Author Archive

Polymer Chemistry Emerging Investigator- Mingjun Huang

Mingjun Huang obtained his B.S. at Peking University in 2010. Then he worked on macromolecular self-assembly with Prof. Stephen Z.D. Cheng at the University of Akron, and obtained his PhD degree in Polymer Chemistry in 2015. After that he moved to MIT and joined the Jeremiah Johnson group as a postdoc, working on battery electrolyte material development. From February 2019, Mingjun started his independent career in South China University of Technology (SCUT). He is currently a professor in South China Advanced Institute for Soft Matter Science and Technology & School of Emergent Soft Matter. He mainly focuses on the novel functional soft matter development within the scope of optics, electric, and energy storage. The main research projects involve: 1) Liquid crystals/liquid crystal polymers with unprecedented structures and properties for applications in optical and electric materials; 2) Self-assembly study of macromolecules with precise chemical structures in condensed states; 3) Design of functional polymer materials for specific needs in display technology and microelectronic industry.

 

Read Mingjun Huang’s Emerging Investigator’s article ‘ Perfluorocyclobutyl-containing transparent polyimides with low dielectric constant and low dielectric loss

Read our interview with Mingjun below.

 

1. How do you feel about Polymer Chemistry as a place to publish research on this topic?

In my mind, Polymer Chemistry is a leading polymer journal for design, synthesis, structure and property study of polymer materials. Particularly for polyimide research, novelty for chemical structure as well as excellent material property is usually required. I feel a great sense of achievement for publication of this topic on this journal.

 

2. What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment and what do you find most challenging about your research?

As a polymer chemist, I am most excited about the successful collection of the new polymer samples, after a long journey of monomer design, synthesis and polymerization. I prefer to design monomer structures with simplicity and functionality.

In my research of polyimide materials, the most challenging part is the monomer structure design, i.e. how to balance the polymerization reactivity and targeted functionality in new monomer structure. Obtaining rather high purity of new monomers is also not an easy task for this step polymerization.

 

3. In your opinion, what are the most important questions to be asked/answered in this field of research?

Polyimides have great potentials for applications in microelectronic industry or flexible display technology. In my opinion, the most important question is how to integrate all the required high performances (e.g. good processibility, high transparency, low dielectric, high glass transition temperature, high thermal degradation stability) in one single material through either chemical structure or composite formulation tuning. A shortage in any important material property would prevent its practical application.

 

4. Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?

I believe in-depth discussions with senior people in similar research area would be very helpful for seeking the entry point or inspiration of new ideas.

 

 

 

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Open call to submit your plastics research to our cross-journal themed collections on ‘Plastic Conversion’ and ‘Polymer Upcycling’

The Royal Society of Chemistry has announced an open call to submit your plastics research to our themed collections on ‘Plastic Conversion’ and ‘Polymer Upcycling’.

The Royal Society of Chemistry is committed to sustainable plastics research and has published a policy statement regarding plastic waste. With increasing impact of plastic waste on the environment, it is necessary to research ways in which we can have a sustainable future for plastics.

Plastics research is interdisciplinary and involves a wide range of chemical scientists. As such, we invite you to contribute to our cross-journal themed collections by submitting your work to Journal of Materials Chemistry A, B, C, Polymer Chemistry or Catalysis Science & Technology.

 

Plastic Conversion

Joint themed collection between Polymer Chemistry and Catalysis Science & Technology

 

 

 

Catalysts have been the main driver for the design of ever new polymers with highly diverse and specialized properties. In this themed issue, we aim to highlight research that makes use of catalysis to optimize the reverse. How can we get the most value out of plastic waste? In this quest, we especially welcome manuscripts that address the challenges unique to plastics. These include but are not limited to additive impurities; mixed polymer streams; how to contact the very viscous, high molecular weight polymer with the (micro-)porous catalyst or a cleavage agent and more broadly catalytic conversion of sustainable polymeric materials for a circular plastic economy. Unconventional approaches via photo-, electro- or mechano-catalytic approaches and combinations thereof are also very welcome. We highly encourage to place the work in the context of performance metrics of green chemistry.

Submissions should fit the scope of either Polymer Chemistry or Catalysis Science & Technology. We would suggest that articles focused on synthetic and polymer chemistry aspects would be best suited to Polymer Chemistry, whereas articles focused on catalytic and/or related methodological advances would be appropriate for Catalysis Science & Technology. The collaborative joint special issue recognizes that management of plastic wastes relies on research conducted at the intersection of polymer chemistry and catalysis. You may submit to whichever journal you feel is most relevant to your current research. Please note that your article may be offered a transfer to the alternate journal if deemed more appropriate by the handling editor.

