Contributors to the ‘New Frontiers in Indian Research’ collection

This profile offers a short introduction to the researchers who have contributed to this themed collection on the talent emerging from India and the excellent work that is being done by them. We would like to congratulate them and their teams on their achievements to date and hope they have continued success in the future as they continue their careers.

 Read the collection now.

  Dr Jyotishman Dasgupta received his undergraduate degree in chemistry from Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur in 2000.  He carried out his Masters thesis under the guidance of Prof. Amit Basak in the chemistry department. Subsequently he moved to Princeton University as a Hughes Stott Taylor graduate fellow where he carried out his Ph.D. work in the field of oxygenic photosynthesis under the supervision of Prof. Charles Dismukes. In 2006, he moved to UC Berkeley where he did his postdoctoral work with Prof. Richard A. Mathies. During his stay at Berkeley, he used femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy to study light-triggered conformation changes in photoactive proteins. After coming back to India in 2010, he set up his independent research group as an Assistant Professor (Reader) at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai. The central theme of his reserach group is to probe dynamical structural events leading upto charge generation in molecular materials, in order to fabricate bio-inspired devices for solar electricity generation and organic photocatalysis in water.
Kanishka Biswas obtained his MS and Ph.D degree from the Solid State Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science (2009) under supervision of Prof. C. N. R. Rao and did postdoctoral research with Prof. Mercouri G. Kanatzidis at the Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University (2009–2012). He is an Assistant Professor in the New Chemistry Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research (JNCASR), Bangalore. He is pursuing research in solid state inorganic chemistry of metal chalcogenides, thermoelectrics, topological materials, 2D nanosheets and water purification. He has published 90 research papers, 1 book and 4 book chapters. He is an Young Affiliate of The World Academy of Sciences (TWAS) and an Associate of Indian Academy of Science (IASc), Bangalore, India. He is also recipient of Young Scientist Medal-2016 from Indian National Science Academy (INSA), Delhi, India and Young Scientist Platinum Jubilee Award-2015 from The National Academy of Sciences (NASI), Allahabad, India. He is recipient of IUMRS-MRS Singapore Young Researcher Merit Awards in 2016, and the Materials Research Society of India Medal in 2017.
  Shachi Gosavi obtained her Integrated M.Sc. in Chemistry from the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, India, and her Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology, USA. After post-doctoral work at the University of California San Diego, USA, she joined the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS), Bangalore, India as a Reader where her group works on diverse problems in the fields of protein folding and dynamics.
 

Dr Suman Chakrabarty earned his B.Sc. degree in Chemistry from Presidency College, Kolkata, India in 2002 and M.S. degree in Chemical Sciences from the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India in 2005. He obtained his Ph.D. degree in Theoretical and Computational Chemistry at Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore in 2010 (Advisor: Prof. Biman Bagchi). He was a postdoctoral research associated with Prof. Arieh Warshel at University of Southern California, USA (2009–2012). Subsequently Dr. Chakrabarty returned to India and started his career as an independent researcher in the Physical and Materials Chemistry Division, CSIR-National Chemical Laboratory, Pune, India as a Ramanujan Fellow. In 2017, he joined the School of Chemical Sciences in National Institute of Science Education and Research (NISER), Bhubaneswar, India as Reader-F. His current research interests are computational modelling and simulation of signal transduction and allosteric regulation in proteins, water mediated interactions and self-assembly related phenomena in soft-condensed matter systems with chemical and topographical heterogeneity.

