Author Archive

Emerging Investigator Series – Aaron Streets

Lab on a Chip is very excited to introduce our most recent Emerging Investigator, Dr Aaron Streets! 

Aaron received a Bachelor of Science in Physics and a Bachelor of Arts in Art at the University of California, Los Angeles. He completed his PhD in Applied Physics at Stanford University with Dr. Stephen Quake. Aaron then went to Beijing, China as a Whitaker International Postdoctoral Fellow and a Ford postdoctoral fellow and worked with Dr. Yanyi Huang in the Peking University BIOPIC institute. Aaron joined the faculty of the University of California, Berkeley as an Assistant Professor in Bioengineering in 2016. He is currently a core member of the Biophysics Program and the Center for Computational Biology and he is a Chan Zuckerberg Biohub investigator. Aaron has received the NSF Early Career award and was recently named a Pew Biomedical Scholar.

You can read Aaron’s article, μCB-seq: microfluidic cell barcoding and sequencing for high-resolution imaging and sequencing of single cells, here.

If you’d like to know more about Aaron and his research, read the short interview with him below!


Your recent Emerging Investigator Series paper focuses on microfluidic cell barcoding and sequencing. How has your research evolved from your first article to this most recent article?

My first publication used a microfluidic-based dynamic light scattering apparatus to investigate protein crystallization. While this study relied on the integration of microfluidic control and optical analysis, it was really focused on the physics of biological macromolecule phase transitions. No cells, no sequencing, not even any microscopy.  The continuous thread that has persisted through my research has been the integration of multilayer microfluidic circuits with advanced optical analysis techniques, however we now take advantage of this technology to study single cells. This means that we rely on a lot of additional experimental and computational tools upstream and downstream of the microfluidics, including interfacing directly with biological samples that are input into our devices, as well as the library preparation, high-throughput sequencing, and ultimately genomic data analysis that are essentially the device outputs. So, while “lab-on-chip” technology is still at the core of our research, we rely heavily on a “chip-in-a-lab” paradigm.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?

After a decade-and-a-half of working with microfluidic technology it is extremely energizing to see microfluidics percolate into all corners of biology and the biomedical sciences. It is particularly exciting to see microfluidic platforms become the primary driving technology that has advanced the field of single-cell biology. From the integrated microfluidic circuits that provided the first commercial single-cell RNA-seq platforms, to the droplet microfluidics and microwell technology that has brought ultra-high-throughput single-cell genomics to the masses and has fuelled the Human Cell Atlas Project. In our lab, we are excited about taking a deeper dive into single-cell measurements, and instead of optimizing throughput, really pushing the information content that can be extracted from a single cell. One of the beautiful aspects of integrated microfluidic circuits is that they pair incredibly well with advanced microscopy techniques while facilitating single-cell manipulation and sequential molecular biology protocols. We are excited about using these capabilities to make multimodal measurements on single cells, connecting genomic information to the spatial organization of molecules and other morphological phenotypes that are probed more efficiently with light.

In your opinion, what is the biggest advantage to using the μCB-seq platform compared to other methods?

It is easy to take a high-resolution image of a single cell, and it is easy (nowadays) to amplify and sequence the RNA or DNA from a single cell. It is still challenging, however, to take a high-resolution image of a single cell, and then pluck that same cell from the microscope slide and sequence it.  Microfluidic cell barcoding and sequencing (μCB-seq) provides a way to do just that for many cells in parallel. With this platform, we are really just using microfluidic chambers to help keep track of which cell was imaged before sequencing. To make this work, we use DNA barcodes that are pre-loaded into the microfluidic device so that each single-cell imaging chamber gets a unique cell barcode. After imaging each cell, that unique barcode gets imprinted into the cDNA from each respective cell so that we can pool all the cDNA from the lanes of our device and make a single sequencing library. After sequencing, the barcode will tell us which transcripts came from which cell, linking gene expression to image data.

What do you find most challenging about your research?

The most challenging aspects of our work tend to be figured out by the PhD students. These are the details you can’t find in a textbook like how to make a device robust to thermal cycling while under a microscope, or where did the cDNA go, or why isn’t this thing working? The truth is that there is a significant up-front investment in resources and time to get these platforms functional. Furthermore, depending on the type of microscopy, many of these tools cannot be ported into other labs. Once we get something like μCB-seq to the proof-of-principle stage there is another set of obstacles to make it a robust technology that we can train collaborators to use efficiently, so that the technology can have impact. Getting these tools into the hands of people who want to use them is still a non-trivial challenge, especially as the front-end and back-end of these experiments require more and more equipment and expertise. 

At which upcoming conferences or events may our readers meet you?

I would love to see everyone at the Physics and Chemistry of Microfluidics Gordon Research Conference in 2021. But if we can’t see each other in Tuscany, I look forward to seeing you on Zoom!

How do you spend your spare time? 

