Archive for the ‘Themed Issues’ Category

Spotlight themed collection: Metal Complexes and Inorganic Materials for Solar Fuel Production

This web collection guest edited by Professor Fausto Puntoriero (Università degli Studi di Messina), and Professor Osamu Ishitani (Tokyo Institute of Technology), highlights the fundamental and applied inorganic chemistry advances inspired by the study of solar radiation as a limitless source of clean energy. The collection contains contributions from experts in the study of solar light conversion, including research focussed on the development of metal complexes and inorganic materials for CO2 photoreduction, photocatalysis, and photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting.

 

Browse the collection

 

Take a look at a selection of articles from the collection:

Recent advances in metalloporphyrin-based catalyst design towards carbon dioxide reduction: from bio-inspired second coordination sphere modifications to hierarchical architectures
Philipp Gotico, Zakaria Halime and Ally Aukauloo
Dalton Trans., 2020, 49, 2381-2396
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT04709C, Perspective

Electrochemical and photoelectrochemical water splitting with a CoOx catalyst prepared by flame assisted deposition
Fusheng Li, Ziqi Zhao, Hao Yang, Dinghua Zhou, Yilong Zhao, Yingzheng Li, Wenlong Li, Xiujuan Wu, Peili Zhang and Licheng Sun
Dalton Trans., 2020, 49, 588-592
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT03983J, Communication

Photoelectrochemical water-splitting over a surface modified p-type Cr2O3 photocathode
Keita Sekizawa, Keiichiro Oh-ishi and Takeshi Morikawa
Dalton Trans., 2020, 49, 659-666
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT04296B, Paper

This is the first in a series of themed web collections on research topics that spotlight the fundamental and applied inorganic chemistry driving, influencing and steering each field of study. They will be guest edited by experts in the fields and will feature previously published and newly commissioned research in each topic.  The aim is to provide a resource of high quality research for someone entering the field, for teachers to recommend to their students, to illuminate new directions for those in the field and demonstrate the vital role inorganic chemistry contributes to these fields.

 

Dalton Transactions, Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit your research or reviews to Dalton Transactions today! – see our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest HOT articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Themed Web Collection: Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms

Guest edited by Sam de Visser (University of Manchester), Jonathan Rourke (University of Cardiff) and Kylie Vincent (University of Oxford) we recently published a special collection of Dalton Transactions which celebrates 50 years of the Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms Discussion Group and highlights the breadth and depth of the area, paying particular interest to areas of contemporary relevance.

 

Browse the collection

 

Check out a selection of the articles below:

Inorganic reaction mechanisms. A personal journey
Colin D. Hubbard, Debabrata Chatterjee, Maria Oszajca, Justyna Polaczek, Olga Impert, Marta Chrzanowska, Anna Katafias, Ralph Puchta and Rudi van Eldik
Dalton Trans., 2020, 49, 4599-4659
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT04620H, Perspective

A subtle structural change in the distal haem pocket has a remarkable effect on tuning hydrogen peroxide reactivity in dye decolourising peroxidases from Streptomyces lividans
Marina Lučić, Amanda K. Chaplin, Tadeo Moreno-Chicano, Florian S. N. Dworkowski, Michael T. Wilson, Dimitri A. Svistunenko, Michael A. Hough and Jonathan A. R. Worrall
Dalton Trans., 2020, 49, 1620-1636
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT04583J, Paper

Tandem deoxygenative hydrosilation of carbon dioxide with a cationic scandium hydridoborate and B(C6F5)3
Daniel W. Beh, Warren E. Piers, Benjamin S. Gelfand and Jian-Bin Lin
Dalton Trans., 2020, 49, 95-101
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT04323C, Paper

Photoactivated silicon–oxygen and silicon–nitrogen heterodehydrocoupling with a commercially available iron compound
Matthew B. Reuter, Michael P. Cibuzar, James Hammerton and Rory Waterman
Dalton Trans., 2020, 49, 2972-2978
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT04870G, Paper

Dalton Transactions, Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit your research or reviews to Dalton Transactions today! – see our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest HOT articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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Breaking bonds over many timescales: in celebration of Robin Perutz’s 70th birthday

Breaking bonds over many timescales: in celebration of Robin Perutz's 70th birthday

Guest-edited by Simon B. Duckett, M. Carmen Nicasio and Michael K. Whittlesey, we reccently published a special collection of Dalton Transactions to mark the 70th birthday of mentor, friend and colleague, Professor Robin Perutz FRS. The collection features areas of organometallic and coordination chemistry where Robin has contributed over the last 40+ years. Themed around the breaking of bonds, it includes both thermal and photochemical bond breakage and activation in stoichiometric and catalytic reactions. Spectroscopic characterisation of reaction intermediates features alongside experimental and computational studies of reactivity.

