Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Prize awarded at Postgraduate Solar Fuels Symposium

SFN 3rd UK Solar Fuels Symposium 19th and 20th January, 2015 Edinburgh Conference CentreChemical Science and Energy & Environmental Science were delighted to sponsor the Postgraduate Solar Fuels Symposium which took place in Edinburgh last month.

The winner of the prize for best oral presentation  was Jan Rongé, University of Cambridge for his talk “Solar fuel from air and sunlight”.

Emily Glover of University College London and Wei Li of the University of Liverpool both received honourable mentions for their talks.

The best poster prize was awarded to Mark Forster from the University of Liverpool, for his poster titled “Elucidating charge carrier dynamics on advanced hematite (Fe2O3) photoelectrodes”.

Congratulations to the winners!

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Challenges in Chemical Renewable Energy – join us in Rio!

Challenges in Chemical Renewable Energy ISACS17 8-11 September 2015 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Call for oral abstracts – deadline 27 April 2015

We invite you to join us at Challenges in Chemical Renewable Energy (ISACS17), which will be held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from 8-11 September 2015.

This conference will bring together leading scientists from across the world to share scientific developments in renewable energy generation and storage. The broad subject scope will provide an excellent overview of some of the key challenges within cutting edge aspects of this important, fast-moving research field, with plenty of opportunities for networking.

Themes include:

  • Solar Fuels and molecular catalysis
  • Photovoltaics
  • Biofuels
  • Battery technology and energy storage
  • Fuel cells


Submit your abstract today via our submission system.

You can find more details about submitting your abstract here.


Invited speakers:

James Durrant, Imperial College London, United Kingdom

Eduardo Falabella, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro and PETROBRAS, Brazil

Marc Fontecave, Collège de France, France

Ernesto R. Gonzalez, University of São Paulo, Brazil

Can Li, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, China

Daniel Nocera, Harvard University, United States

Erwin Reisner, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom

Keith Waldron, Institute of Food Research, United Kingdom

Karen Wilson, Aston University, United Kingdom


Chemical Science cover imageThe ISACS symposia are organised in partnership with Chemical Science. From 2015 all our content is Open Access so you can check out some of the latest freely accessible research in the broad field of Chemical Renewable Energy today:

Reversible photo-induced trap formation in mixed-halide hybrid perovskites for photovoltaics
Eric T. Hoke, Daniel J. Slotcavage, Emma R. Dohner, Andrea R. Bowring, Hemamala I. Karunadasa and Michael D. McGehee
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC03141E

Long-lived charge carrier generation in ordered films of a covalent perylenediimide–diketopyrrolopyrrole–perylenediimide molecule
Patrick E. Hartnett, Scott M. Dyar, Eric A. Margulies, Leah E. Shoer, Andrew W. Cook, Samuel W. Eaton, Tobin J. Marks and Michael R. Wasielewski
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC02551B

Ultrafast delocalization of excitation in synthetic light-harvesting nanorings
Chaw-Keong Yong, Patrick Parkinson, Dmitry V. Kondratuk, Wei-Hsin Chen, Andrew Stannard, Alex Summerfield, Johannes K. Sprafke, Melanie C. O’Sullivan, Peter H. Beton, Harry L. Anderson and Laura M. Herz
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC02424A

Oxygen evolution on well-characterized mass-selected Ru and RuO2 nanoparticles
Elisa A. Paoli, Federico Masini, Rasmus Frydendal, Davide Deiana, Christian Schlaup, Mauro Malizia, Thomas W. Hansen, Sebastian Horch, Ifan E. L. Stephens and Ib Chorkendorff
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC02685C

Metal oxidation states in biological water splitting
Vera Krewald, Marius Retegan, Nicholas Cox, Johannes Messinger, Wolfgang Lubitz, Serena DeBeer, Frank Neese and Dimitrios A. Pantazis
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC03720K