These days? Good question. I enjoy reading science fiction. I am an avid basketball fan. I love listening to live music. So I guess the answer is… reading science fiction.

Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?

I would be a world-famous artist. (Are we allowed to choose how successful we would be? Or just the profession?) Ok, I would be an artist… and a bartender. I studied art in undergrad at UCLA and I always imagined an alternate career making paintings and sculptures and art installations. 


If you’re interested in other articles in our Emerging Investigator Series, the whole collection can be found here

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Lab on a Chip continues partnership with online MicroTAS 2020: our prize winners blog!

The online µTAS 2020 meeting was held from 4-9th October, chaired by Séverine Le Gac and Hang Lu. Philippa Ross, Executive Editor of Lab on a Chip, contributed to a panel discussion on Ethics in Science, and Millie Newman, Deputy Editor of Lab on a Chip, attended to announce the winners of our prestigious Lab on a Chip-sponsored prizes. We’d like to thank all those who entered the awards this year, and to the judging panels who helped us select the winners. All three prizes received excellent submissions and we’re delighted to announce the winners below.


Lab on a Chip/Dolomite Pioneers of Miniaturization Lectureship
Professor Wilbur Lam (Georgia Institute of Technology/Emory University, USA), has been awarded the 15th Pioneers of Miniaturisation Lectureship, sponsored by Dolomite and Lab on a Chip. The Pioneers of Miniaturization Lectureship rewards early to mid-career scientists who have made extraordinary or outstanding contributions to the understanding or development of miniaturised systems.
Like previous years, Professor Lam will receive a monetary award, certificate and plaque, and gave a stunning talk during the online µTAS 2020 conference on clinical translations of microfluidic systems and lessons learned from the COVID-19 pandemic.


 

Art in Science Competition
In collaboration with Greg Cooksey from the National Institute of Standards & Technology (NIST), we were pleased to present the Art in Science award to Qinyu Li (Shanghai Jiao Tong University), for his image titled “A microvascular ring”. This award highlights the aesthetic value of scientific illustrations while still conveying scientific merit.
The image is a fluorescent photograph of a 3D vasculogenic network from human umbilical vein endothelial cells inside a ring-shaped polymethylmethacrylate microfluidic chamber.


Widmer Poster Prize
The Widmer Poster Prize was awarded this year to Janosch Hauser (KTH Royal Institute of Technology), for his poster and video presentation on “TEM grid preparation with minimal user interaction”. Janosch put a huge amount of time and effort into his presentation, and the judges were very impressed.


Congratulations to all the winners at this year’s online µTAS conference. We look forward to seeing you at µTAS 2021, hopefully in-person, in Palm Springs, California!

 

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Wearable and Implantable Sensors thematic collection published

Check out our new Lab on a Chip themed collection, focussing on Wearable and Implantable Sensors.

The collection was curated by members of the Lab on a Chip Editorial Board, and highlights some excellent recent papers in this area. The collection features papers addressing the issues involved in creating wearable or implantable sensors and their applications for diagnostics, medicine and therapeutics, health awareness and other novel applications.

We hope you enjoy reading these articles!*

 


Wearable sensors: modalities, challenges, and prospects
J. Heikenfeld, A. Jajack, J. Rogers, P. Gutruf, L. Tian, T. Pan, R. Li, M. Khine, J. Kim, J. Wang and J. Kim
Critical Review, Lab on a Chip Recent Review Articles, Lab on a Chip Recent Open Access Articles
Lab Chip, 2018, 18, 217-248

A fluorometric skin-interfaced microfluidic device and smartphone imaging module for in situ quantitative analysis of sweat chemistry
Yurina Sekine, Sung Bong Kim, Yi Zhang, Amay J. Bandodkar, Shuai Xu, Jungil Choi, Masahiro Irie, Tyler R. Ray, Punit Kohli, Naofumi Kozai, Tsuyoshi Sugita, Yixin Wu, KunHyuck Lee, Kyu-Tae Lee, Roozbeh Ghaffari and John A. Rogers
Paper
Lab Chip, 2018, 18, 2178-218


Electrostatically gated nanofluidic membrane for ultra-low power controlled drug delivery
Nicola Di Trani, Antonia Silvestri, Antons Sizovs, Yu Wang, Donald R. Erm, Danilo Demarchi, Xuewu Liua and Alessandro Grattoni
Paper
Lab Chip, 2020, 20, 1562-1576

Liquid metal electrode-enabled flexible microdroplet sensor
Renchang Zhang, Zi Ye, Meng Gao, Chang Gao, Xudong Zhang, Lei Li and Lin Gui
Paper
Lab Chip, 2020, 20, 496-504


A flexible enzyme-electrode sensor with cylindrical working electrode modified with a 3D nanostructure for implantable continuous glucose monitoring
Zhihua Pu, Jiaan Tu, Ruixue Han, Xingguo Zhang, Jianwei Wu, Chao Fang, Hao Wu, Xiaoli Zhang,  Haixia Yu and Dachao Li
Paper
Lab Chip, 2018, 18, 3570-3577

