Soft Matter’s latest Impact Factor is 3.798

Soft Matter is pleased to announce that its latest Impact Factor is 3.798.

Soft Matter provides a unique forum for the communication of fundamental science underpinning the behaviour of soft matter. There is a particular focus on the interface between physics, materials science, biology, chemical engineering and chemistry. Our international team of expert Associate Editors and dedicated in-house editors ensure professional peer review and rapid times to publication.

We are extremely grateful to all our readers, authors and referees for their contribution to Soft Matter’s continued success, and to our Editorial and Advisory Board members for their hard work and dedication. Thanks to all of you, Soft Matter was cited a total of 28,934 times in 2015.

Join the many leading scientists who have already chosen to publish in Soft Matter and submit today!

Find out how other Royal Society of Chemistry journals were ranked in the latest Impact Factor release.

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Top 10 most-read Soft Matter articles – Q1 2016

This month sees the following articles in Soft Matter that are in the top ten most accessed from January – March:

Liquid marbles: topical context within soft matter and recent progress
G. McHale and M. I. Newton
Soft Matter, 2015,11, 2530-2546
DOI: 10.1039/C5SM00084J

Spider’s super-glue: thread anchors are composite adhesives with synergistic hierarchical organization
Jonas O. Wolff, Ingo Grawe, Marina Wirth, André Karstedt and Stanislav N. Gorb
Soft Matter, 2015,11, 2394-2403
DOI: 10.1039/C4SM02130D

One-step production of multiple emulsions: microfluidic, polymer-stabilized and particle-stabilized approaches
Paul S. Clegg, Joe W. Tavacoli and Pete J. Wilde
Soft Matter, 2016,12, 998-1008
DOI: 10.1039/C5SM01663K

Durable and scalable icephobic surfaces: similarities and distinctions from superhydrophobic surfaces
H. Sojoudi, M. Wang, N. D. Boscher, G. H. McKinley and K. K. Gleason
Soft Matter, 2016,12, 1938-1963
DOI: 10.1039/C5SM02295A

Understanding diluted dispersions of superparamagnetic particles under strong magnetic fields: a review of concepts, theory and simulations
Jordi Faraudo, Jordi S. Andreu and Juan Camacho
Soft Matter, 2013,9, 6654-6664
DOI: 10.1039/C3SM00132F

Manipulation of micro- and nanostructure motion with magnetic fields
Roger S. M. Rikken, Roeland J. M. Nolte, Jan C. Maan, Jan C. M. van Hest, Daniela A. Wilson and Peter C. M. Christianen
Soft Matter, 2014,10, 1295-1308
DOI: 10.1039/C3SM52294F

Ultra-thin conductive free-standing PEDOT/PSS nanofilms
Francesco Greco, Alessandra Zucca, Silvia Taccola, Arianna Menciassi, Toshinori Fujie, Hiroki Haniuda, Shinji Takeoka, Paolo Dario and Virgilio Mattoli
Soft Matter, 2011,7, 10642-10650
DOI: 10.1039/C1SM06174G

Recent trends in pH/thermo-responsive self-assembling hydrogels: from polyions to peptide-based polymeric gelators
Christophe Chassenieux and Constantinos Tsitsilianis
Soft Matter, 2016,12, 1344-1359
DOI: 10.1039/C5SM02710A

Stimuli-responsive Pickering emulsions: recent advances and potential applications
Juntao Tang, Patrick James Quinlan and Kam Chiu Tam
Soft Matter, 2015,11, 3512-3529
DOI: 10.1039/C5SM00247H

Oil-in-oil emulsions stabilised solely by solid particles
Bernard P. Binks and Andrew T. Tyowua
Soft Matter, 2016,12, 876-887
DOI: 10.1039/C5SM02438B

Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting an article to Soft Matter? Then why not submit to us today!

