Welcoming Anita Maguire to the Reaction Chemistry & Engineering Editorial Board

We are delighted to welcome Professor Anita Maguire to the Reaction Chemistry & Engineering Editorial Board.

Anita is Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Director of the Analytical & Biological Chemistry Research Facility, and Vice President for Research & Innovation, at University College Cork, Ireland.

Anita’s research interests are within synthetic organic chemistry and pharmaceutical chemistry, and a key feature of her research team is extensive interaction with the pharmaceutical industry both within Ireland and internationally.

Anita undertook undergraduate and postgraduate studies at University College Cork (B.Sc., 1985; Ph.D., 1989), focusing during her studies on asymmetric catalysis in reactions of α-diazoketones. Following postdoctoral research in the Facultes Universitaires, Namur, Belgium, and subsequently at the University of Exeter, she returned to Cork in 1991 initially as a Lecturer in Organic Chemistry, then as Associate Professor of Organic Chemistry in 2002, and then as the first Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry in 2004. In 2011 she was appointed as Vice President for Research and Innovation at University College Cork. She was an Adjunct Professor at the University of Bergen from 2011-16. Her research interests include asymmetric synthesis, including transition-metal catalysis and biocatalysis, the development of novel synthetic methodology employing α-diazocarbonyl compounds, organosulfur chemistry, and continuous flow chemistry, and the design and synthesis of bioactive compounds with potential pharmaceutical applications. Anita is a co-PI in the Synthesis and Solid State Pharmaceutical Centre (SSPC). She is the inaugural Chair of the National Forum on Research Integrity and was elected a Member of the Royal Irish Academy in 2014.

Please join us in warmly welcoming Anita to the Reaction Chemistry & Engineering Editorial Board!

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Top 10 most-read Reaction Chemistry & Engineering articles – Q1 2019

This month sees the following articles from the last 12 months in Reaction Chemistry & Engineering that are in the top ten most read during January- March 2019.

Continuous flow synthesis of a pharmaceutical intermediate: a computational fluid dynamics approach
Cameron T. Armstrong, Cailean Q. Pritchard, Daniel W. Cook, Mariam Ibrahim, Bimbisar K. Desai, Patrick J. Whitham, Brian J. Marquardt, Yizheng Chen, Jeremie T. Zoueu, Michael J. Bortner and Thomas D. Roper
React. Chem. Eng., 2019,4, 634-642
DOI10.1039/C8RE00252E

Continuous low temperature synthesis of MAPbX3perovskite nanocrystals in a flow reactor
Xinxing Liang, Robert W. Baker, Kejun Wu, Wentao Deng, Dominic Ferdani, Peter S. Kubiak, Frank Marken, Laura Torrente-Murciano and Petra J. Cameron
React. Chem. Eng., 2018,3, 640-644
DOI10.1039/C8RE00098K

Coupling CFD–DEM and microkinetic modeling of surface chemistry for the simulation of catalytic fluidized systems

Enhancing selectivity and efficiency in the electrochemical synthesis of adiponitrile

Detailed kinetics of substituted phenolic species in pyrolysis bio-oils

Metal-based heterogeneous electrocatalysts for reduction of carbon dioxide and nitrogen: mechanisms, recent advances and perspective

Integrated plug flow synthesis and crystallisation of pyrazinamide

Optimum catalyst selection over continuous and discrete process variables with a single droplet microfluidic reaction platform

Continuous-flow liquid-phase dehydrogenation of 1,4-cyclohexanedione in a structured multichannel reactor

Revealing quantum mechanical effects in enzyme catalysis with large-scale electronic structure simulation

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Outstanding Reviewers for Reaction Chemistry & Engineering in 2018

Outstanding Reviewers for Reaction Chemistry & Engineering in 2018

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Reaction Chemistry & Engineering in 2018, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Professor Marcus Baumann, University College Dublin ORCiD: 0000-0002-6996-5893

Professor Geoffrey Bond, Brunel University

Professor Richard Bourne, University of Leeds ORCiD: 0000-0001-7107-6297

Professor Rajamani Gounder, Purdue University ORCiD: 0000-0003-1347-534X

Professor Heidrun Gruber-Woelfler, Graz University of Technology ORCiD: 0000-0002-6917-4442