 
  Amit Paul was born in 1980 in Kolkata, India. He received his B.Sc. from Jadavpur University, Kolkata, India, and his M.Sc. from Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Bombay, Mumbai, India. He completed his PhD in 2008 from the Department of Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh under the supervision of Prof. David H. Waldeck. He worked as an energy frontier research center (EFRC)-postdoctoral research associate at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with Prof. Thomas J. Meyer between 2009-2011. Since 2011, he is working as an Assistant Professor at the Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Bhopal, India. His research interests include electrochemical supercapacitor, electrocatalysis, solid state proton conduction, electron transfer through molecular bridges, and proton-coupled electron transfer.
Dr Kaushik Chatterjee is an Associate Professor in the Department of Materials Engineering and the Centre for Biosystems Science and Engineering of the Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore (India). He received his Ph.D. in Bioengineering from the Pennsylvania State University (USA) and completed a post-doctoral training jointly at the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the National Institutes of Health supported by the US National Research Council Research Associateship Program. Currently he leads a research group working on a wide variety of biomaterials intended for use in biomedical devices and tissue scaffolds.  
  Kana Sureshan obtained his Master’s degree in Chemistry from the University of Calicut, in 1996 and Ph. D. in Organic Chemistry from the National Chemical Laboratory, Pune in 2002. He carried out his postdoctoral research as a JSPS postdoctoral fellow at Ehime University, Japan (2002-2004), as a Research Officer at Dept. of Pharmacy and Pharmacology at University of Bath, U. K. (2004-2006) and as an Alexander von Humboldt fellow at Max Planck Institute for Molecular Physiology at Dortmund, Germany (2006-2008). He joined Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Thiruvananthapuram in April 2009. His research interests lie in the area of supramolecular chemistry, carbohydrate chemistry, natural product synthesis and chemical biology.  He is an early career editorial board member of ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering. He is the recipient of Ramanujan fellowship, Swarnajayanti Fellowship, Young Scientist award of YIM-Boston, CRSI- Bronze medal and MRSI-Medal.

 

Ravi Venkatramani is a reader in the Department of Chemical Sciences, at Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Mumbai. Ravi obtained his Ph.D. in Physics in 2005 from the University of Rochester, NY, USA. His dissertation topic was on the theoretical modeling of nonlinear optical response of molecules in solution. Subsequently, during 2005-2007, Ravi was a post-doctoral fellow in the Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA, where he studied the molecular mechanism of DNA replication/repair by polymerase enzymes using classical and mixed quantum-classical atomistic simulations. From 2007 – 2012, Ravi was a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Chemistry at Duke University, Durham, NC, USA which involved the modeling of charge transfer reactions in organic molecules and biological systems. At TIFR, Ravi`s research group develops and applies multi-scale modelling and high performance computational simulation methods to describe biomolecular structure and dynamics. Ravi is also developing theoretical formalisms to describe physicochemical processes in biological/molecular systems such as charge/energy transfer and optical response. He is a fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry and serves as the secretary to the RSC-West India Section.  
  Prasenjit Mal was born in 1976 at Lokhesole, Bankura, West Bengal, India.  He obtained his MSc degree from Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Kharagpur in 1999 and followed by PhD at Indian Institute of technology Kanpur in 2005.  Then he undertook postdoctoctoral studies at University of Siegen in Germany (with Prof Michael Schmittel) as Alexander von Humboldt Fellow (2006-2007) and at University of Cambridge (with Prof Jonathan R Nitschke) in UK as Marie Curie Fellow (2008-2009). He started an independent research career at NISER Bhubaneswar since December 2009. Currently, he is working on the research area of role of multiple cooperative weak interactions (soft force relay) in organic synthesis and mechanochemistry.
Rajarshi Chakrabarti is a theoretical physical chemist by training. He excels in developing Statistical Mechanics based analytically solvable models and also makes use of computer simulations to explore interesting problems in the area of soft matter and chemical physics. He grew up in Kolkata, where he did his bachelors and subsequently masters in Chemistry specializing in Physical Chemistry. In 2003, Rajarshi moved to the Indian Institute of Science to pursue his Ph.D. in Theoretical Chemistry. After two stints of postdocs at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign and University of Stuttgart, he started an independent career in 2013 at the Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay. His favorite pass times include spending time with his wife and son and playing with his two pet dogs.  
Sabuj Kundu obtained his PhD in 2009 from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, USA under the supervision of Professor Alan S. Goldman. He worked as a postdoctoral fellow with Professor William D. Jones at University of Rochester, NY (2009-11) and Professor Maurice Brookhart at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2011-13). He returned to Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur as an assistant professor in 2013. He received the DST-INSPIRE fellowship, India. His group is focused on various aspects of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis for sustainable chemical transformations.
Abhishek Dey was born in Calcutta where he did his BSc in the Presidency College. After completing his MSc at the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, he did his PhD from Stanford University, CA, USA, in 2007 with Prof. Edward I. Solomon. After two years of postdoctoral work with Prof. James P. Collman he joined IACS in June 2009 where he is now an Associate Professor. He is the recipient of ACS division of inorganic chemistry young investigator award, SPP Young investigator award and he has been young associate of the Indian Academy of Science, Bangalore. He is currently serving as editorial advisory board member to Chemical Communications, ACS Catalysis and Journal of Biological Inorganic Chemistry. He is an inorganic chemist interested in generation, storage and transfer of energy. A combination of synthesis, self-assembly, spectroscopy, electrochemistry and electronic structure calculations are used to attain these research goals.  
Biman Jana was born in West Bengal, India, in 1983. He received his BSc degree (2003) in Chemistry from Calcutta University, India and MSc degree (2005) in chemistry from Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India. He is obtained his PhD in Theoretical Physical chemistry from Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India with Professor Biman Bagchi as his advisor. He worked as a Research Associate with Professors Jose Nelson Onuchic from Rice University before returning to India in 2013 to join the faculty of the Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Kolkata, India. His group is working actively to explore the basic physical principles behind biological processes using theoretical concepts and computational techniques of Statistical Mechanics. One of the primary research areas is to explore the molecular origin of ice recognition by antifreeze proteins. In addition, his group is actively working on various different biological problems including mehanochemical cycle of motor proteins, protein folding/unfolding and hydrophobic hydration.
G. Naresh Patwari received his Ph.D. from the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai in 2000 working on Intramolecular Vibrational Energy redistribution in substituted benzenes with Prof. Sanjay Wategaonkar. Following, he was JSPS postdoctoral fellow at Tohoku University, Japan with Prof. Naohiko Mikami, where he investigated the formation of dihydrogen bonds in the gas phase. In 2002 he moved to the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign to work with Prof. James M. Lisy on ion-molecule complexes. Subsequently, in 2003 he returned to India to join the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry, where he is presently a Professor. His research interests include intermolecular interactions structure and reactivity. Recently, his group started working on understanding various intermolecular phenomena using internal electric fields. Apart from scientific endeavours, Naresh is also passionate about wildlife.
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CSC100: Celebrating Canadian Chemistry Web Collection

