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RSC Advances 2016 Impact Factor – 3.108

The 2016 Journal Citation Reports® have just been released and we are pleased to  announce that RSC Advances received an Impact Factor of  3.108.

We would like to thank all our authors, referees and readers who have contributed to this success, as well our Editorial and Advisory Boards for their hard work and continued support. Because of you, RSC Advances has maintained its position as a high quality, broad multidisciplinary journal.

We invite you to submit your best work to RSC Advances!

Here are the top five articles that contributed to the 2016 Impact Factor. All of these articles will be free to access for 4 weeks.

Size-controlled silver nanoparticles synthesized over the range 5–100 nm using the same protocol and their antibacterial efficacy
Shekhar Agnihotri, Soumyo Mukherji and Suparna Mukherji*
DOI: 10.1039/C3RA44507K, (Open Access)
RSC Adv., 2014, 4, 3974-3983, Paper

Zinc oxide based photocatalysis: tailoring surface-bulk structure and related interfacial charge carrier dynamics for better environmental applications
S. Girish Kumar and K. S. R. Koteswara Rao*
DOI: 10.1039/C4RA13299H
RSC Adv., 2015, 5, 3306-3351, Review Article

Recent developments in heterogeneous photocatalytic water treatment using visible light-responsive photocatalysts: a review
Shuying Dong, Jinglan Feng, Maohong Fan, Yunqing Pi, Limin Hu, Xiao Han, Menglin Liu, Jingyu Sun* and Jianhui Sun*
DOI: 10.1039/C4RA13734E
RSC Adv., 2015, 5, 14610-14630, Review Article

Removal of basic dye Auramine-O by ZnS:Cu nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon: optimization of parameters using response surface methodology with central composite design
Arash Asfaram, Mehrorang Ghaedi, Shilpi Agarwal, Inderjeet Tyagi and Vinod Kumar Gupta*
DOI: 10.1039/C4RA15637D
RSC Adv., 2015, 5, 18438-18450, Paper

Glutaraldehyde in bio-catalysts design: a useful crosslinker and a versatile tool in enzyme immobilization
Oveimar Barbosa, Claudia Ortiz, Ángel Berenguer-Murcia, Rodrigo Torres, Rafael C. Rodrigues* and Roberto Fernandez-Lafuente*
DOI: 10.1039/C3RA45991H
RSC Adv., 2014, 4, 1583-1600, Review Article

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Top 10 most downloaded articles – January-March 2017

Take a look at our most-downloaded articles for the months of January, February and March 2017 below:

Free radicals, natural antioxidants, and their reaction mechanisms
Satish Balasaheb Nimse and Dilipkumar Pal

RSC Adv., 2015, 5, 27986-28006
DOI: 10.1039/C4RA13315C

Size-controlled silver nanoparticles synthesized over the range 5–100 nm using the same protocol and their antibacterial efficacy
Shekhar Agnihotri, Soumyo Mukherji and Suparna Mukherji
RSC Adv., 2014, 4, 3974-3983
DOI: 10.1039/C3RA44507K

Thermal-runaway experiments on consumer Li-ion batteries with metal-oxide and olivin-type cathodes
Andrey W. Golubkov, David Fuchs, Julian Wagner, Helmar Wiltsche, Christoph Stangl, Gisela Fauler, Gernot Voitic, Alexander Thaler and Viktor Hacker
RSC Adv., 2014, 4, 3633-3642
DOI: 10.1039/C3RA45748F

Electrically conductive polymers and composites for biomedical applications
Gagan Kaur, Raju Adhikari, Peter Cass, Mark Bown and Pathiraja Gunatillake
RSC Adv., 2015, 5, 37553-37567
DOI: 10.1039/C5RA01851J

Auxetic mechanical metamaterials
H. M. A. Kolken and  A. A. Zadpoor
RSC Adv., 2017, 7, 5111-5129
DOI: 10.1039/C6RA27333E

Graphene and its nanocomposite material based electrochemical sensor platform for dopamine
Alagarsamy Pandikumar, Gregory Thien Soon How, Teo Peik See, Fatin Saiha Omar, Subramaniam Jayabal, Khosro Zangeneh Kamali, Norazriena Yusoff, Asilah Jamil, Ramasamy Ramaraj, Swamidoss Abraham John, Hong Ngee Lim and Nay Ming Huang
RSC Adv., 2014, 4, 63296-63323
DOI: 10.1039/C4RA13777A