 

Browse the collection

 

Check out a selection of the articles below:

The experimental determination of Th(iv)/Th(iii) redox potentials in organometallic thorium complexes
Christopher J. Inman and F. Geoffrey N. Cloke
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 10782-10784
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT01553A, Communication

Structural isomerism in the [(Ni@Sn9)In(Ni@Sn9)]5− Zintl ion
Chao Zhang, Harry W. T. Morgan, Zi-Chuan Wang, Chao Liu, Zhong-Ming Sun and John E. McGrady
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 15888-15895
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT03008E, Paper

Reversible photo-isomerization of cis-[Pd(L-κS,O)2] (HL = N,N-diethyl-N′-1-naphthoylthiourea) to trans-[Pd(L-κS,O)2] and the unprecedented formation of trans-[Pd(L-κS,N)2] in solution
Henry A. Nkabyo, Barbara Procacci, Simon B. Duckett and Klaus R. Koch
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 17241-17251
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT03672E, Paper

Iridium complexes featuring a tridentate SiPSi ligand: from dimeric to monomeric 14, 16 or 18-electron species
Cynthia A. Cuevas-Chávez, Laure Vendier, Sylviane Sabo-Etienne and Virginia Montiel-Palma
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 14010-14018
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT03136G, Paper

Transforming PPh3 into bidentate phosphine ligands at Ru–Zn heterobimetallic complexes
Niall O’Leary, Fedor M. Miloserdov, Mary F. Mahon and Michael K. Whittlesey
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 14000-14009
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT03106E, Paper

Dalton Transactions, Royal Society of Chemistry

Submit your research or reviews to Dalton Transactions today! – see our author guidelines for information on our article types or find out more about the advantages of publishing in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal.

Keep up to date with our latest HOT articles, Reviews, Collections & more by following us on Twitter. You can also keep informed by signing up to our E-Alerts.

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Modern Coordination Chemistry

This week’s issue is themed, focusing on Modern Coordination Chemistry to celebrate Professor Annie K Powell’s 60th birthday.

This issue of over 40 reports highlights emerging trends in modern coordination chemistry and serves to reflect the many diverse areas where Annie’s work has impacted upon the field of inorganic chemistry, including molecular magnetism, theoretical modelling, structure, spectroscopy, bioinorganic and supramolecular chemistry. To find out more about Annie, and the collection as a whole, read the Editorial from the guest editors of this issue: George E. Kostakis and 

 

Modern Coordination Chemistry, Dalton Transactions Guest Editors George E. Kostakis, Sally Brooker

 

Read the full issue here

 

Browse selected articles:

Metal-supported and -assisted stereoselective cooperative photoredox catalysis
Jasmin Busch, Daniel M. Knoll, Christoph Zippel, Stefan Bräse and Claudia Bizzarri
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 15338-15357
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT02094B, Perspective

Recent developments in single-molecule toroics
Xiao-Lei Lia and Jinkui Tang
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 15358-15370
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT02113B, Perspective

Magnetic anisotropy in trigonal planar Fe(ii) bis(trimethylsilyl)amido complexes of the type [Fe{N(SiMe3)2}2L]—experiment and theory
Tilmann Bodenstein and Andreas Eichhöfer
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 15699-15712
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT01702J, Paper

Highly soluble fluorine containing Cu(i) AlkylPyrPhos TADF complexes
Jasmin M. Busch, Daniel M. Zink, Patrick Di Martino-Fumo, Florian R. Rehak, Pit Boden, Sophie Steiger, Olaf Fuhr, Martin Nieger, Wim Klopper, Markus Gerhards and Stefan Bräse
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 15687-15698
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT02447F, Paper

Correlating magnetic anisotropy with [Mo(CN)7]4− geometry of MnII–MoIII magnetic frameworks
Michał Magott, Kim R. Dunbar and Dawid Pinkowicz
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 15493-15500
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT02164G, Paper

