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The Editorial Board pick their favourite Polymer Chemistry articles

Polymer Chemistry is dedicated to publishing research encompassing all aspects of synthetic and biological macromolecules, and related emerging areas.

Our Editorial Board wants to tell the scientific community about the content published in Polymer Chemistry.

Editorial Board's top picks from Polymer Chemistry


So, we have put together a web collection to highlight their favourite Polymer Chemistry articles.

Each month a different member of the Editorial Board will be picking their top articles, so be sure to keep checking the website for the latest additions!

Let us know which Polymer Chemistry articles are your favourite by joining the conversation on Twitter @PolymChem.

To whet your appetite for the web collection, we share with you the first “top picks” chosen by Editorial Board member Professor Heather Maynard, University of California, USA! Heather’s research lies at the frontiers of chemistry, biomaterials, and nanotechnology and involves a combination of organic and polymer synthesis, materials characterization, and biomedical research.



Heather has selected these Polymer Chemistry articles from 2015:

Dual side chain control in the synthesis of novel sequence-defined oligomers through the Ugi four-component reaction
Susanne C. Solleder, Katharina S. Wetzel and Michael A. R. Meier

Degradable cross-linked polymer vesicles for the efficient delivery of platinum drugs
Q. Fu, J. Xu, K. Ladewig, T. M. A. Henderson and G. G. Qiao

The power of one-pot: a hexa-component system containing π–π stacking, Ugi reaction and RAFT polymerization for simple polymer conjugation on carbon nanotubes
Bin Yang, Yuan Zhao, Xu Ren, Xiaoyong Zhang, Changkui Fu, Yaling Zhang, Yen Wei and Lei Tao
This article was also highlighted on the Polymer Chemistry blog as Remzi Becer’s Paper of the Week.

We hope you enjoy reading the “Editorial Board’s top picks from Polymer Chemistry!”

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Polymer Chemistry welcomes new Associate Editor Emily Pentzer

We are delighted to welcome our newest Polymer Chemistry Associate Editor: Emily Pentzer (Case Western Reserve University, USA).

Emily will start her role as Associate Editor on 1 July 2015.

Emily Pentzer Polymer Chemistry

Emily obtained a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry from Butler University, USA in 2005. She then moved to Northwestern University, USA where she completed her PhD in 2010 under the supervision of Professor SonBinh T. Nguyen working on the development of new monomers for ring-opening metathesis polymerisation. Between 2010 and 2013 she was a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA where she investigated the synthesis and assembly of n-type and p-type materials for organic photovoltaic applications, supervised by Professor Todd Emrick in the Department of Polymer Science and Engineering. Since July 2013, Emily has been at Case Western Reserve University, USA as an Assistant Professor of Chemistry. Her research addresses application-based materials problems in the areas of energy harvesting, management, and storage. She uses synthetic chemistry to tailor molecular design and control self-assembly for the preparation and study of novel conductive materials with controlled domain sizes and interfaces.

To find out more about Emily’s research take a look at her group’s website.

As a Polymer Chemistry Associate Editor, Emily will be handling submissions to the journal. Why not submit your next paper to her Editorial Office?

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Polymer Chemistry’s Impact Factor increases to 5.520

Polymer Chemistry is delighted to announce its Impact Factor has increased to 5.520.

Polymer Chemistry Impact factor

Polymer Chemistry is dedicated to publishing research on all aspects of synthetic and biological macromolecules, and related emerging areas. The impressive Impact Factor of 5.520 and great Immediacy Index of 1.81 is a strong assurance that research published in Polymer Chemistry will have excellent visibility and relevance to the polymer chemistry community.

Publishing your research in Polymer Chemistry means that your article will be read and cited quickly by your colleagues. Did you know:

  • Polymer Chemistry’s outstanding Immediacy Index has been consistently higher than its competitors since its launch. (Data based on Immediacy Indexes from 2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014)
  • Articles published in Polymer Chemistry receive on average 10 citations.
  • Since 2011 we have grown our content by over 290% AND our Impact Factor has continued to increase.
  • Articles published in Polymer Chemistry are less likely to receive zero citations compared to other journals in the field. In fact, 30% of articles published in Polymer Chemistry in 2014 received a minimum of 5 citations, which is higher than other journals in the field.