Flexible plastic, paper and textile lab-on-a chip platforms for electrochemical biosensing
Anastasios Economou, Christos Kokkinos and Mamas Prodromidis
Critical Review, Lab on a Chip Recent Review Articles
Lab Chip, 2018, 18, 1812-1830


A multi-modal sweat sensing patch for cross-verification of sweat rate, total ionic charge, and Na+ concentration
Zhen Yuan, Lei Hou, Mallika Bariya, Hnin Yin Yin Nyein, Li-Chia Tai, Wenbo Ji, Lu Li and Ali Javey
Paper
Lab Chip, 2019, 19, 3179-3189

A wearable electrofluidic actuation system
Haisong Lin, Hannaneh Hojaiji, Shuyu Lin, Christopher Yeung, Yichao Zhao, Bo Wang, Meghana Malige, Yibo Wang, Kimber King, Wenzhuo Yu, Jiawei Tan, Zhaoqing Wang, Xuanbing Cheng and  Sam Emaminejad
Communication
Lab Chip, 2019, 19, 2966-2972


Passive sweat collection and colorimetric analysis of biomarkers relevant to kidney disorders using a soft microfluidic system
Yi Zhang, Hexia Guo, Sung Bong Kim, Yixin Wu, Diana Ostojich, Sook Hyeon Park, Xueju Wang, Zhengyan Weng, Rui Li, Amay J. Bandodkar, Yurina Sekine, Jungil Choi, Shuai Xu, Susan Quaggin, Roozbeh Ghaffari and John A. Rogers
Paper
Lab Chip, 2019, 19, 1545-1555

Complete validation of a continuous and blood-correlated sweat biosensing device with integrated sweat stimulation
A. Hauke, P. Simmers, Y. R. Ojha, B. D. Cameron, R. Ballweg, T. Zhang, N. Twine, M. Brothers, E. Gomez and J. Heikenfeld
Paper
Lab Chip, 2018, 18, 3750-3759


*These articles are free to read for 4 weeks.

 

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Xingyu Jiang joins the Lab on a Chip Editorial Board

Xingyu Jiang

Lab on a Chip is pleased to announce that Professor Xingyu Jiang has recently joined our editorial board. Professor Jiang is a Chair Professor at the Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, China. He obtained his BS at the University of Chicago (1999) and PhD at Harvard University (Chemistry, 2004). In 2005, he joined the National Center for NanoScience and Technology/the University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. He moved to the Southern University of Science and Technology in 2018.

Professor Jiang’s research interests include microfluidics and nanomedicine and their applications in diagnostics, screening for therapeutics, as well as engineered tissues. He has over 300 publications in peer-reviewed journals. He was awarded the “Hundred Talents Plan” of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the National Science Foundation of China’s Distinguished Young Scholars Award, the Scopus Young Researcher Gold Award, and the Human Frontier Science Program Young Investigator Award. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry (UK) and American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering.

Welcome Xingyu!

 

 


Read some of Professor Jiang’s recent Lab on a Chip publications here*:

Hierarchically structured microchip for point-of-care immunoassays with dynamic detection ranges
Lei Mou, Ruihua Dong, Binfeng Hu, Zulan Li, Jiangjiang Zhang and Xingyu Jiang
Paper
Lab Chip, 2019, 19, 2750-2757

Profiling protein–protein interactions of single cancer cells with in situ lysis and co-immunoprecipitation
Ji Young Ryu, Jihye Kim, Min Ju Shon, Jiashu Sun, Xingyu Jiang, Wonhee Lee and Tae-Young Yoon
Communication
Lab Chip, 2019, 19, 1922-1928

Hand-powered centrifugal microfluidic platform inspired by the spinning top for sample-to-answer diagnostics of nucleic acids
Lu Zhang, Fei Tian, Chao Liu, Qiang Feng, Tingxuan Ma, Zishan Zhao, Tiejun Li, Xingyu Jiang and Jiashu Sun
Paper
Lab Chip, 2018, 18, 610-619


*These articles are free to read for 4 weeks.

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Lab on a Chip and Dolomite 2020 Pioneers of Miniaturization Lectureship Winner

Lab on a Chip and Dolomite are delighted to announce the winner of the 2020 Pioneers of Miniaturization Lectureship, Professor Wilbur A. Lam, MD, PhD.

This Lectureship honours and supports the up and coming, next generation of scientists who have significantly contributed to the understanding or development of miniaturised systems.

Professor Lam is a physician-scientist-engineer and clinical pediatric hematologist/oncologist. He is the W. Paul Bowers Research Chair of Pediatrics and Biomedical Engineering at Emory University and Georgia Tech and an attending physician at the Aflac Cancer and Blood Disorders Center of the Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta.

