Archive for the ‘Themed issues’ Category

Introducing the organic chemistry collection

This organic chemisty collection has been collated by Editorial Board member Professor Russell Cox (Leibniz University Hannover, Germany). It brings together articles with the continued aim of inspiring new authors to submit their best work to the journal, and also to highlight great work by regular authors. These articles are already among the most highly cited works in the journal, illustrating their impact.

The subject areas of the articles include those traditionally regarded as organic, such as synthesis, catalysis, heterocyclic and organometallic chemistry, natural products chemistry and method development. In addition, the collection also includes articles from overlapping areas, such as green chemistry, fuel production, ionic solvents and materials chemistry, where there is a strong organic and biological component. Underpinning all are theoretical and computational studies. Finally, emerging areas, including photovoltaics and chemical biology, have strong organic chemistry foundations and also find a natural home in this RSC Advances collection.

This selection aims to illustrate the breadth, depth and impact of papers published in RSC Advances in the area of organic chemistry and stimulate new submissions in these and allied areas.

The collection contains reviews, communications and full papers, all of which can be found here.

Credit: Recent advances in 4(3H)-quinazolinone syntheses, 10.1039/C4RA00351A

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New themed collection: Materials for energy storage

Our latest themed collection, ‘Materials for energy storage,’ Guest Edited by Professor Chang Ming Li (Southwest University, China), presents a broad range of materials for energy storage, in particular for sustainable clean energies such as Li batteries, supercapacitors, fuel cells and solar cells.

This collection demonstrates various novel methods to tailor nanoscale materials in both physical structure and chemical composition for superior performance of energy storage. In addition the collection gives fundamental insights into the relation of energy storage to the nanostructure of the materials.

These excellent works – just a few of which are illustrated below – powerfully illustrate the great promise of nanoscience for solutions to the fast depletion of fossil fuels and environmental contamination issues.

Selected graphical abstracts from Materials for energy storage collection

View the themed collection here.

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Introducing our latest themed collection on Tribology

Lubricating bicycle gears

© Shutterstock

We are pleased to present to you this themed RSC Advances collection on Tribology.  The field of tribology is where chemistry and mechanics meet.  It represents a challenging cross-disciplinary arena focusing on the widely recognized problems associated with friction, adhesion and wear that impact a range of materials systems, from machined engine parts, to space craft and satellites, to medical implants, to micro and nanoscale machine technologies. The energy losses in machines through friction and wear also represent a significant economic impact, solutions to which could dramatically aid in the ever increasing challenges of the energy needs of modern society. 

In this themed collection, work in the area of tribology is presented across the spectrum from applied to fundamental and computational studies of materials systems. 

Click here to read more…

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Supramolecular Chemistry Themed Collection now online

The latest RSC Advances web-collection on the topic of Supramolecular Chemistry is now available to view online!

The anion complexation properties of a fluorinated alcohol that is isosteric with a simple isophthalamide revealed that the alcohol can complex weakly basic anions with stability constants greater than those of the isophthalamide.The title of the collection is ‘Supramolecular chemistry: self-assembly and molecular recognition’ and is Guest Edited by Professor Mike Ward (University of Sheffield, UK). The articles presented here cover many aspects of the formation of, and molecular recognition with, non-covalent self-assembled systems. Systems studied span the range of supramolecular assemblies from MOFs to gels, and potential applications or functional behaviour that are on display here include host/guest chemistry, spin crossover, molecular sensors, and extraction/separation.  This collection of articles powerfully illustrates the diversity and increasing importance of supramolecular chemistry, and we hope you enjoy reading it.

Click here to view the full collection.