To keep up-to-date with all the latest research, sign up for the Soft Matter e-Alert or RSS feeds or follow Soft Matter on Twitter or Facebook

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2016 Soft Matter Lectureship is awarded to Damien Baigl

We are delighted to announce Professor Damien Baigl (ENS/UPMC/CNRS) as the 2016 Soft Matter Lectureship winner.

The Soft Matter Lectureship, now in its seventh year, is an annual award that honours an early-stage career researcher for their significant contribution to the soft matter field. The recipient is selected by the Soft Matter Editorial Board from a list of candidates nominated by the community.

Read on to find out more about Damien…

Damien did a PhD on soft matter physics with Claudine Williams in the laboratory of Pierre-Gilles de Gennes at College de France in Paris before a post-doc in biophysics at Kyoto University with Kenichi Yoshikawa. Since 2005, he has been working at the UMR PASTEUR (ENS/CNRS/UPMC) laboratory located at the Department of Chemistry of Ecole Normale Supérieure (ENS, PSL Research University) in Paris (France). He was appointed ENS assistant professor in 2005 before becoming full professor (2nd class) at University Pierre and Marie Curie (UPMC, Sorbonne Universités) in 2010 and 1st class UPMC professor in 2013. Former member of the Institut Universtaire de France (IUF), he got an ERC starting grant in 2010. Damien has made numerous, interdisciplinary and highly original contributions to the soft matter field in topics ranging from DNA compaction, gene expression photocontrol, synthetic biology and artificial cell systems to evaporative assembly, coffee-ring effect manipulations and light-driven microfluidics.

Damien’s website can be found at http://www.baigllab.com/

To learn more about Damien’s research, please see the following for his recent work in Soft Matter:

Preparation of one- to four-branch silver nanostructures of various sizes by metallization of hybrid DNA–protein assemblies
Sergii Rudiuk, Anna Venancio-Marques, Géraldine Hallais and Damien Baigl
Soft Matter, 2013, 9, 9146-9152

Theory of DNA–cationic micelle complexation
Helmut Schiessel, María D. Correa-Rodríguez, Sergii Rudiuk, Damien Baigl and Kenichi Yoshikawa
Soft Matter, 2012, 8, 9406-9411

DNA compaction: fundamentals and applications
André Estévez-Torres and Damien Baigl
Soft Matter, 2011, 7, 6746-6756

Sergii Rudiuk, Kenichi Yoshikawa and Damien Baigl
Soft Matter, 2011, 7, 5854-5860

Keep your eyes peeled for Damien’s upcoming Soft Matter article in honour of the Lectureship award.

We would like to thank everybody who nominated a candidate for the Lectureship; we received many excellent nominations, and the Editorial Board had a difficult task in choosing between some outstanding candidates.

Please join us in congratulating Damien in his fantastic achievements by adding your comments below!

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Complex polymer nanostructures with solvent annealing

Fabrication of nanopatterns or nanostructures at a surface is often limited to the accuracy and resolution of the instrument.  Photolithography is successful at producing nanostructures, but the properties are restricted to the dimensions of the chosen mask.  In a current Soft Matter article, a collaborative research group has added an additional step to traditional photolithography to produce more complex micro- and nanostructures.  Initially, nano ‘pre-patterns’ were formed on substrates with photolithography; cross-linked polystyrene (PS), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), or a hydroxyl terminated polymer (PS-PMMA-OH) were patterned as nanostripes on a silicon wafer surface.  After the patterns were deposited, a second layer of block copolymer, PS-b-PMMA, was spincoated over the entire pre-pattern.  Finally, samples were incubated in a sealed container with an open vial of acetone to anneal the layer of PS-b-PMMA.  The solvent annealing of the block copolymer produced ordered nanostructures of PS-b-PMMA on top of the premade photolithography pattern.  PS-b-PMMA structures and dimensions varied with annealing time but remained ordered due to the initial chemical pre-pattern.  Unpatterned surfaces also developed nanostructure, but without any order to the polymer structures.

