2020 #RSCPoster Twitter Conference

Stay tuned for more information coming soon…

 

Find out about our 2019 event here: www.rsc.li/rsc-poster-2019

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Announcing the 2019 #RSCPoster Twitter Conference winners

The #RSCPoster Twitter Conference is an online event held entirely over Twitter to bring members of the scientific research community together to share their research, network and engage in scientific debate.

The 2019 edition of #RSCPoster was the biggest and best yet, taking place for 24 hours starting at 09:00 AM GMT, 5 March 2019. In it’s fifth year, #RSCPoster boasted a full compliment of subject categories spanning the chemical sciences and related fields, supported by 33 passionate Subject Chairs and 20 dedicated General Committee members (find out who they were in this blog post).

Reaching throughout the twitter chemical sciences community and beyond, #RSCPoster 2019 involved:

  • Over 500 registered poster delegates
  • 3186 Contributors
  • 9759 Tweets
  • Audience of over 2 million
  • 14 million total impressions

Find out more about the 2019 #RSCPoster event in the lead-up blog post: here, and see some highlights from the day: here.

 

2019 #RSCPoster Winners:

With thanks to our committee members, we are now delighted to announce the 2019 #RSCPoster winners as below. Please click on the posters to see the original tweet.

  • 1st Place prize = £100
  • 2nd Place prize = £50
#RSCPoster Subject Category 1st Place prize 2nd Place prize
#RSCAnalytical
#RSCChemBio  
#RSCCat
#RSCEnergy
 
#RSCEnv
#RSCInorg  
#RSCMat
#RSCNano  
#RSCOrg  
#RSCPhys  
#RSCEng
 
  • #RSCEdu Primary/ Secondary/ Further education prize= £100
  • #RSCEdu Higher education prize = £100
#RSCPoster Subject Category Primary/ Secondary/ Further education prize Higher education prize
#RSCEdu
  • Audience participation prize (#RSCPoster that receives the most retweets) = chemistry-themed board game: Compounded

 

  • Special commendation  = chemistry-themed board game: Compounded

Thanks again to our wonderful sponsors this year who are supporting these prizes:

Analytical Science NetworkAnalytical Methods CommitteeChemical Biology and Bioorganic GroupApplied Catalysis GroupEducation in ChemistryChemistry Education Research and PracticeAlvatekEnvironmental Chemistry GroupApplied Materials Chemistry GroupChemical Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Group, Organic & Biomolecular ChemistryPhysical Chemistry Chemical PhysicsChemical ScienceProcess Chemistry and Technology Group and Dr Sam Illingworth.

 

Congratulations to the prize winners, thank you to everyone involved and we look forward to the 2020 #RSCPoster – details coming soon.

 

2019 #RSCPoster Event Organizers

Matthew Baker, University of Strathclyde, @ChemistryBaker

Edward Randviir, Manchester Metropolitan University, @EdwardRandviir

Hannah Kerr, Royal Society of Chemistry, @hk_chemistryy

Kathryn Gempf, Royal Society of Chemistry, @KGempf

Contact us: RSCPoster@rsc.org

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Celebrating our Outstanding Reviewers in 2018

We want to make sure that our journals deliver rigorous and fair peer review and we wouldn’t be able to achieve that commitment without the amazing contribution of our reviewers.

In 2018, nearly 50,000 individual reviewers provided a review for one or more of our journals.  Every one of them is contributing to the efforts of our community to advance excellence in the chemical sciences. Our community is truly a global one, with reviewers coming from over 100 different countries.

We want to celebrate some of the individuals who’ve made significant contributions to our journals by reviewing for us over the last 12 months, by publishing a list of Outstanding Reviewers for each of our journals. The lists will be published on each journal blog in March 2018 and each journal will also publish a special Editorial in the coming weeks. Each Outstanding Reviewer will also receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

While it’s not possible to list everyone, we would like to say a big thank you to all of the reviewers that have supported our journals. We would also like to thank all our journal Editorial and Advisory Boards and the chemical community for their continued support as authors, reviewers and readers.

Congratulations to all the Outstanding Reviewers in 2018!

If you would like to become a reviewer for any of our journals, just contact the journal by email with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre.

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2019 #RSCPoster Twitter Conference

#RSCPoster

Thank you to all who participated – check out the winning posters: here!