Professor Ryan Hartman, New York University ORCiD: 0000-0002-5364-9933

Professor C. Oliver Kappe, University of Graz ORCiD: 0000-0003-2983-6007

Dr Matthew O’Brien, Keele University ORCiD: 0000-0002-1943-2351

Professor Victor Sans, University of Nottingham ORCiD: 0000-0001-7045-5244

Dr Kehua Yin, GlaxoSmithKline ORCiD: 0000-0003-2391-5329

We would also like to thank the Reaction Chemistry & Engineering board and the reaction engineering community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

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Top 10 most-read Reaction Chemistry & Engineering articles – Q4 2018

The following articles in Reaction Chemistry & Engineering from the last 12 months are in the top ten most read during October – December 2018.

Why not take a look today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Integrated plug flow synthesis and crystallisation of pyrazinamide
C. Daniel Scott, Ricardo Labes, Martin Depardieu, Claudio Battilocchio, Matthew G. Davidson, Steven V. Ley, Chick C. Wilson and Karen Robertson
React. Chem. Eng., 2018,3, 631-634
DOI: 10.1039/C8RE00087E

Continuous low temperature synthesis of MAPbX3perovskite nanocrystals in a flow reactor
Xinxing Liang, Robert W. Baker, Kejun Wu, Wentao Deng, Dominic Ferdani, Peter S. Kubiak, Frank Marken, Laura Torrente-Murciano and Petra J. Cameron
React. Chem. Eng., 2018,3, 640-644
DOI: 10.1039/C8RE00098K

Coupling CFD–DEM and microkinetic modeling of surface chemistry for the simulation of catalytic fluidized systems
Riccardo Uglietti, Mauro Bracconi and Matteo Maestri
React. Chem. Eng., 2018,3, 527-539
DOI: 10.1039/C8RE00050F

Efficient kinetic experiments in continuous flow microreactors
Kosi C. Aroh and Klavs F. Jensen
React. Chem. Eng., 2018,3, 94-101
DOI: 10.1039/C7RE00163K

Optimum catalyst selection over continuous and discrete process variables with a single droplet microfluidic reaction platform
Lorenz M. Baumgartner, Connor W. Coley, Brandon J. Reizman, Kevin W. Gao and Klavs F. Jensen
React. Chem. Eng., 2018,3, 301-311
DOI: 10.1039/C8RE00032H

Metal-based heterogeneous electrocatalysts for reduction of carbon dioxide and nitrogen: mechanisms, recent advances and perspective
Jun-Hao Zhou and Ya-Wen Zhang
React. Chem. Eng., 2018,3, 591-625
DOI: 10.1039/C8RE00111A

Automated separation of immiscible liquids using an optically monitored porous capillary
James H. Bannock, Tsz Yin (Martin) Lui, Simon T. Turner and John C. deMello
React. Chem. Eng., 2018,3, 467-477
DOI: 10.1039/C8RE00023A

Optimization of the high-throughput synthesis of multiblock copolymer nanoparticles in aqueous media via polymerization-induced self-assembly
Amy A. Cockram, Robert D. Bradley, Sylvie A. Lynch, Patricia C. D. Fleming, Neal S. J. Williams, Martin W. Murray, Simon N. Emmett and Steven P. Armes
React. Chem. Eng., 2018,3, 645-657
DOI: 10.1039/C8RE00066B

In-line separation of multicomponent reaction mixtures using a new semi-continuous supercritical fluid chromatography system
Daniel E. Fitzpatrick, Robbie J. Mutton and Steven V. Ley
React. Chem. Eng., 2018,3, 799-806
DOI: 10.1039/C8RE00107C

Statistics of the network of organic chemistry
Philipp-Maximilian Jacob and Alexei Lapkin
React. Chem. Eng., 2018,3, 102-118
DOI: 10.1039/C7RE00129K

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Profile: Timothy Noël, 2017 Reaction Chemistry & Engineering Emerging Investigator

To celebrate the publication of the Reaction Chemistry & Engineering 2019 Emerging Investigators special issue, the editors caught up with 2017 Emerging Investigator Professor Timothy Noël.

