HOT articles for September!

Engineering entropy in soft matter: the bad, the ugly and the good
Fernando A. Escobedo 

Graphical abstract: Engineering entropy in soft matter: the bad, the ugly and the good

3D Viscoelastic traction force microscopy
Jennet Toyjanova, Erin Hannen, Eyal Bar-Kochba, Eric M. Darling, David L. Henann and Christian Franck

Graphical abstract: 3D Viscoelastic traction force microscopy

These articles will be free until 10th October 2014


 
Approach to universal self-similar attractor for the levelling of thin liquid films
Michael Benzaquen, Paul Fowler, Laetitia Jubin, Thomas Salez, Kari Dalnoki-Veress and Elie Raphaël  

Graphical abstract: Approach to universal self-similar attractor for the levelling of thin liquid films
 
Discovery of a tetracontinuous, aqueous lyotropic network phase with unusual 3D-hexagonal symmetry
Gregory P. Sorenson, Adam K. Schmitt and Mahesh K. Mahanthappa  

Graphical abstract: Discovery of a tetracontinuous, aqueous lyotropic network phase with unusual 3D-hexagonal symmetry

These articles will be free until 15th October 2014


Extracting the dynamic correlation length of actin networks from microrheology experiments
Adar Sonn-Segev, Anne Bernheim-Groswasser and Yael Roichman

Graphical abstract: Extracting the dynamic correlation length of actin networks from microrheology experiments

Tuning the surface properties of hydrogel at the nanoscale with focused ion irradiation
Y. Kim, A. Y. Abuelfilat, S. P. Hoo, A. Al-Abboodi, B. Liu, Tuck Ng, P. Chan and J. Fu  

Graphical abstract: Tuning the surface properties of hydrogel at the nanoscale with focused ion irradiation 
 

These articles will be free until 22nd  October 2014


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Top 10 most-read Soft Matter articles – Q2 2014

This month sees the following articles in Soft Matter that are in the top ten most accessed from April – June:

Edible nanoemulsions: Fabrication, properties, and functional performance 
David Julian McClements    
Soft Matter, 2011,7, 2297-2316 
DOI: 10.1039/C0SM00549E 

Amphiphilic Janus Particles at Fluid Interfaces 
Ankit Kumar, Bum Jun Park, Fuquan Tu and Daeyeon Lee 
Soft Matter, 2013,9, 6604-6617 
DOI: 10.1039/C3SM50239B 

Control of Mesogen Configuration in Colloids of Liquid Crystalline Polymers 
Sönke Haseloh, Paul van der Schoot and Rudolf Zentel 
Soft Matter, 2010,6, 4112-4119 
DOI: 10.1039/C0SM00125B 

Directed Self-Assembly of Block Copolymers: A Tutorial Review of Strategies for Enabling Nanotechnology with Soft Matter 
Hanqiong Hu, Manesh Gopinadhan and Chinedum O. Osuji  
Soft Matter, 2014,10, 3867-3889 
DOI: 10.1039/C3SM52607K 

Manipulation of micro- and nanostructure motion with magnetic fields 
Roger S. M. Rikken, Roeland J. M. Nolte, Jan C. Maan, Jan C. M. van Hest, Daniela A. Wilson and Peter C. M. Christianen   
Soft Matter, 2014,10, 1295-1308 
DOI: 10.1039/C3SM52294F 

Polyelectrolyte adsorption, interparticle forces, and colloidal aggregation 
Istvan Szilagyi, Gregor Trefalt, Alberto Tiraferri, Plinio Maroni and Michal Borkovec    
Soft Matter, 2014,10, 2479-2502 
DOI: 10.1039/C3SM52132J 

Bioinspired materials that self-shape through programmed microstructures 
André R. Studart and Randall M. Erb 
Soft Matter, 2014,10, 1284-1294 
DOI: 10.1039/C3SM51883C 

Traction Force Microscopy in Physics and Biology 
Robert W. Style, Rostislav Boltyanskiy, Guy K. German, Callen Hyland, Christopher W. MacMinn, Aaron F. Mertz, Larry A. Wilen, Ye Xu and Eric R. Dufresne 
Soft Matter, 2014,10, 4047-4055 
DOI: 10.1039/C4SM00264D 