Some highlights from the collection include:

A ligand possessing two orthogonal metal binding sites is designed to bind three-fold and four-fold symmetric metal ions in such a way as to form a cage.An octahedral aluminium(III) complex as a three-fold node for supramolecular heterometallic self-assemblies: solution and solid state chemistry
Damien Simond, Sarah E. Clifford, Andreia F. Vieira, Céline Besnard and Alan F. Williams 
RSC Adv., 2014, 4, 16686-16693
DOI: 10.1039/C4RA00575A

Subtle backbone modifications control the interpenetration of dibenzosuberone-based coordination cages
Thorben R. Schulte, Marcel Krick, Carmen I. Asche, Sabrina Freye and Guido H. Clever 
RSC Adv., 2014, 4, 29724-29728
DOI: 10.1039/C4RA04679J

The versatility of “click” reactions: molecular recognition at interfaces
Thomas Heinrich, Christoph H.-H. Traulsen, Erik Darlatt, Sebastian Richter, Johannes Poppenberg, Nora L. Traulsen, Igor Linder, Andreas Lippitz, Paul M. Dietrich, Baha Dib, Wolfgang E. S. Unger and Christoph A. Schalley 
RSC Adv., 2014, 4, 17694-17702
DOI: 10.1039/C4RA01730G

Melting temperatures deduced from molar volumes: a consequence of the combination of enthalpy/entropy compensation with linear cohesive free-energy densities
Thibault Dutronc, Emmanuel Terazzi and Claude Piguet 
RSC Adv., 2014, 4, 15740-15748
DOI: 10.1039/C4RA00348A

Bis-triazolium containing macrocycles, pseudorotaxanes and interlocked structures for anion recognition
Nicholas G. White, Henry G. Lovett and Paul D. Beer 
RSC Adv., 2014, 4, 12133-12147
DOI: 10.1039/C4RA00615A

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Themed Collection on Cellular and Tissue Imaging

RSC Advances has recently published a themed collection: Cellular and Tissue Imaging – Luminescent Tags and Probes.

Cellular and tissue imaging provide critical tools for scientists to understand cellular functions, combat disease and develop better medicines. There are a broad range of molecules and compounds that are effective in this function, including fluorescent organic dyes, phosphorescent metal complexes, luminescent lanthanide compounds and nanoparticles.

The themed collection features articles showcasing the very latest research from this emerging field and is Guest Edited by Professor Suning Wang (Queen’s University, Canada) and Professor J. Gareth Williams (University of Durham, UK).

Highlights in the collection include comprehensive reviews on fluorescent indicators for imaging biological Zn ions (Professor Lei Zhu, Florida State University, USA) and carbon-based quantum dots for fluorescence imaging of cells and tissues (Professors Sheng-Tao Yang, Southwest University for Nationalities, China and Ya-Ping Sun, Clemson University, USA).

Some articles in the collection feature supplementary videos, including this video of a pollen root stained with an emissive europium complex from a paper by Professor David Parker (Durham University):

Links to all the articles can be found on the themed collection landing page

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Web-themed issue on Tribology – open for submissions

We are delighted to announce that submissions are open for our new web-themed issue on Tribology

RSC Advances coverThis collection is Guest Edited by Professor James Batteas (Texas A&M University, USA), Professor Graham Leggett (University of Sheffield, UK) and Professor Scott Perry (University of Florida, USA).

In this themed issue we seek to highlight the highly interdisciplinary nature of the field of Tribology to illustrate the rich chemistry found within interfaces in sliding contacts and the tight connection between chemistry, biology and mechanics.

We would like to encourage you to submit to this special issue to help highlight the important innovations in this field and illustrate the challenges faced in examining such systems from experimental and theoretical perspectives. 

Articles can be submitted from now until the 28th February 2014submit your work today!  Please indicate in your covering letter that your submission is for consideration for the Tribology issue. 

If you have any queries or for more information, please contact the Editorial Office: advances-rsc@rsc.org.  


 
This collection will also include contributions from the BP Castrol- RSC International Symposium on Tribology and LubricantsThis symposium will be held in Wuhan (19th November 2013) and Shanghai (21st November 2013). More details of the excellent speakers are on the website. Register for this event for free online.

