Call for papers: 2016 themed issues

We are delighted to announce a new CrystEngComm themed issue to be published in 2016:

CrystEngComm

Solid State Photochemistry

Deadline: 1st April 2016
Guest Editors: Dr Jacqui Cole (University of Cambridge), Professor Masahiro Irie (Rikkyo University)

The issue will focus on photochemical reactions and photophysical structure and properties of solid-state materials, ranging from the crystalline state to interfacial structures that involve at least one solid phase.

Studies on photochemical reactions will include photochromic reactions, the photomechanical effect, light induced phase transitions, light-induced morphological changes, molecular machines and photoswitches, and spin crossover materials. Such studies can be applied to any crystalline material, including single crystals, microcrystalline powders and nanocrystals.

Studies on photophysical structure and properties of materials will focus on optoelectronic media, photovoltaic applications, non-linear optical effects, and other optical phenomena. Papers may concern bulk media or interfacial structures that include at least one solid phase. Results will describe relationships between chemical structure and photophysical function or feature some physical chemistry aspect of a solid-state photo-induced phenomenon. We are equally happy to consider experimental and/or computational studies within this arena.

Crystal engineering of composite materials
Guest Editor: Professor Kwangyeol Lee (Korea University).

Deadline: 12th April 2016

This themed issue will focus on crystal engineering of composite materials, particularly in the areas of energy conversion and energy storage, providing insights into the growth behaviour of these complex systems.

The issue will address different aspects of crystal design in/for hybrid materials, such as changes in crystal growth behaviour – namely, changes in morphology or phase, on different supports or by additional components in the system.

Do you work in the field of composite materials? If so, let us know using the link below.

How to submit

All types of manuscript – communications, full papers and Highlights, will be considered for publication. The manuscript should be prepared according to our article guidelines and submitted via our online system.

All manuscripts will be subject to normal peer review and inclusion in the themed issue will be at the discretion of the Guest Editors. Please indicate in your submission the name of the themed issue that you would like to be considered for.

Are you interested in contributing? Contact us for further details

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2016 CrystEngComm HOT articles

Take a look at our 2016 HOT articles which have been carefully selected by our referees. These are free to access for 4 weeks and will be updated regularly so keep checking!

Power driven tunable white upconversion luminescence from Lu2TeO6 tri-doped with Yb3+, Tm3+ and Ho3+
J. F. Tang, G. N. Li, C. Yang, J. Gou, D. H. Luo and H. He
CrystEngComm, 2015, 17, 9048-9054
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE01734C

graphical abstract

Free to access until 19th February 2016


N-donor ligands enhancing luminescence properties of seven Zn/Cd(II) MOFs based on a large rigid π-conjugated carboxylate ligand
Run-Ping Ye, Xin Zhang, Ji-Quan Zhai, Ye-Yan Qin, Lei Zhang, Yuan-Gen Yao and Jian Zhang
CrystEngComm, 2015, 17, 9155-9166
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE01884F

graphical abstract

Free to access until 19th February 2016


Syntheses and characterization of aryl-substituted pyrogallol[4]arenes and resorcin[4]arenes
Constance R. Pfeiffer, Kyle A. Feaster, Scott J. Dalgarno and Jerry L. Atwood
CrystEngComm, 2016, 18, 222-229
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE01792K

graphical abstract

Free to access until 19th February 2016


Quantitative estimate of cohesion forces
Michał Kaźmierczak and Andrzej Katrusiak
CrystEngComm, 2015, 17, 9423-9430
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE01942G

graphical abstract

Free to access until 19th February 2016


Ameliorated synthetic methodology for crystalline lanthanoid–metalloporphyrin open frameworks based on a multitopic octacarboxy-porphyrin scaffold: structural, gas sorption and photophysical properties
Bharat Kumar Tripuramallu, Hatem M. Titi, Sadipan Roy, Roli Verma and Israel Goldberg
CrystEngComm, 2016, 18, 515-520
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE02048D