The #RSCPoster Twitter Conference is an online event held entirely over Twitter to bring members of the scientific research community together to share their research, network and engage in scientific debate.

We are excited to announce that the 2019 event will be held: Tuesday 5 March 2019, 09:00 GMT – Wednesday 6 March 2019, 09:00 GMT.

Read more about #RSCPoster 2019 and take a look at the winning posters: 

Announcing the 2019 #RSCPoster Twitter Conference winners

Registration now closed.

Get involved:

  • Share a poster of your research
  • Network with researchers by following #RSCPoster
  • Engage in scientific debate by commenting on posters

With subject hashtags spanning the core chemical sciences and related fields, whatever your field, connect and showcase your research:

Analytical #RSCPoster  #RSCAnalytical
Chemical and Biology Interface #RSCPoster  #RSCChemBio
Catalysis * #RSCPoster  #RSCCat
Education #RSCPoster  #RSCEdu
Energy & Sustainability * #RSCPoster  #RSCEnergy
Environmental #RSCPoster  #RSCEnv
Inorganic #RSCPoster  #RSCInorg
Materials #RSCPoster  #RSCMat
Nanoscience #RSCPoster  #RSCNano
Organic #RSCPoster  #RSCOrg
Physical  #RSCPoster  #RSCPhys
Engineering #RSCPoster  #RSCEng

* New for 2019

Submit a poster:

  • Register to submit a poster in advance – click here and register via the RSC Events page now
  • Tweet your poster image with a title, #RSCPoster and relevant subject hashtag(s)  – during the 24h conference beginning 5 March 2019, 09:00 GMT
  • Discuss and engage – throughout the 24h conference make sure to answer the questions from the community, committee and comment on other #RSCPosters

Check out this video tutorial from Edward Randviir (Manchester Metropolitan University, @EdwardRandviir) explaining how to search for hashtags in Twitter and how to take part!

and here: https://twitter.com/EdwardRandviir/status/1102956739887054850

 

Top tips for making a poster specifically for Twitter are available on the BetterPosters blog, written by Zen Faulkes (@DoctorZen). 

 

Win a prize:

  • Win cash prizes if your #RSCPoster and presentation is deemed best by the 2019 subject chairs.
  • Audience participation prize will be awarded to the poster that receives the most retweets. The lucky winner will receive a chemistry-themed board game: Compounded. Compounded is a game where players take on the roles of lab managers, hastily competing to make compounds before they are completed by others or destroyed in an explosion… With thanks to Dr Sam Illingworth (Manchester Metrapolitan University) for supporting this prize.

Thanks to our wonderful sponsors this year who are supporting cash prizes:

Analytical Science NetworkAnalytical Methods Committee, Chemical Biology and Bioorganic GroupApplied Catalysis Group, Education in ChemistryChemistry Education Research and Practice, AlvatekEnvironmental Chemistry GroupApplied Materials Chemistry GroupChemical Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Group, Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, Chemical ScienceProcess Chemistry and Technology Group.

 

2019 #RSCPoster Subject Chairs:

#RSCAnalytical Roy Goodacre, University of Liverpool
Martín Resano, University of Zarragoza
@RoyGoodacre
@MartinResano
#RSCChemBio Marloes Peeters, Manchester Metropolitan University
Sara Rouhanifard, NorthEastern University
 @Peeters_Marloes
@SRouhanifard
#RSCCat Paul Collier, Johnson Matthey
James Paterson, BP
Jennifer Garden, University of Edinburgh
@RSC_ACG
@garden_jenni
#RSCEdu Emily Seeber, Bedales School and University of Oxford
Claire McDonnell, Dublin Institute of Technology
Kristy Turner, University of Manchester
@emily_seeber
@clairemcdonndit
@doc_kristy
#RSCEnergy Saiful Islam, University of Bath
Doug Macfarlane, Monash University
@SaifulChemistry
@DRMacFarlane
#RSCEnv Nadine Borduas, ETH Zurich
Helen Casey, University of Huddersfield
Peter Vikesland,
Virginia Tech
@nadineborduas
@helen_casey
@petervikesland
#RSCInorg Charlie O’Hara, University of Strathclyde
Marcel Swart, University of Girona
Cathleen Crudden, Queen’s University
@oharalab
@marcel_swart
@cathleencrudden
#RSCMat Athina Anastasaki, ETH Zurich
Chris Foster, Manchester Metropolitan University
Mark Olson, Tianjin University
@AthinaAnastasa1
@CWFoster90
@MARK_A_OLSON
#RSCNano Gemma-Louise Davies, University College London
Karen Faulds, University of Strathclyde
Sara Skrabalak, Indiana University
 @GemmaLouDavies
@FauldsKaren
@SaraSkrabalak
#RSCOrg Armando Carlone, Università degli Studi dell’Aquila
Ryan Mewis, Manchester Metropolitan University
David Nelson, University of Strathclyde
@armando_carlone
@RyanMewis
@TheNelsonGroup
#RSCPhys Lars Goerigk, University of Melbourne
Laura McKemmish, University of New South Wales
Brian Wagner, University of Prince Edward Island
@lgoer_compchem
@laura_mckemmish
@DrummerBoy2112
#RSCEng Jason Hein, The University of British Columbia
Tanja Junkers, Monash University
Tim Noël, Eindhoven University of Technology
@procrastiprof
@polymerreaction
@NoelGroupTUE