Hydration of nitriles to amides by a chitin-supported ruthenium catalyst
Aki Matsuoka, Takahiro Isogawa, Yuna Morioka, Benjamin R. Knappett, Andrew E. H. Wheatley, Susumu Saito and Hiroshi Naka
RSC Adv., 2015, 5, 12152-12160
DOI: 10.1039/C4RA15682J

Dual protection of amino functions involving Boc
Ulf Ragnarsson and Leif Grehn
RSC Adv., 2013, 3, 18691-18697
DOI: 10.1039/C3RA42956C

Synthesis and properties of molybdenum disulphide: from bulk to atomic layers
Intek Song, Chibeom Park and Hee Cheul Choi
RSC Adv., 2015, 5, 7495-7514
DOI: 10.1039/C4RA11852A

Photovoltaic enhancement of bismuth halide hybrid perovskite by N-methyl pyrrolidone-assisted morphology conversion
Ashish Kulkarni, Trilok Singh, Masashi Ikegami and Tsutomu Miyasaka
RSC Adv., 2017, 7, 9456-9460
DOI: 10.1039/C6RA28190G

Interesting in submitting to RSC Advances? You can submit online today, or email us with your ideas and suggestions. We look forward to your comments!

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Tomography keeps its cool to analyse ice cream

Source: © Royal Society of Chemistry This 3D rendered image shows a central air cell bounded by faceted ice crystals. Scale bar is 100mm

Researchers from the UK have developed a new 3D x-ray tomography (XRT) method to visualise the effects of changing temperature on the microstructure of ice cream.

Ice cream is a mixture of milk, fats, sugars, proteins, emulsifiers, stabilisers and flavours that are aerated and then frozen to form a soft solid comprising about 30% ice, 50% air, and 5–15% fat droplets suspended in a sugar solution. Its quality depends on the size of its ice crystals and air bubbles: smaller crystals and bubbles make it smoother and creamier. And since this complex colloid is unstable above –30˚C, its microstructure will change during shipping and storage (domestic freezers are usually at around –18˚C), which will affect its taste and texture.

Interested? The full article can be read in Chemistry World.

The original RSC Advances article can be read below and is open access:

Synchrotron X-ray tomographic quantification of microstructural evolution in ice cream – a multi-phase soft solid
Enyo Guo et al.,
RSC Adv.,2017, 7, 15561-15573
DOI: 10.1039/C7RA00642J

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Welcoming new RSC Advances Editorial board members

RSC Advances gives a warm welcome to the following new Editorial board members: Giridhar Madras, Heloise Pastore and Manuel Minas de Piedade.

Giridhar Madras has been a Full Professor in the Chemical Engineering Department at the Indian Institute of Science, India since 2007 and has published more than 450 international journal articles, which have more than 13000 citations and is among the most cited engineering scientists in India with a h-index of 55. His research interests are in the area of reaction engineering applied to polymers, supercritical fluids, and catalysis.


Heloise Pastore
is currently a Full Professor at the Chemistry Institute of the State University of Campinas in Brazil and has research interests and experience in Molecular sieves, isomorphic substitution, zeolites, mcm-41 and supramolecular arrangements.

Professor Pastore is responsible for the invention of two new families of molecular sieves called CAL and UEC.

 

Manuel Minas da Piedade‘s research interests are mainly focused on the energetics of molecules (e.g. fullerenes, PAHs, ionic liquids), crystals (nucleation, polymorphism, crystal engineering), and, very recently, also living cells. He is currently based at the Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, Portugal as an Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry.