His laboratory focuses on developing microsystems to study and diagnose hematologic diseases including sickle cell disease, thrombotic/bleeding disorders, and leukemia. He is also principal investigator of the Atlanta Center for Microsystems Engineered Point-of-Care Technology (ACME POCT), an integral part of the NIH’s Point-of-Care Technologies Research Network (POCTRN) and RADx COVID-19 initiative.

Professor Lam received his MD from Baylor College of Medicine, going on to earn his PhD in Bioengineering from the University of California, Berkley. He completed his Fellowship in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology and Residency in Pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco.

Our Pioneers of Miniaturization Lectureship Winner is invited to speak at MicroTAS, and thus Wilbur will be presenting his talk at the online MicroTAS 2020 meeting, 4-9th October 2020.

We our warmest congratulations to Wilbur on his achievement.


Read some of Wilbur Lam’s recent Lab on a Chip papers below:

Interdigitated microelectronic bandage augments hemostasis and clot formation at low applied voltage in vitro and in vivo
Elaissa T. Hardy, Yannan J. Wang, Sanathan Iyer, Robert G. Mannino, Yumiko Sakurai, Thomas H. Barker, Taiyun Chi, Yeojoon Youn, Hua Wang, Ashley C. Brown and Wilbur A. Lam
Lab Chip, 2018, 18, 2985-2993

Probing blood cell mechanics of hematologic processes at the single micron level
Jordan C. Ciciliano, Reza Abbaspour, Julia Woodall, Caroline Wu, Muhannad S. Bakir and Wilbur A. Lam
Lab Chip, 2017, 17, 3804-3816

3D microvascular model recapitulates the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma tumor microenvironment in vitro
Robert G. Mannino, Adriana N. Santiago-Miranda, Pallab Pradhan, Yongzhi Qiu, Joscelyn C. Mejias, Sattva S. Neelapu, Krishnendu Roy and Wilbur A. Lam
Lab Chip, 2017, 17, 407-414


*Free to read until 26th October 2020 with an RSC publishing account.

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Emerging Investigator Series – Katherine Elvira

Lab on a Chip is delighted to introduce our most recent Emerging Investigator, Katherine Elvira!

Katherine received her undergraduate Master’s degree in Chemistry from Imperial College London in 2007. She started working in the field of microfluidics during her PhD (2012, Imperial College London), by building digital microfluidic platforms to perform automated chemical reactions. Katherine then moved to ETH Zürich (Switzerland) working firstly as a Postdoctoral Researcher and then as a Senior Scientist in the Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering. Since 2017, Katherine is the Canada Research Chair in New Materials and Techniques for Health Applications and an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Victoria, Canada. Katherine’s group currently develops microfluidic technologies to build bespoke artificial cells for the quantification of pharmacokinetic parameters in vitro. Katherine has recently presented this work at the Gordon Research Conference on Drug Metabolism (2019), is Co-Chair for the Gordon Research Conference on the Physics and Chemistry of Microfluidics (2023) and is a Scientific Mentor for the Creative Destruction Lab.

Read Dr Elvira’s Emerging Investigator paper* “A bespoke microfluidic pharmacokinetic compartment model for drug absorption using artificial cell membranes” and find out more about her and her research in the interview below.

Katherine Elvira

Image credit: UVic Photo Services

Your recent Emerging Investigator Series paper focuses on a new type of pharmacokinetic compartment model for the prediction of drug absorption. How has your research evolved from your first article to this most recent article?

Funnily enough, my first ever article was a very early precursor to this work. We built a microfluidic platform for the formation of droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) in high-throughput. I didn’t work with DIBs again until I started as a Canada Research Chair at the University of Victoria, but they are the basis for the new type of pharmacokinetic compartment model that we show in the Emerging Investigator article. We can now make them mimic human cell membranes and hence they form the building blocks for the compartments in the pharmacokinetic compartment model. In between, my research involved making microfluidic devices for application in many different fields, such as drug discovery, organic chemistry and food science. I also spent some time investigating why microfluidic droplets rarely behave perfectly, and how we can mitigate this. I like that paper because we included a poster in the ESI which my group still uses in the lab to determine what is going wrong with their chips.

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?

I am really excited about some cool new artificial cell and tissue models that we are building, and how they can be used to model disease and drug behaviour in humans. My group is full of outstanding researchers, which makes it really easy to be excited about the work they are doing!

In your opinion, what is the biggest advantage of using your microfluidic platform over other methods?

It’s two things, really. Firstly, the fact that we are able to build networks of different compartments and artificial cell membranes on a chip. This allows us to build an in vitro model of the pathway that a drug would take in a human, from the intestine to the blood. And secondly, the fact that we can make these artificial cell membranes using phospholipids that are found in human cells. This makes our in vitro model quite biomimetic. In fact, we are able to predict molecular transport into cells three times better than the state-of-the-art in vitro commercial technique.

What do you find most challenging about your research?