2019 #RSCPoster General Committee:

Damien Arrigan, Curtin University  @arri_aus
Zoe Ayres, Hach @zjayres
James Batteas, Texas A&M University  @jamesbatteas
Gonçalo Bernardes, University of Cambridge  @gbernardes_chem
Holly Butler, University of Strathclyde  @HollehButler
Malika Jeffries-El, Boston University  @Chem_Diva
Neil Keddie, University of St Andrews @theyakman
Simon Lancaster University of East Anglia @S_J_Lancaster
Simon Lewis, Curtin University  @SimonWLewis
Jennifer Love, The University of British Columbia @JenniferLoveUBC
Nicholas Marshall, USC Aiken @ChemImprov
Jean-Francois Masson, University of Montreal  @Masson_chem
Claire Murray, Diamond Light Source @drclairemurray
Warren Piers, University of Calgary  @Wpiers1
Dino Spagnoli, University of Western Australia @dino_spagnoli
Fraser Stoddart, Northwestern University @sirfrasersays
Nick Stone, Univeristy of Exeter  @profnickstone
M. Eugenio Vázquez, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela  @ChemBioUSC
Renee Webster, Monash University  @reneewebs
Jason Woolford, Royal Society of Chemistry @RealTimeChem

 

See information from previous events here or see the previous events on Twitter via the subject hashtag links above or here.

 

In the spirit of the recent partnership between the Royal Society of Chemistry and the Royal Australian Chemical Institute we are delighted to announce the RACI will be supporting #RSCPoster by awarding prizes to the best posters presented by Aussie chemists.

Just add the hashtag #ozchem to be in with a chance of winning a year’s free RACI membership and a copy of A Century of Bonds!

A local scientific committee will independently judge the best #ozchem poster and presentation

  • Associate Professor Jack Clegg, University of Queensland (@JackKClegg)
  • Professor Dianne Jolley,  (@DrDianneJolley), together with Dr Darren Koppel, (@DarrenKoppel), both University of Technology Sydney
  • Dr Lidia Matesic, (@DrLidiaM)
  • Professor Anthony O’Mullane, Queensland University of Technology (@AOMullane_EChem)

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Do I need to check the copyright and permissions needed for figures or any other parts of my poster which have already been published?
Yes. Copyright owners have the exclusive right to copy their work and to issue copies of their work to the public, and it is an infringement for anyone else to do so without the copyright owner’s permission. If you are reproducing material contained in a Royal Society of Chemistry publication (journal articles, book or book chapters) you may do so providing that you fully acknowledge the original Royal Society of Chemistry publication and include a link back to it. If you wish to include material that has been published by another publisher, you will need to check how the publisher/copyright owner of the third party material wishes to receive permission requests. Information on this can be found on our Permission Requests page at http://www.rsc.org/Publishing/copyright/permission-requests.asp under “Use of third party material in our publications”.

If I include unpublished work in my poster, will I still be able to publish this in a peer-reviewed journal afterwards?
Subject to the usual conditions outlined in the License to Publish, being a part of the Twitter conference will not prevent you using some of the information included in your poster as part of an article in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal. Please note this policy varies by publisher and if you intend to submit your research for publication elsewhere after the event, you should check the individual policy for that journal and publisher.

