Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Chemical Science Impact Factor rises to 8.6

Chemical Science is dedicated to publishing research of exceptional significance from across the chemical sciences.  For us, it’s all about giving our authors the visibility and recognition their research deserves. http://blogs.rsc.org/sc/files/2013/06/Small-Sunflower.jpg

We are delighted to announce that our 2013 Impact Factor* has risen to an impressive 8.601. This fantastic result further demonstrates that Chemical Science is one of the leading general chemistry journals.

Thank you to all who have contributed to the journal’s success so far – our authors, referees, readers and Editorial and Advisory Boards – we are very grateful for your support.

Our unique combination of high quality articles, flexible format and excellent Associate Editors, makes it clear why so many leading scientists have already chosen to publish in Chemical Science.  You can see our most highly cited articles listed below.

We invite you to submit your exceptional research to Chemical Science today.

Chemical Science is moving to Gold Open Access from Issue 1, 2015. It will be the world’s first high-quality Open Access chemistry journal.

By moving Chemical Science to Gold Open Access, we are giving the global community access to some of the very best research. Read our Press Release to find out more.

Find out how other Royal Society of Chemistry journals are ranked in the latest Impact Factor release

Top cited Chemical Science articles:

Perspectives

Synergistic catalysis: A powerful synthetic strategy for new reaction development

Anna E. Allen and David W. C. MacMillan

Ruthenium-catalyzed direct oxidative alkenylation of arenes through twofold C–H bond functionalization
Sergei I. Kozhushkov and Lutz Ackermann

Rethinking the term “pi-stacking”
Chelsea R. Martinez and Brent L. Iverson

Minireviews

Graphene-based electronic sensors
Author(s): He, Qiyuan; Wu, Shixin; Yin, Zongyou; et al.

Changing and challenging times for service crystallography
Simon J. Coles and Philip A. Gale

Cooperative Lewis acid/N-heterocyclic carbene catalysis
Daniel T. Cohen and Karl A. Scheidt

Edge Articles

Fullerene crystallisation as a key driver of charge separation in polymer/fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells
Fiona C. Jamieson, Ester Buchaca Domingo, Thomas McCarthy-Ward, Martin Heeney, Natalie Stingelin and James R. Durrant

A highly selective ratiometric near-infrared fluorescent cyanine sensor for cysteine with remarkable shift and its application in bioimaging
Zhiqian Guo, SeongWon Nam, Sungsu Park and Juyoung Yoon

A solvent-driven molecular spring
Zibin Zhang, Chengyou Han, Guocan Yu and Feihe Huang

*The Impact Factor provides an indication of the average number of citations per paper.  Produced annually, Impact Factors are calculated by dividing the number of citations in a year by the number of citeable articles published in the preceding two years.  Data based on 2013 Journal Citation Reports®, (Thomson Reuters, 2014).

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Blame the “messenger”

 A team led by Tony James, Steven Bull and Juyoung Yoon have developed a method they hope will help with the early diagnosis of diseases caused by oxidative damage. 

The research team is made up of Tony James, Steven Bull, Stephen Flower, John Lowe and Xiaolong Sun from the University of Bath. They are joined on this project by John Fossey from the University of Birmingham, Juyoung Yoon, Qingling Xu and Gyoungmi Kim from Ewha Woman’s University and Xu-Hong Qian from East China University of Science and Technology. 

The key to the research is the detection of the chemical peroxynitrite. Peroxynitrite is a signalling molecule associated with many diseases associated with oxidative damage but is difficult to detect since it is very short-lived. 

Led by James, Bull and Yoon, the team began by using a water soluble fluorescence probe to successfully detect peroxynitrite in cancer cells. They are now hoping to use this technique as the basis for tests for the early diagnosis of other diseases. 

A paper on their research – A water soluble boronate-based fluorescence probe for the selective detection of peroxynitrite and imaging in living cells – has just been published in Chemical Science and features as the cover image for the latest issue, Issue 9. 

