Archive for the ‘News’ Category

Celebrating International Women’s Day in RCE

As part of International Women’s Day, we would like to take the opportunity to celebrate research led by women and published in Reaction Chemistry & Engineering. With a big thank you to these researchers, and to all women that have contributed to work published in the journal, we encourage you to read their excellent work!


  • Professor Donna Blackmond, Scripps Research Institute, USA and Editorial Board member for Reaction Chemistry & Engineering

In situ FTIR spectroscopic monitoring of electrochemically controlled organic reactions in a recycle reactor
Alexander G. O’Brien, Oana R. Luca, Phil S. Baran and Donna G. Blackmond
React. Chem. Eng., 2016, 1, 90-95
DOI: 10.1039/C5RE00050E

An electrochemical reactor coupled with a recycle loop through a transmission FTIR cell allows continuous monitoring of reaction progress.

 


Catalysis in flow: O2 effect on the catalytic activity of Ru(OH)x/γ-Al2O3 during the aerobic oxidation of an alcohol
John B. Brazier, Klaus Hellgardt and King Kuok (Mimi) Hii
React. Chem. Eng., 2017, 2, 60-67
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00208K

Different roles of O2 in the Ru-catalysed aerobic oxidation of alcohols have been delineated.

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Aerobic oxidations in flow: opportunities for the fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals industries
Asterios Gavriilidis, Achilleas Constantinou, Klaus Hellgardt, King Kuok (Mimi) Hii, Graham J. Hutchings, Gemma L. Brett, Simon Kuhn and Stephen P. Marsden
React. Chem. Eng., 2016, 1, 595-612
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00155F

This collaborative review (between teams of chemists and chemical engineers) describes the current scientific and operational hurdles that prevent the utilisation of aerobic oxidation reactions for the production of speciality chemicals and active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs).

 


Synthesis of narrow sized silver nanoparticles in the absence of capping ligands in helical
microreactors

Ke-Jun Wu, Geoffroy Michet De Varine Bohan and Laura Torrente-Murciano
React. Chem. Eng., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00202A
From themed collection Reaction Chemistry & Engineering Emerging Investigators

Microtubular helical reactors generate secondary flows promoting the synthesis of mono-sized silver nanoparticles in the absence of capping ligands.

 


Application of microfluidics to control product selectivity during non-catalytic oxidation of
naphthenic-aromatic hydrocarbons

M. N. Siddiquee, A. de Klerk and N. Nazemifard
React. Chem. Eng., 2016, 1, 418-435
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00010J

Liquid phase oxidation of naphthenic-aromatic hydrocarbons in slug-flow reactor shows high selectivity, arising from the ability to control local oxygen availability in miniaturized reactors.

 


The catalytic activity and chemical structure of nano MoS2 synthesized in a controlled environment
H. P. Zhang, H. F. Lin, Y. Zheng, Y. F. Hu and A. MacLennan
React. Chem. Eng., 2016, 1, 165-175
DOI: 10.1039/C5RE00046G
From themed collection Celebrating 175 years of the Royal Society of Chemistry

The redox synthesis mechanism is, for the first time, revealed in a novel hydrothermal preparation of nano MoS2 with MoO3 as precursors. The S-to-Mo ratio plays a key role in influencing the morphology and activity of catalyst MoS2.

 


Decay kinetics of sensitive bioinorganic species in a SuperFocus mixer at ambient conditions
Daniela Schurr, Florian Strassl, Patricia Liebhäuser, Günter Rinke, Roland Dittmeyer and Sonja Herres-Pawlis
React. Chem. Eng., 2016, 1, 485-493
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00119J

For the first time the formation and decay of the thermally very sensitive bis(μ-oxo)dicopper species was monitored at ambient temperature in a continuous flow setup and the rate constant of the decay was measured.

 


Methanation of residual syngas after LPG synthesis: identifying the main effects on catalytic performance with Plackett–Burman screening design
Florian Krebs, Vitaliy Bliznuk, Joon Hyun Baik, Regina Palkovits and Kalin Simeonov
React. Chem. Eng., 2016, 1, 477-484
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00071A

Seven factors in catalyst development were selected and rated towards their impact on methanation as a downstream process.