High relaxation barrier in neodymium furoate-based field-induced SMMs
E. Bartolomé, A. Arauzo, J. Luzón, S. Melnic, S. Shova, D. Prodius, I. C. Nlebedim, F. Bartolomé and J. Bartolomé
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 15386-15396
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT02047K, Paper

Phosphine-functionalised tris(pyrazolyl)methane ligands and their mono- and heterobimetallic complexes
Hanna E. Wagner, Silvia Hohnstein, Max G. Schußmann, Lukas A. Steppe and Frank Breher
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 15397-15407
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT02057H, Paper

Dalton Transactions, Royal Society of Chemistry

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Nitrogen Ligands web collection

Dalton Transactions, Royal Society of Chemistry

 

Dalton Transactions published a web collection this week guest-edited by Armando Pombeiro which focusses on the various roles of nitrogen ligands in modern chemistry and pays tribute to the 150th anniversary of the development of the periodic table. This collection of over 40 reports, demonstrates the versatility of nitrogen ligands and their complexes across a range of chemical specialisms. As evidenced by the number and diversity of the contributions to this collection, nitrogen ligand chemistry continues to gather great interest and there is vast and exciting scope for the future use of nitrogen ligands across a wide diversity of fields.

 

Visit the full collection

 

Browse a selection of articles below:

Chelate rings of different sizes with non-innocent ligands
Wolfgang Kaim
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 8521-8529
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT01411J, Perspective

Effect of substituents on molybdenum triiodide complexes bearing PNP-type pincer ligands toward catalytic nitrogen fixation
Takayuki Itabashi, Ikki Mori, Kazuya Arashiba, Aya Eizawa, Kazunari Nakajima and Yoshiaki Nishibayashi
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 3182-3186
DOI: 10.1039/C8DT04975K, Communication

Structural and magnetic characterization of Ni(II), Co(II), and Fe(II) binuclear complexes on a bis(pyridyl-triazolyl)alkane basis
Alexey Gusev, Ivan Nemec, Radovan Herchel, Irina Riush, Ján Titiš, Roman Boča, Konstantin Lyssenko, Mikhail Kiskin, Igor Eremenkoef and Wolfgang Linert
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 10526-10536
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT01391A, Paper

Novel latonduine derived proligands and their copper(II) complexes show cytotoxicity in the nanomolar range in human colon adenocarcinoma cells and in vitro cancer selectivity
Felix Bacher, Christopher Wittmann, Márta Nové, Gabriella Spengler, Małgorzata A. Marć, Eva A. Enyedy, Denisa Darvasiová, Peter Rapta, Thomas Reiner and Vladimir B. Arion
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 10464-10478
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT01238A, Paper

 

Submit your work to Dalton Transactions– Check our website for handy tips and guidelines or find out more about the benefits of publishing with the Royal Society of Chemistry.

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The central role of the d-block metals in the periodic table

As part of the celebrations for the International Year of the Periodic Table , Dalton Tansactions reccently published a themed issue looking at the central role of the d-block materials.

Guest Edited by Catherine E. Housecroft, Christine M. Thomas and Mi Hee Lim, this collection of reports and perspectives highlights the important role that d-block metals play in sustainable energy, catalysis, diagnostics and medicine, and chemical education.

The central role of the d-block metals in the periodic table by Catherine E Housecroft, Christine M Thomas and Mi Hee Lim, Royal Society of Chemistry Dalton Transactions

You can find a selection of the articles below and check out the full collection online here:

 

Evolution and understanding of the d-block elements in the periodic table
Edwin C. Constable
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 9408-9421
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT00765B, Perspective

A look at periodic trends in d-block molecular electrocatalysts for CO2 reduction
Changcheng Jiang, Asa W. Nichols and Charles W. Machan
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 9454-9468
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT00491B, Perspective

Structure and reactivity of the first-row d-block metal-superoxo complexes
Shunichi Fukuzumi, Yong-Min Lee and Wonwoo Nam
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 9469-9489
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT01402K, Perspective

A d10 Ag(I) amine–borane σ-complex and comparison with a d8 Rh(I) analogue: structures on the η1 to η2:η2 continuum
Alice Johnson, Antonio J. Martínez-Martínez, Stuart A. Macgregor and Andrew S. Weller
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 9776-9781
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT00971J, Paper

