Archive for the ‘Article collection’ Category

Sticks and stones may break my bones, but hydrogels will never hurt me

Recent advancements in tissue engineering have led to the fabrication of complex materials that may be used as surrogates for heart, neuronal, bone and cartilage tissue regeneration. A vast majority of engineered tissues are composed of a three-dimensional scaffold at its core, layered with growth stimulating agents, that collectively nurture and support cell growth.

In a study by Gantar and colleagues at the Jozef Stefan Institute, Department for Nanostructured Materials in Slovenia,  a team of researchers created an injectable hydrogel as a potential biomaterial for bone tissue regeneration. They further demonstrate that the hydrogel is capable of self-healing and supports the growth of cells derived from human bone tissue.

Hydrogels based on reversible covalent bonds allow the material to rearrange its structure permanently. This forms the basis for self-healing. A potential drawback is that the conditions (temperature and pH) required to form these bonds to form are not suitable for supporting bone cell growth. Having recognized this limitation, the team decided to develop a liquid hydrogel that transitions to a gel-like state at a pH suitable for cell growth and proliferation. Further, the hydrogel was infused with bioactive glass (BAG) nanoparticles – a silica-based material known to support bone cell growth.

The study also characterizes the physical (elastic properties, compression) and biological (degradation, cytotoxicity) features of the injectable hydrogel. The study finds that the BAG nanoparticles do not drastically alter the physical and biological properties of the hydrogel and suggest that the combination is well suited to support bone cell growth. The team proposes that their efforts will contribute toward the development of an injectable material that will scaffold bone cells within the host and promote self-repair.

Read the full article here:

Injectable and self-healing dynamic hydrogel containing bioactive glass nanoparticles as a potential biomaterial for bone regeneration
Ana Gantar, Nataša Drnovšek, Pablo Casuso, Adrián Pérez-San Vicente, Javier Rodriguez,c   Damien Dupin, Saša Novakab and Iraida Loinazc
RSC Adv., 2016,6, 69156-69166
DOI: 10.1039/C6RA17327F

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RSC Supramolecular Chemistry Award for Editor-in-Chief Mike Ward

Each year the Royal Society of Chemistry presents prizes and awards to chemical scientists who have made a considerable contribution in their area of research, in industry and academia. This year, we are delighted to announce that RSC Advances Editor-in-Chief, Professor Mike Ward of the University of Sheffield, UK, has been awarded the 2016 RSC Supramolecular Chemistry Award, for his leading contributions to the synthesis, characterisation, host-guest chemistry and functional properties of self-assembled coordination cages.

The Supramolecular Chemistry Award is awarded biennially and recognises studies leading to the design of functionally useful supramolecular species.

In celebration of the 2016 RSC Prizes and Awards, we have collected together some of the research recently published by the winners. This collection showcases articles authored by the winners from across the Royal Society of Chemistry’s journals portfolio, which are free to access for a limited period. A full list of 2016 winners and more information about RSC Prizes and Awards can be found here.

Please join us in congratulating Mike on this achievement!

We would like to highlight the RSC Advances themed collection, Supramolecular chemistry: self-assembly and molecular recognition, Guest Edited by Mike Ward.

The articles in this issue cover many aspects of the formation of, and molecular recognition with, non-covalent self-assembled systems. Systems studied span the range of supramolecular assemblies from MOFs to gels, and potential applications or functional behaviour that are on display here include host/guest chemistry, spin crossover, molecular sensors, and extraction/separation. This collection of articles powerfully illustrates the diversity and increasing importance of supramolecular chemistry.

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Introducing the organic chemistry collection

This organic chemisty collection has been collated by Editorial Board member Professor Russell Cox (Leibniz University Hannover, Germany). It brings together articles with the continued aim of inspiring new authors to submit their best work to the journal, and also to highlight great work by regular authors. These articles are already among the most highly cited works in the journal, illustrating their impact.

The subject areas of the articles include those traditionally regarded as organic, such as synthesis, catalysis, heterocyclic and organometallic chemistry, natural products chemistry and method development. In addition, the collection also includes articles from overlapping areas, such as green chemistry, fuel production, ionic solvents and materials chemistry, where there is a strong organic and biological component. Underpinning all are theoretical and computational studies. Finally, emerging areas, including photovoltaics and chemical biology, have strong organic chemistry foundations and also find a natural home in this RSC Advances collection.

This selection aims to illustrate the breadth, depth and impact of papers published in RSC Advances in the area of organic chemistry and stimulate new submissions in these and allied areas.

The collection contains reviews, communications and full papers, all of which can be found here.