 

 


Development of a reactor with carbon catalysts for modular-scale, low-cost electrochemical generation of H2O2
Zhihua Chen, Shucheng Chen, Samira Siahrostami, Pongkarn Chakthranont, Christopher Hahn, Dennis Nordlund, Sokaras Dimosthenis, Jens K. Nørskov, Zhenan Bao and Thomas F. Jaramillo
React. Chem. Eng., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00195E
From themed collection Reaction Chemistry & Engineering Emerging Investigators

Small-scale reactors for H2O2 production that can couple to renewable energy sources would be of great benefit for decentralized water purification.

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Outstanding Reviewers for Reaction Chemistry & Engineering in 2016

Following the success of Peer Review Week in September 2016 (dedicated to reviewer recognition) during which we published a list of our top reviewers, we are delighted to announce that we will continue to recognise the contribution that our reviewers make to the journal by announcing our Outstanding Reviewers each year.

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Reaction Chemistry & Engineering in 2016, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Dr Duncan Browne, Cardiff University
Dr Antimo Gioiello, Universita degli Studi di Perugia
Professor Christian Goldsmith, Auburn University
Dr Ryan Hartman, New York University
Professor Christian Oliver Kappe, Universitat Graz
Dr Amy Mueller, MIT
Dr Antonio Perazzo, Università di Napoli Federico II
Professor Bert Weckhuysen, Universiteit Utrecht
Dr Charlotte Wiles, Chemtrix
Dr Jun Yue, University of Groningen

We would also like to thank the Reaction Chemistry & Engineering board and the reaction engineering community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre.

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Royal Society of Chemistry and ACS Publications commit to ORCID integration

Yesterday, the Royal Society of Chemistry and the American Chemical Society Publications Division, ACS Publications, both signed the ORCID Open Letter committing to unambiguous identification of all authors that publish in our journals.

The official press release can be found here: http://rsc.li/orcid

In brief, this partnership with ORCID will resolve ambiguity in researcher identification caused by name changes, cultural differences in name presentation, and the inconsistent use of name abbreviations, thereby ensuring their contributions are appropriately recognized and credited.

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Batch and flow: united at last

Batch and flow chemistry can finally be carried out together on the same system!

Reaction Chemistry & Engineering Editorial Board member Steve Ley and colleague Daniel Fitzpatrick at the University of Cambridge have developed an automated reactor that can carry out both batch and flow processes, allowing for greater automation of multi-step synthesis.

Read the full story in Chemistry World.

This article is free to access until 25 November 2016

D E Fitzpatrick and S V Ley, React. Chem. Eng., 2016, DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00160B

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Top 10 Reviewers for Reaction Chemistry & Engineering

In celebration of Peer Review Week, with the theme of Recognition for Review, we would like to highlight the top 10 reviewers for Reaction Chemistry & Engineering in 2016, as selected by the editor for their significant contribution to the journal.

Top 10 Reviewers for Reaction Chemistry & Engineering:
– Professor Ian Baxendale – University of Durham, UK
– Dr Duncan Browne – Cardiff University, UK
– Professor Klaus Jensen – Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
– Dr Darren Bradshaw – University of Southampton, UK
– Professor Saif Khan – National University of Singapore, Singapore
– Dr Jun Yue – University of Groningen, Netherlands
– Dr Paul Watts – Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, South Africa
– Dr Christian Goldsmith – Auburn University, USA
– Dr Qingjie Ge – Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, China
– Dr Bert Weckhuysen – Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Netherlands

We would like to say a massive thank you to these reviewers as well as the Reaction Chemistry & Engineering board and all of the chemistry and engineering communities for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

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Connections in flow

Chemistry World has spoken to Reaction Chemistry & Engineering Editorial Board Chair Professor Klavs Jensen about his work in the field of flow chemistry and continuous processing, culminating in the recent construction of an on-demand continuous flow pharmaceutical production platform with colleagues from MIT.

This achievement was made possible because of close collaboration between chemists and chemical engineers. As a journal, Reaction Chemistry & Engineering seeks to foster clear communication and knowledge sharing between the two disciplines that may lead to future endeavours such as this.