(Data downloaded from ISI Web of Science on 17 June 2015)


Our fast times to publication ensure that your research is reviewed and announced to the community rapidly.

From receipt, your research papers will be published in 56 daysCommunications articles will be published in a rapid 40 days(Data taken from 2015 average manuscript handling times)

Our unique combination of high quality articles, outstanding Editorial and Advisory Board, free colour and flexible manuscript format make it clear to see why Polymer Chemistry is one of the leading journals within the polymer science field. Why not take a look at our top 10 most downloaded articles from Q1 of 2015 and read the fantastic articles we publish.

So join the many leading scientists that have already chosen to publish in Polymer Chemistry and submit your research today to be seen with the best!

Submit your research
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Author of the Month: Dr. Andreas Walther

Dr. Andreas Walther graduated from Bayreuth University in Germany in 2008 with a PhD focusing on the self-assembly behaviour and applications of Janus particles and other soft, complex colloids. After a postdoctoral stay with a focus on biomimetic hybrid materials at Aalto University (Helsinki, Finland), he returned to Germany and established his independent research group at the DWI – Leibniz Institute for Interactive Materials in Aachen. His research interests concentrate on developing and understanding hierarchical self-assembly concepts inside and outside equilibrium, and on utilising and connecting such processes to soft materials research – often following bioinspired design principles. Andreas has published more than 90 papers and has recently been awarded the Bayer Early Excellence in Science Award (for Materials) and the Reimund Stadler Young Investigator Award of the German Chemical Society.

What was your inspiration in becoming a chemist?

I believe one of the big chemical companies is responsible for attracting me to chemistry by sending a “polymer science kit”, containing foams, resins and a toolkit to prepare Nylon fibres, to my senior class when I was still back in secondary school. Even nowadays, I still think that the classical experiment of pulling a polyamide fibre from the interface of oil/water monomer mixtures is one of the most intriguing and instructive experiments in a polymer class.

What was the motivation to write your Polymer Chemistry article?

Our main interest lies in developing self-assembly concepts to create new soft materials, for which we heavily rely on very well defined building blocks with tailored functionalities and interactions. Modern polymer chemistry provides us with the tools to make desirable building blocks with relative ease of synthesis. In this case we were interested in a straightforward way to modify the surfaces of colloidal particles to provide us with very specific biorecognition units, while at the same time rejecting all non-specific protein adhesion. Interestingly enough, despite all the common knowledge about the protein-repellent properties of polyethylene glycol (PEG) coatings, we could only find a very small amount of systematic studies discussing how for instance the architecture and composition of adsorbed PEG-based block copolymers influence protein repellency. So we went through a systematic study and optimised the building blocks to provide us with the required features for our future work. The underlying structure/property relationships at this point will be interesting for other researchers working on surface modification, biorecognition and protein-fouling.

Why did you choose Polymer Chemistry to publish your work?

Polymer Chemistry strives for high-level and interdisciplinary scientific contributions covering all modern aspects of polymer chemistry. We felt it to be the right place to achieve highest reach and recognition in the field.

In which upcoming conferences may our readers meet you?

European Polymer Federation Meeting, 21-26 June 2015, at Dresden, Germany.

How do you spend your spare time?

Keeping the work/life balance is probably one of the hardest challenges when working in science. I very much enjoy cooking to take my mind off stressful events, and I enjoy travelling to see new places and meet interesting people.

Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?

Indeed a very good question, I would probably follow another creative passion. Best-case scenario would then be running a restaurant in a picturesque place.