Cobalt-based molecular electrocatalysis of nitrile reduction: evolving sustainability beyond hydrogen
Simon N. Child, Radoslav Raychev, Nathan Moss, Benjamin Howchen, Peter N. Horton, Christopher C. Prior, Vasily S. Oganesyan and John Fielden
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 9576-9580
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT00773C, Communication

Coordination design of cadmium ions at the 4-fold axis channel of the apo-ferritin cage
Satoshi Abe, Nozomi Ito, Basudev Maity, Chenlin Lu, Diannan Lu and Takafumi Ueno
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 9759-9764
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT00609E, Paper
Dalton Transactions, Royal Society of Chemistry

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New Talent: Asia-Pacific, 2019

Have you read our latest New Talent: Asia-Pacific collection

 

Guest-edited by Vadapalli Chandrasekhar, Guo-Xin Jin and Paul J. Low, this themed collection provides an opportunity for emerging talent in the Asia-Pacific region to showcase research and developing interests relevant to the scope of Dalton Transactions. In doing so, it features a broad spectrum of activity in inorganic chemistry, from biological systems to the solid-state, reflecting the strength, diversity and potential of ‘Generation Next’ researchers from across this part of the globe.

 

Vadapalli Chandrasekhar, Guo-Xin Jin, Paul Low, New Talent: Asia-Pacific 2019 Dalton Transactions, Royal Society of Chemistry

 

Read the full collection online here or browse a selection of articles below:

 

Recent advances in self-assembled amidinium and guanidinium frameworks
Nicholas G. White
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 7062-7068
DOI: 10.1039/C8DT05030A, Frontier

Synthesis of Bi3TaO7–Bi4TaO8Br composites in ambient air and their high photocatalytic activity upon metal loading
Kaustav Chatterjee, Maqsuma Banoo, Sanjit Mondal, Lipipuspa Sahoo and Ujjal K. Gautam
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 7110-7116
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT00068B, Communication

Emerging chemical tools and techniques for tracking biological manganese
Sayani Das, Kaustav Khatua, Ananya Rakshit, Asuncion Carmona, Anindita Sarkar, Subha Bakthavatsalam, Richard Ortega and Ankona Datta
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 7047-7061
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT00508K, Frontier

Dinuclear ruthenium acetylide complexes with diethynylated anthrahydroquinone and anthraquinone frameworks: a multi-stimuli-responsive organometallic switch
Yousuke Oyama, Reo Kawano, Yuya Tanaka and Munetaka Akita
Dalton Trans., 2019, 48, 7432-7441
DOI: 10.1039/C9DT01255A, Paper

 

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Call for papers: 2017 themed issue

We are delighted to announce a new Dalton Transactions themed issue to be published in 2017:

Frontiers in Radionuclide Imaging and Therapy, “A chemical journey from naturally radioactive elements to targeted theranostic agents” Guest Editors: Professors Angela Casini (Cardiff University), João D. G. Correia (Universidade de Lisboa) and Chris Orvig (University of British Columbia). Deadline: 19th May 2017

Does your research fit into this subject area? If so, we would welcome your contribution. For further details on issue scope and on how to submit, see below:

How to submit

All types of manuscript – communications, full papers, frontiers and perspectives, will be considered for publication. The manuscript should be prepared according to our article guidelines and submitted via our online system.

All manuscripts will be subject to normal peer review and inclusion in the themed issue will be at the discretion of the Guest Editors. Please indicate in your submission the themed issue you would like to be considered for.

Issue scope

This special issue of Dalton Transactions will highlight emerging trends in the use of radionuclides, namely radiometals, for molecular imaging and systemic radiotherapy. It intends to cover all aspects of the use of radionuclides in biomedical/clinical applications, including:

  • Updates on the chemistry of d- (e.g. Tc and Re) and f-elements, namely actinides and lanthanides (e.g. Lu and Ho), and their applications in molecular imaging and targeted radionuclide therapy. Metal-based complexes such as those with Ru, Ir or Au may also be included as targeted chemical probes for imaging in biological systems (e.g. cells).
  • Multimodal imaging agents with at least one modality being radioactive (e.g. PET- or SPECT-MRI probes; Pet- or SPECT- optical imaging, etc.).
  • Radiometal-containing nanoparticles for application in cancer theranostics; image-guided drug delivery in vivo.
  • Production and application of alpha emitters (e.g. 212Pb, 213Bi, 223Ra or 211At); new trends and applications.
  • Isotopes that are only beginning to become available (by generators, rather than made in cyclotrons or nuclear reactors), such as 68Ga or 213Bi (for alpha therapy).
  • Use of “new” or “so far neglected” radioisotopes of the f elements (Lanthanides) for medicinal applications.