‘It makes sense to form a journal that allows the community from both sides to interact. So we want chemical engineers to publish papers that are interesting to the chemists and chemists to publish papers that have some engineering content and so will also be interesting to the engineers’, explains Professor Jensen, discussing his hopes for the journal. ‘We’d like to have something in between, that actually highlights from both sides what is the contribution in terms of understanding and developing new reactions, being able to optimize those, and understanding the kinetics. But also what does it take to run those – and so we bring together the two disciplines.’

Professor Jensen is convinced that a new journal is needed to do this: ‘Existing journals have reviewers that determine what is published, and they’ve developed their own communities. So it’s much harder to take an existing journal and change the course than it is to redefine, to really set a new goal and create a journal that satisfies the needs from both sides.’

To keep up with the latest research at the interface of chemistry and chemical engineering sign up to the Reaction Chemistry & Engineering TOC alerts or RSS feed, and follow us on Twitter.

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Issue 1 of Reaction Chemistry & Engineering

Covers

Issue 1 of Reaction Chemistry & Engineering is now published online, read it here.

The front covers feature work by Hartman et al. and Noel et al. Take a look inside for articles on polymer reaction engineering, new flow reactor technology, biocatalysis and more!

All articles published in Reaction Chemistry & Engineering in 2016 and 2017 are free-to-access for all. Access is automatic through registered institutions, or individuals can fill in this simple online form to create a free publishing personal account and obtain access to Reaction Chemistry & Engineering and a host of other free content from the Royal Society of Chemistry.

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Breaking news… first Advance Articles published

HeaderThe first Reaction Chemistry & Engineering Advance Articles are now published!

A big thank you to all our board members, authors, referees and others that have worked hard to make this possible.

Read on for a taster of what’s available, and take some time to explore our content. Articles will now be published online as soon as they are ready – the best way to keep up to date with the latest work is to subscribe to our RSS feed or sign-up to email alerts. Don’t forget, the first two volumes of Reaction Chemistry & Engineering are free-to-access for everyone.

A selection of our very first articles:

GAInfluence of water on the deprotonation and the ionic mechanisms of a Heck alkynylation and its resultant E-factors” by Chuntian Hu, Kevin H. Shaughnessy and Ryan L. Hartman

This paper presents a comprehensive investigation into the influence of water on the cationic and anionic derivatives of the deprotonation mechanism of a Heck alkynylation, including evaluation of kinetic parameters, DFT free energy calculations and E-factor analysis in batch and continuous flow. The study increases understanding of how chemical waste generated during Heck alkynylations can be minimised.


GA

A convenient numbering-up strategy for the scale-up of gas–liquid photoredox catalysis in flow by Yuanhai Su, Koen Kuijpers, Volker Hessel and Timothy Noël

This paper presents a modular photocatalytic flow reactor system and its application to the scale-up of the aerobic oxidation of thiols to disulfides, showing a good flow distribution and a yield comparable to a single device. The assembly is made up of only commercially available parts and can be quickly put together by anyone familiar with flow chemistry.


GA

Thermolysis of 1,3-dioxin-4-ones: fast generation of kinetic data using in-line analysis under flow” by Thomas Durand, Cyril Henry, David Bolien, David C. Harrowven, Sally Bloodworth, Xavier Franck and Richard J. Whitby

This paper uses a commercial flow reactor with stepped flow rate for rapid acquisition of kinetic data for the thermolysis of 1,3-dioxin-4-ones. UV and IR provide in-line reaction analysis and kinetic information is extracted from the resulting spectra. The methods developed are widely applicable for reaction study and process development.

We hope you find these articles of interest, don’t forget to check out all the latest content here.

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Sign up for the Reaction Chemistry & Engineering Email Alerts

Email alertsThe Reaction Chemistry & Engineering Email Alerts are a great way to find out about all the latest news and content from the journal.

Our first News Alert will be going out soon, with a roundup of all the most recent developments, so be sure to sign up now.

You can also sign up to Issue Alerts, providing all the content from the latest issue of the journal, which will begin once we have published our first issue.

Don’t forget you can also follow us on Twitter to keep fully up to date.

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Reaction chemistry across the Royal Society of Chemistry

We are delighted to announce that the Royal Society of Chemistry’s newest journal, Reaction Chemistry & Engineering, is now open for submissions – read the full announcement here.

Reaction Chemistry & Engineering cover

To celebrate this, we’ve put together a collection of some of the most exciting recent reaction chemistry papers in Royal Society of Chemistry journals. All the articles in the collection are currently free to access.