Combining the incompatible: Block copolymers consecutively displaying activated esters and amines and their use as protein-repellent surface modifiers with multivalent biorecognition

Daniel Hoenders,   Thomas Tigges and   Andreas Walther


We present the facile synthesis and orthogonal functionalization of diblock copolymers containing two mutually incompatible segments, i.e. primary amines and activated esters, that are displayed chronologically and synthesized by consecutive radical addition fragmentation transfer polymerization (RAFT) of suitably modified monomers. Post-polymerization modification of the active ester moieties with functionalized triethylene glycol derivatives (TEG-NH2/BiotinTEG-NH2) furnishes a protein-repellent block with specific biorecognition, and the activation of the amine groups via deprotection results in newly reactive primary amines. We subsequently use these amines as an anchoring layer for the coating of aldehyde-functionalized polystyrene (PS) colloids and demonstrate tight adhesion and enhanced protein-repellent characteristics combined with specific and multivalent biorecognition of avidin as a function of block ratios. Our strategy demonstrates a viable approach for orthogonal combination of widely needed, but mutually incompatible, functional groups into complex polymer architectures.



Cyrille Boyer is a guest web-writer for Polymer Chemistry. He is currently an associate professor and an ARC-Future Fellow in the School of Chemical Engineering, University of New South Wales (Australia), deputy director of the Australian Centre for NanoMedicine and member of Centre for Advanced Macromolecular Design.


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Recent Appointees in Materials Science 2015 Conference (RAMS2015)

Recent Appointees in Materials Science 2015 Conference RAMS

We are delighted to announce that the Recent Appointees in Materials Science 2015 Conference (RAMS2015) will be held at the University of Warwick on 16-17th September 2015.

Deadlines and dates

Registration will open shortly so be sure to sign up to this essential meeting before 1st September 2015! The cost of registration is £125 for accommodation and meals, including the conference banquet at Warwick Castle. A reduced rate of £70 is offered for those not requiring accommodation.

Abstract submissions are now being accepted for oral and poster presentation but make sure you submit your abstracts by the deadline on 30th June 2015.

Bursaries

A small number of bursaries are available for those with limited travel budgets and will be assessed on an individual basis. Enquire about bursaries here.

Keynote speakers

Biomaterials Science Advisory Board member Andrew Dove (University of Warwick) will be speaking along with other keynote speakers Aron Walsh (University of Bath) and Mary Ryan (Imperial College London). View the full list of invited speakers here.

For full details visit the RAMS2015 website. We hope you can join the materials science community for this fantastic event.

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Author of the Month: Prof. Makoto Obata

Professor Makoto Obata received his Ph.D. degree in polymer chemistry from Hokkaido University, Japan in 1999. In 2000, he joined Professor Percec’s group at the University of Pennsylvania as a postdoctoral fellow. After one and a half years, he joined the faculty of Nara Women’s University from 2001 to 2009. In 2009, he moved to the University of Yamanashi, where he is now an Associate Professor of Applied Chemistry. His research area is the synthetic chemistry of functional polymers containing carbohydrates and dyes.

Take a look at Professor Makoto Obata research group’s website (please select translate for English).

What was your inspiration in becoming a chemist?

The training of my scientific expertise started at Asahikawa National College of Technology, Hokkaido, Japan, when I was 15 years old. I had an impressive supervisor at the college, and I was enthusiastic about studying my first research project on the synthesis of polymers bearing crown-ether for lithium ion capturing. After this experience, I was enchanted with the design and synthesis of new materials, especially organic materials.

What was the motivation to write your Polymer Chemistry article?

I started my career in Professor Yano’s laboratory at Nara Women’s University, Japan. His research area is the coordination chemistry of carbohydrate and its medicinal applications, such as anti-cancer drugs. When I worked with him, I recognised the potential of carbohydrates in medical applications. Currently, polyethylene glycol (PEG) is the first choice for water-soluble and biologically compatible polymers for drug delivery applications. In the future, I would like to make glycopolymer a functional alternative to PEG following a recently developed, controlled polymerisation technique.

Why did you choose Polymer Chemistry to publish your work?

My colleagues and I recognise that Polymer Chemistry is a high quality journal in this area.

In which upcoming conferences may our readers meet you?

I hope to attend the 2015 International Chemical Congress of Pacific Basin Societies (PACIFICHEM 2015).

How do you spend your spare time?

My wife and I love arts, especially 17th century Dutch painting, and animals (we love cats and dogs, and she deeply loves penguins!). However, it is not easy to see such masterpieces in Japan…

Which profession would you choose if you were not a scientist?