Timothy Noël received in 2004 his MSc degree (Industrial Chemical Engineering) from the KaHo Sint-Lieven in Ghent. He then moved to Ghent University to obtain a PhD at the Laboratory for Organic and Bioorganic Synthesis (2005-2009). Next, he moved to Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) as a Fulbright Postdoctoral Fellow with Professor Stephen L. Buchwald. He currently holds a position as an associate professor and he chairs the Micro Flow Chemistry & Synthetic Methodology group at Eindhoven University of Technology. His research interests are flow chemistry, homogeneous catalysis and organic synthesis. His research on photochemistry in microfluidic reactors was awarded the DECHEMA award 2017.

Read Professor Noël’s 2017 Emerging Investigator papers A sensitivity analysis of a numbered-up photomicroreactor system and Safety assessment in development and operation of modular continuous-flow processes.

 

Your 2017 Emerging Investigator research paper focuses on numbering-up a photomicroreactor system. How has your research evolved from this article to your most recent work?

The numbering-up papers that we published both appeared in Reaction Chemistry & Engineering and these publications represent work that we are still proud off. The solution we developed was really easy and it comprised only components that were commercially available and inexpensive. That is a deliberate strategy in our group as we hope that this facilitates uptake of our technology in academia and industry. In this specific case, it was very encouraging to see that the technology was rapidly picked up by quite a number of colleagues to scale their chemistry.

In recent years, we focused more on the harvesting of solar energy with our luminescent solar concentrator-based photomicroreactors and we will publish in the near future some exciting updates on that work. Also we got involved into automation to develop e.g. automated platforms to carry out reaction screening or to cope with specific issues such as variable light conditions due to passing clouds.

 

What aspect of your work are you most excited about at the moment?

We started about three years ago with electrochemistry in flow and this is something that we will work on more in the near future. We have some upcoming work that we are very excited about and I believe that electrochemistry can become as important as photochemistry. It is my firm belief that also electrochemistry requires a technological impetus to make it scalable and widely applicable.

 

What do you find most challenging about your research?

I think one challenging aspect of our research is the interdisciplinarity as we combine organic chemistry and homogeneous catalysis with chemical engineering and flow chemistry. If you want to excel in all these fields, it is quite a challenge to keep track of everything and make sure we have the right people in the group that can take on this challenge. Actually, I am super-proud of my team, they really embrace these challenges and they surprise me every day with their creative solutions.

 

In which upcoming conferences or events may our readers meet you?

I will attend the yearly flow chemistry conference in Cambridge, organized by the Flow Chemistry Society, which is a must-go-to meeting if you work on Flow Chemistry. I am also going to the ACS meeting in Orlando, where I intend to speak during both flow and non-flow sessions. I am also attending the Beilstein meeting on Electrochemistry and the Lab on a Chip meeting in Amsterdam. Besides that, I also give quite a few seminars at academic institutions and in companies. Discussing our work with colleagues in the field is one of the things I really love about my job.

 

How do you spend your spare time?

I have three kids so I spend quite some time with my family. If I have some “Me-time”, I really love to do sports as my job is most of the time quite static. In addition, I also want to learn something about things that I am not an expert in, so I read lots of books and listen to podcasts which deal with history, politics, philosophy, psychology, etc.

 

Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?

A psychologist, I really love to listen and talk to people. Also in my daily job, I really want to know the person behind the researcher.

 

Can you share one piece of career-related advice or wisdom with other early career scientists?

Do something that you are passionate about and try to be different in your approach. Science nowadays is getting increasingly more competitive and the struggle for financial funding is extremely fierce. If you do not truly love what you are doing, you will rapidly lose interest and confidence and eventually you will probably give up. Therefore, it is important to use a different approach that sets you and your team apart. This allows you to really investigate thoroughly what you are doing without being scared of getting scooped. But it is important to never give up and to keep working hard every single day, even if grants get rejected and the results are not as great as you hoped for. Sooner or later you will find something really cool and you will realize it was all worth it.