 

For more information, visit our open calls page

 

Guest Edited by:

Professor Ina Vollmer (Utrecht University, Netherlands), Professor George Huber (University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA), Professor Haritz Sardon (POLYMAT, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU, Spain) and Professor Zhibo Li (Qingdao University of Science and Technology, China)

Submit your work to Polymer Chemistry or Catalysis Science & Technology now!

 

Polymer Upcycling

Joint themed collection between Journal of Materials Chemistry A, B and C

In 2015 alone, the global waste generated by plastic packaging applications was 82.7 metric tons (Mt). Currently, waste management practices for the end-of-life plastics exploit landfilling, industrial energy recovery from municipal solid waste incineration, pyrolysis and recycling. Due to the ubiquity and necessity of plastics in our daily life, the elimination or reduction of plastics is not foreseeable in the near future and fundamentally new science is needed to describe and understand the polymers, interfaces, decomposition and upcycling of plastics. This Themed Collection aims to explore the latest developments in materials characterization, polymer design and synthesis, physical chemistry and molecular understanding of plastic decomposition and transformation that contribute to a broad knowledge base for upcycling waste plastics.

Submissions should fit within the scope of  Journal of Materials Chemistry A, Journal of Materials Chemistry B or Journal of Materials Chemistry C. We welcome high quality studies across all fields of materials chemistry in the form of full Papers, Communications and Review-type articles (Reviews, Highlights or Perspectives) and we invite authors to select the journal that best suits their submission.

 

For more information, visit our open calls page

 

Guest Edited by:

Blair Brettmann (Georgia Institute of Technology), Marco Fraga (Instituto Nacional De Technologia Brasil), Monika Gosecka (Polish Academy of Sciences) and Natalie Stingelin (Georgia Institute of Technology)

Submit your work to Journal of Materials Chemistry A, Journal of Materials Chemistry B or Journal of Materials Chemistry C now!

 

If you would like to contribute to either of these themed collections, you can submit your article directly through the journal’s online submission service. Please add a “note to the editor” in the submission form when uploading your files to say that this is a contribution to the respective themed collection. The Editorial Office reserves the right to check suitability of submissions in relation to the scope of the collection, and inclusion of accepted articles in the final themed collection is not guaranteed.

If you would like more information about the ‘Polymer Upcycling’ themed collection, please email Materials-rsc@rsc.org. For more information about the ‘Plastic Conversion’ themed collection, please email Polymers-rsc@rsc.org.

We look forward to receiving your submissions and showcasing this important research in our collections.

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Congratulations to RSC Poster Prize winners at BPC 2022

We are delighted to congratulate the poster prize winners from the Bordeaux Polymer Conference which took place between June 13-16 2022.

Poster prizes were sponsored by Polymer Chemistry, RSC Advances, Chemical Science and RSC books. The prizes were awarded by Polymer Chemistry Executive Editor Maria Southall, Associate Editor Tanja Junkers and conference chair Sébastien Lecommandoux after being judged by Simon Harrisson and the poster committee.

The RSC poster prize award winners are:

RSC Books: Florent Monie

Polymer Chemistry: Maria Psarrou

RSC Advances: Kam Poon

Chemical Science: Clémence Shvartzman

Please join us in congratulating our winners!

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Announcing a new Desktop Lectureship Seminar hosted by Polymer Chemistry

The RSC Desktop Seminar Lectureship series provides an exciting opportunity for exceptional scientists to share their award-winning research virtually and for you to ask questions. Each session will either feature talks from a journal board member and a recent Lectureship winner, or by two recent Lectureship winners, spanning many topic areas and regions around the world. Further information about upcoming sessions is available here.

As part of the series, Polymer Chemistry will host a session featuring talks from 2021 Lectureship winner Prof. Brett Fors and Associate Editor Prof. Emily Pentzer.

 

Polymer Chemistry Lectureship

Wednesday 27 July 2022, 21:00 – 22:30 BST | 16:00 – 17:30 EDT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Register for free here

 

Please visit rsc.li/lectureship-series for the latest updates and registration links. If you think these events would interest someone you know, please do share this message. We hope you can join us at the Polymer Chemistry Lectureship webinar or at another upcoming event. In the event that you are interested in any of the webinars but cannot make the date, register online before the scheduled event and you will be sent a link to the recording afterwards.

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