Considering the multidisciplinary nature of the topics mentioned, contributions from frontier subjects are welcome. As regards the clinical applications of the above mentioned molecular compounds and nanoparticles, translational aspects should also be addressed in this special issue in addition to chemical design. Thus, contributions related to pharmacological and clinical studies are also welcome.

Interested in submitting a paper? Please contact us (Dalton-RSC@rsc.org) for more information.

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Malcolm Green FRS: In celebration of his 80th Birthday

This collection of articles is dedicated to Professor Malcolm L. H. Green on the occasion of his 80th birthday.  Malcolm was born in Eastleigh, Hampshire, on the 16th of April, 1936. He received his B. Sc. (Hons) in 1956 from the University of London (Acton Technical College) and his Ph. D. in 1959 from Imperial College of Science and Technology, where he studied under Professor Sir Geoffrey Wilkinson. Following Imperial College, Malcolm moved to Cambridge University in 1960, and finally to Oxford University in 1963, where he was appointed University Lecturer and Septcentenary Fellow in Inorganic Chemistry at Balliol College.  On the 2nd of January 1965, he married Jennifer Green (née Bilham), with whom he has also enjoyed a long time scientific collaboration.  Malcolm became a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1985 and was appointed Statutory Professor and Head of the Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory and Professorial Fellow of St. Catherine’s College in 1989.  He became a research active Emeritus Professor in 2003 and continues to publish to this day.

Professor Malcolm L. H. Green

Malcolm’s contributions to inorganic chemistry are numerous and varied.  His first publication, which bears the title “Bis‑cyclopentadienylrhenium hydride”,  appeared in 1958 and was based on his Ph. D. thesis which was entitled “A study of some transition metal hydrides and olefin complexes.”  To date, he has published more than 600 papers describing synthetic, structural, and mechanistic aspects of the chemistry of virtually every transition element.  In order to give the reader a flavour of the research that Malcolm has performed, the present collection provides a selection of his papers that have been published in journals of the Royal Society of Chemistry over a period of more than fifty years.  For example, these papers show how Malcolm’s research popularized the now ubiquitous molybdenocene and tungstenocene systems which provided evidence for alpha‑ and beta‑hydrogen migratory insertion reactions, and also early examples of C–H bond activation.

Malcolm is well known for his synthetic achievements, an important aspect of which was his development of multigram-scale metal vapour synthesis, in which metals are vapourized and condensed with a reactive ligand.  This technique allowed him to obtain molecules such as dibenzene titanium, zirconium and hafnium, the first zerovalent compounds of these elements.  Likewise, Malcolm also employed metal vapour synthesis to isolate Mo(PMe3)6, a highly reactive electron-rich molecule.

His discovery that the simple molecule (dmpe)TiCl3(CH2CH3) exhibits a direct bonding interaction between the titanium and the β‑C‑H moiety, an interaction which he named agostic, must be regarded as one of the most important discoveries in the field of organometallic chemistry.  Furthermore, in terms of mechanistic studies, Malcolm proposed a mechanism for the stereospecific Ziegler-Natta polymerization of olefins (the so-called Green-Rooney mechanism) and also, together with Mingos and Davies, formulated a series of rules to predict the stereospecificity of nucleophilic addition to p-coordinated ligands attached to a transition metal.

While Malcolm is best known for molecular chemistry, he also developed the field of organometallic solid state chemistry, which included the first example of an organometallic compound with a large second order non-linear optical behaviour, and many examples of organometallic intercalation compounds.

Malcolm’s reasearch has not been restricted to organometallic chemistry.  For example, in his later years, he focused much effort into developing the foundational chemistry of C60 and carbon nanotubes.  His research in heterogenous catalysis, in which he discovered an excellent metal carbide catalyst for the Fischer-Tropsch conversion of synthesis gas to hydrocarbons, also resulted in the creation of the Oxford Catalysts Group (subsequently Velocys), of which he is a co-founder.

