The Scale-Up of Chemical Processes conference 2017

Whether you are a chemist, chemical engineer, QA or safety specialist, your aims when scaling up your process are often the same:

Achieving greater process efficiency, yield and throughput.
Eliminating unsafe and non-green processes and materials.
Decreasing the costs and number of steps involved.

Since the first conference in 1994, The Scale-Up of Chemical Processes has become the major international forum for the discussion of all these aspects of scale-up and more in the pharmaceutical, fine chemical and allied fields.

Key speakers presenting case studies and examples of some of the pitfalls and problems they encountered and how they overcame them. With unparalleled networking opportunities, this broad-based conference is the best place to learn about and discuss the latest novel ideas and techniques with the key people in the industry.

This year, the conference takes place in Rochester, NY from 21-23 June and includes speakers such as:

  • Jim Bruno, (Chemical & Pharmaceutical Solutions, USA)
  • Wim Dermaut, (Agfa Materials, Belgium)
  • Emma McInturff, (Pfizer, USA)
  • Vincent Ferey, (Sanofi, France)
  • John W. Harder, (Kodak, USA)
  • Sebastian Härtner, (EMD Performance Materials, Germany)

View the full programme here and visit their website to find out more and register for the event.

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Royal Society of Chemistry Symposium 2017: Continuous Flow Chemistry for Industrial Processes

 

The RSC Special Chemicals Sector, in association with The Knowledge Transfer Network, is pleased to announce the 2017 International Symposium on Continuous Flow Chemistry for Industrial Processes, which will be held in conjunction with Chemspec Europe 2017.

This international symposium, held over two days at the Munich Trade Fair Centre, will highlight recent developments focused on the growth of continuous processes in the fine chemicals and pharmaceutical industries. The programme includes internationally acclaimed speakers, mostly from industry, and from companies making pioneering advances in the technology.

Confirmed speakers:

  • Charlotte Wiles, (Chemtrix, The Netherlands)
  • Andrea Adamo, (Zaiput Flow Technologies, USA)
  • Chris Price, (University of Strathclyde, UK)
  • Dirk Kirschneck, (Microinnova Engineering, Austria)
  • Eric Beausoleil, (SiliCycle Inc, France)
  • André de Vries, (Innosyn, The Netherlands)
  • Sarah Hunter, (GSK, UK)
  • Karim Engelmark Cassimjee, (EnginZyme, Sweden)
  • Christian Hornung, (CSIRO, Australia)
  • Zoel Codolà, (Medichem, Spain)

This event is free to attend – if you are interested in attending, please contact Pat Keen and visit the RSC Special Chemicals Sector webpage for more details.

 

 

 

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Bio-Resources: Feeding a Sustainable Chemical Industry – Faraday Discussion

The upcoming Faraday Discussion meeting on Bio-Resources: Feeding a Sustainable Chemical Industry will be held in London, UK on 19–21 June 2017.

This Faraday Discussion aims to address some of the critical issues in bio-resources, with themes on bio-based materialsbio-based chemicalsconversion technologies and feedstocks and analysis, by bringing together experts in different but complementary areas in the chemical sciences.

Faraday Discussions have a special format where research papers written by the speakers are distributed to all participants before the meeting, and most of the meeting is devoted to discussing the papers. Everyone contributes to the discussion – including presenting their own slide if it aids discussion. The discussion is recorded and will be published alongside the research papers in the Faraday Discussion Volume. Find out more about Faraday Discussions on the FAQs page.

Confirmed speakers:

Poster submission deadline is 10 April – find out more about how to submit and register for the event here.

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IMTB 2017

We are pleased to announce the 4th Implementation of Microreactor Technology in Biotechnology conference, which will take place in Bled, Slovenia, from 23-26 April 2017.

 

The IMTB conference, which is a collaborative series between research groups from the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia, and the University of Zagreb, Croatia, aims to provide a platform for people from industry and academia, working in the cross-section of microfluidics, life sciences, analytics and bioprocess engineering.