Credit: Recent advances in 4(3H)-quinazolinone syntheses, 10.1039/C4RA00351A

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Supramolecular Chemistry Themed Collection now online

The latest RSC Advances web-collection on the topic of Supramolecular Chemistry is now available to view online!

The anion complexation properties of a fluorinated alcohol that is isosteric with a simple isophthalamide revealed that the alcohol can complex weakly basic anions with stability constants greater than those of the isophthalamide.The title of the collection is ‘Supramolecular chemistry: self-assembly and molecular recognition’ and is Guest Edited by Professor Mike Ward (University of Sheffield, UK). The articles presented here cover many aspects of the formation of, and molecular recognition with, non-covalent self-assembled systems. Systems studied span the range of supramolecular assemblies from MOFs to gels, and potential applications or functional behaviour that are on display here include host/guest chemistry, spin crossover, molecular sensors, and extraction/separation.  This collection of articles powerfully illustrates the diversity and increasing importance of supramolecular chemistry, and we hope you enjoy reading it.

Click here to view the full collection.

Some highlights from the collection include:

A ligand possessing two orthogonal metal binding sites is designed to bind three-fold and four-fold symmetric metal ions in such a way as to form a cage.An octahedral aluminium(III) complex as a three-fold node for supramolecular heterometallic self-assemblies: solution and solid state chemistry
Damien Simond, Sarah E. Clifford, Andreia F. Vieira, Céline Besnard and Alan F. Williams 
RSC Adv., 2014, 4, 16686-16693
DOI: 10.1039/C4RA00575A

Subtle backbone modifications control the interpenetration of dibenzosuberone-based coordination cages
Thorben R. Schulte, Marcel Krick, Carmen I. Asche, Sabrina Freye and Guido H. Clever 
RSC Adv., 2014, 4, 29724-29728
DOI: 10.1039/C4RA04679J

The versatility of “click” reactions: molecular recognition at interfaces
Thomas Heinrich, Christoph H.-H. Traulsen, Erik Darlatt, Sebastian Richter, Johannes Poppenberg, Nora L. Traulsen, Igor Linder, Andreas Lippitz, Paul M. Dietrich, Baha Dib, Wolfgang E. S. Unger and Christoph A. Schalley 
RSC Adv., 2014, 4, 17694-17702
DOI: 10.1039/C4RA01730G

Melting temperatures deduced from molar volumes: a consequence of the combination of enthalpy/entropy compensation with linear cohesive free-energy densities
Thibault Dutronc, Emmanuel Terazzi and Claude Piguet 
RSC Adv., 2014, 4, 15740-15748
DOI: 10.1039/C4RA00348A

Bis-triazolium containing macrocycles, pseudorotaxanes and interlocked structures for anion recognition
Nicholas G. White, Henry G. Lovett and Paul D. Beer 
RSC Adv., 2014, 4, 12133-12147
DOI: 10.1039/C4RA00615A

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Graphene and platinum are brought together for fuel cells

Graphene is certainly a hot topic in research right now. A quick look down this very blog shows that it featured in no fewer than seven of the top ten accessed articles in RSC Advances during 2012 (including all of the top three)!

This versatile material appears as oxides, composites, quantum dots, nanomaterials and foams and it has been investigated for uses in photocatalysis, energy, environmental applications and more.

Now researchers in India and China have been investigating graphene supported platinum catalysts for fuel cells.Platinum nanostructures on graphene catalysing oxygen reduction

Sreekuttan M. Unni and colleagues report the first synthesis of a 3D self-assembled single crystalline platinum nanostructure directly on a graphene surface without structural directing agents, by using a slow reduction method. In their paper, they show superior electrocatalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction, a crucial reaction for hydrogen-fuelled polymer electrolyte fuel cells. They show that their material also has less vulnerability to strong hydroxyl adsorption and a higher limiting current density than other graphene supported platinum or commercial platinum-on-carbon catalysts.

Meanwhile Jian Zhao and colleagues have published about their supercritical fluid route for preparing graphene-supported platinum-ruthenium nanoparticles in an effective, simple, low temperature and environmentally benign way. They used supercritical CO2 to uniformly distribute ultrafine PtRu nanoparticles with an average size of 2.87 nm on the surfaces of functionalized graphene sheets. They found considerably improved catalytic activity and stability for methanol oxidation from their supported nanoparticles because of the uniform distribution. Their supercritical approach may have promise for development of direct methanol fuel cells.

Find out more about this research in RSC Advances:

3-Dimensionally self-assembled single crystalline platinum nanostructures on few-layer graphene as an efficient oxygen reduction electrocatalyst, Sreekuttan M. Unni, Vijayamohanan K. Pillai and Sreekumar Kurungot, RSC Adv., 2013, 3, 6913-6921

Methanol electrocatalytic oxidation on highly dispersed platinum–ruthenium/graphene catalysts prepared in supercritical carbon dioxide–methanol solution, Jian Zhao, Lin Zhang, Hao Xue, Zhaobo Wang and Haiqing Hu, RSC Adv., 2012, 2, 9651–9659

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Energy storage of the future?

