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Were you a winner at the SOT meeting?

Thanks to everyone who visited our booth last week at the Society of Toxicology Meeting in Phoenix – it was great to meet you!

We had a range of toxicology resources on display, including Toxicology Research and our Issues in Toxicology book series.

Congratulations to Lawrence Kennedy (United States Naval Academy), the lucky winner of our prize draw.

Please stay in touch

All competition entrants are now signed up to the Toxicology Research table of contents e-alert.

Sign up to stay in touch with other books and journals relevant to your field.

Also of interest

Subscribe to Toxicology Research for just £50

£50* – that’s all it costs Royal Society of Chemistry members to subscribe to Toxicology Research online in 2014.

If you want to stay up-to-date with all the latest research in the toxicology field, don’t miss out on what Toxicology Research has to offer – join the world’s leading chemical science community and make the most of this special members’ rate.

* VAT at 20% will be added to subscriptions from EU members, making the total price £60.

Forthcoming new books in the Issues in Toxicology series

Heavy Metals In Water: Presence, Removal and Safety
Edited by Sanjay Sharma

Histological Techniques: An Introduction for Beginners in Toxicology
Robert Maynard, Noel Downes and Brenda Finney

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Countdown to SOT 2014 – an article collection

Are you going to the Society of Toxicology meeting in Phoenix this month?

We are!

Why not drop by our booth (booth 1540) and see Marie Cote, Deputy Editor for Toxicology Research. Ask her questions and take a look at our resources to support you.

With less than 2 weeks until the meeting, to mark our presence at the meeting and the countdown to it starting we have made a selection of our articles free to access until 27 March.



Safety biomarkers for drug-induced liver injury – current status and future perspectives
Daniel J. Antoine, Alison H. Harrill, Paul B. Watkins and B. Kevin Park
DOI: 10.1039/C3TX50077B, Review Article; Download PDF

The role of chemistry in developing understanding of adverse outcome pathways and their application in risk assessment
Steve Gutsell and Paul Russell
DOI: 10.1039/C3TX50024A, Review Article; Download PDF

The mutagenic effects of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b] pyridine in Muta™Mouse colon is attenuated by resveratrol
Antony Boyce, Rhiannon M. David and Nigel J. Gooderham
DOI: 10.1039/C4TX00007B, Paper; Download PDF

AhR is negatively regulated by miR-203 in response to TCDD or BaP treatment
Daochuan Li, Caixia Liu, Haohui Yu, Xiaowen Zeng, Xiumei Xing, Liping Chen, Chen Gao, Zhengbao Zhang, Yongmei Xiao, Huawei Duan, Yuxin Zheng, Qing Wang and Wen Chen
DOI: 10.1039/C3TX50083G, Paper; Download PDF

The mechanism of immunosuppression by perfluorooctanoic acid in BALB/c mice
Yu Wang, Ling Wang, Jia Li, Yong Liang, Huan Ji, Jie Zhang, Qunfang Zhou and Guibin Jiang
DOI: 10.1039/C3TX50096A, Paper; Download PDF

A reversible model for periportal fibrosis and a refined alternative to bile duct ligation
Philip M. E. Probert, Mohammad R. Ebrahimkhani, Fiona Oakley, Jelena Mann, Alastair D. Burt, Derek A. Mann and Matthew C. Wright
DOI: 10.1039/C3TX50069A, Paper; Download PDF

Comparative cytotoxicity of cadmium forms (CdCl2, CdO, CdS micro- and nanoparticles) in renal cells
Béatrice L’Azou, Isabelle Passagne, Sandra Mounicou, Mona Tréguer-Delapierre, Igor Puljalté, Joanna Szpunar, Ryszard Lobinski and Céline Ohayon-Courtès
DOI: 10.1039/C3TX50063B, Paper; Download PDF

Bicontinuous cubic phase nanoparticle lipid chemistry affects toxicity in cultured cells
Tracey M. Hinton, Felix Grusche, Durga Acharya, Ravi Shukla, Vipul Bansal, Lynne J. Waddington, Paul Monaghan and Benjamin W. Muir
DOI: 10.1039/C3TX50075F, Paper; Download PDF

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Toxicology Research at conferences in 2014

Dr Richard Kelly, Managing Editor

Dr Marie Cote, Deputy Editor

The Toxicology Research team will be attending a number of conferences in 2014 and we would be delighted to meet you there.

We’re also the team behind Toxicology Research’s sister journals Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry, MedChemComm, and Natural Product Reports , so we’ll happily discuss your interdisciplinary research work. In fact, many of our authors choose to publish their research across all of these titles.