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Top 10 most read Reaction Chemistry & Engineering articles – Q3 2018

This month sees the following articles in Reaction Chemistry & Engineering from the last 12 months that are in the top ten most read during July – September 2018.

Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Design and 3D printing of a stainless steel reactor for continuous difluoromethylations using fluoroform

Design and construction of an open source-based photometer and its applications in flow chemistry

Rapid, selective and stable HaloTag-LbADH immobilization directly from crude cell extract for the continuous biocatalytic production of chiral alcohols and epoxides
DOI10.1039/C7RE00173H

Automated separation of immiscible liquids using an optically monitored porous capillary
React. Chem. Eng., 2018,3, 467-477
DOI10.1039/C8RE00023A

Statistics of the network of organic chemistry

React. Chem. Eng., 2018,3, 102-118
DOI10.1039/C7RE00129K

Continuous direct anodic flow oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons to benzyl amides

React. Chem. Eng.
, 2017,2, 822-825
DOI10.1039/C7RE00164A

Thermochemistry of gas-phase and surface species via LASSO-assisted subgraph selection

React. Chem. Eng.
, 2018,3, 454-466
DOI10.1039/C7RE00210F

Coupling CFD–DEM and microkinetic modeling of surface chemistry for the simulation of catalytic fluidized systems

Robust mesoporous bimetallic yolk–shell catalysts for chemical CO2 upgrading via dry reforming of methane

From batch to continuous: Au-catalysed oxidation of D-galacturonic acid in a packed bed plug flow reactor under alkaline conditions

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Top 10 most-read Reaction Chemistry & Engineering articles – Q2 2018

This month sees the following articles from the last 12 months in Reaction Chemistry & Engineering that are the top ten most read during April–June 2018:

Design and 3D printing of a stainless steel reactor for continuous difluoromethylations using fluoroform
Bernhard Gutmann, Manuel Köckinger, Gabriel Glotz, Tania Ciaglia, Eyke Slama, Matej Zadravec, Stefan Pfanner, Manuel C. Maier,   Heidrun Gruber-Wölfler and C. Oliver Kappe
React. Chem. Eng., 2017,2, 919-927
DOI: 10.1039/C7RE00176B

Liquid–liquid microflow reaction engineering
Kai Wang, Liantang Li, Pei Xiea and Guangsheng Luo
React. Chem. Eng., 2017,2, 611-627
DOI: 10.1039/C7RE00082K

Continuous direct anodic flow oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons to benzyl amides
Mikhail A. Kabeshov, Biagia Musioa and Steven V. Ley
React. Chem. Eng., 2017,2, 822-825
DOI: 10.1039/C7RE00164A

Continuous microfluidic synthesis of colloidal ultrasmall gold nanoparticles: in situ study of the early reaction stages and application for catalysis
Ghazal Tofighi, Henning Lichtenberg, Jan Pesek, Thomas L. Sheppard, Wu Wang, Ludger Schöttner, Günter Rinke, Roland Dittmeyere and Jan-Dierk Grunwaldt
React. Chem. Eng., 2017,2, 876-884
DOI: 10.1039/C7RE00114B

Continuous flow synthesis of poly(arylic acid) via free radical polymerisation
Laurens Brocken, Paul D. Price, Jane Whittaker and Ian R. Baxendale
React. Chem. Eng., 2017,2, 662-668
DOI: 10.1039/C7RE00063D

Design protocol of microjet mixers for achieving desirable mixing times with arbitrary flow rate ratios
Asano, S. Yamada, T. Maki, Y. Muranaka and K. Mae
React. Chem. Eng., 2017,2, 830-841
DOI: 10.1039/C7RE00051K

New methods for the preparation of nanoscale nickel phosphide catalysts for heteroatom removal reactions
Mark E. Bussell
React. Chem. Eng., 2017,2, 628-635
DOI: 10.1039/C7RE00098G