PS-b-PMMA nanopatterned polymer with acetone annealing

Nanopatterned polymer with solvent annealing

The mechanism of assembly of the block copolymer nanostructures was controlled by two factors: film thickness and migration of PMMA polymer chains from the bottom to the top of the surface as PMMA is more stable in an acetone vapor.  The combination of solvent annealing and chemical pre-patterning perturbs the polymer chain configurational energy and interfacial energy to instigate the nanostructure formation.  The polymer microdomains are formed while solvated and are retained after acetone removal.  The control of nanopattern dimensions with chemical pre-patterning and solvent annealing expands the application range of traditional photolithography.  This appealing fabrication procedure can be utilized by the seminconductor industry where complicated nanopatterns are used for data storage or electronics.

See the full Soft Matter article here:

Directed self-assembly of solvent-vapor-induced non-bulk block copolymer morphologies on nanopatterned substrates

Lei Wan, Shengxiang Ji, Chi-Chun Liu, Gordon S. W. Craig, and Paul F. Nealey


Morgan M. StantonDr. Morgan M. Stanton is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart, Germany. She completed her Ph.D. in Chemistry from Worcester Polytechnic Institute in 2014. Read more about Morgan’s research publications here or you can follow her on Twitter @morg368.

Follow the latest Soft Matter publications and updates on Twitter @softmatter or on Facebook.


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2015 Soft Matter Lectureship winner Lucio Isa invited speaker at APS March Meeting 2016

2015 Soft Matter Lectureship award winner Professor Lucio Isa (ETH Zürich) is an invited speaker at the American Physical Society March Meeting 2016, to be held on 14–18 March in Baltimore, USA.

Lucio’s talk “Soft particles at fluid interfaces: wetting, structure and rheology” will begin the “Soft Matter at Interfaces (Particles)” focus session, sponsored by the Topical Group on Soft Matter (GSOFT) unit of the APS and chaired by Soft Matter Editorial Board Chair Professor Michael Rubinstein.

To read more about Lucio and the 2015 Soft Matter Lectureship award, see this previous post on the Soft Matter blog.

Lucio being presented with his 2015 Soft Matter Lectureship award by Soft Matter Associate Editor Dimitris Vlassopoulos

Lucio’s most recent Soft Matter articles include:

Colloidal binary mixtures at fluid–fluid interfaces under steady shear: structural, dynamical and mechanical response
Ivo Buttinoni, Zachary A. Zell, Todd M. Squires and Lucio Isa
Soft Matter, 2015,11, 8313-8321

Adsorption of soft particles at fluid interfaces
Robert W. Style, Lucio Isa and Eric R. Dufresne
Soft Matter, 2015,11, 7412-7419

A multiscale approach to the adsorption of core–shell nanoparticles at fluid interfaces
Adrienne Nelson, Dapeng Wang, Kaloian Koynov and Lucio Isa
Soft Matter, 2015,11, 118-129

Highly ordered 2D microgel arrays: compression versus self-assembly
Karen Geisel, Walter Richtering and Lucio Isa
Soft Matter, 2014,10, 7968-7976
From themed collection 2014 Soft Matter Hot Papers

Keep an eye out for our announcement of the 2016 Soft Matter Lectureship award!

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Soft Matter Prize Winners at the 27th Symposium of the Research Group on Polymer Gels

Congratulations to Yuto Jochi and Nobuyuki Watanabe who both won Soft Matter sponsored prizes at the 27th Symposium of the Research Group on Polymer Gels, The Society of Polymer Science, Japan held at Tokyo University on 18–19 January 2016.

From left to right: Royal Society of Chemistry Manager: Hiromitsu Urakami, Prize winner: Yuto Jochi and Chair: Takao Aoyagi

The Soft Matter Poster Award was won by Nobuyuki Watanabe (not pictured), who is based at Tokyo University of Science, for his poster Probe diffusion in Polymer Solution and Gels.