Gel architectures and their complexity 
Walter Richtering and Brian R. Saunders 
Soft Matter, 2014,10, 3695-3702 
DOI: 10.1039/C4SM00208C 

Self-assembly of poly(benzyl methacrylate)-block-poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) diblock copolymer films at the air/water interface and deposition on solid substrates via Langmuir-Blodgett transfer: aggregation behavior, morphological characteristics and subphase pH effects 
P. Cecilia dos Santos Claro, Marcos E. Coustet, Carolina Diaz, Eliana Maza, M. Susana Cortizo, Félix G. Requejo, Lía I. Pietrasanta, Marcelo Ceolín and Omar Azzaroni 
Soft Matter, 2013,9, 10899-10912 
DOI: 10.1039/C3SM52336E 

Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting an article to Soft Matter? Then why not submit to us today!

To keep up-to-date with all the latest research, sign up for the Soft Matter e-Alert or RSS feeds or follow Soft Matter on Twitter or Facebook

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Colloidal caterpillars get a wiggle on

Article written by Katie Bayliss.

Researchers have devised a new method to transport micro cargo – by attaching it to chains of colloidal particles that wiggle their way through liquid crystals.

The research team, led by Hiroshi Orihara from Hokkaido University, Japan, and Christian Bahr from the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Germany, created colloidal ‘caterpillars’ from surface-modified silica particles which self-assemble into chains when placed in a liquid crystal medium. To make them move, the team exploit an effect called electrohydrodynamic convection (EHC), where the application of an electric field creates a convective pattern of parallel rolls within the medium. The caterpillars travel in an undulating motion across successive rolls, driven by a combination of hydrodynamic flow and electric field effects. Excitingly, the caterpillars can be attached to and used to transport larger particles and liquid droplets, which are in themselves too big to be moved by the EHC rolls.

To read the full article visit Chemistry World.

Colloidal Caterpillars for Cargo Transportation
Yuji Sasaki, Yoshinori Takikawa, VSR Jampani, Hikaru Hoshikawa, Takafumi Seto, Christian Bahr, Stephan Herminghaus, Yoshiki Hidaka and Hiroshi Orihara  
Soft Matter, 2014, Accepted Manuscript
DOI: 10.1039/C4SM01354A, Paper

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Themed issue on Interfacial Dynamics in Foams and Emulsions

Graphical abstract: Front coverIssue 36 of Soft Matter is a very special themed issue on interfacial dynamics in foams and emulsions, published in celebration of the career of Dominique Langevin, whose work has done much to advance the understanding of these soft matter systems.

The themed issue is Guest Edited by Anniina Salonen, Wiebke Drenckhan and Emmanuelle Rio (Université Paris-Sud, France) – read their introduction to the issue in the Editorial.

On the cover

Influence of interfacial rheology on drainage from curved surfaces
M. Saad Bhamla, Caroline E. Giacomin, Caroline Balemans and Gerald G. Fuller

Review articles

Thermodynamics of adsorption of ionic surfactants at water/alkane interfaces
V. B. Fainerman, E. V. Aksenenko, N. Mucic, A. Javadi and R. Miller

Bubbles and foams in microfluidics
Axel Huerre, Vincent Miralles and Marie-Caroline Jullien

Effect of polyelectrolytes on (de)stability of liquid foam films
Heiko Fauser and Regine von Klitzing

Read the full issue here

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Kathleen Stebe joins the Soft Matter Editorial Board

Kathleen Stebe joins Soft Matter Editorial Board

We are delighted that Professor Kathleen Stebe has joined the Soft Matter Editorial Board as an Associate Editor.

Kathleen J. Stebe received a B.A. in Economics from the City College of New York, Magna cum Laude, and a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering at the Levich Institute, also at CCNY, under the guidance of Charles Maldarelli. Thereafter, she spent a post-doctoral year at the Université de Technologie de Compiègne with Dominique Barthès-Biesel. Professor Stebe joined the Department of Chemical Engineering at Johns Hopkins University, where she rose through the ranks to become Professor and department chair. In 2008, Professor Stebe joined the University of Pennsylvania as the Richer and Elizabeth M. Goodwin Professor of Engineering and Applied Science, where she has served as the department chair and currently serves as the Deputy Dean for Research.