Chemical Science 

About the image:
 Given that Peroxynitrite is an important cellular signalling “messenger” molecule, the core concept and design of their cover revolves around stamps to convey the idea of “messaging”.
“We used three stamps to represent the three countries (China, South Korea and the UK) involved in the collaboration” says Tony James. The Chinese Stamp contains a painting of the Tree Peony. Extracts from the Tree Peony (Paeonia suffruticosa) have been used as antioxidants as part of Natural and traditional Medicines (nutraceticals) for diseases caused by oxidative damage. The Tree Peony “king of flowers” is also a very important symbol and image of China and still maintains deep cultural significance.

The Korean stamp depicts the metric system, the group of Juyoung Yoon at Ewha Womans University in Seoul Korea carried out the cell imaging “measurements” of the cells. 

The UK stamp is the 2010 Dorothy Hodgkin Stamp released to celebrate 350 years of the Royal Society. Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin was awarded the 1964 Nobel Prize in Chemistry “for her determinations by X-ray techniques of the structures of important biochemical substances”. In particular she determined the structure of Vitamin B12. The structure of this molecule helped to understand the role and function of Vitamin B12 in the metabolism. Vitamin B12 has a key role in the normal functioning of the brain and nervous system, including nerve signalling and “messaging” 

James and co-workers explained that they designed the cover to pay homage to Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin and celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Award of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Therefore, the Chinese and Korean Stamps are both 1964 vintage. The UK stamp celebrates Dorothy Hodgkin’s Nobel Prize in 1964 and clearly links the “50 Years” Anniversary and “messaging” theme of our Cover.

We would also like to take this opportunity to wish our three corresponding Authors a very Happy 50th Birthday, as Juyoung Yoon, Steve Bull and Tony James are all celebrating their 50th birthdays during 2014. 

Read the full article for free today! 

A water-soluble boronate-based fluorescence probe for the selective detection of peroxynitrite and imaging in living cells
Xiaolong Sun, Qingling Xu, Gyoungmi Kim, Stephen E. Flower,  John P Lowe, Juyoung Yoon, John S Fossey, Xu-Hong Qian, Steven Bull and Tony D James 

DOI: 10.1039/C4SC01417K

 

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Excellent visibility for your research

Chemical Science is dedicated to publishing findings of exceptional significance from across the chemical sciences.

The graph below shows the number of citations to articles published in 2013 in Chemical Science and other leading general chemistry journals. 

It’s clear to see from this data that articles in Chemical Science are less likely to receive no citations and after just a few months of publication articles will be highly cited - 45% of 2013 Chemical Science articles have already received 5 or more citations.

Publishing your research in Chemical Science means your article will have excellent visibility and will be read and cited quickly by your colleagues.

Chemical Science Citations

Citations to articles published in 2013 (Data downloaded from ISI Web of Science on 6 June 2014)

Browse the latest articles from Chemical Science here


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A Faraday Discussion – Nanoparticle Synthesis and Assembly

How does the nanoparticle-nanoparticle potential govern nanoparticle formation or assembly? Can one make more robust nanoparticle superlattice structures, which can be moulded, milled and machined into desired shapes? How does the assembly process vary with nanoparticle shape?

These questions cannot be answered in isolation – join the Nanoparticle Synthesis and Assembly, a Faraday Discussion which will be held on 20-22 April 2015 in Chicago, USA.

Abstract submission is now open, so take advantage of this excellent opportunity to showcase your latest research alongside leading scientists from across the globe. Don’t leave it too late – the deadline for oral abstracts is 21 July 2014.

Themes will include:

  • Nanoparticle synthesis – physical chemistry of nanoparticle shape and ligand control
  • Theoretical insights into nanoparticle synthesis and nanoparticle assembly
  • Nanoparticle self-assembly
  • Nanoparticle directed assembly

For more information and to see details of the speakers, visit the event website.

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Challenges in Inorganic and Materials Chemistry (ISACS13) – register before 2 June

Challenges in Inorganic and Materials Chemistry - ISACS13
Don’t miss your chance to attend Challenges in Inorganic and Materials Chemistry (ISACS13)

Final registration deadline – Monday 2 June Register now

Register to join Guy Bertrand, Susumu Kitagawa and Douglas Stephan and a host of impressive speakers at Challenges in Inorganic and Materials Chemistry (ISACS13).