Even if I had not become a chemist, I would maybe have worked as a scientific engineer. I have never imagined joining any other kind of profession.


Aqueous RAFT synthesis of block and statistical copolymers of 2-(α-D-mannopyranosyloxy)ethyl methacrylate with 2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate and their application for nonviral gene delivery
Makoto Obata, Tomoya Kobori, Shiho Hirohara and Masao Tanihara
Polym. Chem., 2015,6, 1793-1804
DOI: 10.1039/C4PY01652A

Block copolymers composed of 2-(α-D-mannopyranosyloxy)ethyl methacrylate (ManEMA) and 2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) were synthesized by aqueous RAFT polymerization. The number-average degree of polymerization (DPn) of ManEMA segments was constant at 33, and the DPn of DMAEMA segments varied from 98 to 241. Statistical copolymers with a similar composition were also prepared via aqueous RAFT polymerization. The mannose-presenting nature was evaluated by a turbidimetric assay using Concanavalin A. The clustering rate of statistical copolymers was faster than those of the corresponding block copolymers. By contrast, no significant differences between block and statistical copolymers were found in their DNA-condensing ability as evaluated using gel shift assays and in their cytotoxicity in the transfection of plasmid DNA (pEGFP-N1) to HeLa cells. However, the overall transfection efficiency significantly depended on the monomer distribution. Statistical copolymers showed an overall transfection efficiency comparable to those of poly(DMAEMA·HCl)s, but block copolymers showed no detectable transfection under the same conditions.


Cyrille Boyer is a guest web-writer for Polymer Chemistry. He is currently an Associate Professor and an ARC-Future Fellow in the School of Chemical Engineering, University of New South Wales (Australia).


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Paper of the week: Precise one-pot synthesis of fully conjugated end-functionalized star polymers containing poly(fluorene-2,7-vinylene) (PFV) arms

Nomura et al. present the one-pot synthesis of star shaped conjugated polymers.

A facile, precise one-pot synthesis of end-functionalized star (triarm) polymers consisting of poly(9,9-di-n-octylfluorene-2,7-vinylene)s (PFVs), the triblock copolymers [by incorporation of tri(2,5-dialkoxy-1,4-phenylene vinylene) or terthiophene units as the middle segment], has been achieved by olefin metathesis followed by Wittig-type coupling. Effects of the PFV conjugation length, the middle segment and the end groups on the emission properties have been studied.

Precise one-pot synthesis of fully conjugated end-functionalized star polymers containing poly(fluorene-2,7-vinylene) (PFV) arms by Kotohiro Nomura, Tahmina Haque, Tomohiro Miwata, Akiko Inagaki and Kenji Takamizu Polym. Chem., 2015,6, 380-388

Remzi Becer is a web-writer and advisory board member for Polymer Chemistry. He is currently a Senior Lecturer in Materials Science and the director of the Polymer Science and Nanotechnology masters programme at Queen Mary, University of London. Visit www.becergroup.com for more information.

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Polymer Chemistry Lectureship: Nominations now open

Do you know someone who deserves recognition for their contribution to the polymer field?

Now is your chance to ensure they receive the accolade they deserve.

Polymer Chemistry is pleased to announce that nominations are now being accepted for its Polymer Chemistry Lectureship 2015.  New in 2015, this award will be run annually by the journal to honour an early-stage career scientist who has made a significant contribution to the polymer field.

Qualification

To be eligible for the Polymer Chemistry Lectureship, the candidate should be in the earlier stages of their scientific career, typically within 15 years of attaining their doctorate or equivalent degree, and will have made a significant contribution to the field.

Description

The recipient of the award will be asked to present a lecture three times, one of which will be located in the home country of the recipient. The Polymer Chemistry Editorial Office will provide the sum of £1000 to the recipient for travel and accommodation costs.

The award recipient will be presented with the award at one of the three award lectures. They will also be asked to contribute a lead article to the journal and will have their work showcased on the back cover of the issue in which their article is published.