Professor Stebe has been a Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Studies; she has received the Robert S. Pond Excellence in Teaching Award at JHU, the Frenkiel Award from the Division of Fluid Dynamics of the American Physical Society, and was named a Fellow of the APS.

Professor Stebe’s research focuses on capillary phenomena, including anisotropic particles interaction and assembly at interfaces and within complex fluids, including liquid crystals and lipid bilayers. She is an expert on interfacial flows, with particular emphasis on how surfactants can be used to direct stresses at interfaces and to alter drop break up modes. Other aspects of her research address dynamic surface tension, rheology of protein laden interfaces, and the design of interfaces and bounding surfaces for biological and materials applications.

To find out more about Professor Stebe’s research, take a look at these recent papers:

Marcello Cavallaro Jr, Mohamed A. Gharbi, Daniel A. Beller, Simon Čopar, Zheng Shi, Randall D. Kamien, Shu Yang, Tobias Baumgart and Kathleen J. Stebe

Lorenzo Botto, Eric P. Lewandowski, Marcello Cavallaro and Kathleen J. Stebe

As a Soft Matter Associate Editor, Professor Stebe will be handling submissions to the journal. Why not submit your next paper to her Editorial Office?
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Poster Prize winner at the 9th Liquid Matter Conference

9th Liquid Matter Conference

Congratulations to Susan James (National University of Ireland, Maynooth) who was awarded a Soft Matter poster prize at Liquids 2014, held in Lisbon, Portugal on 21-25th July 2014. Her winning poster was entitled ‘Effect of mutagenesis on the phase transitions of human gamma-D crystallin’.

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HOT articles for August!

Thermal transitions in hydrated layer-by-layer assemblies observed using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy
Choonghyun Sung, Katelin Hearn and Jodie Lutkenhaus

Graphical abstract: Thermal transitions in hydrated layer-by-layer assemblies observed using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy


Structural and mechanical characteristics of polymersomes
Hung-Yu Chang, Yu-Jane Sheng and Heng-Kwong Tsao

Graphical abstract: Structural and mechanical characteristics of polymersomes

These articles are free to access until 5th September 2014

 


Crystallizing hard-sphere glasses by doping with active particles
Ran Ni, Martien A. Cohen Stuart, Marjolein Dijkstra and Peter G. Bolhuis  

Graphical abstract: Crystallizing hard-sphere glasses by doping with active particles

Phase transitions in supported lipid bilayers studied by AFM
Andrea Alessandrini and Paolo Facci

Graphical abstract: Phase transitions in supported lipid bilayers studied by AFM

These articles are free to access until 11th September 2014


Prediction and validation of diffusion coefficients in a model drug delivery system using microsecond atomistic molecular dynamics simulation and vapour sorption analysis
Christopher Forrey, David M. Saylor, Joshua S. Silverstein, Jack F. Douglas, Eric M. Davis and Yossef A. Elabd

Graphical abstract: Prediction and validation of diffusion coefficients in a model drug delivery system using microsecond atomistic molecular dynamics simulation and vapour sorption analysis

 
Biobased building blocks for the rational design of renewable block polymers
Angela L. Holmberg, Kaleigh H. Reno, Richard P. Wool and Thomas H. Epps, III 

Graphical abstract: Biobased building blocks for the rational design of renewable block polymers

These articles are free to access until 18th September 2014


 
Highly ordered 2D microgel arrays: compression versus self-assembly
Karen Geisel, Walter Richtering and Lucio Isa  

Graphical abstract: Highly ordered 2D microgel arrays: compression versus self-assembly
Evidence for equilibrium gels of valence-limited particles
Nikola A. Dudukovic and Charles F. Zukoski

Graphical abstract: Evidence for equilibrium gels of valence-limited particles

These articles are free to access until 25th September 2014


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Soft Matter Impact Factor rises to 4.151

Graphical abstract: Soft Matter, the futureIn the Editorial Office, we have been celebrating the latest Soft Matter Impact Factor* of 4.151.

At Soft Matter, we remain dedicated to providing a unique, interdisciplinary forum for researchers interested in the fundamental behaviours of soft matter systems to share their high quality research. We seek to publish papers which will push the boundaries of the field and demonstrate the most innovative results.

