu Bosch, Thomas Gentle III and Hong-Cai Zhou*
CrystEngComm, 2014, 16, 4069-4083
DOI: 10.1039/C4CE00321G

Transition metal carboxylate coordination polymers with amide-bridged polypyridine co-ligands: assemblies and properties

Ju-Wen Zhang, Xiao-Min Kan, Xiao-Li Li, Jian Luan and Xiu-Li Wang*
CrystEngComm, 2015, 17, 3887-3907
DOI: 10.1039/C4CE02531H

Metal–organic frameworks as heterogeneous photocatalysts: advantages and challenges
M. A. Nasalevich, M. van der Veen, F. Kapteijn and J. Gascon*
CrystEngComm, 2014, 16, 4919-4926
DOI: 10.1039/C4CE00032C

Tuning of the crystal engineering and photoelectrochemical properties of crystalline tungsten oxide for optoelectronic device applications

Jin You Zheng, Zeeshan Haider, Thanh Khue Van, Amol Uttam Pawar, Myung Jong Kang, Chang Woo Kim and Young Soo Kang*
CrystEngComm, 2015, 17, 6070-6093
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE00900F

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A new structure-director for formation of C60-fullerenes

The structure-directing properties of 2,4,6-trimethylpyridine (TMP) for the formation of colloidal C60-fullerene are revealed in a new paper by Penterman and Liddell Watson.

C60-fullerenes can support singlet excited states that recombine to produce a red photoluminescence and also have a high refractive index and transparency.  As such, they have a potential use in colloid-based photonic crystals.  Fullerene microcrystals are typically prepared in a solvent-antisolvent system, where the antisolvent promotes nucleation.  The solvent-antisolvent ratio, concentration of fullerene, temperature and mixing conditions can be varied to produce particles with different morphologies. However, there are not many compatible solvent-antisolvent combinations, limiting the nature of the particles that can form.

In this paper, the effect of adding TMP to the tetralin or mesitylene:2-propanol solvent-antisolvent system, is investigated.  When the solvent is tetralin, TMP plays a dominant role in determining the colloid morphology, monodispersity and crystal structure (an SEM of one fullerene solvate produced is shown below).  In the mesitylene  system, the crystals have well-defined faceting, higher aspect ratios and improved packing efficiency.


Graphical abstract: Anisometric C60 fullerene colloids assisted by structure-directing agent

The microcrystals show a reduced fluorescence quantum yield and lifetime, which is thought to be a result of greater fullerene packing efficiency. This is enhanced as the polar TMP additive acts as a blocking agent, adsorbing at the solid–liquid interface and slowing the kinetic rates of growth on certain crystallographic planes. The nucleation period is also shortened, supporting monodispersity.

The use of structure-directing agents could allow the production of fullerene microcrystals with diverse internal crystal structures and external forms.  This may allow the development of fullerenes tuned to possess specific properties, including suitability for use as active building blocks for photonic crystals.  The authors are continuing to explore the potential of this application.

For more details, see the full paper at:

Anisometric C60 fullerene colloids assisted by structure-directing agent

Sonny J. Penterman and Chekesha M. Liddell Watson

CrystEngComm, 2016
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE02122G
________________________________________________________________________________________________
Gwenda KydGwenda Kyd has a PhD in metallocarborane chemistry from the University of Edinburgh. Other research work includes the spectroscopic study of the structure of glasses and organometallic electron-transfer reactions and the preparation of new inorganic phosphors. She has recently published a book on chemicals from plants.
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2016 CrystEngComm HOT articles

Take a look at our 2016 HOT articles which have been carefully selected by our referees. These are free to access for 4 weeks and will be updated regularly so keep checking! These have also been compiled into a collection for viewing on our website.