Invited prominent speakers from leading research institutions and industry, together with participants of various backgrounds including chemical, mechanical and electrical engineering, medicine, pharmacy, chemistry, biochemistry, microbiology and biotechnology, will present their recent achievements in the fields of enzymatic microreactors, cells within microdevices, analytical microdevices and bioprocess intensification and integration within microdevices. Abstract submission prizes, as well as oral and poster prizes supported by Reaction Chemistry & Engineering, will also be presented.

Confirmed speakers include:

Visit the IMTB website now for more information on how to register and the full programme.

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McMaster University Chemical Engineering Conference 2017

We are pleased to announce the McMaster University Chemical Engineering Conference (MUCEC), occurring this year on Tuesday 11 April at the McMaster Innovation Park (MIP), Hamilton, ON. The event will provide an opportunity for the university’s graduate students to present their research progress to their colleagues and the department faculty, as well as to attend a keynote presentation given by a distinguished alumnus of the department.

Students will also have the chance to compete for the A.E. Hamielec Award, a prestigious award honouring Dr. Archie Hamielec that represents the department’s commitment to academic communication, as well as departmental awards for the Graduate Student Poster Competition, supported by Reaction Chemistry & Engineering and Molecular Systems Design & Engineering.

Keynote speaker: Dr Laura Wells, (Queen’s University, Canada)

This event is free to attend for all McMaster Chemical Engineering graduate students. To find out more, visit the website here.

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Celebrating International Women’s Day in RCE

As part of International Women’s Day, we would like to take the opportunity to celebrate research led by women and published in Reaction Chemistry & Engineering. With a big thank you to these researchers, and to all women that have contributed to work published in the journal, we encourage you to read their excellent work!


  • Professor Donna Blackmond, Scripps Research Institute, USA and Editorial Board member for Reaction Chemistry & Engineering

In situ FTIR spectroscopic monitoring of electrochemically controlled organic reactions in a recycle reactor
Alexander G. O’Brien, Oana R. Luca, Phil S. Baran and Donna G. Blackmond
React. Chem. Eng., 2016, 1, 90-95
DOI: 10.1039/C5RE00050E

An electrochemical reactor coupled with a recycle loop through a transmission FTIR cell allows continuous monitoring of reaction progress.

 


Catalysis in flow: O2 effect on the catalytic activity of Ru(OH)x/γ-Al2O3 during the aerobic oxidation of an alcohol
John B. Brazier, Klaus Hellgardt and King Kuok (Mimi) Hii
React. Chem. Eng., 2017, 2, 60-67
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00208K

Different roles of O2 in the Ru-catalysed aerobic oxidation of alcohols have been delineated.

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Aerobic oxidations in flow: opportunities for the fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals industries
Asterios Gavriilidis, Achilleas Constantinou, Klaus Hellgardt, King Kuok (Mimi) Hii, Graham J. Hutchings, Gemma L. Brett, Simon Kuhn and Stephen P. Marsden
React. Chem. Eng., 2016, 1, 595-612
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00155F

This collaborative review (between teams of chemists and chemical engineers) describes the current scientific and operational hurdles that prevent the utilisation of aerobic oxidation reactions for the production of speciality chemicals and active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs).

 


Synthesis of narrow sized silver nanoparticles in the absence of capping ligands in helical
microreactors

Ke-Jun Wu, Geoffroy Michet De Varine Bohan and Laura Torrente-Murciano
React. Chem. Eng., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00202A
From themed collection Reaction Chemistry & Engineering Emerging Investigators

Microtubular helical reactors generate secondary flows promoting the synthesis of mono-sized silver nanoparticles in the absence of capping ligands.

 


Application of microfluidics to control product selectivity during non-catalytic oxidation of
naphthenic-aromatic hydrocarbons

M. N. Siddiquee, A. de Klerk and N. Nazemifard
React. Chem. Eng., 2016, 1, 418-435
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00010J

Liquid phase oxidation of naphthenic-aromatic hydrocarbons in slug-flow reactor shows high selectivity, arising from the ability to control local oxygen availability in miniaturized reactors.

