Congratulations to BTS Congress Poster Prize Winner

Heather Wallace presents Nathan Goldsmith with his award.

The BTS Annual Congress was held in Newcastle on April 16-18th. Toxicology Research was honoured to sponsor one of the poster prizes of the congress, which was presented at the Congress Dinner.

The winner was Mr Nathan Goldsmith, Public Health England. His poster was titled “The presence of tobacco specific nitrosamines in the urine and saliva of cigarette users transitioning to electronic cigarettes“.

His award was presented by the Editor-in-Chief of Toxicology Research, Professor Heather Wallace. Congratulations to Nathan!

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Will you be at the BTS Annual Congress in Newcastle?

Will you be at the BTS Annual Congress in Newcastle, April 16-17, in Newcastle, UK?

The BTS Annual Congress 2018 programme has a strong speaker line-up this year which hopes to draw in excess of 250 delegates, all key members within the field of toxicology. Toxicology Research will be sponsoring two student poster prizes, so best of luck!

In addition, I will be giving a presentation on Tuesday Apr 17, 12-12:30 pm, on ‘How to get Published’, please do join me as I offer some valuable insight into the world of science publishing along with some editors top tips.

Rebecca Brodie

Rebecca Brodie, Deputy Editor, Toxicology Research

Please feel free to get in touch with me before the conference to arrange a meeting: toxres-rsc@rsc.org

I look forward to meeting you in Newcastle!

Toxicology Research
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Outstanding Reviewers for Toxicology Research in 2017

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Toxicology Research in 2017, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

 

Provost Martin Philbert, University of Michigan

Dr. William Pennie, Takeda Pharmaceuticals International Inc., ORCID: 0000-0002-8990-9143

Dr. Andy Smith, University of Leicester

Dr. Bechan Sharma, University of Allahabad, ORCID: 0000-0002-7835-9406

Dr. Jia-Han Li, Wuhan University

Dr. Manuella Batista-de-Oliveira Hornsby, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, ORCID: 0000-0003-2749-5923

Dr. Mingqing Chen, Central China Normal University

Dr. Hizlan H. Agus, Istanbul Yeni Yuzyil University , ORCID: 0000-0002-0252-9501

Professor Heather Wallace, University of Aberdeen, ORCID: 0000-0003-2804-3304

Dr. Ayhan Filazi, Ankara University Faculty of Veterinary Medicine

 

We would also like to thank the Toxicology Research board and the toxicology community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé. You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

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The Drug Metabolism Group 2.0

The recent article in Toxicology Research: “Paracetamol Metabolism, Hepatotoxicity, Biomarkers and Therapeutic Interventions: A Perspective”, draws together contributions from expert toxicologists made at the Drug Metabolism Group (DMG) Winter Meeting 2017. Collectively, these reflections highlight some of the toxicological challenges that paracetamol – one of the most commonly used drugs worldwide – has presented.

This supplementary meeting report provides some context to, and rationale for, the main article, alongside a description of the DMG.

The DMG

The Drug Metabolism Group (DMG) was founded as a forum for UK scientists to meet and share advances in foreign compound (xenobiotic) metabolism and related areas. Following the establishment of a steering committee consisting of John Caldwell, Alan Boobis and Gerry Cohen the inaugural meeting was held at St Marys Hospital Medical School in London on the 26th of October 1977 (for a report of that first meeting see Caldwell 1977).1

From that date, the meetings of the DMG formed a regular part of the diaries of both academic and industrial scientists interested in this rapidly growing area of science. These meetings had the great virtues of being topical, open to all, and essentially free at the point of use (but with a contribution to support the provision of refreshments). Over time, longer meetings were introduced (the Stowe School Symposia), but for many it was the half day meetings at St Marys that were DMG’s pearl beyond price. However, the rise of organisations like the International Society for the study of Xenobiotics (ISSX) and the continued growth of the industrially focussed Drug Metabolism Discussion Group (DMDG) there was perhaps less need for the DMG and so, for perhaps a decade in the 21st century, the DMG became essentially inactive.

While the need for a forum for academically-focussed metabolism studies was perhaps diminished, it never went away. And, because the need still seemed to be there, it was decided to resurrect the popular short meetings of the DMG that had proved to be such a successful way of bringing the community (both academic and industrial) together to discuss the latest hot topics in xenobiotic metabolism.