Let’s face it, PDMS is awesome in some ways, but awful in others. I would love to find another material that has the advantages of PDMS, such as being cheap, transparent, and good for prototyping, but that has really stable and modifiable surface chemistry, and that we can mass produce for commercial applications.

In which upcoming conferences or events may our readers meet you?

I am part of the Technical Program Committee for MicroTAS 2020, so I will be at the online conference in October. And next year I am co-Vice Chair of the Gordon Research Conference on the Physics and Chemistry of Microfluidics, which will hopefully be taking place in Italy.

How do you spend your spare time?

I am really lucky to live in beautiful British Columbia on the West coast of Canada. During the winter months I get to go backcountry snowboarding in some of the most outstanding mountains in the world. In the summer, I switch my snowboard for a stand-up paddle board along the beaches in Victoria. I also love travelling, which I do a lot, both for work and for fun. I need my yoga classes to keep me relaxed, and have a slight obsession with cooking all the European foods that I miss from home.

Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?

I wanted to be an astronaut when I was younger. It still sounds cool but I am also happy staying on earth and being an academic, it’s a pretty great life.

Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?

I don’t always find it easy being a woman in science, so I would encourage early career female scientists to persevere, we need diversity in academia. I would tell their male colleagues to be good allies.

 

*Dr Elvira’s paper is free to access with an RSC account for the next month.

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Emerging Investigator Series – Fabrice Gielen

Lab on a Chip is delighted to introduce our most recent Emerging Investigator, Fabrice Gielen! 

Dr. Fabrice Gielen is an Independent Research Fellow at the Living Systems Institute, University of Exeter. He obtained his PhD from Imperial College London during which he studied cellular membrane dynamics using a combination of single cell microfluidic trapping techniques and single molecule spectroscopy with Profs. Joshua Edel and Andrew deMello. He subsequently moved to Cambridge as a Post-Doctoral Research Associate with Prof. Florian Hollfelder to contribute to the field of ultra-high-throughput biocatalyst evolution. He is a Founder and Scientific Director of Drop-Tech Ltd, which commercializes droplet-on-demand platforms. His research interests include developing novel tools and methods to study and harness single cells with applications in bacteria-phage interactions, protein evolution and regenerative medicine.

Read Dr Gielen’s Emerging Investigator paper* “Deep learning guided image-based droplet sorting for on-demand selection and analysis of single cells and 3D cell cultures” and find out more about him and his research in the interview below. 

Picture of Emerging Investigator, Fabrice Gielen

 

Your recent Emerging Investigator Series paper focuses on sorting of single droplets for selection and analysis of single cells and 3D cell cultures. How has your research evolved from your first article to this most recent article?

 My first article (long ago already!) presented a microfluidic device for trapping and focussing microparticles within microchannels. The common theme with my present work is how precise control at the microscale enables us to perform novel types of biological experiments across populations. We can now truly benefit from the progress made in engineering, computing and optical setups to study biology, not just faster but in fundamentally different ways than was possible when I started my career.

 

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?

Studying single cells holds the promise to understand biology down to its fundamental unit. I joined the Living Systems Institute at the University of Exeter to exploit the advantages of droplet microfluidics in terms of single cell control and interrogation for the study of complex biological systems. Since then, I have developed multiple interests ranging from the behaviour of unicellular organisms, cellular differentiation or the discovery of novel antimicrobials. I believe there is also a large scope for other, yet unforeseen applications.

 

In your opinion, what is the biggest advantage to using your platform for classifying single droplet images compared to other methods?

 Images hold a lot of information and machines can uncover patterns where humans cannot. Recent technological progress allows us to combine image acquisition and analysis in real-time. Problems such as image classification used in medical diagnostics or selection to isolate rare cell types benefit enormously from machine learning tools that can identify objects only using human-labelled training data. Our paper shows one way of doing this is by using convolutional neural networks which can be trained to recognize several types of micro-objects simultaneously.

 

What do you find most challenging about your research?

The ability to combine in a single experiment microfluidic workflows, biological entities, and biochemical reactions has the flipside that successful and conclusive experiments happen only when all these variables coincide (which is sometimes rare!). On the bright side, microfluidics has gone a long way in terms of reproducibility and long-term functionality and the onus is now more on the biology.

 

At which upcoming conferences or events may our readers meet you?

I am planning to attend the MicroTAS 2020 (Palm Springs) and EMBL microfluidics (Heidelberg).  

 

How do you spend your spare time?

I like to take the family out to visit Devon and the Jurassic Coast, which I highly recommend to anyone visiting the region.

 

Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?

I would go for musician/composer, maybe pianist.

 

*Dr Gielen’s paper is free to access with an RSC account for the next month.

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Meet our new Advisory Board members!

Lab on a Chip is excited to introduce the newest additions to our Advisory Board!