Graphene oxide-templated preferential growth of continuous MOF thin films
Daeok Kim and Ali Coskun
CrystEngComm, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE02188J

graphical abstract

Free to access until 18th March 2016


Synthesis of the biocompatible and highly stable MIL-127(Fe): from large scale synthesis to particle size control
Hubert Chevreau, Anastasia Permyakova, Farid Nouar, Paul Fabry, Carine Livage, Florence Ragon, Alfonso Garcia-Marquez, Thomas Devic, Nathalie Steunou, Christian Serre and Patricia Horcajada
CrystEngComm, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE01864A

graphical abstract

Free to access until 18th March 2016


Crystal structure of disordered nanocrystalline αII-quinacridone determined by electron diffraction
T. E. Gorelik, C. Czech, S. M. Hammer and M. U. Schmidt
CrystEngComm, 2016, 18, 529-535
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE01855B

graphical abstract

Free to access until 18th March 2016


Syntheses and characterization of aryl-substituted pyrogallol[4]arenes and resorcin[4]arenes
Constance R. Pfeiffer, Kyle A. Feaster, Scott J. Dalgarno and Jerry L. Atwood
CrystEngComm, 2016, 18, 222-229
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE01792K

graphical abstract

Free to access until 18th March 2016


Control of interpenetration of copper-based MOFs on supported surfaces by electrochemical synthesis
Sumit Sachdeva, Alexey Pustovarenko, Ernst J. R. Sudhölter, Freek Kapteijn, Louis C. P. M. de Smet and Jorge Gascon
CrystEngComm, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE02462E

graphical abstract

Free to access until 18th March 2016


Tuning the optical, electronic and luminescence properties of LaOCl:Eu3+via structural and lattice strain modulation
Li Lv, Ting Wang, Sipeng Li, Yiguo Su and Xiaojing Wang
CrystEngComm, 2016, 18, 907-916
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE02098K

graphical abstract

Free to access until 18th March 2016



A brief review of the crucial progress on heterometallic polyoxotungstates in the past decade
Jiancai Liu, Qing Han, Lijuan Chen and Junwei Zhao
CrystEngComm, 2016, 18, 842-862
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE02378E

graphical abstract

Free to access until 18th March 2016



Synthesis, X-ray characterization, DFT calculations and Hirshfeld surface analysis of thiosemicarbazone complexes of Mn+ ions (n = 2, 3; M = Ni, Cd, Mn, Co and Cu)
Ghodrat Mahmoudi, Alfonso Castiñeiras, Piotr Garczarek, Antonio Bauzá, Arnold L. Rheingold, Vasyl Kinzhybalo and Antonio Frontera
CrystEngComm, 2016, 18, 1009-1023
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE02371H

graphical abstract

Free to access until 18th March 2016


Power driven tunable white upconversion luminescence from Lu2TeO6 tri-doped with Yb3+, Tm3+ and Ho3+
J. F. Tang, G. N. Li, C. Yang, J. Gou, D. H. Luo and H. He
CrystEngComm, 2015, 17, 9048-9054
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE01734C

graphical abstract

Free to access until 19th February 2016


N-donor ligands enhancing luminescence properties of seven Zn/Cd(II) MOFs based on a large rigid π-conjugated carboxylate ligand
Run-Ping Ye, Xin Zhang, Ji-Quan Zhai, Ye-Yan Qin, Lei Zhang, Yuan-Gen Yao and Jian Zhang
CrystEngComm, 2015, 17, 9155-9166
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE01884F

graphical abstract

Free to access until 19th February 2016


Syntheses and characterization of aryl-substituted pyrogallol[4]arenes and resorcin[4]arenes
Constance R. Pfeiffer, Kyle A. Feaster, Scott J. Dalgarno and Jerry L. Atwood
CrystEngComm, 2016, 18, 222-229
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE01792K

graphical abstract

Free to access until 19th February 2016


Quantitative estimate of cohesion forces
Michał Kaźmierczak and Andrzej Katrusiak
CrystEngComm, 2015, 17, 9423-9430
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE01942G

graphical abstract

Free to access until 19th February 2016


Ameliorated synthetic methodology for crystalline lanthanoid–metalloporphyrin open frameworks based on a multitopic octacarboxy-porphyrin scaffold: structural, gas sorption and photophysical properties
Bharat Kumar Tripuramallu, Hatem M. Titi, Sadipan Roy, Roli Verma and Israel Goldberg
CrystEngComm, 2016, 18, 515-520
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE02048D