The Soft Matter Presentation Award was awarded to Yuto Jochi from Nagoya University for his presentation One-pot Synthesis of Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) Gels with Homogeneous Polymer Network Structure.

We thank Mr Watanabe and Mr Jochi for their excellent contributions and we look forward to hearing more about them in the future!

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4th International Soft Matter Conference – abstract submission and registration now open!

Join keynote speakers and Soft Matter Associate Editors Jan Dhont, Christos Likos and Dimitris Vlassopoulos at The 4th International Soft Matter Conference (ISMC 2016), to be held in Grenoble, France from 12–15 September 2016.

Submit your abstract by 1 March 2016

Early bird registration ends 1 June 2016

This conference will cover both the fundamental and applied aspects of soft matter and complex systems – please see the scientific programme for more information. Organised locally by scientists from the large-scale facilities ILL and ESRF as well as from Grenoble University and other research organisations such as CEA, CNRS and INPG, the venue will be the conference centre Alpexpo in Grenoble.

Plenary speakers confirmed:

  • Matthias Ballauff, Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin, Germany
  • Jasna Brujic, University of New York, USA
  • Joao Cabral, Imperial College, London, UK
  • Michael E. Cates, University of Cambridge, UK
  • Stefan W. Hell, MPI and University of Göttingen, Germany
  • Regine von Klitzing, Technische Universität Berlin, Germany
  • Igor Musevic, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia
  • Dieter Richter, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany
  • Francesco Sciortino, University La Sapienza, Rome, Italy

Submit your abstract now to get involved!

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Top 10 most-read Soft Matter articles – Q4 2015

This month sees the following articles in Soft Matter that are in the top ten most accessed from October – December:

The nonlinear viscoelasticity of hyaluronic acid and its role in joint lubrication
Zhenhuan Zhang and Gordon F. Christopher
Soft Matter, 2015,11, 2596-2603
DOI: 10.1039/C5SM00131E

Biomimetic microlens array with antireflective “moth-eye” surface
Doo-Hyun Ko, John R. Tumbleston, Kevin J. Henderson, Larken E. Euliss, Joseph M. DeSimone, Rene Lopez and Edward T. Samulski
Soft Matter, 2011,7, 6404-6407
DOI: 10.1039/C1SM05302G

Liquid marbles: topical context within soft matter and recent progress
G. McHale and M. I. Newton
Soft Matter, 2015,11, 2530-2546
DOI: 10.1039/C5SM00084J

How droplets nucleate and grow on liquids and liquid impregnated surfaces
Sushant Anand, Konrad Rykaczewski, Srinivas Bengaluru Subramanyam, Daniel Beysens and Kripa K. Varanasi
Soft Matter, 2015,11, 69-80
DOI: 10.1039/C4SM01424C

Manipulation of micro- and nanostructure motion with magnetic fields
Roger S. M. Rikken, Roeland J. M. Nolte, Jan C. Maan, Jan C. M. van Hest, Daniela A. Wilson and Peter C. M. Christianen
Soft Matter, 2014,10, 1295-1308
DOI: 10.1039/C3SM52294F

Spider’s super-glue: thread anchors are composite adhesives with synergistic hierarchical organization
Jonas O. Wolff, Ingo Grawe, Marina Wirth, André Karstedt and Stanislav N. Gorb
Soft Matter, 2015,11, 2394-2403
DOI: 10.1039/C3SM52294F

Ultra-thin conductive free-standing PEDOT/PSS nanofilms
Francesco Greco, Alessandra Zucca, Silvia Taccola, Arianna Menciassi, Toshinori Fujie, Hiroki Haniuda, Shinji Takeoka, Paolo Dario and Virgilio Mattoli
Soft Matter, 2011,7, 10642-10650
DOI: 10.1039/C3SM52294F

Why are double network hydrogels so tough?
Jian Ping Gong
Soft Matter, 2010,6, 2583-2590
DOI: 10.1039/B924290B

Understanding diluted dispersions of superparamagnetic particles under strong magnetic fields: a review of concepts, theory and simulations
Jordi Faraudo, Jordi S. Andreu and Juan Camacho
Soft Matter, 2013,9, 6654-6664
DOI: 10.1039/C3SM00132F

Vibro-levitation and inverted pendulum: parametric resonance in vibrating droplets and soft materials
Rahul Ramachandran and Michael Nosonovsky
Soft Matter, 2014,10, 4633-4639
DOI: 10.1039/C4SM00265B

Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting an article to Soft Matter? Then why not submit to us today!