Computational design of molecules for an all-quinone redox flow battery
Süleyman Er, Changwon Suh, Michael P. Marshak and Alán Aspuru-Guzik
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC03030C

A noble metal-free proton-exchange membrane fuel cell based on bio-inspired molecular catalysts
P. D. Tran, A. Morozan, S. Archambault, J. Heidkamp, P. Chenevier, H. Dau, M. Fontecave, A. Martinent, B. Jousselme and V. Artero
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC03774J

A facile route to electronically conductive polyelectrolyte brushes as platforms of molecular wires
Karol Wolski, Michał Szuwarzyński and Szczepan Zapotoczny
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC04048A

Catalysis of water oxidation in acetonitrile by iridium oxide nanoparticles
Jonnathan C. Hidalgo-Acosta, Manuel A. Méndez, Micheál D. Scanlon, Heron Vrubel, Véronique Amstutz, Wojciech Adamiak, Marcin Opallo and Hubert H. Girault
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC02196G

Tandem redox mediator/Ni(II) trihalide complex photocycle for hydrogen evolution from HCl
Seung Jun Hwang, David C. Powers, Andrew G. Maher and Daniel G. Nocera
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC02357A

Durable hydrogen evolution from water driven by sunlight using (Ag,Cu)GaSe2 photocathodes modified with CdS and CuGa3Se5
Li Zhang, Tsutomu Minegishi, Mamiko Nakabayashi, Yohichi Suzuki, Kazuhiko Seki, Naoya Shibata, Jun Kubota and Kazunari Domen
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC02346C

Magnetic MOF microreactors for recyclable size-selective biocatalysis
Jia Huo, Jordi Aguilera-Sigalat, Samir El-Hankari and Darren Bradshaw
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC03367A

We hope you can join us for Challenges in Chemical Renewable Energy (ISAC17). Claudio Mota, Roberto Torresi and the rest of the Scientific Committee look forward to welcoming you and your colleagues to Rio de Janeiro!

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Challenges in Chemical Biology – oral abstract deadline: 23 February


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Oral abstract submission – deadline extended to 23 February 2015

We invite you to join us at Challenges in Chemical Biology (ISACS16), the 16th conference in the highly successful International Symposia on Advancing the Chemical Sciences (ISACS) series.

The conference will be held at the ETH, Zurich, Switzerland from 15-18 June 2015.

Take advantage of this excellent opportunity to showcase your latest research alongside the following leading scientists from across the globe - submit your abstract today.

Confirmed invited speakers:

Shankar Balasubramanian, University of Cambridge, UK
Annette Beck-Sickinger, Leipzig University, Germany
Peng Chen, Peking University, China
Dorothea Fiedler, Princeton University, USA
Kai Johnsson, EPFL Switzerland, Switzerland
Carsten Schultz, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Germany
Scott Sternson, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, USA
John Sutherland, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, UK
David Tirrell, California Institute of Technology, USA
Yasuteru Urano, University of Tokyo, Japan
Wilfred van der Donk, University of Illinois, USA

We look forward to welcoming you to Zurich in June 2015.

Professor Hema Wennemers
Conference Chair
Dr Heather Montgomery
Deputy Editor, Chemical Science
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Daniel Nocera – our new Chemical Science Editor-in-Chief

We are delighted to announce Professor Daniel Nocera as the new Editor-in-Chief of Chemical Science. Daniel Nocera, the Patterson Rockwood Professor of Energy at Harvard University, has a diverse research programme and is recognised, internationally, as a pioneer and leading expert in the field of solar energy conversion.

Professor Nocera’s group has recently accomplished a solar fuels process that captures many of the elements of photosynthesis – he has now translated this science to produce the artificial leaf. This exciting discovery sets the stage for a storage mechanism for the distributed deployment of solar energy.

As we thank Professor David MacMillan for his valuable contributions to Chemical Science since its launch in 2010, we extend a warm welcome to Professor Nocera as he leads the journal towards continued success and excellence.

