Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Chemical Science welcomes Zhenan Bao as Associate Editor

This month, Chemical Science is delighted to welcome Zhenan Bao as Associate Editor in the area of organic materials. Zhenan received her PhD from the University of Chicago in 1995, and after a spell at Lucent Technologies’ Bell Labs, joined the Department of Chemical Engineering at Stanford University in 2004. She was appointed to her present position as Professor in 2012.

Zhenan was awarded the Beilby Medal and Prize by the Royal Society of Chemistry in 2009, for her contributions and discoveries in the field of organic semiconductors. These included demonstrating that conjugated polymers can produce high mobilities of charge carriers when self-assembled using solution deposition.

She also featured in Thomson Reuter’s ‘Top 100 Materials Scientists’ report in 2011, which identified researchers with the highest citation counts for papers published in 2000–2010.

The Bao Group’s research utilizes the basic principles in chemistry, physics and material sciences to enable novel applications and development of flexible, stretchable electronics and energy devices. Current research projects within the group include organic semi-conductor design, organic and carbon solar cells, and electronic skin.

The group has published work in a number of Royal Society of Chemistry journals, and you can read more about it in the following articles:

Probing interfacial molecular packing in TIPS-pentacene organic semiconductors by Surface enhanced Raman Scattering
Jie Xu, Ying Diao, Dongshan Zhou, Yisha Mao, Gaurav Giri, Wei Chen, Nan Liu, Stefan C B Mannsfeld, Gi Xue and Zhenan Bao  
J. Mater. Chem. C, 2014, Accepted Manuscript, DOI: 10.1039/C3TC32581D

Sequentially solution-processed, nanostructured polymer photovoltaics using selective solvents
Do Hwan Kim, Jianguo Mei, Alexander L. Ayzner, Kristin Schmidt, Gaurav Giri, Anthony L. Appleton, Michael F. Toney and Zhenan Bao  
Energy Environ. Sci., 2014, 7, 1103-1109, DOI: 10.1039/C3EE43541E, Paper

A review of fabrication and applications of carbon nanotube film-based flexible electronics
Steve Park, Michael Vosguerichian and Zhenan Bao  
Nanoscale, 2013, 5, 1727-1752, DOI: 10.1039/C3NR33560G

Confined organization of fullerene units along high polymer chains
Lei Fang, Peng Liu, Benjamin R. Sveinbjornsson, Sule Atahan-Evrenk, Koen Vandewal, Sílvia Osuna, Gonzalo Jiménez-Osés, Supriya Shrestha, Gaurav Giri, Peng Wei, Alberto Salleo, Alán Aspuru-Guzik, Robert H. Grubbs, K. N. Houk and Zhenan Bao  
J. Mater. Chem. C, 2013, 1, 5747-5755, DOI: 10.1039/C3TC31158A

5,11-Conjugation-extended low-bandgap anthradithiophene-containing polymer exhibiting enhanced thin-film order and field-effect mobility
Ying Jiang, Jianguo Mei, Alexander L. Ayzner, Michael F. Toney and Zhenan Bao  
Chem. Commun., 2012, 48, 7286-7288, DOI: 10.1039/C2CC32473C

Impact of regioregularity on thin-film transistor and photovoltaic cell performances of pentacene-containing polymers
Ying Jiang, Sanghyun Hong, Joon Hak Oh, Rajib Mondal, Toshihiro Okamoto, Eric Verploegen, Michael F. Toney, Michael D. McGehee and Zhenan Bao  
J. Mater. Chem., 2012, 22, 4356-4363, DOI: 10.1039/C2JM15483H

Graphene–sponges as high-performance low-cost anodes for microbial fuel cells
Xing Xie, Guihua Yu, Nian Liu, Zhenan Bao, Craig S. Criddle and Yi Cui  
Energy Environ. Sci., 2012, 5, 6862-6866, DOI: 10.1039/C2EE03583A

Zhenan is now accepting submissions to Chemical Science in the area of organic materials.  Submit your high-impact research to her Editorial Office.

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Challenges in Inorganic and Materials Chemistry (ISACS13) – 2 weeks until oral deadline

Challenges in Inorganic and Materials Chemistry - ISACS13
   
Oral abstract deadline – 24 February 2014
 
Don’t miss your chance to present at Challenges in Inorganic and Materials Chemistry (ISACS13) in Dublin this July.Oral abstracts are currently invited, but hurry, the deadline is just two weeks away. Submit before Monday 24 February 2014 for the opportunity to showcase your latest research at this significant event.