What size/format should my poster be?
You can choose any dimensions for your poster, the important thing is that the text and figures are clear for people to read and understand. Using Microsoft PowerPoint, we found a text size of between 12-16 were clear to read when saving an A4 slide as a JPEG and uploading to Twitter. Using an A0 template, the text needed to be between 50 and 60 to be legible. You can use any software you like to create your poster, as long as the image you upload is clear for others to read. We recommend testing your poster on Twitter before the conference to make sure you are happy with your image. Check out this blog post by Zen Faulkes for some top tips for making posters with Twitter in mind: http://betterposters.blogspot.com/2019/02/top-tips-for-twitter-posters.html

 

Please don’t get carried away and use Twitter-bots. We want everyone to actively participate and engage in discussions to get the most out of the event.

 

 

Contact us

RSCPoster@rsc.org

 

Event Organizers

Matthew Baker, University of Strathclyde, @ChemistryBaker

Edward Randviir, Manchester Metropolitan University, @EdwardRandviir

Hannah Kerr, Royal Society of Chemistry, @hk_chemistryy

Kathryn Gempf, Royal Society of Chemistry, @KGempf

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Contributors to the 2018 New Frontiers in Indian Research collection

This profile offers a short introduction to the researchers who have contributed to this themed collection on the talent emerging from India and the excellent work that is being done by them. We would like to congratulate them and their teams on their achievements to date and hope they have continued success in the future as they continue their careers.

Read the collection now!

Dr Masashi ArakawaDr Masashi Arakawa received Ph.D degree in chemistry from The University of Tokyo, Japan, in 2011 under supervision of Prof. H. Kagi and Dr. H. Fukazawa.  His Ph.D work was hydrogen ordering in ice under low temperature and high pressure observed from neutron diffraction, which was carried out under the support of JSPS research fellowship.  Subsequently, he moved to Kyushu University, Japan, to join Prof. A. Terasaki’s group as an Assistant Professor, working on reaction and spectroscopy of gas-phase free metal clusters.  One of the primary research interests is reaction of small mineral clusters related to chemistry in the universe, especially, molecular evolution.

 

 

Dr Anindya Datta

Anindya Datta was born obtained his  B. Sc. (Hons). and M. Sc.  from Calcutta University, studying in Presidency College and University College of Science and Technology, respectively. He was a CSIR research fellow with Prof. Kankan Bhattacharyya in Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science and obtained his Ph. D. from Jadavpur University  After his postdoctoral research with Prof. Jacob W. Petrich in Iowa State University and After a brief stint in Raja Ramanna Centre of Advanced Technology, Indore, he joined Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, where he is presently a Professor of Chemistry.  He is a recipient of Bronze Medal of Chemical Research Society of India and Fellow of National Academy of Science, India. His research interest is in ultrafast processes in Chemistry and Materials Science.

 

Dr Ankona DattaAnkona received her B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in chemistry from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur in 2000. She did her graduate research work on chiral water soluble porphyrins for catalysis and recognition with Prof. John T. Groves at Princeton University (Ph.D., 2006). After graduating from Princeton she joined as a postdoctoral scholar in the laboratory of Prof. Ken Raymond at the University of California, Berkeley, where she worked on macromolecular MRI contrast agents. Since 2010 she is a faculty in the Department of Chemical Sciences at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, India. Ankona and her team of vibrant students use molecular interaction insights from coordination chemistry and molecular recognition to develop chemical probes for tracking cell signal mediating molecules and metal ions in living systems.

 

Professor Chandan Jana

Chandan K. Jana completed his graduation in Chemistry from Calcutta University in 2002 and in 2005, he received his M.S. in Chemical Science (with Prof. N. Jayaraman) from the Indian Institute of Science Bangalore. In that year, he joined the group of Prof. A. Studer at the University of Muenster, Germany, as a member of the International Graduate School of Chemistry for his doctoral studies and he received his Ph.D. degree in 2008. He then moved to the group of Prof. K. Gademann, first at EPFL and then the University of Basel, Switzerland, for his postdoctoral research (2009–2011). In 2011, he returned to India and started his independent research career as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry at the Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, where he became an Associate Professor in 2015. His research and teaching interest center on organic chemistry.