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Themed issue – Bioactive surfaces for hard tissue regeneration

RSC Advances front coverTake at look at issue 28 of RSC Advances to read our latest themed issue on:

Bioactive surfaces for hard tissue regeneration

This issue is Guest Edited by Professors Matthias Epple and Roman Surmenev and features work covering the modification of the surface properties of different implant materials to control their interaction with the biological environment.

Read the Editorial for the issue here.

Take a look also at the recent Chemistry World story on Bone-repairing nanoparticles laced with DNA.

Stay up-to-date with the latest content in RSC Advances by registering for our free table of contents alerts.

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Nucleic Acids: new life, new materials – web themed issue now published!

Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry, ChemComm and RSC Advances are delighted to announce the publication of a timely web collection on:

Nucleic Acids: new life, new materials

Guest-edited by:

Michael Gait (MRC, Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK) Nadrian Seeman (New York University, USA)
Makoto Komiyama (University of Tsukuba, Japan) Oliver Seitz (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany)
David Liu (Harvard University, USA) Jason Mickelfield (University of Manchester, UK)

Through over 70 communications, full papers, feature articles and perspectives, this collection guides the reader through the most recent and exciting findings in nucleic acids research and applications in emerging areas.

Some of the work presented in this virtual collection is also dedicated to the memory of Professor Har Gobind Khorana (1922 – 2011) and Dr Daniel McGillivray Brown (1923 – 2012) acknowledging their legacy to the nucleic acids community.

“The ingenuity of nucleic acids chemists is formidable, particularly in the newly emerging areas involving DNA architecture combined with novel chemical modifications and material composites. This web collection nicely showcases this potential.”
Read this and more in the guest-editors’ Editorial for the issue.

As a taster, this collection of articles includes:

Pyridostatin analogues promote telomere dysfunction and long-term growth inhibition in human cancer cells
Sebastian Müller, Deborah A. Sanders, Marco Di Antonio, Stephanos Matsis, Jean-François Riou, Raphaël Rodriguez and Shankar Balasubramanian
Org. Biomol. Chem., DOI: 10.1039/C2OB25830G, Paper

A clocked finite state machine built from DNA
Cristina Costa Santini, Jonathan Bath, Andy M. Tyrrell and Andrew J. Turberfield
Chem. Commun., DOI: 10.1039/C2CC37227D

Theoretical model of substrate-assisted self-assembly of DNA nanostructures
Shogo Hamada and Satoshi Murata
RSC Adv., DOI: 10.1039/C2RA20764H

Reduction of metal ions by boranephosphonate DNA
Subhadeep Roy, Magdalena Olesiak, Petra Padar, Heather McCuen and Marvin H. Caruthers
Org. Biomol. Chem., DOI: 10.1039/C2OB26661J

Dehydration from conserved stem regions is fundamental for ligand-dependent conformational transition of the adenine-specific riboswitch
Vinit Kumar, Tamaki Endoh, Kentaro Murakami and Naoki Sugimoto
Chem. Commun., DOI: 10.1039/C2CC34506D

DNA glycoclusters and DNA-based carbohydrate microarrays: From design to applications
François Morvan, Sébastien Vidal, Eliane Souteyrand, Yann Chevolot and Jean-Jacques Vasseur
RSC Adv., DOI: 10.1039/C2RA21550K

The bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP: probing interactions with protein and RNA binding partners using cyclic dinucleotide analogs
Carly A. Shanahan and Scott A. Strobel
Org. Biomol. Chem., DOI: 10.1039/C2OB26724A

A DNA based five-state switch with programmed reversibility
Jonathan R. Burns, Søren Preus, Daniel G. Singleton and Eugen Stulz
Chem. Commun., DOI: 10.1039/C2CC35799B

Two-photon excitation of the fluorescent nucleobase analogues 2-AP and tC
R. S. K. Lane and S. W. Magennis
RSC Adv., DOI: 10.1039/C2RA21881J

…and many more.

We hope that you will find this collection enjoyable and stimulating to read!

Please feel free to send the link to the issue to other researchers who you think may be interested.

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