We hope that you enjoy reading this collection of great reaction chemistry. After you’re done, why not explore the scope of Reaction Chemistry & Engineering and send us your own best reaction chemistry research now for the chance of being included in our very first issue?

Iron-catalyzed kinetic resolution of N-sulfonyl oxaziridines, Kevin S. Williamson, James W. Sawicki and Tehshik P. Yoon, Chem. Sci., 2014, 5, 3524–3527. Topic areas: New reactions and reaction optimisation; Catalysis and catalytic reaction engineering.

Multi-step and multi-component organometallic synthesis in one pot using orthogonal mechanochemical reactions, José G. Hernández, Ian S. Butler and Tomislav Friščić, Chem. Sci., 2014, 5, 3576–3582. Topic areas: Reaction pathways and design; New reactions and reaction optimisation.

Effects of internal and external carboxylic acids on the reaction pathway of organocatalytic 1,4-addition reactions between aldehydes and nitroolefins, Jörg Duschmalé, Johannes Wiest, Markus Wiesner and Helma Wennemers, Chem. Sci., 2013, 4, 1312–1318. Topic areas: Reaction mechanism and kinetics; Reaction pathways and design; Reaction analysis and monitoring.

Kinetic correlation between aldehyde/enamine stereoisomers in reactions between aldehydes with ɑ-stereocenters and chiral pyrrolidine-based catalysts, Jordi Burés, Alan Armstrong and Donna G. Blackmond, Chem. Sci., 2012, 3, 1273. Topic areas: Reaction mechanism and kinetics, Reaction analysis and monitoring, Catalysis and catalytic reaction engineering

Operando X-ray absorption and EPR evidence for a single electron redox process in copper catalysis, Qingquan Lu, Jian Zhang, Pan Peng, Guanghui Zhang, Zhiliang Huang, Hong Yi, Jeffrey T. Miller and Aiwen Lei, Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 4851. Topic areas: Reaction pathways and design; Reaction analysis and monitoring; New reactions and reaction optimisation.

A self optimizing synthetic organic reactor system using real-time in-line NMR spectroscopy, Victor Sans, Luzian Porwol, Vincenza Dragone and Leroy Cronin, Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 1258. Topic areas: Reaction analysis and monitoring, New reactions and reaction optimisation; Emerging reactor technology.

Cascade upgrading of γ-valerolactone to biofuels, Kai Yan, Todd Lafleur, Xu Wu, Jiajue Chai, Guosheng Wu and Xianmei Xie, Chem. Commun., 2015, 51, 6984. Topic areas: Catalysis and catalytic reaction engineering; Sustainable reaction engineering.

Beyond the use of modifiers in selective alkyne hydrogenation: silver and gold nanocatalysts in flow mode for sustainable alkene production, Gianvito Vilé and Javier Pérez-Ramírez, Nanoscale, 2014, 6, 13476. Topic areas: Catalysis and catalytic reaction engineering; Multiphase and reacting flows; Sustainable reaction engineering.

Continuous flow chemistry: a discovery tool for new chemical reactivity patterns, Jan Hartwig, Jan B. Metternich, Nikzad Nikbin, Andreas Kirschning and Steven V. Ley, Org. Biomol. Chem., 2014, 12, 3611. Topic areas: Multiphase and reacting flows; New reactions and reaction optimisation.

Continuous synthesis of artemisinin-derived medicines, Kerry Gilmore, Daniel Kopetzki, Ju Weon Lee,  Zoltán Horváth, D. Tyler McQuade, Andreas Seidel-Morgenstern and Peter H. Seeberger, Chem. Commun., 2014, 50, 12652. Topic areas: Emerging reactor technologies; Multiphase and reacting flows.

End-to-end continuous flow synthesis and purification of diphenhydramine hydrochloride featuring atom economy, in-line separation, and flow of molten ammonium salts, David R. Snead and Timothy F. Jamison, Chem. Sci., 2013, 4, 2822. Topic areas: Sustainable reaction engineering; Multiphase and reacting flows.

To keep up with the latest news from Reaction Chemistry & Engineering, be sure to sign up to our e-alerts and follow us on twitter @RSC_ReactionEng.

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