Back in 1918, the first national conference for chemistry in Canada took place in Ottawa, with about 200 attendees. This May, the 100th Canadian Chemistry Conference and Exhibition will be a celebration of chemistry’s contributions to Canadian society and the impact of Canadian scientists on the field. Over 3000 abstracts have been received, a record.

Everyone will also be celebrating Canada’s 150th birthday on the 1st of July. Canada’s economy thrives because of chemical technologies related to resources, but Canadian chemistry discoveries have contributed to society and scientific knowledge in many other ways as well, such as the discovery of insulin, Rutherford’s explanation of radioactivity, Bartlett’s demonstration of the reactivity of noble gases, Herzberg’s study of radicals, Polanyi’s contribution to chemical kinetics, and Smith’s development of site-directed mutagenesis.

“Over the last 100 years, Canadian chemistry innovators have contributed to the myriad of products and services that underpin our quality of life,” says Dr. Rui Resendes, President of the Canadian Society for Chemistry.  “We are part of a global community of ‘thinkers and tinkerers’ who through collaboration, innovation and perseverance will usher in the next generations of technologies that will enhance quality of life around the world while ensuring a sustainable future.”

In honour of these two anniversaries, we offer a special virtual issue of new research articles from Canadian chemists.* Authors from across the country, from Vancouver to Halifax, have contributed more than fifty articles on topics ranging from organic solar cells to microcoil NMR spectroscopy for microfluidics. We invite you to read through these articles to see what’s happening in Canada in this year of double celebrations.

Read the collection now.

Philip Jessop Jennifer Love Warren Piers Doug Stephan Andrei Yudin
Queen’s University University of British Columbia University of Calgary University of Toronto University of Toronto

*All of these articles are freely available online until 18 June 2017.

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We are pleased to announce the winners of the RSC Twitter Poster Conference 2017

#RSCPoster

We are delighted to announce the winners of the RSC Twitter Poster Conference 2017 (#RSCPoster).

The Royal Society of Chemistry Twitter Poster Conference is an online event held entirely over Twitter to bring members of the scientific research community together to share their research, network and engage in scientific debate.

Building upon the success of the previous two Analytical Science Twitter Poster Conferences, the 2017 poster conference encompassed all areas of the chemical sciences. The conference reached the scientific research community around the world, achieving 1,650 contributors, 6,473 tweets, an audience of 2,770,749 and 11,841,519 total impressions.

You can find out all the details about the conference here.