 

Professor Sabuj Kundu

Sabuj Kundu obtained his PhD in 2009 from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, USA under the supervision of Professor Alan S. Goldman. He worked as a postdoctoral fellow with Professor William D. Jones at University of Rochester, NY (2009-11) and Professor Maurice Brookhart at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2011-13). Subsequently, in 2013 he returned to India to join as an Assistant Professor at the Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, where he is presently an Associate Professor. He received the DST-INSPIRE Faculty fellowship, India. His group is focused on various aspects of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis for sustainable chemical transformations.

 

 

Professor Bani Kanta SarmaDr. Bani Kanta Sarma received his BSc and MSc in chemistry from Cotton College, Gauhati University and IIT Guwahati, respectively. Subsequently, he joined Prof. G. Mugesh’s research group at the Department of Inorganic & Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science Bangalore to carry out his doctoral studies. During his PhD, he worked on the antioxidant activity of organoselenium compounds, especially ebselen and its analogues. He was awarded “Prof. S. Soundararajan Medal” for the year 2008-2009 for the best PhD thesis of the year in the area of Inorganic Chemistry at Indian Institute of Science Bangalore. Upon finishing his PhD, he pursued his postdoctoral studies with Prof. Thomas Kodadek in the area of peptoid chemistry and chemical biology at the UT Southwestern Medical Centre and The Scripps Research Institute Florida. He joined the Department of Chemistry at Shiv Nadar University as Assistant Professor in 2014. His current research interest is to understand the various aspects of carbonyl-carbonyl noncovalent interactions and their role in the stabilization of small molecules and various protein secondary structures.

 

Professor Ravi Venkatramani Ravi Venkatramani is an Associate Professor in the Department of Chemical Sciences, at Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Mumbai. Ravi obtained his Ph.D. in Physics in 2005 from the University of Rochester, NY, USA. Subsequently, he was a post-doctoral fellow, first in the Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA (2005-2007) and then in the Department of Chemistry at Duke University, Durham, NC, USA (2007-2012). At TIFR, Ravi`s research group extracts effective reaction coordinates and pathways governing biomolecular function and electronic charge flow through molecules using rigorous statistical and dynamical descriptions. Notable contributions of the group over the last few years include: 1) the concept of a molecular breadboard circuit, wherein single molecules with multiple lead contact points offer dozens of possible current flow channels and as many as four conductance states, and 2) the discovery of a new optical (UV-Visible) charge transfer spectral band to probe biomolecular dynamics. Ravi is a fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry and serves as the secretary to the RSC-West India Section

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Congratulations to the EuChemS Poster Prizewinners

EuChemSOn the 26th August approximately 1,500 delegates from 60 different countries came to Liverpool for the 7th EuChemS Chemistry Congress. The theme was Molecular frontiers and global challenges, a topic addressed over 5 days by over 100 speakers and in over 500 poster presentations.

To celebrate the diverse range and oustanding quality of the posters a number of Royal Society of Chemistry journals awarded poster prizes. All prizewinners received an official certificate and a £50 voucher for use in the RSC bookstore.

And if you missed the action, don’t worry! You can watch some of the Poster highlights on Youtube now – featuring Immo Klose, winner of a Chemical Science poster prize and Anjali Das, winner of the Polymer Chemistry prize.

Congratulations to all of the winners in the list below!

James Rushworth (Imperial College London Biomaterials Science
G.T. Kasun Kalhara Gunasooriya (Ghent University) Catalysis Science and Technology
Daniel Payne (National Institute for Materials Science) Chemical Communications
Lorenzo D’Amore (Universitat de Girona) Chemical Communications
Mohammad Bodiuzzaman (IIT Madras) Chemical Communications
Roser Morales-Martínez (Universitat Rovira i Virgili) Chemical Communications
Alex Grigoropoulos (University of Liverpool) Chemical Science
Ema Horak (Ruđer Bošković Institute Chemical Science
Eike Dornsiepen (Philipps-Universität Marburg) Chemical Science
Leana Travaglini (University of Strasbourg) Chemical Science
Immo Klose (University of Vienna) Chemical Science   
Mauricio Morais (King’s College London) Chemical Science   
Dowine de Bruijn (University of Groningen) Chemical Society Reviews
Nils Schmickler (Universität Bonn) Chemical Society Reviews
Peter McNeice (Queen’s University Belfast) Chemical Society Reviews
Natalie Dehnhardt (Philipps-Universität Marburg) Dalton Transactions
David Williamson (University of Bath) Energy & Environmental Science
Alessandro Manfrin (ETH Zürich) Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts
Robert Woodward (Imperial College London) Green Chemistry
Michael Gärtner (Universität Frankfurt) Journal of Materials Chemistry and Material Horizons
Anna-Bea Bornhof (Université de Génève) MSDE
Marcus Richter (Dresden University of Technology) Nanoscale
Philip Lane (Sheffield Hallam University) Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry
Gabriella Kervefors (Stockholm University) Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry
Jonathan Davidson (University of Cambridge) PCCP
Anjali Devi Das (Università degli Studi di Parma) Polymer Chemistry
Christian Goldhahn (ETH Zürich) Reaction Chemistry & Engineering
Cathryn Shepherd (Heriot-Watt University) RSC Advances
Marco Chino (Università degli studi di Napoli “Federico II”) RSC Advances
Sabina Alexandra Nicolae (Queen Mary University of London) Sustainable Energy & Fuels