 

Please see a small selection of articles from our new board members below:

Facile one-pot scalable strategy to engineer biocidal silver nanocluster assembly on thiolated PVDF membranes for water purification
Maya Sharma, Nagarajan Padmavathy, Sanjay Remanan, Giridhar Madras and Suryasarathi Bose
RSC Adv., 2016, 6, 38972-38983
DOI: 10.1039/C6RA03143A, Paper

Lamellar zeolites: an oxymoron?
F. Solânea O. Ramos, Mendelssolm K. de Pietre and Heloise O. Pastore
RSC Adv., 2013, 3, 2084-2111
DOI: 10.1039/C2RA21573J, Review Article

Direct experimental observation of the aggregation of α-amino acids into 100–200 nm clusters in aqueous solution
Daniel Hagmeyer, Johannes Ruesing, Tassilo Fenske, Heinz-Werner Klein, Carsten Schmuck, Wolfgang Schrader, Manuel E. Minas da Piedade and Matthias Epple
RSC Adv., 2012, 2, 4690-4696
DOI: 10.1039/C2RA01352E, Paper

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Sandpaper electrode harvests electricity from friction

Researchers in South Korea have developed a method to turn common sandpaper into an electrode that generates current from friction, promising a way to power portable devices with ambient mechanical energy.

Source: © iStock Sandpaper already has the rough texture required to make an effective triboelectric generator

Wirelessly powering small devices by harvesting energy from the environment could eliminate the need to ever recharge them. This is especially useful for embedded sensors as they will often be located in inaccessible places without a power supply, for example, on the inside of machines or the side of buildings.

Interested? Read the full article in Chemistry World.

The original article can be read below:

Large-sized sandpaper coated with solution-processed aluminum for a triboelectric nanogenerator with reliable durability
Daewon Kim, Hye Moon Lee and Yang-Kyu Choi
RSC Adv., 2017, 7, 137-144
DOI:  10.1039/C6RA26677K

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Major society chemistry publishers jointly commit to integration with ORCID

ORCID provides an identifier for individuals to use with their name as they engage in research, scholarship and innovation activities, ensuring authors gain full credit for their work.

Today, we signed their open letter, along with ACS Publications, committing to unambiguous identification of all authors that publish in our journals.

The official press release can be read here.

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It’s in the blood

Scientists have designed a tiny fuel cell that generates electricity from the human body’s blood flow, and for the first time, they have tested the device in a person.

The blood-powered fuel cell connected to a low voltage display

The blood-powered fuel cell connected to a low voltage display

Phones, tablets and other portable electronics are common, but development of equally portable power sources is lagging behind. This is a particular concern for biomedical devices such as pacemakers. Since the 1960s, researchers have made biocompatible fuel cells that generate power inside the body. However, none of these power sources has been successfully demonstrated in a human subject.

To read the full article visit Chemistry World.

Ex vivo electric power generation in human blood using an enzymatic fuel cell in a vein replica
Dmitry Pankratov, Lars Ohlsson, Petri Gudmundsson, Sanela Halak, Lennart Ljunggren, Zoltan Blum and Sergey Shleev
RSC Adv., 2016,6, 70215-70220
DOI: 10.1039/C6RA17122B, Communication

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Machine-learning accelerates catalytic trend spotting

Researchers in Japan have used a machine-learning method to cut the time it takes to predict the catalytic potential of different metals.

Binding between a metal surface and an adsorbate mainly depends on the electronic structure of the metal. More energy at centre of the metal’s d-band creates a stronger bond between its surface and the adsorbate. Based on this theory, scientists have long regarded a value called the d-band centre as a key indicator of a metal’s catalytic activity.

Machine learning helps researchers tackle challenging tasks, such as designing pollution filter catalysts at industrial scale © iStock

Researchers normally compute this value independently for each metal using first-principles calculations. Now, as part of a wider interest in machine-learning applications, Ichigaku Takigawa and his group at Hokkaido University have developed a new method for predicting the d-band centre value. They use readily available data, such as density and electronegativity from other metals or bimetals, to predict the d-band centre for 11 metals and their bimetallic alloys. The results compare favourably with values obtained through density functional theory.

To read the full article please visit Chemistry World.

Machine-learning prediction of the d-band center for metals and bimetals
Ichigaku Takigawa, Ken-ichi Shimizu, Koji Tsuda and Satoru Takakusagi
RSC Adv., 2016,6, 52587-52595
DOI: 10.1039/C6RA04345C, Paper

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Now you see me: autofluorescent nanoparticles for live cell imaging and biodegradation modeling

There is an increasing need for novel technologies to facilitate in vivo tissue visualization and drug delivery. However, this need is largely unmet due to the challenges associated with creating biocompatible materials that meet safety standards. In addition, the potential health risks associated with the accumulation of non-degradable imaging agents and drug carries represents a major obstacle in the innovation pipeline.