Professor Nocera joins us in inviting you to read Chemical Science’s first Open Access articles in Issue 1 for 2015 – one hundred cutting-edge articles showcasing exceptional research across the chemical sciences. For a limited time, these have been gathered under broad subject areas to show significant breakthroughs in each field:

Analytical Chemistry

Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry

Organic Chemistry

Catalysis

Energy and Physical Chemistry

Materials

Nanoscience

Inorganic Chemistry

Chemical Science is the Royal Society of Chemistry’s flagship journal, publishing research articles of exceptional significance and high-impact reviews from across the chemical sciences. The journal’s latest (2013) Impact Factor is 8.6. Research in Chemical Science is not only of the highest quality but also has excellent visibility; this is reflected in our latest citation profile.

Submit your exceptional research to Chemical Science today!

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Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014

The prestigious Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 was awarded jointly to Eric Betzig, Stefan W. Hell and William E. Moerner for their outstanding contributions to advancing single molecule spectroscopy. Many congratulations to all of them!

To mark this special occasion, we would like to remember Moerner’s latest publication in Chemical Science. Take another look at his exceptional minireview on single-molecule spectroscopy. To access the full article, download a copy for free* by clicking the link below:

Single-molecule spectroscopy of photosynthetic proteins in solution
Gabriela S. Schlau-Cohen, Samuel Bockenhauer, Quan Wangac and W. E. Moerner
DOI: 10.1039/C4SC00582A

The Chemical Science team would like to take this opportunity to congratulate Prof. Moerner on this fantastic achievement.

Single-molecule optical spectroscopy is the topic of one of our very successful Chem. Soc. Rev. themed issues, aimed to sample a number of recent conceptual and methodic inroads as well as applications in single-molecule science.

This special issue, guest edited by Professor Michel Orrit, Professor Taekjip Ha and Professor Vahid Sandoghdar, combines tutorial reviews with review articles to illustrate the power and versatility of single-molecule optical techniques

Additionally, don’t miss out our upcoming Faraday Discussion on Single Molecule Microscopy and Spectroscopy during the 14-16 September 2015. We look forward to welcoming you to London for this Faraday Discussion.

Abstract submission is now open, so take advantage of this excellent opportunity to showcase your latest research alongside leading scientists from across the globe. Don’t leave it too late – the deadline for oral abstracts is 8 December 2014.

Themes will include:
- Quantum optics and plasmonics
- Probes and sensors for molecular biophysics
- Superresolution and imaging of soft and biological matter
- Nonlinear optics and coherence in biophysics

It is our pleasure to announce that two of the Nobel laureates will be with us during the event. Prof. Moerner has agreed to be our opening lecturer and Prof. Hell will be responsible for the closing remarks of this exciting Faraday Discussion. Check the programme and the complete list of speakers here.

*Access is free through a registered RSC account for the next six weeks – click here to register

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Chemical Science Impact Factor rises to 8.6

Chemical Science is dedicated to publishing research of exceptional significance from across the chemical sciences.  For us, it’s all about giving our authors the visibility and recognition their research deserves. http://blogs.rsc.org/sc/files/2013/06/Small-Sunflower.jpg

We are delighted to announce that our 2013 Impact Factor* has risen to an impressive 8.601. This fantastic result further demonstrates that Chemical Science is one of the leading general chemistry journals.

Thank you to all who have contributed to the journal’s success so far – our authors, referees, readers and Editorial and Advisory Boards – we are very grateful for your support.

Our unique combination of high quality articles, flexible format and excellent Associate Editors, makes it clear why so many leading scientists have already chosen to publish in Chemical Science.  You can see our most highly cited articles listed below.

We invite you to submit your exceptional research to Chemical Science today.

Chemical Science is moving to Gold Open Access from Issue 1, 2015. It will be the world’s first high-quality Open Access chemistry journal.