The following winners have been awarded prizes for the nine subject categories-

Analytical – #RSCAnal

1st Prize
Matthew Healey, Loughborough University, Detecting Prion Diseases Using Aptamers and Tunable Resistive Pulse Sensing

2nd Prize
Laena D’Alton, La Trobe University, 3D-printed optical sensor chip for cell and particle analysis and Modified chitosan as an alternative to paper in paper-based sensing

3rd Prize
Sarah Hampson, Loughborough University, 3D-printed optical sensor chip for cell and particle analysis

Chemical Biology – #RSCChemBio

1st Prize
Novenia Oerip Ariyani‏, Nanyang Technological University, Protein nanocage-stabilized emulsion: The first nonviral protein nanocage.

2nd Prize
Michael J Booth, University of Oxford, Light-activated communication in synthetic tissues

3rd Prize
Jean-Marc Henry, University of Manchester, Integrated catalysis opens new arylation pathways via regiodivergent enzymatic C-H activation

Education – #RSCEdu

1st Prize
Michael Seery, The University of Edinburgh, Peer Assessment of Laboratory Skills

2nd Prize
Dino Spagnoli, The University of Western Australia, Technology to Develop Transferable Skills + Enhance the Lab Experience in 1st Year Chemistry

3rd Prize
Fraser Scott, University of Lincoln, A Very Brief Overview of Scott’s Numeracy Framework: A Refinement of Hogan’s

Environmental – #RSCEnv

1st Prize
Nadine Borduas, ETH Zurich, The atmospheric fate of organic nitrogen compounds

2nd Prize
Nigel Richards, Cardiff University, Exploring the effect of heat treatments on 2 wt% Pd-Al2O3 for N2O decomposition

3rd Prize
Zeljka Kesic, University of Belgrade, Biodiesel synthesis using mechanochemically obtained mixed oxide catalyst

Inorganic – #RSCInorg

1st Prize
Jason Dutton, La Trobe University, A New Family of Au (III) Trications

2nd Prize
Suzanne Jansze, EPFL, Size matters

Materials – #RSCMat

1st Prize
David Lunn, University of Oxford, Versatile and scalable synthesis of functional lipids for material applications

2nd Prize
Adam Squires, University of Bath, Breaking the mould: lipid cubic phases as templates for catalytic metal nanomaterials

3rd Prize
Zachariah Page, University of California, Santa Barbara, Lights, camera, action: Photoswitches & photopolymerizations shot in real time with NMR

Nanoscience – #RSCNano

1st Prize
Samuel Hinman, University of California Riverside, DNA linkers and diluents for ultrastable gold nanoparticle conjugates

2nd Prize
Paolo Actis, University of Leeds, Creative use of electrowetting to perform biopsies from living cells

3rd Prize
Valerio Voliani, Istituto Italiano Di Tecnologia, Passion fruit-like nano-architectures as cleavable inorganic theranostics

Organic – #RSCOrg

1st Prize
Neil Keddie, University of St Andrews, All cis-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexafluorocyclohexane: the most polar aliphatic molecule currently identified

2nd Prize
James Birkett and Joe Sweeney, University of Huddersfield, Iron catalysed synthesis of novel spirocyclic heterocycles

Physical – #RSCPhys

1st Prize
Andrea Villa-Torrealba, Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Research, Degrees of Freedom of Soft Particles

2nd Prize
Gieberth Rodriguez-Lopez, Venezuelan Institute for Scientific Research, Anomolous Diffusion of a Brownian Droplet Under Oswald Ripening

3rd Prize
Matthew Ryder, University of Oxford, Mechanical Trends and Elastic Anomalies Underpinning the Stability of Isoreticular Zirconium-Based Metal-Organic Frameworks

The RSC Twitter Poster Conference 2017 audience award for most re-tweeted and liked poster is awarded to-

Jo-Han Ng, University of Southampton Malaysia Campus, Telepresence Learning of Chemistry using Minecraft in Virtual Reality, entered in the #RSCEdu category.

The winners received cash prizes, RSC book or OA journal vouchers, or 6 month digital subscriptions to Chemistry World. We would like to give special thanks to external sponsors Fluorochem, Morton Fraser and Thermofisher for their prize donations and support for the conference.

Congratulations to all the winners and thank you to the scientific community for making the conference such a big success!