 

 

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Announcing a themed collection – Celebrating Excellence in Research: 100 Women of Chemistry

Diverse teams produce better research. There are demonstrable benefits to having a wide range of viewpoints and experiences, whether in academia or industry, and there’s a moral responsibility for us to make our community a place where anyone can reach their full potential.

 

In our report, the Diversity landscape of the chemical sciences, published earlier this year, we compiled some of the available evidence for the current state of diversity in the Chemical Sciences. This data gathering has given us a picture that allows us to identify areas of the most need, set intelligent targets for our future activities, and benchmark our future progress from a defined starting point. The report touched on issues of inclusivity in terms of ethnicity, disability, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic background, and we are

 

However, retention of women emerged as the biggest single loss of talent from our community. At each stage of progression, women are leaving the sector, a massive loss of talent and economic potential. In academia, at undergraduate level, 44% of students are female. This drops to 39% of postgraduate students, and plummets to a mere 9% among chemistry professors.

 

This is a systemic failure – with a wide range of factors including conscious and unconscious bias in hiring and progression committees, and a working environment that is hostile to all but disproportionately affects women. There’s also a difference in remuneration. The difference in median pay between men and women is £13,000, an increase since 2015. The pay gap increases over the course of women’s careers, with older respondents reporting a greater gap than those at the beginning of their careers.

Scientific publishing, as an inherent part of academic life, also plays a huge role in this problem. As the publisher of a journals portfolio including 45 peer-reviewed journals the Royal Society of Chemistry is ideally situated not only to contribute data to the discussion but also to take action to tackle the issues that are identified. By harnessing the authorship and citation data associated with almost 70,000 published, peer-reviewed articles we showed that papers by female corresponding authors received significantly fewer citations than those authored by men. We also saw a negative correlation between the impact factor of a journal and the number of submissions by women, suggesting that female corresponding authors are discouraged from putting their work forward for consideration by top journals.

 

As part of our actions to address this imbalance we are carefully monitoring all new editorial board appointments as well as our ongoing commissioning efforts to identify and remove potential sources of bias. The goal of these efforts is not to employ positive discrimination, but instead to better enable ourselves and our community to recognise the many talented women already working in the Chemical Sciences and hence encourage further progress towards equity. It is with this in mind that we are proud to launch our new themed collection:

 

Celebrating Excellence in Research: 100 Women of Chemistry is a collection of high quality papers from across the RSC Publishing portfolio. As the name of the collection suggests, the excellence comes first – all papers included have previously been judged to be of outstanding quality by the reviewers, editors, or readers.

 

In light of the problems with women’s progression and retention, we decided to focus on female group leaders and corresponding authors – both to celebrate their own achievements in the field and to act as an inspiration for early career researchers and students within the community. An initial nomination stage by our journal editorial teams or editorial board members identified leaders in their respective fields. This resulted in a considerable number of excellent authors from whom 100 papers were then chosen as examples of exceptional research. We intend to represent the diversity of the publishing landscape, including researchers from 23 countries and at all stages of an independent career.

 

We have selected 100 papers but could have selected many more. The number 100 also has special significance here in the UK, where we are currently celebrating Vote 100 – the centenary of the first women in the UK to obtain the vote. The number proved restrictive, and as part of our ongoing commitment to equality and diversity, we will be following this up with subjects-specific collections in the months to come, but for now, we invite you to read this collection and Celebrate Excellence in Research with us.