 


The catalytic activity and chemical structure of nano MoS2 synthesized in a controlled environment
H. P. Zhang, H. F. Lin, Y. Zheng, Y. F. Hu and A. MacLennan
React. Chem. Eng., 2016, 1, 165-175
DOI: 10.1039/C5RE00046G
From themed collection Celebrating 175 years of the Royal Society of Chemistry

The redox synthesis mechanism is, for the first time, revealed in a novel hydrothermal preparation of nano MoS2 with MoO3 as precursors. The S-to-Mo ratio plays a key role in influencing the morphology and activity of catalyst MoS2.

 


Decay kinetics of sensitive bioinorganic species in a SuperFocus mixer at ambient conditions
Daniela Schurr, Florian Strassl, Patricia Liebhäuser, Günter Rinke, Roland Dittmeyer and Sonja Herres-Pawlis
React. Chem. Eng., 2016, 1, 485-493
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00119J

For the first time the formation and decay of the thermally very sensitive bis(μ-oxo)dicopper species was monitored at ambient temperature in a continuous flow setup and the rate constant of the decay was measured.

 


Methanation of residual syngas after LPG synthesis: identifying the main effects on catalytic performance with Plackett–Burman screening design
Florian Krebs, Vitaliy Bliznuk, Joon Hyun Baik, Regina Palkovits and Kalin Simeonov
React. Chem. Eng., 2016, 1, 477-484
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00071A

Seven factors in catalyst development were selected and rated towards their impact on methanation as a downstream process.

 

 


Development of a reactor with carbon catalysts for modular-scale, low-cost electrochemical generation of H2O2
Zhihua Chen, Shucheng Chen, Samira Siahrostami, Pongkarn Chakthranont, Christopher Hahn, Dennis Nordlund, Sokaras Dimosthenis, Jens K. Nørskov, Zhenan Bao and Thomas F. Jaramillo
React. Chem. Eng., 2017, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00195E
From themed collection Reaction Chemistry & Engineering Emerging Investigators

Small-scale reactors for H2O2 production that can couple to renewable energy sources would be of great benefit for decentralized water purification.

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Outstanding Reviewers for Reaction Chemistry & Engineering in 2016

Following the success of Peer Review Week in September 2016 (dedicated to reviewer recognition) during which we published a list of our top reviewers, we are delighted to announce that we will continue to recognise the contribution that our reviewers make to the journal by announcing our Outstanding Reviewers each year.

We would like to highlight the Outstanding Reviewers for Reaction Chemistry & Engineering in 2016, as selected by the editorial team, for their significant contribution to the journal. The reviewers have been chosen based on the number, timeliness and quality of the reports completed over the last 12 months.

We would like to say a big thank you to those individuals listed here as well as to all of the reviewers that have supported the journal. Each Outstanding Reviewer will receive a certificate to give recognition for their significant contribution.

Dr Duncan Browne, Cardiff University
Dr Antimo Gioiello, Universita degli Studi di Perugia
Professor Christian Goldsmith, Auburn University
Dr Ryan Hartman, New York University
Professor Christian Oliver Kappe, Universitat Graz
Dr Amy Mueller, MIT
Dr Antonio Perazzo, Università di Napoli Federico II
Professor Bert Weckhuysen, Universiteit Utrecht
Dr Charlotte Wiles, Chemtrix
Dr Jun Yue, University of Groningen

We would also like to thank the Reaction Chemistry & Engineering board and the reaction engineering community for their continued support of the journal, as authors, reviewers and readers.

If you would like to become a reviewer for our journal, just email us with details of your research interests and an up-to-date CV or résumé.  You can find more details in our author and reviewer resource centre.

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3D printing outclasses glass

Reactionware revolution continues with nanoparticle flow reactor

A UK team has demonstrated the power of 3D printing in producing complex labware for about the same cost as a paperback book.

The inaugural study to come from Victor Sans’ group at the University of Nottingham, UK, is a proof of concept. In it they designed, manufactured and optimised a cheap yet complex flow reactor for a model system – silver nanoparticle synthesis.