Supercapacitors, also known as electrochemical capacitors, are used as highly reliable energy storage devices with the advantage of rapid charge and discharge compared to batteries. However to further expand their use it is necessary to improve their performance in other areas including energy density.

Ruthenium oxide is the material widely used for supercapacitor electrodes. Its use is reviewed by Wentao Deng and colleagues in China and the UK, in a comprehensive overview of the state-of-the-art in this area.Ruthenium oxide decorated carbon nanotubes for supercapacitors

Work has not stopped on improving the performance of these highly promising devices – far from it. Just to take a couple of examples, Sho Makino and colleagues from Japan have used nanostructured ruthenium oxide in an aqueous hybrid supercapacitor with a specific energy comparable to modern rechargeable batteries, opening the possibility of using these materials in a post-lithium ion battery technology. Meanwhile Beena Balan and colleagues from India have looked at decorating carbon nanotubes with ruthenium oxide to produce a ternary electrode material to increase the specific capacitance by 103%, with enhanced rate and excellent electrochemical stability.

Read more about this valuable research in RSC Advances – free to access for 4 weeks:

Electrochemical capacitors utilising transition metal oxides: an update of recent developments, Wentao Deng, Xiaobo Ji, Qiyuan Chen and Craig E. Banks, RSC Adv., 2011, 1, 1171

4 V class aqueous hybrid electrochemical capacitor with battery-like capacity,Sho Makino, Yuto Shinohara, Takayuki Ban, Wataru Shimizu, Keita Takahashi, Nobuyuki Imanishib and Wataru Sugimoto, RSC Adv., 2012, 2, 12144

Carbon nanofiber–RuO2–poly(benzimidazole) ternary hybrids for improved supercapacitor performance, Beena K Balan, Harshal D Chaudhari, Ulhas K Kharul and Sreekumar Kurungot, RSC Adv., 2013, 3, 2428

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Top 10 cited review articles in RSC Advances

RSC Advances coverAt the end of another successful year for RSC Advances, here are the top 10 most highly cited review articles in the Journal so far – all free to access!

Triplet–triplet annihilation based upconversion: from triplet sensitizers and triplet acceptors to upconversion quantum yields, Jianzhang Zhao, Shaomin Ji and Huimin Guo, RSC Adv., 2011, 1, 937-950

Cucurbituril chemistry: a tale of supramolecular success, Eric Masson, Xiaoxi Ling, Roymon Joseph, Lawrence Kyeremeh-Mensah and Xiaoyong Lu, RSC Adv., 2012, 2, 1213-1247

Graphene-based photocatalytic composites, Xiaoqiang An and Jimmy C. Yu, RSC Adv., 2011, 1, 1426-1434

Graphene–inorganic nanocomposites, Song Bai and Xiaoping Shen, RSC Adv., 2012, 2, 64-98

CO2 chemistry: task-specific ionic liquids for CO2 capture/activation and subsequent conversion, Zhen-Zhen Yang, Ya-Nan Zhao and Liang-Nian He, RSC Adv., 2011, 1, 545-567

Transition metal complexes with strong absorption of visible light and long-lived triplet excited states: from molecular design to applications, Jianzhang Zhao, Shaomin Ji, Wanhua Wu, Wenting Wu, Huimin Guo, Jifu Sun, Haiyang Sun, Yifan Liu, Qiuting Li and Ling Huang, RSC Adv., 2012, 2, 1712-1728

Bioelectrochemical systems (BES) for sustainable energy production and product recovery from organic wastes and industrial wastewaters, Deepak Pant, Anoop Singh, Gilbert Van Bogaert, Stig Irving Olsen, Poonam Singh Nigam, Ludo Diels and Karolien Vanbroekhoven, RSC Adv., 2012, 2, 1248-1263

Graphene oxide and its reduction: modeling and experimental progress, Shun Mao, Haihui Pu and Junhong Chen, RSC Adv., 2012, 2, 2643-2662

Electrochemical capacitors utilising transition metal oxides: an update of recent developments, Wentao Deng, Xiaobo Ji, Qiyuan Chen and Craig E. Banks, RSC Adv., 2011, 1, 1171-1178

Making contact: charge transfer during particle–electrode collisions, Neil V. Rees, Yi-Ge Zhou and Richard G. Compton, RSC Adv., 2012, 2, 379-384

Stay up-to-date with the latest content in RSC Advances by registering for our free table of contents alerts.