Spaces are filling up fast so guarantee your place now.

We look forward to welcoming you to Dublin this July.

Professor Thorri Gunnlaugsson Dr Robert D. Eagling
Conference Chair Editor, Chemical Science
P.S. Join us for the 5th Joint CSJ RSC Symposium on Supramolecular Chemistry which is being held on 1st July in Dublin, just before the start of ISACS13. It’s free to attend and registration is open now.

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Challenges in Inorganic and Materials Chemistry (ISACS13) – early bird registration approaching

 
Challenges in Inorganic and Materials Chemistry - ISACS13
   
Don’t miss your chance to attend Challenges in Inorganic and Materials Chemistry (ISACS13)

Early bird registration and bursary deadline – 12 May
 Register now

Now is also a perfect time to register to join Guy Bertrand, Susumu Kitagawa and Matthew Rosseinsky at Challenges in Inorganic and Materials Chemistry (ISACS13) as early bird rates and bursaries are currently available.

Remember, these great savings are only available until the 12 May 2014 so guarantee your place now.

We look forward to welcoming you to Dublin this July.            
                                      

Professor Thorri Gunnlaugsson Dr Robert D. Eagling
Conference Chair Editor, Chemical Science
 

P.S. Join us for the 5th Joint CSJ RSC Symposium on Supramolecular Chemistry which is being held on 1st July in Dublin, just before the start of ISACS13. It’s free to attend and registration is open now.

 

 

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Challenges in Inorganic and Materials Chemistry (ISACS13) – poster deadline 21 April

 
Challenges in Inorganic and Materials Chemistry - ISACS13
Poster abstract deadline – 21 April
 Submit
Don’t miss your chance to submit an abstract for Challenges in Inorganic and Materials Chemistry (ISACS13) – the poster deadline is just one week away.

This is an excellent opportunity to showcase your work and there will also be a poster prize awarded by Chemistry World for the best contribution, so be sure to submit your latest research before Monday 21 April 2014.

Early bird registration and bursary deadline – 12 May
 Register now

Now is also a perfect time to register to join Guy Bertrand, Susumu Kitagawa and Matthew Rosseinsky at Challenges in Inorganic and Materials Chemistry (ISACS13) as early bird rates and bursaries are currently available.

Remember, these great savings are only available until the 12 May 2014 so guarantee your place now.

We look forward to welcoming you to Dublin this July.            
                                      

Professor Thorri Gunnlaugsson Dr Robert D. Eagling
Conference Chair Editor, Chemical Science
P.S. Join us for the 5th Joint CSJ RSC Symposium on Supramolecular Chemistry which is being held on 1st July in Dublin, just before the start of ISACS13. It’s free to attend and registration is open now.

 

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Chemical Science welcomes Zhenan Bao as Associate Editor

This month, Chemical Science is delighted to welcome Zhenan Bao as Associate Editor in the area of organic materials. Zhenan received her PhD from the University of Chicago in 1995, and after a spell at Lucent Technologies’ Bell Labs, joined the Department of Chemical Engineering at Stanford University in 2004. She was appointed to her present position as Professor in 2012.

Zhenan was awarded the Beilby Medal and Prize by the Royal Society of Chemistry in 2009, for her contributions and discoveries in the field of organic semiconductors. These included demonstrating that conjugated polymers can produce high mobilities of charge carriers when self-assembled using solution deposition.

She also featured in Thomson Reuter’s ‘Top 100 Materials Scientists’ report in 2011, which identified researchers with the highest citation counts for papers published in 2000–2010.

The Bao Group’s research utilizes the basic principles in chemistry, physics and material sciences to enable novel applications and development of flexible, stretchable electronics and energy devices. Current research projects within the group include organic semi-conductor design, organic and carbon solar cells, and electronic skin.

