Archive for the ‘Hot articles’ Category

‘Robo-chemist’ optimises reactions in one day

Reaction Chemistry & Engineering Chair Klavs Jensen and colleague Steve Buchwald have developed an intelligent automated reactor that drastically cuts the time it takes to optimise cross-coupling reactions.

Their automated flow reactor that can respond to the results of experiments and determine the optimum conditions for catalytic reactions within a single day.

suzuki miyaura optimisation

RCE Advisory Board member Ryan Hartman highly praises the research as a ‘vital contribution that advances both synthetic chemistry and chemical engineering’ in Chemistry World.

Check out the full story by Jamie Durrani here.


This article is open access

B J Reizman et al, React. Chem. Eng., 2016, DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00153J

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Batch and flow: united at last

Batch and flow chemistry can finally be carried out together on the same system!

Reaction Chemistry & Engineering Editorial Board member Steve Ley and colleague Daniel Fitzpatrick at the University of Cambridge have developed an automated reactor that can carry out both batch and flow processes, allowing for greater automation of multi-step synthesis.

Read the full story in Chemistry World.

This article is free to access until 25 November 2016

D E Fitzpatrick and S V Ley, React. Chem. Eng., 2016, DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00160B

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Flow chemistry for on-demand chlorine

No one wants to stock cylinders of toxic and corrosive chlorine in the lab. Now, researchers working with the gas can generate small amounts when and where they need it.

Read the full story by Abigail Hallowes in Chemistry World.

This article is free to access until 05 October 2016

F J Strauss et alReact. Chem. Eng., 2016, DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00135A

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A colour is worth a thousand spectra

Scientists from Germany have developed a quick and low-cost screening method for photocatalytic reactions based on a simple change of colour.

In a recent study in Reaction Chemistry & Engineering, Burkhard König and a colleague from the University of Regensburg have developed a simple colorimetric method to analyse the outcome of photocatalytic reactions. An organic dye changes colour if a reaction works and can even indicate how much of the starting materials has been consumed.

Read the full story by Michaela Mühlberg in Chemistry World.

This article is free to access until 19 September 2016:

Michal Poznik and Burkhard Konig, React. Chem. Eng, 2016, DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00117C

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Top 10 most-downloaded articles: Q2 April–June 2016

Take a look at the most-downloaded Reaction Chemistry & Engineering articles from the months of April, May and June 2016 and let us know what you think!

Continuous flow Buchwald–Hartwig amination of a pharmaceutical intermediate
Polina Yaseneva, Paul Hodgson, Jacek Zakrzewski, Sebastian Falß, Rebecca E. Meadows and Alexei A. Lapkin
React. Chem. Eng., 2016,1, 229-238
DOI: 10.1039/C5RE00048C

A multistep continuous flow synthesis machine for the preparation of pyrazoles via a metal-free amine-redox process
Jian-Siang Poh, Duncan L. Browne and Steven V. Ley
React. Chem. Eng., 2016,1, 101-105
DOI: 10.1039/C5RE00082C

Online monitoring and analysis for autonomous continuous flow self-optimizing reactor systems
D. C. Fabry, E. Sugiono and M. Rueping
React. Chem. Eng., 2016,1, 129-133
DOI: 10.1039/C5RE00038F

Environmental and economic assessment of glycerol oxidation to dihydroxyacetone over technical iron zeolite catalysts
Giacomo M. Lari, Cecilia Mondelli, Stavros Papadokonstantakis, Merten Morales, Konrad Hungerbühler and Javier Pérez-Ramírez
React. Chem. Eng., 2016,1, 106-118
DOI: 10.1039/C5RE00090D

Low-cost instant CO generation at room temperature using formic acid, mesyl chloride and triethylamine
Cedrick Veryser, Seger Van Mileghem, Brecht Egle, Philippe Gilles and Wim M. De Borggraeve
React. Chem. Eng., 2016,1, 142-146
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00006A