The DMG 2.0

The first meeting of this rebooted DMG was held at Imperial College on Friday the 20th of February 2015, and since then has met twice a year at the same venue. Recently, in recognition of the 60th anniversary of the introduction of paracetamol (acetaminophen, N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, APAP) onto the UK market, the DMG held a symposium entitled “60 years of paracetamol: what do we really know?” The meeting was based on invited presentations covering both the unravelling of the mechanisms of toxicity of this iconic human hepatotoxin and a discussion of our current state of our knowledge on the topic. In addition, the meeting also included a number of submitted contributions and posters, many of which also had a paracetamol focus. The discussion generated at the meeting led the organizers to collate the contributions of the various invited speakers into the short article (“Paracetamol Metabolism, Hepatotoxicity, Biomarkers and Therapeutic Interventions: A Perspective”) that is published in the current issue of Toxicology Research.2 We believe that this presents a timely commentary on the state of our understanding of the toxicity of paracetamol, the potential of various candidate biomarkers to contribute to patient care and the management of overdose, and the state of our knowledge of the roles of the innate immune system and genetic factors affecting the response of individuals to paracetamol administration. Details of future meetings will be made available on the DMG website.

Acknowledgements

The authors wish to thank the speakers and participants of the meeting for their contributions and support for The Drug Metabolism Group.

Toby J Athersuch, Muireann Coen, and Ian D Wilson, Division of Computational and Systems Medicine, Imperial College London

1 J. Caldwell, Inaugural meeting of the Drug Metabolism Group, 1978, Xenobiotica, 1978, 8, 61-62.
2 T.J. Athersuch, et al. 2018, Toxicol. Res., DOI: 10.1039/C7TX00340D

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Professor Heather Wallace: New Toxicology Research Editor-in-Chief

We are delighted to announce that Heather Wallace has taken over as Editor-in-Chief of Toxicology Research.

 

Heather is the Professor of Biochemical Pharmacology and Toxicology at the University of Aberdeen. Her research interests are in cancer therapeutics and prevention, selective drug delivery and the use of biomarkers for diagnosis and monitoring efficacy of anticancer drug therapy. She co-ordinates postgraduate teaching in Clinical Pharmacology, Drug Discovery and Development and Bio-Business.

 

Heather is a Fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists and is CPD Advisor for Toxicology at the College. She is also a Fellow of the following learned Societies: British Toxicology Society, Royal Society of Chemistry, Royal Society of Biology and British Pharmacological Society. Heather is a member of the UK Register of Toxicologists and a European Registered Toxicologist (since 2006).

 

We recently had a chance to catch up with Heather to talk about her plans for the journal.

 

What are you most looking forward to in your new role as Editor-in-Chief?

I am looking forward to working with the team at the Royal Society of Chemistry and our Editorial Board to develop our Journal even further.  We have had a very promising start but we need to work hard to ensure the submissions continue to rise and that the quality of our product remains high. I particularly would like to encourage early career researchers in toxicology to submit papers to our journal.

 

What are your aims for your time as Editor-in-Chief?

My main aim is to increase our impact factor and raise the visibility of Toxicology Research. As part of that, we need the journal to be listed in PubMed. I would like the Journal to become known for its ‘state of the art’ incisive reviews as well as original high quality papers. Toxicology is a broad church and as such, the journal has wide appeal.  We need to be in a position to capture some of the breakthroughs in Toxicology Research.

 

How do we encourage the next generation of toxicologists?

By publishing great science, we can excite and enthuse the next generation of toxicologists. The Journal needs to be relevant to the broad church of toxicology. I am very keen to encourage themed issues to help those new to the field identify Toxicology Research as source of up to date information

 

Once again, we’d like to congratulate Heather on her new role and we look forward to her term as editor-in-chief.

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BTS Annual Congress 2018

The BTS Annual Congress 2018 will be held from 16th – 18th April 2018, at the Hilton Newcastle Gateshead, UK.

The British Toxicology Society was founded as a natural successor to the Toxicology Club (1971-1979).  The aim was to provide a discussion forum for scientific problems and issues related to toxicology.  The Society was constituted formally in April 1979 with 200 members.  One key role for the Society is to host the Annual Congress where toxicologists from all areas of the discipline come together to participate in learning and discuss research in toxicology.

As part of the congress, Toxicology Research Deputy Editor, Rebecca Brodie, will being giving a talk on  how to get published. This will offer valuable insight into the world of science publishing and should not be missed.