graphical abstract

Free to access until 19th February 2016



Crystal structure of disordered nanocrystalline αII-quinacridone determined by electron diffraction
T. E. Gorelik, C. Czech, S. M. Hammer and M. U. Schmidt
CrystEngComm, 2016, 18, 529-535
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE01855B

graphical abstract

Free to access until 19th February 2016

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Understanding gout

A new paper by Lee et al. who carried out research at the National Central University in China, finally explains the formation of gout.  Gout is an inflammatory arthritic condition caused by the deposition of crystals of monosodium urate monohydrate (MSUM) in joints and tendons.  Traditionally associated with over-indulgent consumption of alcohol and rich food, gout was known as the disease of kings.  It has become more common in recent years, affecting 2-3% of the Western population at some point during their lives.

Development of gout is related to raised levels of uric acid in the blood (hyperuricemia).  However, the mechanism of crystallisation of MSUM and the fact that only some people with hyperuricemia develop gout were not understood, but are now unveiled in this new paper.

The morphology of the MSUM formed from uric acid was studied under various Na+ ion concentrations, under conditions mimicking the body (pH 7.4, 37oC).  The formation of a metastable “beachball structure” which converts to “urchin-like aggregates” and “bow-like aggregates” depends on the Na+ ion concentration and it is suggested that the pathogenesis of gout may be related to the transformation of “beachballs” to needles.

When the pH is lowered by adding lactic acid, which would occur during inflammatory response, uric acid dihydrate (UAD) is formed.  As the pH returns to normal, this converts to MSUM, causing an inflammatory response and generating a self-sustaining cycle, as shown in the diagram below.

Formation of gout

The presence of hyaluronate, Na+, K+ and Ca2+ is found to affect the development of gout and a new MSUM “fishtail” morphology was observed in hyaluronate-, Na+- and Ca2+- containing solutions.  A highly water soluble hyaluronate-Ca-urate complex was identified and authors suggest that disruption of this complex would lead to MSUM deposition, causing gout.  Thus, people could have hyperuricemia but not develop gout, if their physiological conditions maintain the complex.

For more information, see the paper at:

The culprit of gout: triggering factors and formation of monosodium urate monohydrate

Meng Hsiu Chih, Hung Lin Lee and Tu Lee

CrystEngComm, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE01656H, Paper

___________________________________________________________________________________________________

Gwenda KydGwenda Kyd has a PhD in metallocarborane chemistry from the University of Edinburgh. Other research work includes the spectroscopic study of the structure of glasses and organometallic electron-transfer reactions and the preparation of new inorganic phosphors. She has recently published a book on chemicals from plants.

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End of year HOT articles!

December 2015’s HOT articles are below and free to access for 4 weeks. These are also in a collection available for viewing on our website.

Intermolecular interaction energies in transition metal coordination compounds
Andrew G. P. Maloney, Peter A. Wood and Simon Parsons
CrystEngComm, 2015, 17, 9300-9310
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE01522G

graphical abstract

Free to access until 23rd December 2015


α,ω-Alkanediyldiammonium dications sealed within calix[5]arene capsules with a hydrophobic bayonet-mount fastening
Giovanna Brancatelli, Giuseppe Gattuso, Silvano Geremia, Nadia Manganaro, Anna Notti, Sebastiano Pappalardo, Melchiorre F. Parisi and Ilenia Pisagatti
CrystEngComm, 2015, 17, 7915-7921
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE01558H

graphical abstract

Free to access until 23rd December 2015


Combinatorial crystal synthesis of ternary solids based on 2-methylresorcinol
Niyaz A. Mir, Ritesh Dubey, Srinu Tothadi and Gautam R. Desiraju
CrystEngComm, 2015, 17, 7866-7869
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE01280E

graphical abstract

Free to access until 23rd December 2015

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Prize winners at the 24th Symposium on Organic Crystals

Congratulations to our CrystEngComm prize winner Tomonori Ikegami (Hokkaido University) who was awarded for best oral presentation at the 24th Symposium on Organic Crystals which took place at Hiroshima University, Japan from the 1st - 3rd November 2015.