The intrinsic autofluorescent, biodegradable and biocompatible properties of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) is well appreciated. However, BSA has short excitation and emission wavelengths, which substantially restricts any in vivo biomedical applications.  Motivated by a recent report suggesting that glutaraldehyde (GA)-crosslinking induces autofluorescence in protein-based nanoparticles by modifying a series of C=C and C=N bonds, a team led by Yu Lei at the Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Connecticut, developed low-cost, non-toxic, BSA-based protein nanoparticles (average size ~40 nm) for live cell imaging and biodegradation analysis.

The nanoparticles were generated by adding drops of a prepared BSA solution to glutaraldehyde/n-butanol solution at high-speed, and the resulting product heated at 121°C to ensure sterility. Interestingly, a similar reaction carried out in the absence of the GA crosslinker did not produce autofluorescent BSA nanoparticles, suggesting that GA was indeed playing an important role in chemically transforming BSA. Using UV-visible spectroscopy, the investigators observed that BSA nanoparticles exhibited strong autofluorescence at both green (530 nm) and red (630 nm) wavelengths.

The BSA nanoparticles were not uniform in structure, owing to the random points of crosslinking within BSA, and also due to the ensuing condensation reaction that occurs during the sterilization step. Therefore, a clear mechanistic explanation for the strong autofluorescence warrants further investigation. However, the investigators speculate that GA-crosslinking and heating could result in new C=N bonds, which could synergize with the C=C bonds from tryptophan, tyrosine, phenylalanine and histidine residues with BSA, leading to enhanced green and red fluorescence.

The team went on to demonstrate the utility of the BSA nanoparticles in biomedical applications such as imaging and biodegradation. They used fluorescent microscopy techniques to visualize the entry of BSA nanoparticles into human kidney cells grown in vitro. The study also found that the BSA nanoparticles were completely degraded within 18 days of injection in mice. A mathematical model for the distribution and biodegradation of the nanoparticles was in good agreement with the experimental results. Finally, to add an additional line of evidence supporting the biocompatible nature of the BSA nanoparticles, the investigators looked for signs of tissue damage in the region surrounding the site of injection, together with an analysis of internal organs including the pancreas, liver and kidney, and report that the BSA nanoparticles are biocompatible.

Read the full article here:

Xiaoyu Ma, Derek Hargrove, Qiuchen Dong, Donghui Song, Jun Chen, Shiyao Wang, Xiuling Lu, Yong Ku Cho, Tai-Hsi Fan and  Yu Lei
DOI: 10.1039/c6ra06783b
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RSC Supramolecular Chemistry Award for Editor-in-Chief Mike Ward

Each year the Royal Society of Chemistry presents prizes and awards to chemical scientists who have made a considerable contribution in their area of research, in industry and academia. This year, we are delighted to announce that RSC Advances Editor-in-Chief, Professor Mike Ward of the University of Sheffield, UK, has been awarded the 2016 RSC Supramolecular Chemistry Award, for his leading contributions to the synthesis, characterisation, host-guest chemistry and functional properties of self-assembled coordination cages.

The Supramolecular Chemistry Award is awarded biennially and recognises studies leading to the design of functionally useful supramolecular species.

In celebration of the 2016 RSC Prizes and Awards, we have collected together some of the research recently published by the winners. This collection showcases articles authored by the winners from across the Royal Society of Chemistry’s journals portfolio, which are free to access for a limited period. A full list of 2016 winners and more information about RSC Prizes and Awards can be found here.

Please join us in congratulating Mike on this achievement!

We would like to highlight the RSC Advances themed collection, Supramolecular chemistry: self-assembly and molecular recognition, Guest Edited by Mike Ward.

The articles in this issue cover many aspects of the formation of, and molecular recognition with, non-covalent self-assembled systems. Systems studied span the range of supramolecular assemblies from MOFs to gels, and potential applications or functional behaviour that are on display here include host/guest chemistry, spin crossover, molecular sensors, and extraction/separation. This collection of articles powerfully illustrates the diversity and increasing importance of supramolecular chemistry.

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