Programme Highlights

  • Full BTS Annual Congress Programme
  • Plenary Speaker – Ms Syril Petit – ILSI Health and Environmental Sciences Institute, Washington DC, USA
  • CEP – Continuing Education Programme – Immuno-oncology – safety assessment strategies
  • Symposium 1– Liver disease and environmental causes of liver disease
  • Symposium 2 – Inhalation toxicity and lung pathology (BTS/BSTP session)
  • Symposium 3 – Advanced in vitro models for inhalation toxicity testing (BTS/IVTS session)
  • Symposium 4 – Ageing, Frailty and Multi-morbidity: medical challenges, current interventions, future solutions
  • Symposium 5 – Redox and oxidative stress
  • Symposium 6 – Stem cells and toxicology testing (BTS/RSC session)
  • Paton Prize winner – Prof Lewis Smith
  • Hot Topic – Immuno-oncology toxicology – Dr Lolke de Haan
  • Early Career Presentations
  • Doctoral Student Presentations
  • Posters

Key Dates

  • Early bird registration deadline: 20th February 2018
  • Oral and poster abstract submission deadline: 1st February 2018
  • Bursary application deadline: 30th January

Register here

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Congratulations to the 8th National Congress of Toxicology Poster Prize Winners

The 8th National Congress of Toxicology, Chinese Society of Toxicology was held from 15th – 18th October, 2017, in Jinan, China. The congress is organized by Chinese Society of Toxicology (CSOT).

Toxicology Research is delighted to have sponsored poster prizes. We would like to congratulate all of the winners!

 

Poster Prize winners:

  • Junchao Duan, Capital Medical University
  • Zhenlie Huang, Guangdong Province Hospital For Occupational Disease Prevention and Treatment
  • Qinghe Meng, Peking University
  • Shumei Wang, Institute of hygiene and environmental medicine, Military Medical Science Academy
  • Lixiao Zhou, Hebei Medical University

Winners of the Toxicology Research Poster Prize

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Top 10 most downloaded articles: July – September

We are delighted to share with you the top 10 most downloaded articles in Toxicology Research  from July – September 2017. These papers are free to access for the next two weeks with a free publishing personal account – register here.

We hope you enjoy reading these highly accessed articles, and we welcome your future submissions to the journal.

Statistical evaluation of toxicological bioassays – a review
Ludwig A. Hothorn
Toxicol. Res., 2014, 3, 418-432
DOI: 10.1039/C4TX00047A

Characterization of a functional C3A liver spheroid model
Harriet Gaskell, Parveen Sharma, Helen E. Colley, Craig Murdoch, Dominic P. Williams and Steven D. Webb
Toxicol. Res., 2016, 5, 1053-1065
DOI: 10.1039/C6TX00101

Development and use of in vitro alternatives to animal testing by the pharmaceutical industry 1980–2013
Jen-Yin Goh, Richard J. Weaver, Libby Dixon, Nicola J. Platt and Ruth A. Roberts
Toxicol. Res., 2015, 4, 1297-1307
DOI: 10.1039/C5TX00123D

Proteasome inhibitors bortezomib and carfilzomib used for the treatment of multiple myeloma do not inhibit the serine protease HtrA2/Omi
Vilmos Csizmadia, Paul Hales, Christopher Tsu, Jingya Ma, Jiejin Chen, Pooja Shah, Paul Fleming, Joseph J. Senn, Vivek J. Kadambi, Larry Dick and Francis S. Wolenski
Toxicol. Res., 2016, 5, 1619-1628
DOI: 10.1039/C6TX00220J

A. R. Iskandar, B. Titz, A. Sewer, P. Leroy, T. Schneider, F. Zanetti, C. Mathis, A. Elamin, S. Frentzel, W. K. Schlage, F. Martin, N. V. Ivanov, M. C. Peitscha and J. Hoeng
Toxicol. Res., 2017,6, 631-653
DOI: 10.1039/C7TX00047B

Valerie Y. Soldatow, Edward L. LeCluyse, Linda G. Griffith and Ivan Rusyn
Toxicol. Res., 2013, 2, 23-29
DOI: 10.1039/C2TX20051A

Patricia Erebi Tawari, Zhipeng Wang, Mohammad Najlah, Chi Wai Tsang, Vinodh Kannappan, Peng Liu, Christopher McConville, Bin He, Angel L. Armesillaa and Weiguang Wang
Toxicol. Res., 2015, 4, 1439-1442
DOI: 10.1039/C5TX00210A

Effects of monoolein-based cubosome formulations on lipid droplets and mitochondria of HeLa cells
Angela Maria Falchi, Antonella Rosa, Angela Atzeri, Alessandra Incani, Sandrina Lampis, Valeria Meli, Claudia Caltagirone and Sergio Murgia
Toxicol. Res., 2015, 4, 1025-1036
DOI: 10.1039/C5TX00078E

Toxic mechanisms of microcystins in mammals
Nicole L. McLellana and Richard A. Manderville
Toxicol. Res., 2017, 6, 391-405
DOI: 10.1039/C7TX00043J

Novel in vitro and mathematical models for the prediction of chemical toxicity
Dominic P. Williams, Rebecca Shipley, Marianne J. Ellis, Steve Webb, John Ward, Iain Gardner and Stuart Creton
Toxicol. Res., 2013, 2, 40-59
DOI: 10.1039/C2TX20031G

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Introducing the newest member of the Toxicology Research Advisory Board

We are delighted to introduce you to the newest member of the Toxicology Research Advisory Board – Dr Muireann Coen from Imperial College London.