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Celebrating our Outstanding Reviewers in 2016

We want to make sure that our journals deliver rigorous and fair peer review and we wouldn’t be able to achieve that commitment without the amazing contribution of our reviewers.

In 2016, nearly 50,000 individual reviewers provided a review for one or more of our journals.  Every one of them is contributing to the efforts of our community to advance excellence in the chemical sciences. Our community is truly a global one, with reviewers coming from over 100 different countries.

We want to celebrate some of the individuals who’ve made significant contributions to our journals by reviewing for us over the last 12 months, by publishing a list of Outstanding Reviewers for each of our journals. The lists will be published on each journal blog on Friday 24 February 2017 and each journal will also publish a special Editorial in the coming weeks. Each Outstanding Reviewer will also receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

While it’s not possible to list everyone, we would like to say a big thank you to all of the reviewers that have supported our journals. We would also like to thank all our journal Editorial and Advisory Boards and the chemical community for their continued support as authors, reviewers and readers.

Congratulations to all the Outstanding Reviewers in 2016!

If you would like to become a reviewer for any of our journals, just contact the journal by email with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre.

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RSC Twitter Poster Conference 2017

#RSCPoster

We are delighted to announce the RSC Twitter Poster Conference 2017 (#RSCPoster) will be happening on Monday March 20th (9am GMT) to Tuesday March 21st (9 am GMT).

The Royal Society of Chemistry Twitter Poster Conference is an online event held entirely over Twitter to bring members of the scientific research community together to share their research, network and engage in scientific debate.

Building upon the success of the previous two Analytical Science Twitter Poster Conferences, we have broadened the scope of the poster conference to include all areas of the chemical sciences.

How do I take part?
During the event simply tweet an image (e.g. JPEG) which will be a digital poster summarising your research along with #RSCPoster, the most appropriate subject area hashtag and the title of your work.

The hashtags required are:

Analytical – #RSCPoster #RSCAnal

Chemical Biology – #RSCPoster #RSCChemBio

Education – #RSCPoster #RSCEdu

Environmental – #RSCPoster #RSCEnv

Inorganic – #RSCPoster #RSCInorg

Materials – #RSCPoster #RSCMat

Nanoscience – #RSCPoster #RSCNano

Organic – #RSCPoster #RSCOrg

Physical – #RSCPoster #RSCPhys

For instance, if you are presenting an analytical poster you would tweet “Poster Title” #RSCPoster #RSCAnal. Throughout the day you can then answer any questions posed to you by other people on Twitter and ask questions about other posters. Make sure you follow #RSCPoster throughout the day as the conference progresses.

You also need to upload your poster and details to the conference Tumblr site, under the appropriate subject category, to ensure you are in contention for a prize. Access the Tumblr site here.

When is it?
Posters tweeted with #RSCPoster with the most relevant subject hashtag and also uploaded to Tumblr between 9am GMT March 20th and 9am GMT March 21st will be eligible to win prizes. Make sure you ask and answer lots of questions to ensure your work is well understood!

Is my research area suitable?
The conference is open to anyone working in any area of science whose research topic falls within one of the subject hashtag categories. If you’re unsure if your poster is suitable for the conference, just get in touch and we can advise.

What can I win?
The main aim of the event is to meet new scientists, share ideas and learn about the latest developments in different scientific areas. The scientific committee will select posters which stimulate wide interest and feature innovative, high quality, exciting research. Posters prizes will be awarded for content & accessibility, design and researcher interaction with the conference. There will also be an audience award for the most tweeted poster.

Who is organising the event and how do I find them?
At different points throughout the day members of each scientific committee for each subject area will be logging in to Twitter and searching #RSCPoster to ask questions about some of the posters. Make sure you check back in at different times to see if you have any new questions and also make sure you ask questions about other posters. Members of the organising and scientific committee and their Twitter names are listed below and make sure you follow the RSC journal twitter accounts relevant to your research for updates.