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C-H activation: an article collection

Picture showing several chemical reaction schemes and moleculesOne of the simplest and most utilised chemical reactions is the burning of hydrocarbons and while combustion is an excellent way to exploit the energy content of this naturally occurring resource, there is a lot more we can do with the ‘inert’ C-H bond.

C-H activation allows us to convert cheaper hydrocarbon starting materials into more valuable and versatile products; leading to the development of a wide range of reagents and catalysts that activate C-H bonds. To keep you up to date with the latest developments in the field we have created this article collection, where all articles are free to download until 15th December.

Click here for the full list of free articles

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Biocatalysis: an article collection

A picture of an enzymeBeers, wines and cheeses are enjoyed around the world today and have been for millennia. In fact the practices of brewing and cheese-making pre-date recorded history so it is difficult to accurately determine when we first started using naturally occurring enzymes and microorganisms to create valuable (and in this case, tastier!) products.

Biocatalysts are of course used in far more diverse applications than the creation of food-stuffs, including in many organic syntheses and in the generation of fine chemicals. Due to their natural design, they can offer superior selectivity for particular products and have a far lower environmental impact than many traditional catalysts. Our knowledge and understanding of biocatalysts has increased dramatically in the last few decades, which has allowed us to develop biologically modified and biomimetic catalysts for a range of applications.

To keep you up to date with the latest advances in this rapidly expanding field we have collected together these high impact articles and made them free to access until the 31st October!

Click here to read the full collection

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Top ten most accessed articles in August

This month sees the following articles in RSC Advances that are in the top ten most accessed:-

Graphene-inorganic nanocomposites
Song Bai and Xiaoping Shen
RSC Adv., 2012, 2, 64-98, DOI: 10.1039/C1RA00260K

Graphene quantum dots with controllable surface oxidation, tunable fluorescence and up-conversion emission
Shoujun Zhu, Junhu Zhang, Xue Liu, Bo Li, Xingfeng Wang, Shijia Tang, Qingnan Meng, Yunfeng Li, Ce Shi, Rui Hu and Bai Yang
RSC Adv., 2012,2, 2717-2720, DOI: 10.1039/C2RA20182H, Communication

Synthesis of graphene-based nanomaterials and their application in energy-related and environmental-related areas
Guixia Zhao, Tao Wen, Changlun Chen and Xiangke Wang
RSC Adv., 2012,2, 9286-9303, DOI: 10.1039/C2RA20990J, Review Article

Recent developments in solvent-free multicomponent reactions: a perfect synergy for eco-compatible organic synthesis
Maya Shankar Singh and Sushobhan Chowdhury
RSC Adv., 2012, Advance Article, DOI: 10.1039/C2RA01056A

Nitrogen-doped graphene with high nitrogen level via a one-step hydrothermal reaction of graphene oxide with urea for superior capacitive energy storage
Li Sun, Lei Wang, Chungui Tian, Taixing Tan, Ying Xie, Keying Shi, Meitong Li and Honggang Fu
RSC Adv., 2012,2, 4498-4506, DOI: 10.1039/C2RA01367C, Paper

Graphene oxide and its reduction: modeling and experimental progress
Shun Mao, Haihui Pu and Junhong Chen
RSC Adv., 2012, 2, 2643-2662, DOI: 10.1039/C2RA00663D

Organocatalytic Mannich/cyclization/aromatization sequence: direct synthesis of substituted pyrrole-3-carboxaldehydes
Indresh Kumar, Nisar A. Mir, Panduga Ramaraju and Basant P. Wakhloo
RSC Adv., 2012,2, 8922-8925, DOI: 10.1039/C2RA21258G, Communication

3D anatase TiO2 hollow microspheres assembled with high-energy {001} facets for lithium-ion batteries
Yanlong Yu, Xiaoliang Wang, Hongyu Sun and Mashkoor Ahmad
RSC Adv., 2012,2, 7901-7905, DOI: 10.1039/C2RA20718D, Paper

A facile room-temperature route to flower-like CuO microspheres with greatly enhanced lithium storage capability
Zhengqiu Yuan, Yan Wang and Yitai Qian
RSC Adv., 2012,2, 8602-8605, DOI: 10.1039/C2RA21267F, Communication

Cucurbituril chemistry: a tale of supramolecular success
Eric Masson, Xiaoxi Ling, Roymon Joseph, Lawrence Kyeremeh-Mensah and Xiaoyong Lu
RSC Adv., 2012,2, 1213-1247, DOI: 10.1039/C1RA00768H, Review Article

Why not take a look at the articles today and blog your thoughts and comments below.

Fancy submitting an article to RSC Advances? Then why not submit to us today or alternatively email us with your suggestions.

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