Check out the full story by Reaction Chemistry & Engineering’s Development Editor Hugh Cowley in Chemistry World!


This article is free to access when you register:

O. Okafor et al, React. Chem. Eng., 2017, DOI: 10.1039/c6re00210b

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Automated fluorine radiolabelling moves closer to the clinic

New technique could improve tumour diagnosis and treatment

A new automated fluorine-18 radiolabelling procedure could allow better tumour diagnosis and treatment in the clinic.

Graham Smith and coworkers at the Institute of Cancer Research have used two different radiolabelling platforms to successfully label three small biological molecules with fluorine-18, which could allow the batch production of these radiopharmaceuticals to satellite PET centres around the country.

“We showed how the process could be automated, and reported some indicative trends for the radiolabelling efficiency so that radiochemists with an interest in this type of radiolabelling can quickly adapt and optimise to suit a chosen peptide of interest,” comments Smith.

Check out the full story in Chemistry World.

 


This article is free to access until March 14th.

L Allott et al, React. Chem. Eng., 2017, DOI: 10.1039/c6re00204h

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Top 10 Most-accessed Reaction Chemistry & Engineering articles – Q4 2016

This month sees the following articles in Reaction Chemistry & Engineering that are in the top ten most accessed from October – December 2016:

Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

A miniature CSTR cascade for continuous flow of reactions containing solids
Yiming Mo and Klavs F. Jensen
React. Chem. Eng., 2016,1, 501-507
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00132G

Self-optimisation of the final stage in the synthesis of EGFR kinase inhibitor AZD9291 using an automated flow reactor
Nicholas Holmes, Geoffrey R. Akien, A. John Blacker, Robert L. Woodward, Rebecca E. Meadows and Richard A. Bourne
React. Chem. Eng., 2016,1, 366-371
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00059B

The application of reaction engineering to biocatalysis
R. H. Ringborg and J. M. Woodley
React. Chem. Eng., 2016,1, 10-22
DOI: 10.1039/C5RE00045A

A spray-drying continuous-flow method for simultaneous synthesis and shaping of microspherical high nuclearity MOF beads
L. Garzón-Tovar, M. Cano-Sarabia, A. Carné-Sánchez, C. Carbonell, I. Imaz and D. Maspoch
React. Chem. Eng., 2016,1, 533-539
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00065G

Continuous flow Buchwald–Hartwig amination of a pharmaceutical intermediate
Polina Yaseneva, Paul Hodgson, Jacek Zakrzewski, Sebastian Falß, Rebecca E. Meadows and Alexei A. Lapkin
React. Chem. Eng., 2016,1, 229-238
DOI: 10.1039/C5RE00048C

Adenine as an organocatalyst for the ring-opening polymerization of lactide: scope, mechanism and access to adenine-functionalized polylactide
Guilherme Nogueira, Audrey Favrelle, Marc Bria, João P. Prates Ramalho, Paulo J. Mendes, Andreia Valente and Philippe Zinck
React. Chem. Eng., 2016,1, 508-520
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00061D

A convenient numbering-up strategy for the scale-up of gas–liquid photoredox catalysis in flow
Yuanhai Su, Koen Kuijpers, Volker Hessel and Timothy Noël
React. Chem. Eng., 2016,1, 73-81
DOI: 10.1039/C5RE00021A

A laboratory-scale continuous flow chlorine generator for organic synthesis
Franz J. Strauss, David Cantillo, Javier Guerra and C. Oliver Kappe
React. Chem. Eng., 2016,1, 472-476
DOI: 10.1039/C6RE00135A

Continuous photochemistry: the flow synthesis of ibuprofen via a photo-Favorskii rearrangement
M. Baumann and Ian R. Baxendale
React. Chem. Eng., 2016,1, 147-150
DOI: 10.1039/C5RE00037H

A multistep continuous flow synthesis machine for the preparation of pyrazoles via a metal-free amine-redox process
Jian-Siang Poh, Duncan L. Browne and Steven V. Ley
React. Chem. Eng., 2016,1, 101-105
DOI: 10.1039/C5RE00082C

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