The symposium was organized by the Organic Crystals Division of the Chemical Society of Japan. Hiromitsu Urakami, our RSC representative for Japan was in attendance and commented that the award was “very well received” by the attendants at the symposium.

The president of the Organic Crystals Division, Professor Rui Tamura (Kyoto University) was also on hand to present awards.

(Far left) Professor Rui Tamura (Kyoto University & Organic Crystals Division President) with Hiromitsu Urakami (RSC) and award winners

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Poster prize winners at ECM29

(Far left) Professor Christer Aakeroy (Associate Editor, CrystEngComm) with the poster prize winners

Many congratulations to the following CrystEngComm poster prize winners: Josefina Perles (Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Spain), Laura Valles Rios (Freie Universitat, Berlin) and Shu Tsukui (Kyoto University, Japan) who were presented with their certificates by our Associate Editor, Professor Christer Aakeroy at the 29th European crystallographic meeting which took place in Rovinj, Croatia from the 23rd-28th August 2015.

The meeting took 4 years of preparation and stemmed from the Executive Committee of the Croatian Crystallographic Association (CCA) accepting an invitation of the European Crystallographic Association to present the bid to host the ECM29 in Croatia.

Further information about the meeting can be viewed here.

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Poster prize winners at The 2nd ICSU/IUPAC Workshop

CrystEngComm would like to congratulate the following who were awarded poster prizes for their contributions at the 2nd ICSU/IUPAC Workshop on Crystal Engineering which took place in Como, Italy from the 30th August – 1st September 2015.

  • Vijith Kumar (Politecnico di Milano, Italy): ‘Dynamic Separation of Homologous Dicarboxylic Acids by Nonporous Organic Solids’
  • Hannes Kulla (BAM, Germany): ‘Direct in Situ Analysis of Milling Reactions using Synchrotron XRD and Raman Spectroscopy’
  • Luca Catalano (Politecnico di Milano, Italy): ‘Modular Preparation and Dynamic Characterization of Halogen-Bonded Crystalline Molecular Rotors’
  • Davide Capucci (University of Parma, Italy): ‘Stabilization of Drug Molecules Through Co-Crystallization and Their Solubility Properties’

Participation at the workshop was free and and consisted of invited lectures by internationally renowned leaders in the field with plenty of opportunities for young scientists’ networking with both peers and recognized leaders in the field.

Further details about the event can be found on the website.

CrystEngComm poster prize winners (from top to bottom: Luca Catalano & Vijith Kumar)

CrystEngComm poster prize winners (from top to bottom: Hannes Kulla & Davide Capucci)

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Showcasing the breadth of research published in CrystEngComm

Below, you can find a selection of articles that showcase the breadth of cutting-edge research published in CrystEngComm, on the design and understanding of solid-state and crystalline materials.

We want to share these articles with you, for your reading pleasure.

IR spectroscopy as a probe for C–H⋯X hydrogen bonded
supramolecular synthons

Subhankar Saha, Lalit Rajput, Sumy Joseph, Manish Kumar
Mishra, Somnath Ganguly and Gautam R. Desiraju
CrystEngComm, 2015, 17, 1273–1290
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Will it crystallise? Predicting crystallinity of molecular materials
Jerome G. P. Wicker and Richard I. Cooper
CrystEngComm, 2015, 17, 1927–1934
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Nanocrystal formation and polymorphism of glycine
Xiaochuan Yang and Allan S. Myerson
CrystEngComm, 2015, 17, 723–728
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Reductive coordination replication of V2O5 sacrificial macrostructures into vanadium-based porous coordination polymers
Julien Reboul, Kenji Yoshida, Shuhei Furukawa and Susumu Kitagawa
CrystEngComm, 2015, 17, 323–330

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A simple strategy for the synthesis of well-defined bassanite nanorods
U. Tritschler, M. Kellermeier, C. Debus, A. Kempter and H. Cölfen
CrystEngComm, 2015, 17, 3772–3776
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Submit your work today

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A red-emitting nanophosphor for white LEDs

A new red-emitting nanophosphor with potential use in white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has recently been reported by Mi and colleagues.