Synthesis and molecular weight control of poly(3-hexylthiophene) using electrochemical polymerization in a flow microreactor
Masatsugu Mizuno, Hiroyuki Tateno, Yoshimasa Matsumura and Mahito Atobe
React. Chem. Eng., 2017,2, 642-645
DOI: 10.1039/C7RE00089H

Design and testing of an operando-Raman annular reactor for kinetic studies in heterogeneous catalysis
Ali Maghsoumi, Andrea Ravanelli, Federico Consonni, Fabio Nanni, Andrea Lucotti, Matteo Tommasini, Alessandro Donazzi and Matteo Maestri
React. Chem. Eng., 2017,2, 908-918
DOI: 10.1039/C7RE00092H

Telescoped continuous flow generation of a library of highly substituted 3-thio-1,2,4-triazoles
Mariana C. F. C. B. Damião, Renan Galaverna, Alan P. Kozikowski, James Eubanks and Julio C. Pastre
React. Chem. Eng., 2017,2, 896-907
DOI: 10.1039/C7RE00125H

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Top 10 Most-read Reaction Chemistry & Engineering articles – Q1 2018

This month sees the following articles in Reaction Chemistry & Engineering that are in the top ten most read from January – March 2018.

Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Design and 3D printing of a stainless steel reactor for continuous difluoromethylations using fluoroform
Bernhard Gutmann, Manuel Köckinger, Gabriel Glotz, Tania Ciaglia, Eyke Slama, Matej Zadravec, Stefan Pfanner, Manuel C. Maier, Heidrun Gruber-Wölfler and C. Oliver Kappe
React. Chem. Eng., 2017, 2, 919-927
DOI: 10.1039/C7RE00176B

A miniature CSTR cascade for continuous flow of reactions containing solids
Yiming Mo and Klavs F. Jensen
React. Chem. Eng., 2016, 1, 501-507
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00132G

Halogenation of organic compounds using continuous flow and microreactor technology
David Cantillo and C. Oliver Kappe
React. Chem. Eng., 2017, 2, 7-19
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00186F

Suzuki–Miyaura cross-coupling optimization enabled by automated feedback
Brandon J. Reizman, Yi-Ming Wang, Stephen L. Buchwald and Klavs F. Jensen
React. Chem. Eng., 2016, 1, 658-666
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00153J

Development of a reactor with carbon catalysts for modular-scale, low-cost electrochemical generation of H2O2
Zhihua Chen, Shucheng Chen, Samira Siahrostami, Pongkarn Chakthranont, Christopher Hahn, Dennis Nordlund, Sokaras Dimosthenis, Jens K. Nørskov, Zhenan Bao and Thomas F. Jaramillo
React. Chem. Eng., 2017, 2, 239-245
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00195E

Aerobic oxidations in flow: opportunities for the fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals industries
Asterios GavriilidisAchilleas ConstantinouKlaus HellgardtKing Kuok (Mimi) HiiGraham J. HutchingsGemma L. BrettSimon Kuhn and Stephen P. Marsden
React. Chem. Eng., 2016, 1, 595-612
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00155F

The application of reaction engineering to biocatalysis
R. H. Ringborg and J. M. Woodley
React. Chem. Eng., 2016, 1, 10-22
DOI: 10.1039/C5RE00045A

Continuous direct anodic flow oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons to benzyl amides
Mikhail A. KabeshovBiagia Musio and Steven V. Ley
React. Chem. Eng., 2017, 2, 822-825
DOI: 10.1039/C7RE00164A

Poly(oxymethylene) dimethyl ether synthesis – a combined chemical equilibrium investigation towards an increasingly efficient and potentially sustainable synthetic route
M. Ouda, G. Yarce, R. J. White, M. Hadrich, D. Himmel, A. Schaadt, H. Klein, E. Jacob and I. Krossing
React. Chem. Eng., 2017, 2, 7-19
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00145A

Rapid, selective and stable HaloTag-LbADH immobilization directly from crude cell extract for the continuous biocatalytic production of chiral alcohols and epoxides
J. Döbber, M. Pohl, S. V. Ley and B. Musio
React. Chem. Eng., 2018, 3, 8-12
DOI: 10.1039/C7RE00173H