Dr Coen has recently been appointed to the Advisory Board and we welcome the knowledge and expertise she will bring to the journal. We very much look forward to working with her. Welcome to the Toxicology Research team!

 

You can keep up to date with the latest developments from Toxicology Research by signing up for free table of content alerts and monthly e-newsletters.

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10 most downloaded articles: April – June 2017

We are delighted to share with you the top 10 most downloaded articles in Toxicology Research  from April – June 2017. These papers are free to access for the next two weeks with a free publishing personal account – register here.

We hope you enjoy reading these highly accessed articles, and we welcome your future submissions to the journal.

Statistical evaluation of toxicological bioassays – a review 
Ludwig A. Hothorn
Toxicol. Res., 2014, 3, 418-432
DOI: 10.1039/C4TX00047A

Development and use of in vitro alternatives to animal testing by the pharmaceutical industry 1980–2013 
Jen-Yin Goh, Richard J. Weaver, Libby Dixon, Nicola J. Platt and Ruth A. Roberts
Toxicol. Res., 2015, 4, 1297-1307
DOI: 10.1039/C5TX00123D

Characterization of a functional C3A liver spheroid model 
Harriet Gaskell, Parveen Sharma, Helen E. Colley, Craig Murdoch, Dominic P. Williams and Steven D. Webb
Toxicol. Res., 2016, 5, 1053-1065
DOI: 10.1039/C6TX00101

Novel in vitro and mathematical models for the prediction of chemical toxicity 
Dominic P. Williams, Rebecca Shipley, Marianne J. Ellis, Steve Webb, John Ward, Iain Gardner and Stuart Creton
Toxicol. Res., 2013, 2, 40-59
DOI: 10.1039/C2TX20031G

Quantifying the pharmaceutical industry’s contribution to published 3Rs research 2002–2012
Seth Cunningham, Nicola Partridge, Nicola Platt and Ruth A. Roberts
Toxicol. Res., 2015, 4, 311-316
DOI: 10.1039/C4TX00100A

Proteasome inhibitors bortezomib and carfilzomib used for the treatment of multiple myeloma do not inhibit the serine protease HtrA2/Omi 
Vilmos Csizmadia, Paul Hales, Christopher Tsu, Jingya Ma, Jiejin Chen, Pooja Shah, Paul Fleming, Joseph J. Senn, Vivek J. Kadambi, Larry Dick and Francis S. Wolenski
Toxicol. Res., 2016, 5, 1619-1628
DOI: 10.1039/C6TX00220J

Effects of monoolein-based cubosome formulations on lipid droplets and mitochondria of HeLa cells 
Angela Maria Falchi, Antonella Rosa, Angela Atzeri, Alessandra Incani, Sandrina Lampis, Valeria Meli, Claudia Caltagirone and Sergio Murgia
Toxicol. Res., 2015, 4, 1025-1036
DOI: 10.1039/C5TX00078E

Gender specific differences in the liver proteome of rats exposed to short term and low-concentration hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) 
I. Miller, C. Diepenbroek, E. Rijntjes, J. Renaut, K. J. Teerds, C. Kwadijk, S. Cambier, A. J. Murk, A. C. Gutleb and T. Serchi
Toxicol. Res., 2016, 5, 1273-1283
DOI: 10.1039/C6TX00166A

Induction and inhibition of human cytochrome P4501 by oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons
Emma Wincent, Florane Le Bihanic and Kristian Dreij
Toxicol. Res., 2016, 5, 788-799
DOI: 10.1039/C6TX00004E

Evaluating the effects of nacre on human skin and scar cells in culture
Vipul Agarwal, Edwin S. Tjandra,  K. Swaminathan Iyer, Barry Humfrey, Mark Fear, Fiona M. Wood,  Sarah Dunlop and Colin L. Raston
Toxicol. Res., 2014, 3, 223-227
DOI: 10.1039/C4TX00004H

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