White LEDs are used for lighting as they use little energy, have high brightness and long lifetimes and are considered environmentally friendly. Currently, these LEDs consist of a combination of a yellow-emitting phosphor and a blue LED chip. However, the lack of a red component is problematic, leading to a low colour rendering index (in other words, some colours do not appear naturalistic) and a high colour temperature (giving light a blue hue). Other possible methods of generating white LEDs that use red phosphors are limited by the low stability and efficiency of commercial sulphide-based red phosphors. Now, Mi and colleagues report an efficient and stable europium-based red phosphor that could solve the problem and improve the suitability of white LEDs for certain medical applications.

The phosphor Ca9Eu(PO4)7 was prepared using hydrothermal methods from calcium- and europium- nitrates and phosphoric acid. It shows a red emission at 616nm under excitation at 397nm. This is attributed to the 5D07F2 transition in Eu3+, which will only happen when the Eu ion occurs in sites without inversion symmetry (as it is parity forbidden).

morphology of the nanophosphor Ca9Eu(PO4)7

When the phosphor was doped (in other words, when Eu was partially replaced by Gd, La or Y), the emission intensity decreased. The pH value of the synthesis reaction was found to alter the morphology of the phosphor (see the diagram below) from rods to spheres, which had different luminescence properties. The most favourable properties were obtained from rods obtained at pH 7, attributed to the smallest number of lattice defects being formed at this pH. The rods are approximately 100nm long with an aspect ratio (long axis length to width ratio) of 2.5. This phosphor shows a good colour saturation index (R = 2.4) and future studies to optimise its properties could lead to potential application in white LEDs.

For more details read the full paper at:

Hydrothermal synthesis and photoluminescence properties of Ca9Eu(PO4)7 nanophosphors
Jiacheng Sun, Xiaoyun Mi, Lijian Lei, Xiaoying Pan, Shuyi Chen, Zan Wang, Zhaohui Bai and Xiyan Zhang
CrystEngComm, 2015
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE01289A

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

Gwenda KydGwenda Kyd has a PhD in metallocarborane chemistry from the University of Edinburgh. Other research work includes the spectroscopic study of the structure of glasses and organometallic electron-transfer reactions and the preparation of new inorganic phosphors. She has recently published a book on chemicals from plants.

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October’s HOT articles

October brings a new selection of HOT articles below. These are free to access for 4 weeks and have been compiled into a collection available for viewing on our website.

Lipid or aqueous medium for hematin crystallization?
Peter G. Vekilov, Jeffrey D. Rimer, Katy N. Olafson and Megan A. Ketchum
CrystEngComm, 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE01178G

graphical abstract

Free to access until 5th November 2015 


 

Versatile solid modifications of icariin: structure, properties and form transformation
Lina Jia, Qi Zhang, Jian-Rong Wang and Xuefeng Mei
CrystEngComm, 2015, 17, 7500-7509
DOI: 10.1039/C5CE01422K

graphical abstract

Free to access until 5th November 2015

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Professor Rahul Banerjee Wins Thomson Reuters Research Excellence – India Citation Award 2015

We are delighted to announce that Professor Rahul Banerjee (Associate Editor, CrystEngComm) was recently selected as one of the winners of the Thomson Reuters Research Excellence – India Citation Awards 2015.

Through research citations within Web of ScienceTM, the Awards identify and recognize India’s most prominent scientists and researchers for their outstanding and pioneering research and influential contribution to global R&D.

Congratulations, Professor Banerjee!

Professor Banerjee Professor Banerjee's Award
__Professor Banerjee (right) receives his Thomson
__Reuters Research Excellence – India Citation Award

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