Registration now open
 

With a host of world-class speakers and a vibrant city location, Challenges in Inorganic and Materials Chemistry is set to be the most popular ISACS conference to date.

Register today to guarantee your place and benefit from the fantastic savings currently available:

  • Early bird discount
  • Student and member rates
  • Bursaries worth £150

We look forward to welcoming you.                                                          
 

Professor Thorri Gunnlaugsson Dr Robert D. Eagling
Conference Chair Editor, Chemical Science
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Chemical Science listed in SCI

We are delighted to announce that Chemical Science has now been listed in Thomson Reuters’ Science Citation Index® (SCI).

The journal has featured in the Science Citation Index Expanded™ (SCIE), the database behind Web of Science™, since its launch; however we are pleased to now feature in the SCI as well. The SCI contains the highest ranking journals in their fields, further emphasizing the quality of research published in Chemical Science.

Read more about the citation profile and Impact Factor of Chemical Science.

Browse the latest articles from Chemical Science

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Exotic interactions uncovered in actinide systems

The six orbital phase changes around the internuclear axis are unique to phi interactions

Theory had predicted the presence of Φ interactions in actinide systems but it had never been observed experimentally, until now. Scientists in the US using high-energy x-ray spectroscopy to study the involvement of the f-orbitals in actinide sandwich complexes have experimental evidence for this unusual interaction in thorocene.

At its most basic level, bonding in actinide molecules is typically comprised of a small amount of covalent orbital mixing in the presence of overwhelming ionic attractions. However, in many cases it is proposed that these small changes in f-element covalency are responsible for profound changes in chemical reactivity and actinide properties.

Covalency is a fundamental concept used to describe how elements share electrons in chemical bonds. For the d-block transition metal series, 3d, 4d, and 5d orbitals extend well into the periphery of the atom and can interact with valence orbitals of ligand atoms to form covalent chemical bonds. In contrast, the 4f orbitals of lanthanides are very core-like and their interactions with ligands are – in general – assumed to be of comparatively little chemical consequence. The actinide elements lie between these two extremes, and the extent to which valence f and d orbitals participate in chemical bonding is a subject of debate in the community.


You can also read this article in Chemistry World

Read the original journal article in Chemical Science:

New evidence for 5f covalency in actinocenes determined from carbon K-edge XAS and electronic structure theory
Stefan G. Minasian, Jason M. Keith, Enrique R. Batista, Kevin S. Boland, David L. Clark, Stosh A. Kozimor, Richard L. Martin, David K. Shuh and Tolek Tyliszczak
Chem. Sci., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC52030G, Edge Article

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Hole hopping in solar cells

The technique estimates the energetic cost of a dye molecule changing conformation

Researchers in the UK, Spain and Switzerland say a method they have developed for probing electron transfer reactions could help them design more efficient solar cells.

Monitoring the behaviour of charges in photovoltaic devices is important for improving charge collection, especially in dye sensitised solar cells (DSSCs) that convert sunlight to electricity. Creating efficient solar cells is pivotal for meeting increasing energy demands especially as the world looks to move away from fossil fuels. DSSCs have many attractive features being simple to make, flexible and transparent, but they still have a way to go in terms of efficiency.

A research team led by Piers Barnes of Imperial College London has pioneered a technique that measures the diffusion coefficient of a less well reported phenomenon known as hole hopping, which occurs between sensitised dye molecules anchored to surfaces (in this case TiO2).


You can also read this article in Chemistry World

Read the original journal article in Chemical Science:

The reorganization energy of intermolecular hole hopping between dyes anchored to surfaces
Davide Moia, Valérie Vaissier, Ismael López-Duarte, Tomás Torres, Mohammad K. Nazeeruddin, Brian C. O’Regan, Jenny Nelson and Piers R. F. Barnes
Chem. Sci., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C3SC52359D

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Chemical Science chemical biology symposium – the highlights

On 6th November 2013, the Department of Chemistry at the University of Warwick hosted a Chemical-Science sponsored symposium on Chemical Biology. The symposium was convened to celebrate several prizes and awards from the RSC Chemistry Biology Interface Division. There were over 130 attendees from industry and many different UK Universities, including a healthy number of local attendees from Warwick.