Finally, it is important to note that Malcolm has contributed much to the community by his development of a new approach for classifying covalent compounds, namely the Covalent Bond Classification (CBC) method.  This approach, which offers considerable advantages over that employing oxidation states, has now been widely adopted, to the extent that it is also used in describing materials chemistry.

Not surprisingly, his research has been widely recognized by numerous awards, some of which include:  The Royal Society of Chemistry Corday‑Morgan Medal and Prize in Inorganic Chemistry (1974); the Chemistry Society Medal in Transition Metal Chemistry (1978); the Royal Society of Chemistry Tilden Lectureship and Prize (1982); The J. C. Bailar Lecture and Medal, University of Illinois (1983); the American Chemical Society Award in Inorganic Chemistry (1984); the Royal Society of Chemistry Medal in Organometallic Chemistry (1986); the Royal Society of Chemistry Sir Edward Frankland Prize (1989); The Karl‑Ziegler Prize of the Gesellschaft Deutscher Chemiker (1992); the Davy medal of the Royal Society (1995) ; American Chemical Society award in Organometallic Chemistry (1997) and The Royal Society of Chemistry Sir Geoffrey Wilkinson Medal and Prize (2000).  Other recognitions of his work include:  University of Western Ontario, Visiting Professor (1971); Ecole de Chimie and Institute des Substances Naturalles, Paris, Visiting Professor (1972); Harvard University, A. P. Sloan Visiting Professor (1973); Pacific West Coast Lecturer in Inorganic Chemistry (1977); Sherman Fairchild Visiting Scholar at the California Institute of Technology (1981); Karl Ziegler Gastprofessor, Max Plank Institute, Mulheim (1983); Hutchinson Lectureship, University of Rochester (1983); The University Lecturer in Chemistry, University of Western Ontario (1984); Debye Lecturer, Cornell University (1985); Wuhan University, PRC, Visiting Professor (1985); Julius Stieglitz Lecturer, University of Chicago (1986); Frontiers of Science Lecturer, Texas A & M University (1987); The DuPont Lecturer, Indiana University (1989/90); The Ida Beam Lecturer, University of Iowa (1990); The Glenn T. Seaborg Lecturer in Inorganic Chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley (1991); The South‑East Lecturer in Inorganic Chemistry, USA (1991); The Walter Heiber Gastprofessor, University of Munich (1991); The Pacific Coast Lecturer (1994); The Rayson Huang Visiting Lecturer, Hong Kong (1995); The A. D. Little Lecturer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1995); The Stauffer Lecturer, University of Southern California (1996); the Dow Lecturer at the University of Ottowa (1996); and the James Walker Memorial Lecture, University of Edinburgh (1996); Doutor Honoris Causa, University of Lisbon, Portugal (1997); The Frank Dyer Medal, University of New South Wales (1997); The Fred Basolo Medal and Lecture., Northwestern University (1998); Ernest H. Swift Lectureship, California Institute of Technology (1998); Lewis Lecture, Cambridge UK (2001); FMC Lecturer, Princeton (2001); Distinguished Visiting Professor, Hong Kong University (2002);  Eastman Company Distinguished Lecturer in Inorganic Chemistry, University of North Carolina (2002); 34th Camille and Henry Dreyfus Lecturer, Dartmouth College (2002); Raymond Siedle Lecturer, Indiana University (2004); Bert Vallee Visiting Professor at Harvard University (2004); Falk-Plaut Lecturer, Columbia University, New York (2006); Prix Franco-Briitannique, Societé,  Francaise de Chemie (2007); and, most recently, the European Prize for Organometallic Chemistry (2015).

The breadth and originality of Malcolm’s work collected here underscores his fearless and often iconoclastic approach to chemistry. Armed with his pipe and cigarette lighter (essential for checking  new products in the lab) Malcolm infected new students with his enthusiastic approach by asking them to prepare starting materials on big scales, whether it was 3 moles of trimethylphosphine, a kilogram of molybdenum pentachloride, or more than 100 grams of  tungstenocene dihydride.  Many students encountered some of his more ambitious ideas in the King’s Arms, where original experiments and apparatus were dreamed up on the back of a beer mat.  Malcolm’s seminars became legendary for the anthropomorphism of his chemical intuition, where both mechanism and apparatus were often described in mime.  Every student of Malcolm went away not only with a broad training in inorganic chemistry, from organometallic to solid state, but also with a wealth of often hilarious stories from their time in the group.