How do I register?
Pre-registration is not necessary; however we will need to verify who you are and where you do your research to be eligible for the prizes. We strongly recommend you do this before the event by emailing us and letting us know:
•    Your name, address and contact details
•    The title or topic of your poster
•    Your twitter ID

Conference Chairs
Matthew J Baker, University of Strathclyde, @ChemistryBaker
Craig Banks, Manchester Metropolitan University, @ACT_mmu

Organisers
Samuel Illingworth, Manchester Metropolitan University, @Samillingworth
Edward Randviir, Manchester Metropolitan University, @EdwardRandviir

Royal Society of Chemistry

Subject Chairs

Roy Goodacre, University of Manchester, #RSCAnal, @RoyGoodacre

Martin Resano, University of Zarragoza, #RSCAnal, @MartinResano

Michael Johnson, University of Arizona, #RSCChemBio, @blacksciblog 

Marloes Peeters, Manchester Metropolitan University, #RSCChemBio, @Peeters_Marloes

Claire McDonnell, Dublin Institute of Technology, #RSCEdu

Kristy Turner, University of Manchester, #RSCEdu, @doc_kristy

Damien Arrigan, Curtin University, #RSCEnv, @arri_aus

Doug Macfarlane, Monash University, #RSCEnv, @DRMacFarlane

Polly Arnold, University of Edinburgh, #RSCInorg, @ProfArno

Rebecca Melen, Cardiff University, #RSCInorg, @rebecca_melen

Athina Anastasaki, University of California, Santa Barbara, #RSCMat, @AthinaAnastasa1

Fiona Hatton, University of Sheffield, #RSCMat, @fi_hat

Gemma-Louise Davies, University of Warwick, #RSCNano, @GemmaLouDavies

Karen Faulds, University of Strathclyde, #RSCNano, @FauldsKaren

Ryan Mewis, Manchester Metropolitan University, #RSCOrg

David Nelson, University of Strathclyde, #RSCOrg, @TheNelsonGroup

Committee Members

Zoe Ayres, University of Warwick, @zjayres

Perdita Barran, University of Manchester, @PerditaB

James Batteas, Texas A&M University, @jamesbatteas

Gonçalo Bernardes, University of Cambridge, @gbernardes_chem

Margaret Brimble, University of Auckland, @BrimbleM

Holly Butler, University of Strathclyde, @HollehButler

Richard Dluhy, UAB College of Arts and Sciences, @radluhy

Malika Jeffries-EL, Boston University, @Chem_Diva

Simon Lewis, Curtin University, @SimonWLewis

Jean-Francois Masson, University of Montreal, @Masson_chem

Warren Piers, University of Calgary, @Wpiers1

Michael Seery, University of Edinburgh, @seerymk

Nick Stone, Univeristy of Exeter, @profnickstone

Marcel Swart, University of Girona, @marcel_swart

Renee Webster, Monash University, @reneewebs

Register for #RSCPoster

We look forward to meeting you in March!

Frequently Asked Questions (will be regularly updated)

Do I need to check the copyright and permissions needed for figures or any other parts of my poster which have already been published?
Yes. Copyright owners have the exclusive right to copy their work and to issue copies of their work to the public, and it is an infringement for anyone else to do so without the copyright owner’s permission. If you are reproducing material contained in a Royal Society of Chemistry publication (journal articles, book or book chapters) you may do so providing that you fully acknowledge the original Royal Society of Chemistry publication and include a link back to it. If you wish to include material that has been published by another publisher, you will need to check how the publisher/copyright owner of the third party material wishes to receive permission requests. Information on this can be found on our Permission Requests page at http://www.rsc.org/Publishing/copyright/permission-requests.asp under “Use of third party material in our publications”.

If I include unpublished work in my poster, will I still be able to publish this in a peer-reviewed journal afterwards?
Subject to the usual conditions outlined in the License to Publish, being a part of the Twitter conference will not prevent you using some of the information included in your poster as part of an article in a Royal Society of Chemistry journal. Please note this policy varies by publisher and if you intend to submit your research for publication elsewhere after the event, you should check the individual policy for that journal and publisher.

What size should my poster be?
You can choose any dimensions for your poster, the important thing is that the text and figures are clear for people to read and understand. Using Microsoft PowerPoint, we found a text size of between 12-16 were clear to read when saving an A4 slide as a JPEG and uploading to Twitter. Using an A0 template, the text needed to be between 50 and 60 to be legible. You can use any software you like to create your poster, as long as the image you upload is clear for others to read. We recommend testing your poster on Twitter before the conference to make sure you are happy with your image.

My image is too big for Twitter – what can I do?
We strongly recommend uploading the highest resolution image possible, but it won’t always be so simple. If your image is too high resolution, simply upload a lesser quality image of your poster to Twitter, then upload the high resolution image to the Tumblr page. You might also like to redirect any interest shown in your work towards Tumblr.

