Winners of the Soft Matter award at the Polymer Gel Symposium

16-17th Jan 2017, Tokyo, Japan

The 28th Symposium organized by the Research Group on Polymer Gels, The Society of Polymer Science, Japan was held on 16,17th January 2017, in Tokyo, Japan.


This is the third year in a row that Soft Matter supported this event, which has been continuously very well received.

The winners of the price will receive a free subscription to Soft Matter.


On the image, from the left

  • Prof. Hidemitsu Furukawa (Yamagata University) conference organizer
  • Kenta Honma (The University of Tokyo)
  • Dr. Ryota Tamate (The University of Tokyo)
  • The other winners were awarded other poster/presentation awards
  • Mr Honma’s poster was titled: “Micro Patterning of the Self-Oscillating Polymer Brush for Control of its Spatio-temporal Function

    Dr Tamate’s talk was titled: “Fabrication of self-oscillating colloidosomes undergoing cell-like complex shape oscillations

    Congratulations to all winners!

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    Hokkaido Summer Institute & International Soft Matter Summer School in Hokkaido 2017

    1st Session: Otaki Seminar House, Otaki Village, July 30 (Sun) – Aug 5 (Sat), 2017
    2nd Session Hokkaido University Sapporo Campus, City of Sapporo, Aug 7 (Mon) – Aug 11 (Fri), 2017

    ESAT

    1st Session: July 30 (Sun) – Aug 5 (Sat), 2017 / 2nd Session: Aug 7 (Mon) – Aug 11 (Fri), 2017

    1st Session: Otaki Seminar House, Otaki Village / 2nd Session: Hokkaido University Sapporo Campus, City of Sapporo


    This summer, the Global Station for Soft Matter, GI-CoRE from Hokkaido University will hold a two-week long “Summer School on Soft Matter” for graduate students and early career researchers. This summer school will focus on polymer physics, soft matter mechanics, and chemistry and characterization of materials. The seminar will be divided into two sessions. The first session will be held at Otaki Seminar House in central Hokkaido, located about 20 km from the beautiful Lake Toya. The second session will be held at the Sapporo Campus of Hokkaido University. The seminar will be held by world-leading scientists in the field of soft matter.

    Apply now for this exciting seminar!


    Organisers:

    • Dr. Michael Rubinstein; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and GI-CoRE, Hokkaido University
    • Dr. Costantino Cretonl; ESPCI Paris Tech and GI-CoRE, Hokkaido University
    • Dr. Jian Ping Gong; GI-CoRE, Hokkaido University
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    Cracking theory helps understand paint ageing

    New model could benefit art conservators and geologists

    Source: © Royal Society of Chemistry / Image courtesy of Mauritshuis Museum.

    Understanding how cracking patterns develop in desiccated surfaces like old oil paintings or dried mud is surprisingly difficult. Now a Chilean scientist has established the first mathematical model of cracked surfaces that could help conservators preserve old paintings or give geologists information about the thickness of cracked clay or salt layers, and the stress they’ve been subjected to.

    In oil paintings, the varnish becomes less flexible with age and when the canvas shrinks and expands in response to humidity and temperature changes, the paint starts to crack. As the cracks are hard to forge, art experts often use them, among other factors, to determine a painting’s authenticity. ‘Crack networks are like fingerprints,’ says JC Flores from the University of Tarapacá, who has developed a series of equations that give a theoretical insight into cracking patterns.

    Read the full story by Kat Kramer in Chemistry World.


    This article is free to access until 10 March 2017.

    J C Flores, Soft Matter, 2017, DOI: 10.1039/c6sm02849g

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    How to not make a splash

    Study adds to understanding of droplet behaviour

    New research by a scientist in the US can better explain how a droplet splash is dictated by the smoothness of a surface, as well as the surrounding air pressure.

    Source: © Royal Society of Chemistry


    Scientists already knew that two aspects were involved in this seemingly simple process; one related to the surrounding air, and the other to how the liquid spreads on the substrate. ‘If we were forced to guess, we’d probably assume that decreasing the ambient pressure around the drop would make the splash bigger. After all, we’re decreasing air resistance,’ explains Andrzej Latka, at the University of Chicago, who performed the new research.

    Read the full story and watch the video showing the splash in Chemistry World.



    This article is free to access until 28 February 2017.

    Andrzej Latka, Soft Matter, 2017. DOI: 10.1039/C6SM02321E

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