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Congratulations to prizewinners at the 1st National Meeting of the Swedish Chemical Society

The 1st National Meeting of the Swedish Chemical Society took place in Lund on the 17th to 20th June. Roughly 500 participants attended to discuss a broad range of topics within chemistry and to celebrate the 150th Anniversary of the Chemical Association in Lund.

Dalton Transactions, Molecular Systems Design & Engineering and Soft Matter were all delighted to award poster prizes at this event.

The winners were

Levgen Pylypchuk (Swe. Univ. of Agricultural Sciences) won a Dalton Transactions poster prize for their talk on ‘Enhanced performance and stability of enzymes immobilized on magnetic SiO2-DTPA nanocomposites’

Shaoqi Zhan (KTH Royal Institute of Technology) won a Dalton Transactions poster prize for their talk on ‘Artificial photosynthesis catalysts dancing on carbon nanotubes’

Masoumeh Dowlatshahi Pour (Chalmers University of Technology) won a MSDE poster prize for their talk on ‘Altered lipid composition of secretory cells following exposure to zinc can be correlated to changes in exocytosis’

Shira Joudan (University of Toronto) won a MSDE poster prize for their talk on ‘Biological cleavage of the C-P bond in perfluoroalkyl phosphinic acids in male Sprague Dawley rats and the formation of persistent and reactive metabolites’

Kristina Thomsson Hulthe (University of Gothenburg) won a Soft Matter poster prize for their talk on ‘Recombinant O-linked glycosylation mimic of an osteoarthritic biolubricating proteines’

Martin Ratsch (University of Gothenburg) won a Soft Matter poster prize for their talk on ‘Covalent organic framework films on surfaces’

Award winners receiving their certificates at the 1st National Meeting of the Swedish Chemical Society

Award winners receiving their certificates at the 1st National Meeting of the Swedish Chemical Society

Congratulations to all award winners!

 

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Celebrating our Outstanding Reviewers in 2017

We want to make sure that our journals deliver rigorous and fair peer review and we wouldn’t be able to achieve that commitment without the amazing contribution of our reviewers.

In 2017, nearly 50,000 individual reviewers provided a review for one or more of our journals.  Every one of them is contributing to the efforts of our community to advance excellence in the chemical sciences. Our community is truly a global one, with reviewers coming from over 100 different countries.

We want to celebrate some of the individuals who’ve made significant contributions to our journals by reviewing for us over the last 12 months, by publishing a list of Outstanding Reviewers for each of our journals. The lists will be published on each journal blog in March 2018 and each journal will also publish a special Editorial in the coming weeks. Each Outstanding Reviewer will also receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

While it’s not possible to list everyone, we would like to say a big thank you to all of the reviewers that have supported our journals. We would also like to thank all our journal Editorial and Advisory Boards and the chemical community for their continued support as authors, reviewers and readers.

Congratulations to all the Outstanding Reviewers in 2017!

If you would like to become a reviewer for any of our journals, just contact the journal by email with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre.

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#RSCPoster 2018: And the Winners are…

We are delighted to announce the winners of the 2018 #RSCPoster Twitter Conference.

For the past three years, the Royal Society of Chemistry has hosted a Twitter poster conference, inviting participants to submit posters on Twitter based on their research in the chemical sciences. These poster conferences, the first of their kind, allowed people all over the world and at all stages of their careers to present their work and network with other chemists without having to travel.

This year, people from all across the globe participated in the Twitter poster conference, achieving 1,912 contributors, 6,715 Tweets, an audience of 2,019,127 and 10,267,097 total impressions! This means that the conference was an even greater success than Last year, where there were 1,650 contributors and 6,473 tweets.

And the winners are…

We are delighted to announce the winners of the 2018 event, as selected by our fantastic committee chairs. A full list of all the subject chairs is available at rsc.li/rsc-poster-2018 and at the end of this post.