Here are just some of the conferences where you can meet us in the coming months:


GRC marine natural products 2-7 March Ventura, CA, USA – Meet Rich

Society of Toxicology annual meeting 23-27 March Phoenix, USA – Meet Marie

National Organic Symposium Trust 11-14 April Agra, India – Meet Rich

ISMSC-9 7-11 June Shanghai, China – Meet Marie

GRC Bioorganic Chemistry 8-13 June Proctor Academy, USA – Meet Rich

BOSS XIV 13-18 July Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium – Meet Marie

Fall ACS meeting 10-14 August San Francisco, USA – Meet Rich

Gregynog Young Chemists’ Workshop 10-12 September Gregynog, Wales – Meet Marie

EFMC-ISMC 7-10 September Lisbon, Portugal – Meet Rich

Eurotox 7-9 September Edinburgh, UK – Meet Marie

Let us know if you are planning on attending any of these meetings, as we would be happy to meet you there!

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Interviewing Frederik-Jan van Schooten, Associate Editor for Toxicology Research

Toxicology research Associate Editor Frederik-Jan van SchootenFrederik-Jan van Schooten is a Professor of Genetic Toxicology at Maastricht University Medical Centre and is the Head of Department for the Department of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology. As part of the Toxicology Research Editorial Board and one of the journal’s Associate Editors we took this opportunity to ask him a few questions:

1.         What led you to specialise in toxicology?

For the past 30 years I have been working in the field of chemical carcinogenesis and genetic toxicology. From the beginning of my scientific career it has fascinated me how chemical carcinogens induce cancer through damaging DNA and disrupting cellular control, especially how people differ in their response. The question why certain people have an increased susceptibility to chemical exposure and have an enhanced risk of getting cancer is intriguing to me. In toxicology it all comes together; chemical structures, biochemistry, biology, individual susceptibility for disease, and of course how to implement all this knowledge into assessing risks and onto policy making.

2.         What do you think are the most important developments in the field of toxicology at the moment?

Toxicology has grown into a real multidisciplinary discipline. It is not anymore describing phenomena by, for instance, treating animals with a chemical carcinogen and then counting the number of tumours that ultimately arise. Nowadays it is strongly orientated towards molecular mechanisms behind chemical exposures leading to disease by making use of state of the art technologies such as genomics, proteomics and metabolomics. Next to that is the emerging arena of the exposome that is the analytical challenge to judge a person’s lifetime exposure. An important development is the importance of knowing at what time during life we are exposed and especially the prenatal exposure window is increasingly becoming of interest via epigenetic imprinting. The following quote is still inspiring me: “What is it that is not a poison? All things are poisons and nothing is without poison. It is the dose only that makes a thing not a poison.” Who said this a long time ago? Right; Paracelsus, 1493-1541.

3.         How do you envisage toxicology research developing in the future?

Toxicology is developing into a real important and modern field of science that is highly relevant for society. It integrates all modern insights in science and the gained knowledge is increasingly important for an array of societal applications including refinement of risk assessment, replacement of animals in chemical testing and also applications in translational medicine by judging side effects of therapeutics.

4.         You’re one of the Associate Editors for Toxicology Research. What excites you most about your new role?

To say it bluntly, it is my desire to help to make Toxicology Research one of the leading journals dealing with chemical exposures and its effects in ecosystems to humans. I think that science should not be restricted to certain disciplines and that we can learn when crossing borders. And that we should use our imagination and creativity as much as possible to find solutions for the global environmental and societal problems we are facing. I am very proud to be part of a team that has the ambition to go beyond our self-imposed boundaries. Therefore I encourage the scientists to let loose their creativity and submit these papers to this inter-disciplinary journal.

5.         What advice would you give to the students who will be the next generation of scientists?

Research is very exciting. When I was a PhD student I remember how I biked to work in the morning, wondering what my experiment in the lab that night had done. I know that students first have to study hard to gain knowledge before becoming a scientist and sometimes this can be boring. But I advise them to push through because science is so exciting. Once a scientist, many times during the course of their experiments they may face troubles but it is very rewarding when the expectations come true. So, don’t give up because we need young and gifted people.

6.         If you weren’t a scientist, what would you be?

If possible something in a creative direction; perhaps an artist or actor. However I cannot imagine not being in science.

If you would like to submit an article to Toxicology Research, to be handled by Frederik-Jan, you can do so here on our submissions platform.

Don’t forget to follow us on Twitter and to sign up for our Table of Content Alerts & Newsletter.

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Review: Mechanisms of lead and manganese neurotoxicity

It has been shown that exposure to high levels of lead and manganese in both children and adults can cause cognitive and behavioural deficits. While both metals having distinct neurological effects, each with different brain targets and modes of action, they do share a key similarity in that they both disrupt synaptic transmission.

In this review Tomas R. Guilarte and April P. Neal summarise the toxicokinetics of lead and manganese; describing their neurotoxic mechanisms and discussing the commonalities in their neurotoxicity.

Mechanisms of lead and manganese neurotoxicity
April P. Neal and Tomas R. Guilarte
DOI: 10.1039/C2TX20064C

Fancy writing a review article?  Have a topic in mind that will benefit the community? Send us your suggestions!

Do you want to get involved in Toxicology Research?

  • Submit your latest research
  • Sign up for the contents alerts and newsletter – keep up to date with the latest research published in  the journal
  • All articles published in 2012 and 2013 are free to access. Arrange for your free access by simply  filling in this short online registration form
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Toxicology Research issue 1, 2013, available online now!