Esther Amstad studied material science at ETH Zurich, Switzerland, where she also carried out her PhD thesis under the supervision of Prof. Marcus Textor (2007-2011). Her thesis was devoted to the steric stabilization of iron oxide nanoparticles. As a Postdoctoral fellow, she joined the experimental soft condensed matter group of David A. Weitz at Harvard University, USA (2011-2014). She developed new microfluidic devices to study early stages of the crystallization of nanoparticles, and to produce drops of well-defined sizes at high throughputs. Since June 2014, she is Tenure Track Assistant Professor at the institute of Materials at Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland, where she heads the Soft Materials Laboratory (SMAL). Inspired by nature, her research team develops drop-based processing routes that offer control over the local composition and structure of materials to fabricate adaptable, self-healing materials.

Esther Amstad

Stephanie Descroix is team leader at Institut Curie, France. Her group is interested in the development of microfluidics for biomedical applications and more recently in organ on chip development for biophysics and biology. She has an initial background in biochemistry and obtained her PhD in Analytical Chemistry in 2002. She was hired a CNRS researcher at ESPCI (Paris) in 2004 to develop microfluidic device for bioanalytical application. In 2011, she joined the lab PhysicoChemistry Curie at Institut Curie to benefit from a unique interdisciplinary and clinical environment. Since 2013, she is head of the CNRS French Micro and Nanofluidic Network (GDR MNF) and she is co-founder of INOREVIA company.

Stephanie Descroix

Mei He is an Assistant Professor at the University of Kansas, USA. She received her PhD degree from the University of Alberta with Professor Jed Harrison, and postdoctoral training from the University of California, Berkeley with Professor Amy Herr. Dr. He Received NIH Maximizing Investigator’s Research Award for Early Stage Investigators (MIRA ESI) and LOC Emerging Investigator in 2019. She also received an Lab on Chip Outstanding Reviewer award for the year of 2018. One of her publications received the 2018 SLAS Technology Readers Choice Award. Her research interests include biomedical microfluidic devices and sensing approaches, 3D biomaterials, and nanodelivery, employed in programming and monitoring biomimetic immunity associated with extracellular vesicles.

Mei He

Michelle Khine is Professor of Biomedical Engineering at University of California, Irvine, USA. Prior to UC Irvine, Khine was an Assistant and Founding professor at UC Merced from 2006-09. At UC Merced, Shrink Nanotechnologies Inc., the first start-up company from youngest UC campus, was spun out of the research developed in Khine’s lab. Her current research projects include: single cell electroporation, shrinky-dink microfluidics, microsystems for stem cell differentiation, canary-on-a-chip and quantitative single-cell analysis of receptor dynamics and chemotactic response on a chip.

Michelle Khine

Wilbur Lam MD, PhD is a physician-scientist-engineer trained in clinical pediatric hematology/oncology as well as bioengineering. He is the W. Paul Bowers Research Chair, Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Biomedical Engineering at Emory University School of Medicine and the Georgia Institute of Technology, and an attending physician at the Aflac Cancer and Blood Disorders Center of Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. His laboratory focuses on developing microfluidic and microfabricated systems to study, diagnose, and even treat hematologic diseases including sickle cell disease, thrombotic/bleeding disorders, and leukemia.

Wilbur Lam

Severine Le Gac is Professor at the University of Twente (The Netherlands), where she leads a group called Applied Microfluidics for BioEngineering Research (AMBER). Séverine Le Gac holds her Engineer degree from the ESPCI (Ecole Supérieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielles) and her MSc degree from the National Museum of Natural History (both Paris, France). In 2004, she obtained her PhD degree cum laude from the University of Lille (France). After a short visit at the University of Tokushima (Japan), she joined the University of Twente in 2005 as a post-doctoral researcher, before being appointed as a tenure-tracker in the same university. Professor Le Gac is member of the director board of the Chemical Biological Microsystem Society (CBMS). Her research focuses on the use of miniaturized devices for biological and medical applications, and in particular for cancer research and the field of assisted reproductive technologies.

Séverine Le Gac

Xiujun (James) Li is Associate Professor at the University of Texas at El Paso, USA. Prior to University of Texas at El Paso, Professor Li was a NSERC Postdoctoral Fellow at UC Berkeley working with Richard A. Mathies and a NSERC Postdoctoral Fellow at the Harvard University & Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, working with Professor Whitesides. Professor Li has received various awards including the 2018 Outstanding Faculty Dissertation Research Mentoring Award, UTEP, the 2017-2018 Outstanding Efforts Award, UTEP and a 2017 Innovation Center Proof-of-Concept Grant, Medical Center of the Americas Foundation (MCA). Professor Li’s research focusses on bioanalysis, biomedical & environmental applications, and catalysis using microfluidic lab-on-a-chip platforms and nanotechnology.