To keep up-to-date with all the latest research, sign up for the Soft Matter e-Alert or RSS feeds or follow Soft Matter on Twitter or Facebook

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Stable Liquid Drop Deformation with Nanoparticles

Miniature reaction vessels, such as liquid marbles, have shown significant promise for millimeter scale and low volume chemical and biological experiments. Here, solid particles are trapped at the drop surface, separating the interior liquid from the surface, so the droplet does not stick to the substrate. For large scale applications, liquid marbles have some handicaps, including their lack of optical clarity and their restriction to only a spherical shape. In a recent full article in Soft Matter, a collaborative research team has recently discovered a liquid marble alternative, where nanoparticles are squeezed onto a drop surface to alter its shape while still maintaining optical transparency and reaction vessel properties.

Water drops and liquid plasticine deformed with nanoparticles

Deformed water drops and examples of liquid plasticine.

To create the stable deformation of a liquid, a single water drop is placed between two glass surfaces. The two glass surfaces were coated with layers of hydrophobic silica nanoparticles. When the drop was squeezed between the two modified glass layers and then released, nanoparticles detached from the glass and became adhered at the water droplet surface. Once the squeezing force was released and as the droplet tried to recover to its original spherical shape, the new nanoparticle layers on the drop surface became “jammed”, and permanently deformed the water droplet shape. The final shape of the deformed droplet was determined by the squeezing force, but the shape of the droplet could be adjusted by injecting new water into the drop, breaking apart the surface nanoparticles.

Moving from single water drops to larger volumes and exploiting the jamming properties of the nanoparticles, liquid plasticines could be developed. The water was deformed into a variety of shapes and used as small reaction vessels. Multiple plasticines were joined for controlled chemical reactions and then quickly separated using a hydrophobic knife. As proof of concept, a liquid plasticine with gold nanoparticles was connected to DC power (30 V) allowing the gold nanoparticles to migrate to the positive end of the plasticine. The liquid was then cut to separate the gold particles from the rest of the liquid. The permanently deformed drops and liquid plasticines offer new alternatives for liquid lenses and small volume liquid reactors.

See the full Soft Matter article here:

Liquid plasticine: controlled deformation and recovery of droplets with interfacial nanoparticle jamming

Xiaoguang Li, Yahui Xue, Pengyu Lv, Hao Lin, Feng Du, Yueyun Hu, Jun Shen, and Huiling Duan



Morgan M. StantonDr. Morgan M. Stanton is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart, Germany. She completed her Ph.D. in Chemistry from Worcester Polytechnic Institute in 2014. Read more about Morgan’s research publications here or you can follow her on Twitter @morg368.

Follow the latest Soft Matter publications and updates on Twitter @softmatter or on Facebook.

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8th International Conference on Porous Media & Annual Meeting

Soft Matter is pleased to sponsor the 8th International Conference on Porous Media & Annual Meeting taking place May 9-12, 2016, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.

The annual InterPore conference aims to unite people from diverse disciplines who study and work with porous media. From natural to industrial systems, porous media can be complex. The goal of the annual conference is to bring people together so they can exchange ideas and be made aware of each other’s interests and research activities

Plenary speakers include:

Howard Stone Princeton University, USA
Sarah Tolbert University of California, Los Angeles, USA
David Weitz Harvard University, USA
Paul Trokhan, Procter and Gamble Company (P&G)

Abstract submission deadline is December 28th 2016

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