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And the winners are…

As part of our participation in Peer Review Week, we ran a prize draw for our reviewers. Anyone who provided a review for one of our journals between 19 September 2016 and 16 October 2016 was automatically entered for a chance to win a fantastic prize!

The winners have now been selected at random, with the first three winning an Apple iPad and then next ten winning a six-month subscription to Chemistry World.

The lucky reviewers that will receive an iPad are….

Name Institution Country
Le Yu Nanyang Technological University Singapore
Bin Hu Wuhan University China
Claudia Kummerloewe Osnabrück University of Applied Sciences Germany

The reviewers that have won a six-month subscription to Chemistry World are….

Name Institution Country
Kaushik Chatterjee Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore India
A. Stephen K. Hashmi Heidelberg University Germany
Xiaolin Wang City University of Hong Kong China
W. Henderson The University of Waikato New Zealand
Julia Laskin Pacific Northwest National Laboratory United States
Robert Phipps University of Cambridge United Kingdom
Feng Guo Pennsylvania State University United States
Shengfang Li Hubei Polytechnic University China
William Wuest Temple University United States
E. Ruijter VU University Amsterdam Netherlands

Please join us in congratulating all of the winners!

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Review and win!

When you give your time as a reviewer for a Royal Society of Chemistry journal, you are part of the world’s leading chemistry community, supporting us in advancing excellence in the chemical sciences.  As a little added bonus to celebrate Peer Review Week, for the next four weeks you will also be in with a chance of winning a fantastic prize!

The first three lucky winners will receive an Apple iPad and 10 runners-up will collect a free 6 month digital subscription to Chemistry World the Royal Society of Chemistry’s flagship magazine featuring the latest chemistry news, research updates, features, opinions, podcasts and more. This offer also includes a 25% discount on a 12 month digital subscription after the end of the free access period.

Entry couldn’t be simpler – a reviewer who submits a review for any of our journals between 19 September 2016 and 16 October 2016 will be automatically eligible for a chance to win.  Winners will be selected at random and announced in the first week of November 2016.*

If you would like to become a reviewer for any of our journals, just contact the journal by email with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre.

P.S. Did you know that all reviewers for our journals are entitled to a 25% discount on books published by the Royal Society of Chemistry?  Contact booksales@rsc.org for more information.

*Reasonable efforts will be made to contact the winner(s). If the winner(s) cannot be contacted, we reserve the right to offer the prize to the next eligible entrant drawn at random. We reserve the right to reject entries from entrants not entering into the spirit of the competition.

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Celebrating our reviewers

This week, we are excited to be joining in the celebrations for Peer Review Week – a global event recognising the essential role that peer review plays in maintaining scientific quality.

At the Royal Society of Chemistry, we are passionate about ensuring that our journals deliver rigorous and fair peer review.  We wouldn’t be able to achieve that commitment without the amazing contribution of our reviewers.

So far this year, nearly 40,000 individual reviewers have provided a review for one or more of our journals.  Between them they have submitted over 120,000 reviews!  Every one of them is contributing to the efforts of our community to advance excellence in the chemical sciences.

Our community is truly a global one, with reviewers coming from over 100 different countries.

This Peer Review Week, we want to celebrate just some of the individuals who’ve made significant contributions to our journals by reviewing for us this year.  We’ll be publishing a list of the top 10 reviewers for each of our journals throughout this week, starting today with our materials and nanoscience journals.

While it’s not possible to list all of them here, we would like to thank each and every reviewer for their support.  We’d also like to say an extra-special thank you to the members of our journals’ editorial and advisory boards who often serve as senior reviewers and adjudicators.

Each day, a different set of journals will publish their Top 10 reviewers for 2016, as selected by the editor for their significant contribution to the journal

Monday

19th September

Tuesday

20th September

Wednesday

21st September

Thursday

22nd September

Friday

23rd September

Materials and Nanoscience Energy, Environmental and Catalysis Organic, Biological and Medicinal Inorganic, Physical and Analytical General chemistry and Applied chemistry
Biomaterials Science Energy & Environmental Science Integrative Biology Dalton Transactions Chemical Communications
Journal of Materials Chemistry A Environmental Science: Nano Metallomics Inorganic Chemistry Frontiers Chemical Science
Journal of Materials Chemistry B Environmental Science: Processes & Impacts Molecular BioSystems CrystEngComm Chemical Society Reviews
Journal of Materials Chemistry C Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology MedChemComm Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics New Journal of Chemistry
Materials Chemistry Frontiers Green Chemistry Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry Analyst Molecular Systems Design & Engineering
Materials Horizons Catalysis Science & Technology Toxicology Research Analytical Methods Reaction Chemistry & Engineering
Polymer Chemistry Food & Function Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry
Soft Matter Organic Chemistry Frontiers Lab on a Chip
Nanoscale Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences

Make sure you come back everyday this week to see the top reviewers for our journals.