The first talk of the day was from Prof. Richard Silverman, winner of the RSC Centenary Prize medal, who got things off to a great start and some excellent discussion/questions from the audience. Prof Thomas Carell (Chemical Science invited speaker) and Prof Gregory Challis (from the home team) completed an excellent first session. After a quick break, we had talks from Prof Benjamin Davis (President of RSC Chemistry Biology Interface Division and Chemical Science Associate Editor) and last but not least, Prof Rein Ulijn gave his Norman Heatley Award lecture.

It is also important to thank the Warwick Centre for Analytical Science for sponsoring lunch and the student helpers who helped make this a great event. It goes without saying that the speakers enjoyed a well-earned dinner in the evening to celebrate the awards!

Dr. Matthew I. Gibson
University of Warwick and Conference Chair
@LabGibson on Twitter

Warwick speakers

Speakers at the Chemical Science-RSC Awards Symposium

Click here for more photos!

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Editors’ Choice: Chemical Biology

Meet our Editors

Ben DavisProfessor Ben Davis (University of Oxford) handles submissions to Chemical Science in the areas of bioorganic chemistry and chemical biology and Professor Tom Muir (Princeton) welcomes papers in chemical biology.

Tom MuirRead their interviews on our blog to find out more about them. We invite you to submit your next high-quality research paper to their editorial offices.

Looking for the best articles at the chemistry-biology interface?

Ben and Tom have picked some of their favourite articles recently published in Chemical Science. You can read these articles for free for a limited period by clicking on the links below.

Chemical Science citationsChemical Science is the Royal Society of Chemistry’s flagship journal; publishing articles of exceptional significance and high-impact reviews from across the chemical sciences. The journal’s latest (2012) Impact Factor is 8.3. Research in Chemical Science is not only of the highest quality but also has excellent visibility; this is reflected in our latest citation profile.

Read our chemical biology Editor’s Choice selection for FREE today:

Chemical fidelity of an RNA polymerase ribozyme
James Attwater,   Shunsuke Tagami,   Michiko Kimoto,   Kyle Butler,  Eric T. Kool,   Jesper Wengel,   Piet Herdewijn,   Ichiro Hirao and   Philipp Holliger*
Chem. Sci., 2013,4, 2804-2814

Remodeling a β-peptide bundle
Matthew A. Molski, Jessica L. Goodman, Fang-Chieh Chou, David Baker, Rhiju Das and Alanna Schepartz  
Chem. Sci., 2013,4, 319-324

Clickable, photoreactive inhibitors to probe the active site microenvironment of fatty acid amide hydrolase
Susanna M. Saario, Michele K. McKinney, Anna E. Speers, Chu Wang and Benjamin F. Cravatt    
Chem. Sci., 2012,3, 77-83

A cyclic peptide inhibitor of C-terminal binding protein dimerization links metabolism with mitotic fidelity in breast cancer cells
Charles N. Birts,   Sharandip K. Nijjar,   Charlotte A. Mardle,   Franciane Hoakwie,   Patrick J. Duriez,   Jeremy P. Blaydes* and   Ali Tavassoli*  
Chem. Sci., 2013,4, 3046-3057

Chemical biology toolkit for exploring protein kinase catalyzed phosphorylation reactions
Sanela Martić and Heinz-Bernhard Kraatz  
Chem. Sci., 2013,4, 42-59

Metallohelices with activity against cisplatin-resistant cancer cells; does the mechanism involve DNA binding?
Viktor Brabec, Suzanne E. Howson, Rebecca A. Kaner, Rianne M. Lord, Jaroslav Malina, Roger M. Phillips, Qasem M. A. Abdallah, Patrick C. McGowan, Alison Rodger and Peter Scott
Chem. Sci., 2013, DOI: 10.1039/C3SC51731D

You can find many more excellent articles on chemical biology on our dedicated webpage:

Online collection: Chemical biology

Stay up to date with Chemical Science
Be among the first to hear about the newest articles being published – Sign-up to our journal news alert to receive information about most read articles, themed issues, journal news, as well as calls for papers and invitations.