Selection

The recipient of the award will be selected and endorsed by the Polymer Chemistry Editorial Board.

Nominations

Those wishing to make a nomination should send details of the nominee, including a brief C.V. (no longer than 2 pages A4) together with a letter (no longer than 2 pages A4) supporting the nomination, to the Polymer Chemistry Editorial Office by 6th March 2015.  Self-nomination is not permitted.

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GFP 2014 Saint Malo Best Oral presentation Winner

GFP 2014 RSC Polymer Chemistry Oral Presentation Prize Winner

Lucie Imbernon receives her prize for the best Oral Presentation from Jean-Luc Audic at the GFP 2014- Saint Malo Congress

Lucie Imbernon receiving her Best Oral presentation prize at Groupe Français des Polymeres (GFP) 2014. The young PhD student winner was delighted with her gift certificate and will enjoy reading Polymer Chemistry thanks to the year’s subscription provided by the Royal Society of Chemistry.

Lucie’s presentation was based on her PhD research and titled “Immiscible Blends of Epoxidized Natural Rubber: a Way to achieve Semi-Interpenetrating Networks.” She is part of the Soft Matter and Chemistry group at the ESPCI Paris-Tech-CNRS, PSL Research University in Paris. An overview of Lucie’s work is outlined in the abstract below:

“Directly obtained by epoxidation of Natural Rubber (NR), Epoxidized Natural Rubber (ENR) is a unique elastomer widely used in the industry. ENR retains most of the properties of natural rubber, in particular high tensile properties and resistance to crack propagation up to 50 mol% epoxidation. While keeping the advantages of NR, ENR presents a new reactive functionality. Our group recently showed the possibility to crosslink this elastomer by reaction with a dicarboxylic acid (DA). The DA molecules react with the epoxy groups, producing β hydroxy-esters along the chain.

Here, we show that different grades of ENR are immiscible and that the polar crosslinker DA is more soluble when the level of epoxidation increases. Because the curing rate is faster with more epoxidized grades of ENR, we selectively crosslinked blends of immiscible ENRs presenting different levels of epoxidation (ENR10 and ENR50).The morphology of the resulting material can be tuned from nodules of crosslinked ENR50 dispersed in a soft ENR10 matrix to a semi-interpenetrating continuous network giving rise to elastomeric properties (see figure below).”

Mechanical properties of the blends linked with their morphology

Mechanical properties of the blends linked with their morphology

Lucie’s work led to the publication of “Crosslinking of epoxidized natural rubber by dicarboxylic acids: An alternative to standard vulcanization” and “Semi-interpenetrating Networks in Blends of Epoxidized Natural Rubbers” last year in Macromolecular Symposia and Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics respectively.

GFP 2014 took place on 3rd – 6th November 2014 in Saint Malo and was the 43rd National Conference organised by the Groupe Français d’études etd’applications des Polymères.  It’s aim was to bring together around 200 researchers from different backgrounds, countries, universities, public research institutions and industries to discuss the latest advances in the field of polymers.

For the latest Polymer Chemistry news follow us on Twitter @PolymChem

Check out the latest Polymer Chemistry articles.

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Magnetic field and pH synergy controls therapeutic burst

Australian researchers have shown how alternating magnetic fields could be used to localise the release of cancer-fighting drugs to cancer cells, limiting side effects in the rest of the body.

May Lim at the University of New South Wales, and colleagues, have devised a system where a magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticle is bound to a temperature-responsive polymer onto which drug molecules can be attached via Schiff base bonds.

A magnetic field combined with the acidic environment of cancer tissue results in rapid hydrolysis of the Schiff base bond

A magnetic field combined with the acidic environment of cancer tissue results in rapid hydrolysis of the Schiff base bond

Interested? Read the full article at Chemistry World.

Spatial and temporal control of drug release through pH and alternating magnetic field induced breakage of Schiff base bonds
Alexander E. Dunn, Douglas J. Dunn, Alexander Macmillan, Renee Whan, Tim Stait-Gardner, William S. Price, May Lim and  Cyrille Boyer
Polym. Chem., 2014, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4PY00150H

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