 

Analytical – #RSCAnalytical 1st Prize:

Maria Sánchez-Purrà

2nd Prize:

Darya Mozhayeva

Chemical Biology – #RSCChemBio 1st Prize:

Jeffrey Mak

2nd Prize:

Agnese Solari

Chemistry Education – #RSCEdu Primary/Secondary:

David Paterson

Higher:

Katherine Haxton

Engineering – #RSCEng 1st Prize:

Nicole Neyt

2nd Prize:

Marcin  Drop

Environmental – #RSCEnv 1st Prize:

Maxim Galkin

2nd Prize:

Aryeh Feinberg

Inorganic – #RSCInorg 1st Prize:

Timothy Barendt

2nd Prize:

Miguel Chacon

Materials – #RSCMat 1st Prize:

Luke Wilkinson

2nd Prize:

Marion Roullet

Nanoscience – #RSCNano 1st Prize:

Alexandra Gellé

2nd Prize:

Jennifer Gracie

Organic – #RSCOrg 1st Prize:

Jesús San José

2nd Prize:

Hannes  P. L. Gemoets

Physical – #RSCPhys 1st Prize:

Mario González Jiménez

2nd Prize:

Elaine Kelly

 

All the winners of the first prizes and the two winners in the Chemistry Education category, received £100 and the winners of the second prizes were given a £50 Royal Society of Chemistry book voucher.

We also had a special audience participation prize for the poster that received the most re-tweets during the event. Congratulations to Jo-Han Ng, whose poster Creative and Playful Learning of Chemistry Through the Use of a Green Technology Escape Room received a massive 452 retweets! Jo-Han Ng won a copy of The Case of the Poisonous Socks by William H. Brock.

Well done to all of our winners! The competition was very fierce with more participants than ever before!

Thanks to everyone who took part and made the fourth #RSCPoster Conference such a huge success and a special thanks to our Scientific Committee and all our subject chairs for all their help and support.

Conference Organisers and Committee

Conference Organisers

Royal Society of Chemistry

Matt Baker, University of Strathclyde, UK @ChemistryBaker

Edward Randviir, Manchester Metropolitan University, UK @EdwardRandviir.

Subject Chairs

#RSCAnalytical Roy Goodacre, University of Manchester @RoyGoodacre
Martín Resano, University of Zaragoza @MartinResano
#RSCChemBio Michael Johnson, University of Arizona @blacksciblog
Marloes Peeters, Manchester Metropolitan University @peeters_marloes
#RSCEdu Claire McDonnell, Dublin Institute of Technology @clairemcdonndit
Kristy Turner, University of Manchester @doc_kristy
#RSCEnv Peter Vikesland, Virginia Tech @petervikesland
Nadine Borduas, ETH Zürich @nadineborduas
David Megson, Manchester Metropolitan University
#RSCInorg Rebecca Melen, Cardiff University @rebecca_melen
 Charlie O’Hara, University of Strathclyde @oharalab
 #RSCMat  Athina Anastasaki, UC Santa Barbara @AthinaAnastasa1
 Chris Foster, Manchester Metropolitan University  @cwfoster90
 #RSCNano  Gemma-Louise Davies, University of Warwick  @GemmaLouDavies
 Karen Faulds, University of Strathclyde  @FauldsKaren
 #RSCOrg  Ryan Mewis, Manchester Metropolitan University  @RyanMewis
 David Nelson, University of Strathclyde  @TheNelsonGroup
 #RSCPhys  Brian Wagner, University of Prince Edward Island  @DrummerBoy2112
 Lars Goerigk, University of Melbourne  @lgoer_compchem
 #RSCEng  Mark Olson, Tianjin University  @MARK_A_OLSON
 Tim Noël, Eindhoven University of Technology @NoelGroupTUE

Scientific Committee

Fraser Stoddart, Northwestern University @sirfrasersays
Zoë Ayres, University of Warwick @ZJAyres
Perdita Barran, University of Manchester @PerditaB
James Batteas, Texas A&M University @jamesbatteas
Gonçalo Bernardes, University of Cambridge @gbernardes_chem
Margaret Brimble, University of Auckland @BrimbleM
Holly Butler, University of Strathclyde @HollehButler
Simon Lewis, Curtin University @SimonWLewis
Jean-François Masson, University of Montreal @Masson_chem
Warren Piers, University of Calgary @wpiers1
Michael Seery, University of Edinburgh     @seerymk
Nick Stone, University of Exeter     @profnickstone
Marcel Swart, University of Girona     @Marcel_Swart
Renée Webster, Monash University     @reneewebs
Doug MacFarlane, Monash University     @DRMacFarlane
Damien Arrigan, Curtin University     @arri_aus
Neil Keddie, University of St Andrews     @theyakman
Yonatan Calahorra, University of Cambridge     @YonCalahorra

 

 

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