The first issue of Toxicology Research for 2013 has arrived!

In this issue we have: An editorial from Nigel Gooderham, Editor in Chief and Richard Kelly, Managing Editor, looking back on 2012 and looking forward to 2013.

3 reviews:
S-Methyl-L-cysteine sulphoxide: the Cinderella phytochemical?

William M. B. Edmands, Nigel J. Gooderham, Elaine Holmes and Stephen C. Mitchell

In vitro models for liver toxicity testing
Valerie Y. Soldatow, Edward L. LeCluyse, Linda G. Griffith and Ivan Rusyn

Novel in vitro and mathematical models for the prediction of chemical toxicity
Dominic P. Williams et al.

3 Papers:

Triclosan interferes with the thyroid axis in the zebrafish (Danio rerio)
Patrícia I. S. Pinto, Eduarda M. Guerreiro and Deborah M. Power

Assessing confidence in predictions made by knowledge-based systems
Philip N. Judson, Susanne A. Stalford and Jonathan Vessey

Adult human exocrine pancreas differentiation to hepatocytes – potential source of a human hepatocyte progenitor for use in toxicology research
Matthew C. Wright et al.

Read all of these articles for free today.

Like what you read?

Submit your work to Toxicology Research now.

Ensure you keep up to date with the latest research published in the journal: sign up for the contents alerts and newsletter.

All articles published in 2012 and 2013 are free to access.

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Safer blood clotting agents for open wounds

New toxicity results show that foams would be safer than the currently used clays as materials to stem blood flow in open wounds.

Blood loss is one of the leading causes of death in both military and civilian casualties. Currently, aluminosilicate layered clays, such as kaolin clay, are used as haemostatic agents (agents that encourage the blood to clot) in dressings to prevent fatalities. These clays have varying degrees of cytotoxicity and can be difficult to remove from wounds, which can lead to thrombosis. Recently, one clay product has been removed from use for this reason.

Haemostatic agents are added to wound dressings to encourage the blood to clot

Now, scientists in Singapore and the US, led by Daniele Zink from the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology in Singapore and Galen Stucky from the University of California, Santa Barbara, have found, using in vitro tests, that a silica mesocellular foam (MCF-26) is 1–2 orders of magnitude less toxic to human cells than the clays, whereas its potency in promoting blood clotting is similar.

‘MCF-26 would be effective and safer than currently used haemostatic agents,’ says Zink. She adds that the clay particles in their tests to compare the two materials adhered to cell surfaces and were taken up into the cells’ cytoplasm. The MCF-26 was not taken up and was easy to remove.

Read the full story in Chemistry World

And read the Toxicology Research paper, for free here:

Cytotoxicity and potency of mesocellular foam-26 in comparison to layered clays used as hemostatic agents
Yao Li, April M. Sawvel, Young-Si Jun, Sara Nownes, Ming Ni, Damien Kudela, Galen D. Stucky and Daniele Zink
DOI: 10.1039/C2TX20065A

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In vitro models for liver toxicity testing

In this review Ivan Rusyn, University of North Carolina, and co-workers present an overview of various traditional and novel liver-derived in vitro systems for hepatotoxicity testing. Examples of such systems include:

  • Primary hepatocytes cultures,
  • Immortalized cell lines,
  • Co-cultures of hepatocytes with liver non-parenchymal cells,
  • Bioartificial livers.

Rusyn et al. discuss the benefits and disadvantages associated with using traditional in vitro systems whilst also examining the usefulness of the novel in vitro liver models for toxicity testing.

Want to know more? Read the entire review for free….

In vitro models for liver toxicity testing
Valerie Y. Soldatow, Edward L. LeCluyse, Linda G. Griffith and Ivan Rusyn
DOI: 10.1039/C2TX20051A

Interested in liver toxicology? You may also be interested in these related articles:

Role of innate and adaptive immunity during drug-induced liver injury

Novel in vitro and mathematical models for the prediction of chemical toxicity

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Using transcriptomics to detect genotoxic and non-genotoxic renal carcinogens

Currently there is no in vitro system for the reliable detection of non-genotoxic carcinogens and the tests currently available for the detection of genotoxic carcinogens can have a low specificity. As such there is a need for the development of quick, cheap, sensitive and specific methods to detect the carcinogenic potential of chemicals.

In this paper Katarzyna M. Bloch (Liverpool John Moores University) and colleagues use toxicogenomics and NRK-52E cell lines to try and develop an in vitro system in renal cells to detect the carcinogenic potential of chemicals to the kidney.

Interested? Read the paper for free…

Detection of genotoxic and non-genotoxic renal carcinogens in vitro in NRK-52E cells using a transcriptomics approach
Katarzyna M. Bloch, Noreen Yaqoob, Andrew Evans, Robert Radford, Paul Jennings, Jan J. W. A Boei, Tara McMorrow, Craig Slattery, Michael P. Ryan, Hans Gmuender, Joost H. M. van Delft and Edward A. Lock
DOI: 10.1039/C2TX20023F

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