Xiujun Li

Ian Papautsky is Richard and Loan Hill Professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago, USA and Co-Director of the NSF Center for Advanced Design & Manufacturing of Integrated Microfluidics. The Papautsky lab is focused on innovating blood analysis technologies, using microfluidics and sensing, for precision and point-of-care medicine. The Papautsky lab also pioneered the inertial microfluidics technology for label-free isolation and analysis of rare cells. The Papautsky lab has recently focused on capture and molecular profile analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating tumor microemboli (CTM), whose molecular profile can provide a “cancer census” that is more holistic representation of disease state and active pathophysiology.

Ian Papautsky

Weian Zhao is an Associate Professor at the Sue and Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center, Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences at University of California, Irvine. Dr. Zhao is also the co-founder of Velox Biosystems Inc, and Amberstone Biosciences Inc, start-up companies that aim to develop technologies for rapid diagnosis and immunotherapeutic discovery, respectively. Dr. Zhao’s research aims to 1) elucidate and eventually control the fate of transplanted stem cells and immune cells to treat cancer and autoimmune diseases, and 2) develop novel miniaturized devices for early diagnosis and monitoring for conditions including sepsis, antibiotic resistance and cancer. Dr. Zhao has received several awards including the MIT’s Technology Review TR35 Award: the world’s top 35 innovators under the age of 35 and NIH Director’s New Innovator Award. Dr. Zhao completed his BSc and MSc degrees in Chemistry at Shandong University and then obtained his PhD in Chemistry at McMaster University in 2008. During 2008-2011, Dr. Zhao was a Human Frontier Science Program (HFSP) Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and MIT.

Weian Zhao

Recent Publications in Lab on a Chip by our newest Advisory Board members

Simplified Drop-seq workflow with minimized bead loss using a bead capture and processing microfluidic chip

Biočanin, M, Bues, J.Dainese, R. Amstad, E., Deplancke, B.

Lab Chip, 2019, 19, 1610-1620

 

Scalable production of double emulsion drops with thin shells

Vian, A., Reuse, B., Amstad, E.

Lab Chip, 2018, 18, 1936-1942

 

Controlling the distance of highly confined droplets in a capillary by interfacial tension for merging on-demand

Ferraro, D, Serra, M., Filippi, D., Zago, L., Guglielmin, E., Pierno, M., Descroix, S., Viovy, J.-L., Mistura, G.

Lab Chip, 2019, 19, 136-146

 

3D-printing enabled micro-assembly of a microfluidic electroporation system for 3D tissue engineering

Zhu, Q., Hamilton, M., Vasquez, B., He, M.

Lab Chip, 2019, 19, 2362-2372

 

Microfluidic on-demand engineering of exosomes towards cancer immunotherapy

Zheng Zhao, Jodi McGill, Pamela Gamero-Kubotac and Mei He.

Lab Chip, 2019, 19, 1877-1886

 

Wearable sensors: Modalities, challenges, and prospects

Heikenfeld, J., Jajack, A., Rogers, J., Gutruf, P., Tian, L., Pan, T., Li, R., Khine, M., Kim, J., Wang, J., Kim, J.

Lab Chip, 2018, 18, 217-248

 

Interdigitated microelectronic bandage augments hemostasis and clot formation at low applied voltage: In vitro and in vivo

Hardy, E.T., Wang, Y.J., Iyer, S., Mannino, R.G., Sakurai, Y., Barker, T.H., Chi, T., Youn, Y., Wang, H., Brown, A.C., Lam, W.A.

Lab Chip, 2018, 18, 2985-2993

 

Immuno-capture of extracellular vesicles for individual multi-modal characterization using AFM, SEM and Raman spectroscopy

Beekman, P., Enciso-Martinez, A., Rho, H.S., Pujari, S.P., Lenferink, A., Zuilhof, H., Terstappen, L.W.M.M., Otto, C., Le Gac, S.

Lab Chip, 2019, 19, 2526-2536

 

Size-dependent enrichment of leukocytes from undiluted whole blood using shear-induced diffusion

Zhou, J., Papautsky, I.

Lab Chip, 2019, 19, 3416-3426

 

Single stream inertial focusing in low aspect-ratio triangular microchannels

Mukherjee, P., Wang, X., Zhou, J., Papautsky, I.

Lab Chip, 2019, 19, 147-157

 

An ultrasensitive test for profiling circulating tumor DNA using integrated comprehensive droplet digital detection

Chen-Yin Ou, Tam Vu, Jonathan T. Grunwald, Michael Toledano, Jan Zimak, Melody Toosky, Byron Shen, Jason A. Zell, Enrico Gratton, Timothy J. Abram and Weian Zhao

Lab Chip, 2019, 19, 993-1005

 

Functional TCR T cell screening using single-cell droplet microfluidics

Aude I. Segaliny, Guideng Li, Lingshun Kong, Ci Ren, Xiaoming Chen, Jessica K. Wang, David Baltimore, Guikai Wu and Weian Zhao

Lab Chip, 2018, 18, 3733-3749

We hope you enjoy reading this collection, which we have made free to access until the 15th March 2020 with an RSC Publishing Account.

