Archive for the ‘Chemistry World articles’ Category

And the time of death was?

Graphical AbstractScientists in Portugal have developed a tool to calculate the post-mortem interval (PMI) or ‘time of death’ of a cadaver from a blood sample.

Monitoring changes in body temperature, as well as the stages of rigor mortis are among the traditional methods currently used to estimate the PMI. But environmental fluctuations, such as temperature, can impact the rate at which these changes occur, reducing their reliability.

Read the full article in Chemistry World >>>


Promising blood-derived biomarkers for estimation of the postmortem interval
Isabel Costa, Félix Carvalho, Teresa Magalhães, Paula Guedes de Pinho, Ricardo Silvestre and Ricardo Jorge Dinis-Oliveira
Toxicol. Res., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C5TX00209E, Paper

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Safer blood clotting agents for open wounds

New toxicity results show that foams would be safer than the currently used clays as materials to stem blood flow in open wounds.

Blood loss is one of the leading causes of death in both military and civilian casualties. Currently, aluminosilicate layered clays, such as kaolin clay, are used as haemostatic agents (agents that encourage the blood to clot) in dressings to prevent fatalities. These clays have varying degrees of cytotoxicity and can be difficult to remove from wounds, which can lead to thrombosis. Recently, one clay product has been removed from use for this reason.

Haemostatic agents are added to wound dressings to encourage the blood to clot

Now, scientists in Singapore and the US, led by Daniele Zink from the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology in Singapore and Galen Stucky from the University of California, Santa Barbara, have found, using in vitro tests, that a silica mesocellular foam (MCF-26) is 1–2 orders of magnitude less toxic to human cells than the clays, whereas its potency in promoting blood clotting is similar.

‘MCF-26 would be effective and safer than currently used haemostatic agents,’ says Zink. She adds that the clay particles in their tests to compare the two materials adhered to cell surfaces and were taken up into the cells’ cytoplasm. The MCF-26 was not taken up and was easy to remove.

Read the full story in Chemistry World

And read the Toxicology Research paper, for free here:

Cytotoxicity and potency of mesocellular foam-26 in comparison to layered clays used as hemostatic agents
Yao Li, April M. Sawvel, Young-Si Jun, Sara Nownes, Ming Ni, Damien Kudela, Galen D. Stucky and Daniele Zink
DOI: 10.1039/C2TX20065A

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