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Outstanding Reviewers for Reaction Chemistry & Engineering in 2017

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for RCE in 2017, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Dr Marcus Baumann, University College Dublin, ORCID: 0000-0002-6996-5893
Dr Stefano Di Stefano, Università di Roma La Sapienza, ORCID: 0000-0002-6742-0988
Dr Dimitrios Gerogiorgis, University of Edinburgh, ORCID: 0000-0002-2210-6784
Dr Heidrun Gruber-Woelfler, Graz University of Technology, ORCID: 0000-0002-6917-4442 
Dr Ryan Hartman, New York University, ORCID: 0000-0002-5364-9933
Dr Istvan Mandity, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, ORCID: 0000-0003-2865-6143
Dr Dennis J. Miller, Michigan State University, ORCID: 0000-0001-8909-5015
Dr Timothy Noel, Eindhoven University of Technology, ORCID: 0000-0002-3107-6927 
Professor László Poppe, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, ORCID: 0000-0002-9957-1203 
Dr Artem Vityuk, BASF Corporation, ORCID: 0000-0003-3234-5380 

We would also like to thank the RCE boards and the reaction engineering community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre

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Top 10 Most-read Reaction Chemistry & Engineering articles – Q4 2017

This month sees the following articles in Reaction Chemistry & Engineering that are in the top ten most read from October – December 2017.

Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Halogenation of organic compounds using continuous flow and microreactor technology
David Cantillo and C. Oliver Kappe
React. Chem. Eng., 2017, 2, 7-19
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00186F

Design and 3D printing of a stainless steel reactor for continuous difluoromethylations using fluoroform
Bernhard Gutmann, Manuel Köckinger, Gabriel Glotz, Tania Ciaglia, Eyke Slama, Matej Zadravec, Stefan Pfanner, Manuel C. Maier, Heidrun Gruber-Wölfler and C. Oliver Kappe
React. Chem. Eng., 2017, 2, 919-927
DOI: 10.1039/C7RE00176B

A miniature CSTR cascade for continuous flow of reactions containing solids
Yiming Mo and Klavs F. Jensen
React. Chem. Eng., 2016, 1, 501-507
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00132G

Suzuki–Miyaura cross-coupling optimization enabled by automated feedback
Brandon J. Reizman, Yi-Ming Wang, Stephen L. Buchwald and Klavs F. Jensen
React. Chem. Eng., 2016, 1, 658-666
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00153J

The application of reaction engineering to biocatalysis
R. H. Ringborg and J. M. Woodley
React. Chem. Eng., 2016, 1, 10-22
DOI: 10.1039/C5RE00045A

Development of a reactor with carbon catalysts for modular-scale, low-cost electrochemical generation of H2O2
Zhihua Chen, Shucheng Chen, Samira Siahrostami, Pongkarn Chakthranont, Christopher Hahn, Dennis Nordlund, Sokaras Dimosthenis, Jens K. Nørskov, Zhenan Bao and Thomas F. Jaramillo
React. Chem. Eng., 2017, 2, 239-245
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00195E

Tuning reaction products by constrained optimisation
Barnaby E. WalkerJames H. BannockAdrian M. Nightingale and John C. deMello
React. Chem. Eng., 2017, 2, 785-798
DOI: 10.1039/C7RE00123A

Aerobic oxidations in flow: opportunities for the fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals industries
Asterios GavriilidisAchilleas ConstantinouKlaus HellgardtKing Kuok (Mimi) HiiGraham J. HutchingsGemma L. BrettSimon Kuhn and Stephen P. Marsden
React. Chem. Eng., 2016, 1, 595-612
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00155F

Liquid–liquid microflow reaction engineering
Kai WangLiantang LiPei Xie and Guangsheng Luo
React. Chem. Eng., 2017, 2, 611-627
DOI: 10.1039/C7RE00082K

Continuous direct anodic flow oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons to benzyl amides
Mikhail A. KabeshovBiagia Musio and Steven V. Ley
React. Chem. Eng., 2017, 2, 822-825
DOI: 10.1039/C7RE00164A

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