graphical abstract

Free to access until 19th February 2016



Crystal structure of disordered nanocrystalline αII-quinacridone determined by electron diffraction
T. E. Gorelik, C. Czech, S. M. Hammer and M. U. Schmidt
CrystEngComm, 2016, 18, 529-535
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE01855B

graphical abstract

Free to access until 19th February 2016

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Understanding gout

A new paper by Lee et al. who carried out research at the National Central University in China, finally explains the formation of gout.  Gout is an inflammatory arthritic condition caused by the deposition of crystals of monosodium urate monohydrate (MSUM) in joints and tendons.  Traditionally associated with over-indulgent consumption of alcohol and rich food, gout was known as the disease of kings.  It has become more common in recent years, affecting 2-3% of the Western population at some point during their lives.

Development of gout is related to raised levels of uric acid in the blood (hyperuricemia).  However, the mechanism of crystallisation of MSUM and the fact that only some people with hyperuricemia develop gout were not understood, but are now unveiled in this new paper.

The morphology of the MSUM formed from uric acid was studied under various Na+ ion concentrations, under conditions mimicking the body (pH 7.4, 37oC).  The formation of a metastable “beachball structure” which converts to “urchin-like aggregates” and “bow-like aggregates” depends on the Na+ ion concentration and it is suggested that the pathogenesis of gout may be related to the transformation of “beachballs” to needles.

When the pH is lowered by adding lactic acid, which would occur during inflammatory response, uric acid dihydrate (UAD) is formed.  As the pH returns to normal, this converts to MSUM, causing an inflammatory response and generating a self-sustaining cycle, as shown in the diagram below.

Formation of gout

The presence of hyaluronate, Na+, K+ and Ca2+ is found to affect the development of gout and a new MSUM “fishtail” morphology was observed in hyaluronate-, Na+- and Ca2+- containing solutions.  A highly water soluble hyaluronate-Ca-urate complex was identified and authors suggest that disruption of this complex would lead to MSUM deposition, causing gout.  Thus, people could have hyperuricemia but not develop gout, if their physiological conditions maintain the complex.

For more information, see the paper at:

The culprit of gout: triggering factors and formation of monosodium urate monohydrate

Meng Hsiu Chih, Hung Lin Lee and Tu Lee

CrystEngComm, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE01656H, Paper

___________________________________________________________________________________________________

Gwenda KydGwenda Kyd has a PhD in metallocarborane chemistry from the University of Edinburgh. Other research work includes the spectroscopic study of the structure of glasses and organometallic electron-transfer reactions and the preparation of new inorganic phosphors. She has recently published a book on chemicals from plants.

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End of year HOT articles!

December 2015’s HOT articles are below and free to access for 4 weeks. These are also in a collection available for viewing on our website.

Intermolecular interaction energies in transition metal coordination compounds
Andrew G. P. Maloney, Peter A. Wood and Simon Parsons
CrystEngComm, 2015, 17, 9300-9310
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE01522G

graphical abstract

Free to access until 23rd December 2015


α,ω-Alkanediyldiammonium dications sealed within calix[5]arene capsules with a hydrophobic bayonet-mount fastening
Giovanna Brancatelli, Giuseppe Gattuso, Silvano Geremia, Nadia Manganaro, Anna Notti, Sebastiano Pappalardo, Melchiorre F. Parisi and Ilenia Pisagatti
CrystEngComm, 2015, 17, 7915-7921
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE01558H

graphical abstract

Free to access until 23rd December 2015


Combinatorial crystal synthesis of ternary solids based on 2-methylresorcinol
Niyaz A. Mir, Ritesh Dubey, Srinu Tothadi and Gautam R. Desiraju
CrystEngComm, 2015, 17, 7866-7869
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE01280E

graphical abstract

Free to access until 23rd December 2015

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