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Lab on a Chip presents prestigious prizes at MicroTAS 2019

The µTAS 2019 Conference was held from 27-31st October in Basel, Switzerland. Maria Southall, Deputy Editor of Lab on a Chip, attended the conference and announced the prestigious Lab on a Chip awards which include the Pioneers of Miniaturization Lectureship (in partnership with Dolomite Microfluidics), the Widmer Young Researcher Poster Prize and the Art in Science competition (in partnership with NIST). All three competitions received many fantastic submissions and we are delighted to present the winners, below:

Lab on a Chip/Dolomite “Pioneers of Miniaturization” Lectureship

Professor Hang Lu (Georgia Tech, USA) was awarded the 14th “Pioneers of Miniaturization” Lectureship, sponsored by Dolomite and Lab on a Chip. The “Pioneers of Miniaturization” Lectureship rewards early to mid-career scientists who have made extraordinary or outstanding contributions to the understanding or development of miniaturised systems. Professor Lu received a certificate, a monetary award and delivered a short lecture at the conference.

Left to right: Mark Gilligan (Dolomite), Hang Lu (winner) and Maria Southall (Lab on a Chip)

Left to right: Mark Gilligan (Dolomite), Hang Lu (winner) and Maria Southall (Lab on a Chip)

 

 

Hang Lu (winner) delivering her lecture

Hang Lu (winner) delivering her lecture

Art in Science Competition

Greg Cooksey from the National Institute of Standards & Technology (NIST) and Lab on a Chip Deputy Editor Maria Southall presented the Art in Science award to Joseph de Rutte from UCLA for his entry “A Cell’s World”. This award aims to highlight the aesthetic value in scientific illustrations while still conveying scientific merit.

Greg Cooksey (NIST), Joseph de Rutte (UCLA, winner) and Maria Southall (Lab on a Chip)

Left to right: Greg Cooksey (NIST), Joseph de Rutte (UCLA, winner) and Maria Southall (Lab on a Chip)

Fluorescent image of uniform droplets formed using structured microparticles. Fluorescently labeled particles are suspended in a water solution and agitated with oil and surfactant. This platform is used to encapsulate single-cells and measure their secretions.

Winning image ‘A Cell’s World’: Fluorescent image of uniform droplets formed using structured microparticles. Fluorescently labeled particles are suspended in a water solution and agitated with oil and surfactant. This platform is used to encapsulate single-cells and measure their secretions.

Widmer Young Researcher Poster Prize

The Widmer Young Researcher Poster Prize was awarded to Roberto Rodriguez-Moncayo from the Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Mexico, for his poster on “Integrated microfluidic device for universal secretory immunophenotyping studies for adherent and non adherent cells”.

Maria Southall (left) with Roberto Rodriguez-Moncayo (winner)

Maria Southall (left, Lab on a Chip) with Roberto Rodriguez-Moncayo (winner)

Congratulations to all the winners at the conference, we look forward to seeing you at µTAS 2020 in Palm Springs, California, USA! 

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Art in Science Competition Winner and runners up announced at MicroTAS 2019

Lab on a Chip and the National Institute of Standards Technology (NIST) presented the Art in Science award at the µTAS 2019 Conference on the 30th October 2019 at the Lab on a Chip/Royal Society of Chemistry booth. The award highlights the aesthetic value in scientific illustrations while still conveying scientific merit. The competition received many fantastic submissions this year which were judged by Jeanne Andres, Lab on a Chip Executive Editor, Greg Cooksey, NIST representative and Hang LuLab on a Chip Associate Editor .

Greg Cooksey and Maria Southall (Lab on a Chip Deputy Editor) announced the winner of the competition was Joesph de Rutte (UCLA) with his entry “A Cell’s World” and presented Mr de Rutte with his award and certificate.

A Cell’s World  

Joseph de Rutte, UCLA, USA

Fluorescent image of uniform droplets formed using structured microparticles. Fluorescently labeled particles are suspended in a water solution and agitated with oil and surfactant. This platform is used to encapsulate single-cells and measure their secretions.
Fluorescent image of uniform droplets formed using structured microparticles. Fluorescently labeled particles are suspended in a water solution and agitated with oil and surfactant. This platform is used to encapsulate single-cells and measure their secretions.
Greg Cooksey (NIST), Joseph de Rutte (UCLA, winner) and Maria Southall (Lab on a Chip)
Left to right: Greg Cooksey (NIST), Joseph de Rutte (UCLA, winner) and Maria Southall (Lab on a Chip)

The runners up are:

Laura Barillas, Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (INP), Germany
MicroQuasar – Laura Barillas, Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (INP), Germany
Sensing in Three-Dimensions
Sensing in Three-Dimensions – Michael Restaino, University of Maryland, USA
Stars and Diamonds made out of bone cells
Stars and Diamonds made out of bone cells – Charlotte Yvanoff, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium

 

A big thank you to all the contributors this year!

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