Kinetics of nanocrystal synthesis in a microfluidic reactor: theory and experiment
Richard M. Maceiczyk, Leonard Bezinge and Andrew J. deMello
React. Chem. Eng., 2016,1, 261-271
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00073H

Online quantitative mass spectrometry for the rapid adaptive optimisation of automated flow reactors
Nicholas Holmes, Geoffrey R. Akien, Robert J. D. Savage, Christian Stanetty, Ian R. Baxendale, A. John Blacker, Brian A. Taylor, Robert L. Woodward, Rebecca E. Meadows and Richard A. Bourne
React. Chem. Eng., 2016,1, 96-100
DOI: 10.1039/C5RE00083A

Progress in reactor engineering of controlled radical polymerization: a comprehensive review
Xiaohui Li, Erlita Mastan, Wen-Jun Wang, Bo-Geng Li and Shiping Zhu
React. Chem. Eng., 2016,1, 23-59
DOI: 10.1039/C5RE00044K

A convenient numbering-up strategy for the scale-up of gas–liquid photoredox catalysis in flow
Yuanhai Su, Koen Kuijpers, Volker Hessel and Timothy Noël
React. Chem. Eng., 2016,1, 73-81
DOI: 10.1039/C5RE00021A

Simple efficient one-pot synthesis of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and 2,5-diformylfuran from carbohydrates
Quentin Girka, Boris Estrine, Norbert Hoffmann, Jean Le Bras, Siniša Marinković and Jacques Muzart
React. Chem. Eng., 2016,1, 176-182
DOI: 10.1039/C5RE00004A

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Kinetics of Nanocrystal Synthesis in a Microfluidic Reactor

New insight into nanocrystal nucleation and growth has emerged from researchers in Switzerland, giving vital knowledge and tools for large-scale quantum dot production.

Andrew DeMello and his team at ETH Zurich used a two-stage microfluidic reactor to precisely control the nucleation and growth stages of nanocrystal synthesis by automated control of reagent amounts, residence times and temperatures. This tight control combined with measurement of online spectroscopic data gave the scientists the ability to validate kinetic models of the synthesis – essential tools for chemical engineers to design processes for high quality, high volume quantum dot production.

Read the full paper here.

If you are unable to view journal content through automatic institutional access, register to gain free access to the first two volumes.

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Carbon monoxide where you want it, when you want it

Synthetic chemists have invented two new room temperature methods for generating carbon monoxide from cheap precursors and using it straight away, so that deadly amounts of the gas never build up.

Carbon monoxide is toxic, flammable and disperses fast in air. It also happens to be one of the most useful C1 building blocks for organic synthesis. Important industrial processes use bulk quantities. But concerns over safety, especially in cylinder storage and transportation, are hampering research. Carbon monoxide surrogates do exist, but involve costly components, high temperatures or harsh conditions.

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To generate carbon monoxide at the point of use, Wim De Borggraeve and coworkers at KU Leuven, Belgium, have devised a triple system of cheap and common mesyl chloride, triethylamine and formic acid. Alternatively, collaborative work between the groups of Steven Ley at the University of Cambridge, UK, and Trond Ulven at the University of Southern Denmark, brings together chemistry developed in Denmark with flow chemistry technology from Cambridge.

Read the full story in Chemistry World.

Both articles are free to access:

Low-cost instant CO generation at room temperature using formic acid, mesyl chloride and triethylamine, Cedrick Veryser, Seger Van Mileghem, Brecht Egle, Philippe Gilles and Wim M. De Borggraeve, React. Chem. Eng., 2016, DOI: 10.1039/c6re00006a

Controlled generation and use of CO in flow, Steffen V. F. Hansen, Zoe E. Wilson, Trond Ulven and Steven V. Ley, React. Chem. Eng., 2016, DOI: 10.1039/c6re00020g

If you are unable to read Reaction Chemistry & Engineering content through automatic free institutional access, you can fill in this form to gain free individual access to the first two volumes.

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