If you would like to become a reviewer for any of our journals, just contact the journal by email with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre.


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Introducing Sustainable Energy & Fuels

The new place to publish your energy and fuels researchSustainable Energy and Fuels cover image

Here at the Royal Society of Chemistry, we are justifiably proud of our reputation for high quality publications in energy science. So we are delighted to announce the expansion of our energy portfolio with the launch of new journal Sustainable Energy & Fuels.

Complementing our leading titles Energy & Environmental Science and Journal of Materials Chemistry A, Sustainable Energy & Fuels will publish interdisciplinary research that contributes to the development of sustainable energy technologies, with a particular emphasis on new and next-generation technologies.

An essential resource for energy researchers, Sustainable Energy & Fuels cuts across major disciplines – materials science, physics, chemistry, engineering and biology – covering evolving and emerging areas such as:

•    bioenergy including biofuels, biomass conversion and fuels from living organisms
•    carbon capture, storage and utilisation
•    energy conversion including fuel cells, piezoelectrics and thermoelectrics
•    energy storage including batteries and supercapacitors
•    hydrogen production, storage and distribution
•    new technologies for energy efficiency including magnetocalorics,  lighting and heating
•    nuclear power
•    solar energy including solar photovoltaics and solar fuels
•    sustainable fossil and alternative fuels

Guided by Editor-in-Chief Professor James Durrant (Imperial College London and Swansea University, UK), Sustainable Energy & Fuels will publish monthly issues containing a mix of Communications, Full papers and Reviews. Look out for the first issue online in spring 2017, with advance articles published from December 2016.

We’ll be sharing more news soon – including when Sustainable Energy & Fuels opens for submissions. With all content published in 2017 and 2018 free to access upon registration, publishing your research in these high profile first issues offers you maximum exposure for your work.

Make sure you stay up to date – sign up to email alerts today.

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Celebrating our 2016 prize and award winners

Excellence doesn’t come in just one form. And neither does our recognition.

Prizes and awards 2016

Across the scientific community, talented groups and individuals are shaping the future of the chemical sciences.

For over 140 years, we’ve been acknowledging and celebrating that talent with our prizes and awards programme.

Our awards reflect the exceptional achievements and diverse nature of our community, across academia, education and industry. Winners have come from a vast range of specialisms, backgrounds, countries and communities. Many have gone on to be Nobel Laureates. All have proved that passion, excellence and dedication deserve recognition and reward.

In celebration of our 2016 prizes and awards, we have collected articles from across our journals to showcase some of the remarkable contributions made by this year’s winners.

All articles are free to access until 5th June 2016.

Access the full collection

Dr Robert Parker, Chief Executive of the Royal Society of Chemistry says:
“It is an honour to recognise the illustrious achievements of our prize and award winners in our 175th anniversary year.

“We were founded in 1841 by a group of academics, industrialists and doctors who understood the power of the chemical sciences to change our world for the better. Our winners share that vision and are advancing excellence in their fields, whether through innovative research or inspirational teaching and outreach.

“We are proud to celebrate and support the work of inspiring and influential individuals, whose work has the potential to improve so many lives.”

Did you know?

An incredible 47 previous winners of the Royal Society of Chemistry’s awards have gone on to win Nobel Prizes for their pioneering work, including Harry Kroto, Fred Sanger and Linus Pauling. Indeed, one of the 2012 Royal Society of Chemistry prize winners, Arieh Warshel, was awarded the 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

A full list of winners and more information about the Royal Society of Chemistry prizes and awards can be found at: rsc.li/awards-prizes-2016

Like what you read? Why not share it with your colleagues, using this convenient short link:

http://rsc.li/rscwinners2016-collection

http://rsc.li/rscwinners2016-collection

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