Royal Society of Chemistry and ACS Publications commit to ORCID integration

Yesterday, the Royal Society of Chemistry and the American Chemical Society Publications Division, ACS Publications, both signed the ORCID Open Letter committing to unambiguous identification of all authors that publish in our journals.

The official press release can be found here: http://rsc.li/orcid

In brief, this partnership with ORCID will resolve ambiguity in researcher identification caused by name changes, cultural differences in name presentation, and the inconsistent use of name abbreviations, thereby ensuring their contributions are appropriately recognized and credited.

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Crystal expansion makes light work of moving microbeads


Moving microbeads in liquid crystals
Light-induced displacement of a microbead through the thermal expansion of liquid crystals


By exploiting local thermal expansion and mesophase changes, scientists from Japan are able to move microbeads dispersed in a liquid crystal using UV light, despite neither material being light-responsive.


Takenaka and Yamamoto from the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology in Japan have used UV light to move a microbead through a 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl liquid crystal, without the need for a complicated experimental setup or addition of photo responsive materials.


Read the full story by Amy Middleton-Gear in Chemistry World.



This article is free to access until 16 January 2016

Y Takenaka and T Yamamoto, Soft Matter, 2016. DOI: 10.1039/C6SM02324J

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Secrets of Formulation IV

Early Bird fees end Friday 2 December, don’t delay

Secrets of Formulation IV

Secrets of Formulation IV


10 January 2017, London, UK

Organised jointly by RSC’s Formulation Science and Technology Group and Colloid & Interface Group, and by SCI’s Colloid & Surface Chemistry Group, this one-day meeting will bring together leading researchers from industry and academia, looking at cutting-edge science underpinning products in the context of the challenges that their industry faces, which can range from product performance to regulation.

Each industry has different constraints (cost / purity / safety / shelf life etc.).   Application environments can range from ambient (agrochemical) to inside the body (pharmaceutical) or to extremes of temperature and pressure (oil).  These differences mean successful formulations require innovative and excellent use of colloid, polymer, surfactant and interfacial science. The speakers hope to inspire, educate and entertain scientists both from academia and other industries.

Speakers include:

  • Malcolm Faers Bayer Crop Science
  • Simon Emmett Akzo Nobel
  • Jayne Lawrence Kings College
  • Peter Dettmar Technostics
  • Mauro Vaccaro Procter & Gamble
  • Nick Ainger Unilever
  • Cuross Bakhtiar Harley Street Consultants
  • Peter Dowding Infineum
  • Geoff Maitland Imperial College

Early Bird registration deadline is 02 December 2016 – don’t delay!

For further information and to register, please visit: http://www.rsc.org/events/detail/24574/secrets-of-formulation-iv

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Soft Matter Young Investigators Meet 2016

16th to 18th December 2016, Goa, India

We are delighted to announce that the Soft Matter Young Investigators Meet 2016 (SMYIM2016) will be held in Goa, India, on 16 – 18 December 2016.

Soft Matter Young Investigators Meet 2016

16 – 18 December 2016, Goa, India

The soft matter young investigator meet (SMYIM), started 4 years back, and the previous three meetings, in Jan-2014, Dec-2014 and Dec-2015, in Pondicherry were a wide success.

SMYIM aims to bring together serious soft matter scientists and engineers to present their research ideas and to encourage new and fruitful collaborations. The meeting is an attempt to connect a rapidly growing interdisciplinary group working on colloidal/polymer/granular matter-dynamics, self assembly of mesoscopic structures and the interface of soft matter, chemistry and biology, to enhance the quality of soft matter science through profitable discussions by bringing scientist together.
The past meetings appealed to broad and high-level variety of scientists, theorists, experimentalists and modeling folks, from various academic and geographical backgrounds, and have led to long-lasting collaborations between researchers with complementary skill sets.

Scientific Sessions:

  • Bulk soft matter assemblies (colloids, gels, proteins, surfactants and liquid crystals)
  • Nanoparticle and Nanomaterials
  • Polymers, networks and composites
  • Surfaces, interfaces, and interactions
  • Biological aspects of soft matter
Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)

Handy gel grips chemists

Written by Tom Wilson for Chemistry World

Concept of composite material gripping

Source: Royal Society of Chemistry

A team of scientists has computationally modelled a responsive material that shows finger-like motion while another research group has theoretically studied materials that can move like a snail.

The human body is a remarkable system, and scientists have tried hard to reproduce its combination of motion and stability for many years. One promising approach is to use systems composed of several different materials that can mimic bone and muscle structure and can respond to stimuli such as light.


To read the full article visit Chemistry World.

Awaneesh Singh, Olga Kuksenok and Anna C. Balazs
Soft Matter, 2016, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6SM02006B, Paper
Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Bookmark this on Technorati
Post on Twitter
Google Buzz (aka. Google Reader)