By moving Chemical Science to Gold Open Access, we are giving the global community access to some of the very best research. Read our Press Release to find out more.

Find out how other Royal Society of Chemistry journals are ranked in the latest Impact Factor release

Top cited Chemical Science articles:

Perspectives

Synergistic catalysis: A powerful synthetic strategy for new reaction development

Anna E. Allen and David W. C. MacMillan

Ruthenium-catalyzed direct oxidative alkenylation of arenes through twofold C–H bond functionalization
Sergei I. Kozhushkov and Lutz Ackermann

Rethinking the term “pi-stacking”
Chelsea R. Martinez and Brent L. Iverson

Minireviews

Graphene-based electronic sensors
Author(s): He, Qiyuan; Wu, Shixin; Yin, Zongyou; et al.

Changing and challenging times for service crystallography
Simon J. Coles and Philip A. Gale

Cooperative Lewis acid/N-heterocyclic carbene catalysis
Daniel T. Cohen and Karl A. Scheidt

Edge Articles

Fullerene crystallisation as a key driver of charge separation in polymer/fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cells
Fiona C. Jamieson, Ester Buchaca Domingo, Thomas McCarthy-Ward, Martin Heeney, Natalie Stingelin and James R. Durrant

A highly selective ratiometric near-infrared fluorescent cyanine sensor for cysteine with remarkable shift and its application in bioimaging
Zhiqian Guo, SeongWon Nam, Sungsu Park and Juyoung Yoon

A solvent-driven molecular spring
Zibin Zhang, Chengyou Han, Guocan Yu and Feihe Huang

*The Impact Factor provides an indication of the average number of citations per paper.  Produced annually, Impact Factors are calculated by dividing the number of citations in a year by the number of citeable articles published in the preceding two years.  Data based on 2013 Journal Citation Reports®, (Thomson Reuters, 2014).

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Blame the “messenger”

 A team led by Tony James, Steven Bull and Juyoung Yoon have developed a method they hope will help with the early diagnosis of diseases caused by oxidative damage. 

The research team is made up of Tony James, Steven Bull, Stephen Flower, John Lowe and Xiaolong Sun from the University of Bath. They are joined on this project by John Fossey from the University of Birmingham, Juyoung Yoon, Qingling Xu and Gyoungmi Kim from Ewha Woman’s University and Xu-Hong Qian from East China University of Science and Technology. 

The key to the research is the detection of the chemical peroxynitrite. Peroxynitrite is a signalling molecule associated with many diseases associated with oxidative damage but is difficult to detect since it is very short-lived. 

Led by James, Bull and Yoon, the team began by using a water soluble fluorescence probe to successfully detect peroxynitrite in cancer cells. They are now hoping to use this technique as the basis for tests for the early diagnosis of other diseases. 

A paper on their research – A water soluble boronate-based fluorescence probe for the selective detection of peroxynitrite and imaging in living cells – has just been published in Chemical Science and features as the cover image for the latest issue, Issue 9. 

Chemical Science 

About the image:
 Given that Peroxynitrite is an important cellular signalling “messenger” molecule, the core concept and design of their cover revolves around stamps to convey the idea of “messaging”.
“We used three stamps to represent the three countries (China, South Korea and the UK) involved in the collaboration” says Tony James. The Chinese Stamp contains a painting of the Tree Peony. Extracts from the Tree Peony (Paeonia suffruticosa) have been used as antioxidants as part of Natural and traditional Medicines (nutraceticals) for diseases caused by oxidative damage. The Tree Peony “king of flowers” is also a very important symbol and image of China and still maintains deep cultural significance.

The Korean stamp depicts the metric system, the group of Juyoung Yoon at Ewha Womans University in Seoul Korea carried out the cell imaging “measurements” of the cells. 