To all our authors, readers, referees and board members, we would like to say a big thank you for your support.

In the meantime, we invite you to look out for the following, coming soon in Soft Matter:

  • Next month, we will be publishing a themed issue on Interfacial dynamics in foams and emulsions.  Guest Edited by Anniina Salonen, Wiebke Drenckhan and Emmanuelle Rio (Université Paris-Sud), this issue celebrates the career of Dominique Langevin, who has played a major role in advancing this field.
  • Soft Matter celebrates its 10th anniversary next year! Expect special Anniversary Articles written by leading soft matter scientists.

    Soft Matter wasn’t the only Royal Society of Chemistry journal to see an increase in its Impact Factor this year.  Find a full list of our journals and their 2013 Impact Factors in this blog post.

    *The Impact Factor provides an indication of the average number of citations per paper. Produced annually, Impact Factors are calculated by dividing the number of citations in a year by the number of citeable articles published in the preceding two years. Data based on 2013 Journal Citation Reports®, (Thomson Reuters, 2014).

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    Soft matter goes digital

    Written by Katie Bayliss

    Already used in everything from paints to optical materials, colloids have found an entirely new application: as computing elements capable of high density information storage.

    US collaborators Sharon Glotzer from University of Michigan and David Pine from New York University have designed a system of reconfigurable colloidal clusters which show potential for performing computational functions in unconventional environments. The team’s ‘digital colloids’ are based on specially designed dimpled particles, which, through entropic interactions, can be made to assemble onto a central sphere and explore various configurations on the sphere’s surface.

    To read the full article please visit Chemistry World.

    Carolyn L. Phillips, Eric Jankowski, Bhaskar Jyoti Krishnatreya, Kazem V. Edmond, Stefano Sacanna, David G. Grier, David J. Pine and Sharon C. Glotzer
    Soft Matter, 2014, Advance Article DOI: 10.1039/C4SM00796D
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    Web collection for 2013 International Soft Matter Conference

    Take a look at our new web collection, celebrating the excellent research presented at the 2013 International Soft Matter Conference and the very healthy state of the soft matter field.

    This collection of articles is Guest Edited by Sofia Kantorovich (University of Vienna) and Emanuela Zaccarelli (CNR-ISC, Sapienza Universita di Roma).  It comprises papers from a selection of talks and posters that were presented at  the 3rd International Soft Matter Conference, held in Rome on 15-19 September last year.

    The collection reflects the variety of topics discussed at the conference, and includes articles on colloids, gels, biomaterials such as DNA and cells, crystals and glasses.  It highlights novel experimental methods, theoretical approaches and advanced simulation techniques, and provides an insight into both equilibrium and out-of-equilibrium behaviour of soft matter.

    Articles include:

    Phase separation and self-assembly of colloidal dimers with tunable attractive strength: from symmetrical square-wells to Janus dumbbells
    Gianmarco Munaò, Patrick O’Toole, Toby S. Hudson, Dino Costa, Carlo Caccamo, Achille Giacometti and Francesco Sciortino  

    Graphical abstract: Phase separation and self-assembly of colloidal dimers with tunable attractive strength: from symmetrical square-wells to Janus dumbbells

    Biocompatible cationic lipids for the formulation of liposomal DNA vectors
    Costanza Montis, Silvia Sostegni, Silvia Milani, Piero Baglioni and Debora Berti  

    Graphical abstract: Biocompatible cationic lipids for the formulation of liposomal DNA vectors

    Viscoelasticity of nematic liquid crystals at a glance
    Fabio Giavazzi, Stefano Crotti, Antonio Speciale, Francesca Serra, Giuliano Zanchetta, Veronique Trappe, Marco Buscaglia, Tommaso Bellini and Roberto Cerbino (Open Access)

    Graphical abstract: Viscoelasticity of nematic liquid crystals at a glance

    Stratum corneum molecular mobility in the presence of natural moisturizers
    Sebastian Björklund, Jenny Marie Andersson, Quoc Dat Pham, Agnieszka Nowacka, Daniel Topgaard and Emma Sparr  (featured in Chemistry World)

      Graphical abstract: Stratum corneum molecular mobility in the presence of natural moisturizers

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