In closing, Malcolm has been at the forefront of organometallic chemistry for more than a half-century and we hope that this collection serves as a simple means to highlight some of his significant achievements.

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Professor Kenneth Wade, F.R.S. 13th October 1932–16th March 2014

This themed collection of articles in Dalton Transactions is dedicated to Ken Wade, who very unexpectedly passed away on 16th March 2014.  While this sad loss is the reason for this commemoration, it is an honour for me to write this preface.

I had the pleasure and privilege of getting to know Ken personally during my student days at Durham, a relationship that continued when, much more recently, I became a colleague in the same Department.

I first met Ken when, as a second year undergraduate, he introduced us to aspects of structure and bonding.  Only after looking up the subject in the textbooks, did I realise that the relationships he was describing were in fact ‘Wade’s rules’.

It is a vivid reflection of Ken’s humble and self-effacing character that he himself only ever referred to these rules as polyhedral skeletal electron pair theory (PSEPT) or even occasionally during his lectures or in discussions as “Blogg’s Rules”!

Ken’s pioneering work exploring and explaining the structures of deceivingly unrelated clusters and ring systems, which developed primarily as a result of his insightfulness, logical thinking and intuition, now means that his name is familiar to every inorganic chemist, from undergraduate student to senior research professor.

This work lead to the formalised relationship between structure and electron counting in polyhedral cluster systems: relationships that are known universally as Wade’s Rules (J. Chem. Soc. D, 1971, 792).

This set of deceptively simple rules has been developed and expanded into what are known today as the Wade-Mingos Rules, which continue to be taught to chemistry students worldwide as a fundamental tool of Inorganic Chemistry.

Ken’s research career started in 1954 when he began his Ph.D. at the University of Nottingham with Norman Greenwood, probing the addition compounds of gallium and boron trichlorides.  This was followed by two postdoctoral positions: first at Cambridge with Harry Emeléus, working on “assorted reactions of diborane”, and second, at Cornell University with Albert Laubengayer, where he investigated various aspects of organonitrogen-aluminium chemistry.

In 1960, Ken returned to the UK to take up his first independent academic position as a lecturer at Derby College of Technology, before moving north to take up a lectureship at the University of Durham a year later, where his interests in synthetic main group chemistry continued to expand.

Although universally known for his electron counting rules, Ken’s innovative and creative character also led him to be major contributor to the areas of azomethine, lithium amide, organophosphorus, transition metal and organolithium chemistry, to name but a few.  Ken officially retired in 1997 and, for the sixteen years leading up to his untimely passing, he remained in the Department holding an Emeritus chair of Inorganic Chemistry.

Throughout his sixty-year research career Ken maintained a tireless enthusiasm and curiosity for chemistry, teaching, writing books and original papers, reviewing articles, attending chemistry meetings, and giving invited lectures around the world.  Ken’s numerous contributions to the broad field of chemistry were recognised by his election to Fellow of the Royal Society in 1989, and by his election to President of the Dalton Division of The Royal Society of Chemistry in 1996.

On top of all these achievements, Ken’s enormous abilities as a teacher and leader must not be forgotten.  His lectures were always inspiring, and were characterised by being both simple and clear, while delivering a broad spectrum of inorganic chemistry topics.

Every lecture was punctuated by anecdotes and amusing stories – who can forget the colour-blind English spy in Russia – and always demonstrated Ken’s ability for clear, logical thinking, something he continually encouraged and inspired in others, be it through undergraduate tutorials, questions after seminars, or chats in the corridor or around the whiteboard.

This themed collection of papers of 60 papers in Dalton Transactions covers a wide and diverse spectrum of topics spanning inorganic chemistry, something that very clearly demonstrates Ken’s significant and wide-ranging contributions to inorganic chemistry in its broadest context.

The rapidity with which all of the invited authors agreed to contribute their work to this special collection of articles unmistakeably reflects the great esteem and friendship with which Ken was held, and provides a fitting tribute to the man himself, his huge role as a teacher and mentor, and his important and extensive contributions to chemistry…  Without a doubt, Ken is very sorely missed.

Philip W. Dyer
Department of Chemistry
Durham University, UK

(Left – cover art for the themed collection kindly provided by Professor Jeremy Rawson, University of Windsor. It features the an image of seminal ChemComm paper from 1971 – click to zoom)

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