The UK stamp is the 2010 Dorothy Hodgkin Stamp released to celebrate 350 years of the Royal Society. Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin was awarded the 1964 Nobel Prize in Chemistry “for her determinations by X-ray techniques of the structures of important biochemical substances”. In particular she determined the structure of Vitamin B12. The structure of this molecule helped to understand the role and function of Vitamin B12 in the metabolism. Vitamin B12 has a key role in the normal functioning of the brain and nervous system, including nerve signalling and “messaging” 

James and co-workers explained that they designed the cover to pay homage to Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin and celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Award of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Therefore, the Chinese and Korean Stamps are both 1964 vintage. The UK stamp celebrates Dorothy Hodgkin’s Nobel Prize in 1964 and clearly links the “50 Years” Anniversary and “messaging” theme of our Cover.

We would also like to take this opportunity to wish our three corresponding Authors a very Happy 50th Birthday, as Juyoung Yoon, Steve Bull and Tony James are all celebrating their 50th birthdays during 2014. 

Read the full article for free today! 

A water-soluble boronate-based fluorescence probe for the selective detection of peroxynitrite and imaging in living cells
Xiaolong Sun, Qingling Xu, Gyoungmi Kim, Stephen E. Flower,  John P Lowe, Juyoung Yoon, John S Fossey, Xu-Hong Qian, Steven Bull and Tony D James 

DOI: 10.1039/C4SC01417K

 

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Excellent visibility for your research

Chemical Science is dedicated to publishing findings of exceptional significance from across the chemical sciences.

The graph below shows the number of citations to articles published in 2013 in Chemical Science and other leading general chemistry journals. 

It’s clear to see from this data that articles in Chemical Science are less likely to receive no citations and after just a few months of publication articles will be highly cited - 45% of 2013 Chemical Science articles have already received 5 or more citations.

Publishing your research in Chemical Science means your article will have excellent visibility and will be read and cited quickly by your colleagues.

Chemical Science Citations

Citations to articles published in 2013 (Data downloaded from ISI Web of Science on 6 June 2014)

Browse the latest articles from Chemical Science here


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A Faraday Discussion – Nanoparticle Synthesis and Assembly

How does the nanoparticle-nanoparticle potential govern nanoparticle formation or assembly? Can one make more robust nanoparticle superlattice structures, which can be moulded, milled and machined into desired shapes? How does the assembly process vary with nanoparticle shape?

These questions cannot be answered in isolation – join the Nanoparticle Synthesis and Assembly, a Faraday Discussion which will be held on 20-22 April 2015 in Chicago, USA.

Abstract submission is now open, so take advantage of this excellent opportunity to showcase your latest research alongside leading scientists from across the globe. Don’t leave it too late – the deadline for oral abstracts is 21 July 2014.

Themes will include:

  • Nanoparticle synthesis – physical chemistry of nanoparticle shape and ligand control
  • Theoretical insights into nanoparticle synthesis and nanoparticle assembly
  • Nanoparticle self-assembly
  • Nanoparticle directed assembly

For more information and to see details of the speakers, visit the event website.

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Challenges in Inorganic and Materials Chemistry (ISACS13) – register before 2 June

Challenges in Inorganic and Materials Chemistry - ISACS13
Don’t miss your chance to attend Challenges in Inorganic and Materials Chemistry (ISACS13)

Final registration deadline – Monday 2 June Register now

Register to join Guy Bertrand, Susumu Kitagawa and Douglas Stephan and a host of impressive speakers at Challenges in Inorganic and Materials Chemistry (ISACS13).

Spaces are filling up fast so guarantee your place now.

We look forward to welcoming you to Dublin this July.

Professor Thorri Gunnlaugsson Dr Robert D. Eagling
Conference Chair Editor, Chemical Science
P.S. Join us for the 5th Joint CSJ RSC Symposium on Supramolecular Chemistry which is being held on 1st July in Dublin, just before the start of ISACS13. It’s free to attend and registration is open now.

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