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Chemical Science–RSC Prizes and Awards Symposium: Chemical Biology

 
  
Dear Colleague   Join Now

Join us for the Chemical Science–RSC Prizes and Awards Symposium, which will be taking place on 6 November 2013, Warwick.We invite you to connect with distinguished professionals and RSC Prize and Award winners at this engaging event, which will reflect on issues of chemical biology. Strong networking opportunities will be provided through a diverse range of presentations, and a wine reception will complete the evening activities.  

Confirmed Speakers Include:  

Prof. Thomas Carrel, Zurich
 
Prof. Greg Challis, Warwick
 
Prof. Ben Davis, University of Oxford
 
Prof. R Silverman, Northwestern
Winner of the Centenary prize 2013
 
Prof. R. Ulijn, Strathclyde
Winner of the Norman Heatley award 2013 
  

We hope that you and your colleagues will take advantage of this opportunity to attend the Chemical Science–RSC Prizes and Awards Symposium.  

For further information about this free event, and to register, please visit the dedicated webpage.  

Kind Regards

Dr Robert D. Eagling
Editor, Chemical Science  
  Dr James Hutchinson
Senior Programme Manager – Life Sciences  

Supported by the Chemistry Biology Interface Division  

 
 
  

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Vote for Chemical Science in the ScholarOne Journal Triathlon!

Vote now for Chemical Science!

We’re very proud to announce that Chemical Science has been nominated as one of the journals competing in this year’s ScholarOne Journal Triathlon, for the category ‘Swimming/Agility.’ This first stage of the triathlon, according to ScholarOne, is all about “how quickly and easily a journal is able to validate that they are accepting the right papers for their journal.”

In her nomination piece, Senior Publishing Editor Philippa Ross justifies why we think Chemical Science particularly excels in this category:

  • The introduction of the Edge article, a new article type which allows authors to present a novel piece of scientific research in an exciting succinct format with no page restrictions.
  • 17 world-leading scientists recruited by the Editor-in-Chief as Associate Editors whose expertise covers the breadth of the chemical sciences, and who act as gatekeepers of the science, ensuring that only the very best articles are accepted after peer review. The Associate Editors also raise the visibility of the journal internationally, which is vital in generating high quality submissions.
  • Highly talented and experienced professional editors, all with a broad range of scientific and publishing expertise, who make an initial assessment of all submissions received and decide whether a manuscript should be rejected without peer review or forwarded to an Associate Editor for consideration.
  • For each submission, the professional editors followed by Associate Editors are required to ask themselves a series of challenging questions around the novelty, significance, impact and originality of the research article. This triple layer of peer review helps us achieve our goal of only publishing exceptional research.

As a result of this rigorous process, only 10% of submitted Edge articles meet the exceptionally high standards for acceptance and publication in Chemical Science.

With our 2012 impact factor having risen to an impressive 8.314 and having been awarded as the Best New Journal 2011 by the Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers (ALPSP), we know that we truly are accepting only the best and most suitable papers for Chemical Science.

S1 Journal Triathlon

“This all-virtual tournament,” according to the ScholarOne Journal Triathlon webpage, “(which was) created to recognise the innovative work of scholarly journals, will allow a journal to compete with its peers in divisions of scholarly agility, efficiency, and endurance—the attributes of a true journal champion.”

We think we’ve got the agility to be the best, and we hope you do, too!

Vote now for Chemical Science!

Voting now underway– spread the word! Voting for this category is open to the general public till 7th October 2013.

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BBC World Service Recording at ISACS12

Want to know what Daniel Nocera thinks about wirelessly beaming energy from space? Over the coming weekend, the BBC World Service will be broadcasting an episode of The Forum, which was recorded at the RSC’s ISACS12 conference last week entitled “Challenges in Chemical Renewable Energy”.

Quentin Cooper hosts the programme in which Daniel Nocera of Harvard University, Clare Grey of the University of Cambridge, Carlos Henrique de Brito Cruz of the State University of Campinas and Jim Watson of the UK Energy Research Council discuss the work in their areas of expertise and future challenges for renewable energy as a whole.

The programme will be broadcast at 23.06 GMT on Saturday 14th September, 10.06 GMT on Sunday 15th September and 2.06 GMT on Monday 16th September. Find out when this is in your local time at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/programmeguide/.

It will also be available to listen on the iPlayer shortly after the broadcasts have finished and you will be able to hear it at http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01g94yj.

– Written by Yuandi Li, RSC Science Executive

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