The group has published work in a number of Royal Society of Chemistry journals, and you can read more about it in the following articles:

Probing interfacial molecular packing in TIPS-pentacene organic semiconductors by Surface enhanced Raman Scattering
Jie Xu, Ying Diao, Dongshan Zhou, Yisha Mao, Gaurav Giri, Wei Chen, Nan Liu, Stefan C B Mannsfeld, Gi Xue and Zhenan Bao 
J. Mater. Chem. C, 2014, Accepted Manuscript, DOI: 10.1039/C3TC32581D

Sequentially solution-processed, nanostructured polymer photovoltaics using selective solvents
Do Hwan Kim, Jianguo Mei, Alexander L. Ayzner, Kristin Schmidt, Gaurav Giri, Anthony L. Appleton, Michael F. Toney and Zhenan Bao 
Energy Environ. Sci., 2014, 7, 1103-1109, DOI: 10.1039/C3EE43541E, Paper

A review of fabrication and applications of carbon nanotube film-based flexible electronics
Steve Park, Michael Vosguerichian and Zhenan Bao 
Nanoscale, 2013, 5, 1727-1752, DOI: 10.1039/C3NR33560G

Confined organization of fullerene units along high polymer chains
Lei Fang, Peng Liu, Benjamin R. Sveinbjornsson, Sule Atahan-Evrenk, Koen Vandewal, Sílvia Osuna, Gonzalo Jiménez-Osés, Supriya Shrestha, Gaurav Giri, Peng Wei, Alberto Salleo, Alán Aspuru-Guzik, Robert H. Grubbs, K. N. Houk and Zhenan Bao 
J. Mater. Chem. C, 2013, 1, 5747-5755, DOI: 10.1039/C3TC31158A

5,11-Conjugation-extended low-bandgap anthradithiophene-containing polymer exhibiting enhanced thin-film order and field-effect mobility
Ying Jiang, Jianguo Mei, Alexander L. Ayzner, Michael F. Toney and Zhenan Bao 
Chem. Commun., 2012, 48, 7286-7288, DOI: 10.1039/C2CC32473C

Impact of regioregularity on thin-film transistor and photovoltaic cell performances of pentacene-containing polymers
Ying Jiang, Sanghyun Hong, Joon Hak Oh, Rajib Mondal, Toshihiro Okamoto, Eric Verploegen, Michael F. Toney, Michael D. McGehee and Zhenan Bao 
J. Mater. Chem., 2012, 22, 4356-4363, DOI: 10.1039/C2JM15483H

Graphene–sponges as high-performance low-cost anodes for microbial fuel cells
Xing Xie, Guihua Yu, Nian Liu, Zhenan Bao, Craig S. Criddle and Yi Cui 
Energy Environ. Sci., 2012, 5, 6862-6866, DOI: 10.1039/C2EE03583A

Zhenan is now accepting submissions to Chemical Science in the area of organic materials.  Submit your high-impact research to her Editorial Office.

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Challenges in Inorganic and Materials Chemistry (ISACS13) – 2 weeks until oral deadline

Challenges in Inorganic and Materials Chemistry - ISACS13
   
Oral abstract deadline – 24 February 2014
 
Don’t miss your chance to present at Challenges in Inorganic and Materials Chemistry (ISACS13) in Dublin this July.Oral abstracts are currently invited, but hurry, the deadline is just two weeks away. Submit before Monday 24 February 2014 for the opportunity to showcase your latest research at this significant event.

Registration now open
 

With a host of world-class speakers and a vibrant city location, Challenges in Inorganic and Materials Chemistry is set to be the most popular ISACS conference to date.

Register today to guarantee your place and benefit from the fantastic savings currently available:

  • Early bird discount
  • Student and member rates
  • Bursaries worth £150

We look forward to welcoming you.                                                         
 

Professor Thorri Gunnlaugsson Dr Robert D. Eagling
Conference Chair Editor, Chemical Science
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Chemical Science listed in SCI

We are delighted to announce that Chemical Science has now been listed in Thomson Reuters’ Science Citation Index® (SCI).

The journal has featured in the Science Citation Index Expanded™ (SCIE), the database behind Web of Science™, since its launch; however we are pleased to now feature in the SCI as well. The SCI contains the highest ranking journals in their fields, further emphasizing the quality of research published in Chemical Science.

Read more about the citation profile and Impact Factor of Chemical Science.

Browse the latest articles from Chemical Science

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